Issuu on Google+

AT THE NEW UNIVERSITY OF OREGON CAMPUS IN DOWNTOWN PORTLAND, OR A MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE THESIS PROJECT PROPOSAL

AMY M. PERENCHIO

PROFESSOR HAJO NEIS PHD, UNIVERSITY OF OREGON, JUNE 2011

“REAL-WORLD PROBLEMS DO NOT COME IN DISCIPLINARY SHAPED BOXES.” - PAUL JEFFREY

1

Continue urban fabric on first floor.

2

Push roof to continue public space.

3

Break block for program elements.

4

Push UO function down to meet city uses.

5

Bring public functions up for more interaction.


This project seeks to enhance the city fabric of Downtown Portland, specifically the neighborhoods of Old Town/China Town, and the Pearl District, by proposing an new urban university campus for the University of Oregon at the current post office block AT 715 NW Hoyt Street. The process of campus design culminates with a campus master plan. One building from the plan will be designed in depth.

Cafe

Auditorium

Study/Social Space

As academics increase the extent and scope of knowledge created through research, there is an expanding need within disciplines to specialize. This specialization occurs on all levels of the university setting and leads to a much deeper understandings of topics. Unfortunately, these topics become so narrow in scope that research tends to look at problems with little realworld application. As Paul Jeffrey states, “real-world problems do not come in disciplinary-shaped boxes.” Because of this, it is becoming much more necessary to collaborate on problems to come to an appropriate, socially robust solution to the complex issues that society faces.

UP UP

Classroom

Classroom

Classroom

FLOOR 3: 1/8”=1’-0”

Storage Leasable Office Space

Open to below.

UP

Collaborative relationships, formed by cross-disciplinary research, are affected by many different factors including: university support, funding availability, corporate encouragement, the views and goals of team members, communication, and the impact of built space. Although these components are not sole influencers of a cross-disciplinary relationship, it is important to look at each as a means to enhance and improve collaboration. As one stimulus, the influence of the built environment on behavior is important and can serve as a catalyst for behavior. How then can architecture foster a collaborative atmosphere that will enhance the work of cross-disciplinary research teams? This thesis project aims to critically analyze the cross-disciplinary research relationships that currently occur in universities. While many universities seek to support an increasing trend of cross-disciplinary research, current facilities, buildings, and campus master plans do not allow for these relationships to succeed. Due to the specific needs of disciplines, departments are frequently housed in separate buildings and locations on university campuses. Solely because of this disconnect, there is little interaction between faculty members in different departments. This physical separation inhibits conversation from happening naturally and does not allow for spontaneous collaboration. This project aims to suggest a new built prototype that will enhance and encourage collaborative interactions between research faculty, students, and the public.

UP

DN

Lounge

UP

Leasable Office Space

Open to below.

DN

Duck Store

FLOOR 2: 1/8”=1’-0”

Mech. Open to workshop below.

Leasable Retail

Leasable Retail UP

UP UP

Coffee Shop

UP

Duck Store Back of House

Lobby

Duck Store

UP

Restaurant

Leasable Retail

Leasable Retail DN

Bike Entrance

GROUND FLOOR: 1/8”=1’-0”


ENHANCING COLLABORATION THROUGH SPATIAL AND PROGRAMATIC RELATIONSHIPS.

CLOSED LABORATORY SPACE Typical lab/office configurations do not allow for mixing CLOSED OFFICE SPACE between researchers. This follows the idea that researchers are very individualistic and should be isolated.

CLOSED LABORATORY SPACE

CIRCULATION / MIXING

CLOSED OFFICE SPACE

OPEN LABORATORY SPACE By pulling the office away from the lab space, it forces researchers to mix through their circulatory paths. Closed labs do not provide for intellectual exchange across research teams.

CIRCULATION MIXING CIRCULATION OPEN OFFICE SPACE

By pinching the circulation, it forces interactions to occur at a certain moment. Programs that support interaction, such as meeting spaces and break rooms should be placed along the circulation spine. Labs and offices are opened up to maximize the sharing of ideas.


Prep / Storage

Laboratory

Open to laboratory below.

UP

UP

Open to below.

Open to below.

DN UP

Office

Office

FLOORS 6 AND 8 TYPICAL: 1/8”=1’-0”

UP

Flex Lab

Prep / Storage

ELEVATION LOOKING NORTH: 3/32”=1’-0”

Laboratory

ELEVATION LOOKING SOUTH: 3/32”=1’-0”

UP

DN

Open to below.

Open to below.

UP UP

Office

Office

FLOORS 5 AND 7 TYPICAL: 1/8”=1’-0”

Flex Lab

Laboratory

Prep / Storage

UP

ELEVATION LOOKING EAST: 3/32”=1’-0” UP

Open to below.

Open to below.

DN UP

Office

Office

FLOOR 4: 1/8”=1’-0”

Wood and Metal Shop

Storage Bike Lockers Trash/ Recycle Storage

Mechanical

Storage

Storage

Storage

BASEMENT: 1/16”=1’-0”

ELEVATION LOOKING WEST: 3/32”=1’-0”


INCREASING CITY AND PARK SPACE CONNECTIVITY WHILE MAINTAINING CAMPUS IDENTITY.

1 THE GRID

It is important to continue the Portland City Grid through the site to create a cohesive transition from the city through the site. Vehicular traffic should be included as it activates streets. Many variations can be taken.

2

THE SPINE

The spine acts as a connector between the North Park Blocks and Jamison Square with the Peter Walker park sequence. It also informs the circulation on the site and gives a heirarchy to buildings and streets.

3

STREETS AS PARKS

The buldings along the spine act as a central organizing element for the university while the streets act as park connectors. Vehicular traffic is narrowed and the pedestrian realm is celebrated with vegitation and ample sidewalks.

4

THE VERTICAL CAMPUS

The importance of density and active street frontages in an urban setting tends to push university facilities above the ground level, giving a vertical nature to urban campuses, and allowing for views back to the city itself.


INITIAL IDEA: URBAN CAMPUS AS VERTICAL CAMPUS.

ENGINEERING AND ARCHITECTURE

STUDENT UNION BUILDING

LIBERAL ARTS AND LIBRARY

URBAN AGRICULTURE

MIXED HOUSING

REC CENTER

FINE ARTS TRANSDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH INSTITUTE

CAMPUS STREET SECTION, STREET AS PARK: 1/8”=1’-0”

BUSINESS LAW JOUNRALISM

SCIENCES

CAMPUS LOCATION: NOT TO SCALE

CAMPUS MASTER PLAN: 1”=100’


Thesis Boards