Issuu on Google+

A Guide To NAS Storage In the last few years, there have been many ideas and methods that have appeared for data storage. Network Attached Storage (NAS), is one sort of method. When compared to traditional methods, NAS offers business owners a far more efficient and affordable method of keeping their data stored. When they have to have the data, it is easily retrievable as well. NAS challenges the standard approach of storing data through the file server which is part of the reason it is so popular right now. The basic traditional elements are taken from the bottom up, and enhanced through NAS to offer increased efficiency in the workplace. Basically, a single hardware unit, often referred to as the box or the head, acts as the interface that communicates between the clients of the network and the NAS directly. There does not need to be a keyboard or monitor attached as additional accessories are not needed. Clients are connected to the box, or the head, rather than their individual storage device, when they need to access data. Clients are generally able to tap into their NAS with an Ethernet connection. Content from the internet, email inboxes or backup email, computerized files, remote system backup and much, much more; essentially any data that a client needs to store can be stored with this device. Traditional file servers are paralleled using NAS, which is effective. The fact that the system is reliable and very easy to use are other facets of NAS storage that lots of clients enjoy. Automatic sending alerts when errors are found, secure authentication, in addition to quotas for disk space are some of the special built-in features that some systems have which optimize management and accessibility. While it sounds like a super easy system, it hasn’t always been that easy. NAS came from a long line of trial and error hardware and software items through the years. With the beginning being the floppy drive, and moving into things like central file servers, there have been a variety of storage options. These days, nothing is as effective as NAS although hard drives, tape drives and other types of file servers have served their purposes throughout the years. Some of the benefits of this type of storage include that it comes at a lower price to the customer, it gives you better security for the business, and that there is less downtime. Additionally, it is easier to use and manage than other traditional file servers which was mentioned above. This system will not crash as a result of stripping out of unnecessary capabilities that other servers have and is far less prone to security attacks. These systems have the capacity to become diagnosed rapidly if a problem does arise, and can be rebooted more quickly than ever before. Numerous different types of businesses, facilities and even homeowners can really benefit from a NAS storage system as you can see. Companies with lots of data to store can find the peace that their information is being kept safe when they make use of a NAS system. Where traditional server systems fall short, this is a system that will benefit a variety of networks, both big and small. To see how it can benefit you with proper data storage, find out more about NAS today. In the last few years, there have been many ideas and methods that have appeared for data storage. Network Attached Stor...

nfina Technologies

Page 1


A Guide To NAS Storage

Document Tags: nas network attached storage, nas storage http://www.nfinausa.com/

nfina Technologies

Page 2


A Guide To NAS Storage