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Amy Kilner Design New Graphic Design www.amykilner.co.uk

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Amy Kilner Design.


Contents Design Process Section Design Brief / Design Goals Research Development Step One Development Step Two Development Step Three Evaluation References

Page no. 1-2 3 - 46 47 - 60 61 - 68 68 - 77 78 79

Design Brief / Design Goals Brief: You are to submit design proposals for a new graphic design publication entitled, New Graphic Design. The first issue will focus on Form follows function - an exploration of Modernism and Post Modernism. Part 1

Design Goals: • Learn about Modernism & Post Modernism • Learn about Magazine Layout • Gain a better understandment of Art Movements • Create appropriate designs

Research into Modernism and Post Modernism generating a body of work that explores the origins and philosophy of the movements. Your visual work should be an expression of the movement and not a pastiche. You should aim to convey the essential nature of the movement. You will need to understand the social, industrial and political concerns which influence both movements. Part 2 You are to submit designs for a broad sheet, which should be based on your personal and original visual research.

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Research - What are you looking at - Will Gompertz

I bought this book on a trip to London at the Tate. So far (11/03/2013), it has really helped me understand the different movements in modern art, especially how it all began with Impressionism.

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Amy Kilner Design.


Research - What are you looking at - Will Gompertz The Fountain 1917 - Pre-Impressionism

This piece of art is the first documented piece of contemporary art by Marcel Duchamp. He believed that art could be found “readymade”. This first got rejected from an Art Exhibition in Paris even though the rules stated that if you paid for your art to be put in then it would be.

“The original, which is now lost, consisted of a standard urinal, laid flat on its back rather than upright in its usual position, and signed ‘R. Mutt 1917’. The Tate’s work is a 1964 replica and is made from glazed earthenware painted to resemble the original porcelain.” (Viewed 11/03/2013)

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“The practical joke that started an art revolution.” Amy Kilner Design.


Research - Manet

This is Manets Olympia, it was the first piece of impressionism by Manet to be accepted in to the Salon.

Paul Cézanne (1839-1906) A Modern Olympia 1873-1874

Edouard Manet, Le Dejeuner sur l’Herbe, 1863 “He had painted those within his circle: recognizable hipsters belonged to his fashionable Parisian set.” (Viewed 11/03/2013 pg 26 What are you looking at, Will Gompertz) This painting was rejected by the 1863 Salon mainly because one of the men is staring at the naked woman and the woman seems to know this far too well which makes the painting represent prostitution. They also didn’t accept the painting style as it wasn’t clear enough so they said it was unfinished.

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This is a post modern version of “Olympia” by Mel Ramos. It was made in 1974.

Amy Kilner Design.


Research - Impressionism “But art history had determined that it was in the role of rebel that Manet would be cast, and so with reluctance he became the leader of a circle of dissident artists that included Claude Monet, Camille Pissarro, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Alfred Sisley and Edgar Degas; the group that would form the core of what is generally considered to be the first movement in Modern art: Impressionism.” (Viewed 13/03/2013 What are you looking at? Will Gompertz)

““Those furrows? That frost?” read a chuckling Sisley. “But they are palette-scrapings placed uniformly on a dirty canvas. It has neither head nor tail, top nor bottom, front nor back.”” Is a quote about the above painting called “Hoar Frost, the Old Road to Ennery (1873) (Viewed 13/03/2013 What are you looking at? Will Gompertz pg 37)

This is The Bar at the Folies-Bergeres by Edouard Manet, made in 1882. Manet was one of the first impressionists that painted real things and real people. This woman working at a bar shows this and this painting shows a lot of emotion, she seems angry looking at the man in front of her which we can see in the mirror behind. The painting is sketchy, especially in the background which again, goes against the rules of realism.

“They were pioneers of painting en plein air, in front of the subject, which as we know was made possible by recent invention of portable tubes for oil paint.” (Viewed 13/03/2013 What are you looking at? Will Gompertz pg 38)

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Research - Van Gogh and Expressionism

The Potato Eaters by Vincent Van Gogh (Viewed 13/03/2013 What are you looking at? Will Gompertz)

The Painter on the Road to Tarascon was lost forever when it became a causality of the Second World War, but the portrait has left a lasting impression. It remains one of the most cherished pieces of art that was lost in the war.

The Starry Night by Vincent Van Gogh (Viewed 13/03/2013 What are you looking at? Will Gompertz) Page 7

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Research - Seurat & Pointillism “Pointillism is a technique of painting in which small, distinct dots of pure color are applied in patterns to form an image. Georges Seurat and Paul Signac developed the technique in 1886, branching from Impressionism.”

(Viewed 16/03/2013, Internet Source)

Georges Seurat - The Side Show (1888) (Viewed 16/03/2013 Internet Source)

Georges Seurat - A Sunday Afternoon 1884 (Viewed 16/03/2013 Internet Source)

This painting shows Seurats use of Pointilism well. The technique seems to use larger paint strokes to create the whole image but this makes us have to step back at look at the image to see it properly.

“Georges Seurat spent over two years painting A Sunday Afternoon, focusing meticulously on the landscape of the park. He reworked the original as well as completed numerous preliminary drawings and oil sketches. He would go and sit in the park and make numerous sketches of the various figures in order to perfect their form. He concentrated on the issues of colour, light, and form. The painting is approximately 2 by 3 meters (7 by 10 feet) in size.” (Viewed 16/03/2013 Internet Source)

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Research - Modern Pointillist Federico Pietrella “Just a quick look at Federico Pietrella’s work and you might think at first that you’re admiring a painting by one the 20th century’s greatest artists, such as Camille Pissarro or George Seurat. Like these artists, Federico uses the pointillism technique to recreate photographs and simple objects, but he has put a contemporary touch on classical painting: instead of using small, distinct dots of pure color applied in patterns to form an image, Federico uses only a library date stamp.” (Viewed 16/03/2013, Internet Source)

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Research - Abstract Art

“Abstract art describes paintings or sculptures that do not mimic or even attempt to represent a physical subject, like a house or a dog. To do so would be a failure in the eyes of the abstract artist, who aims to produce an artwork that is a fest of imagination in which we are unable to recognize anything of our known world. It is sometimes called ‘non-figurative art’. (Viewed 16/03/2013 What are you looking at? Will Gompertz pg 150)

Black Square by Kazmir Malevich, 1915 “Black square might appear simplistic, but Malevich’s intentions were complex. He knew that even though he had removed all reference to the known world, the viewer’s brain would attempt to rationalize the painting: to attempt to find meaning. But what was there to make sense of? People would inevitably keep coming back to the essential fact that if it was a black square on a white background.” (Viewed 16/03/2013 Will Gompertz pg 171)

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Wassily Kandinsky, Composition VII 1913 Kandinsky was well known as an abstract artist. His art expressed various music. The line, form and colour used makes an appearence of an explosion of feelings and emotion built in to the image. (Viewed 16/03/2013 Will Gompertz pg 170)

Amy Kilner Design.


Research - More Kandinsky

Composition VIII 1923 Kandinsky (Viewed 16/03/2013 Internet Source)

Composition IX 1936 Kandinsky (Viewed 16/03/2013 Internet Source)

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Yellow, Red, Blue 1925 Kandinsky (Viewed 16/03/2013 Internet Source)

Composition X 1939 Kandinsky (Viewed 16/03/2013 Internet Source) Amy Kilner Design.


Research - London trip/Surrealism Exhibition

I recently visited London and went to the Tate. One of the free exhibitions was called Surrealism and Beyond. The following are photos from what I saw. I found the Surrealism exhibition really interesting, they had work from all sorts of artists from Picasso to Miro. Miro is one of my favourite and most inspirtational artists anyway so seeing that work up front was a very good experience for me.

This piece was in the “Poetry and Dream” Section. It is called “Painting” and was created by Joan Miro in 1927. On the piece next to the painting it said: “Delicate linear forms float on the open blue that Miro associated with dreams. With Andre Masson, Miro was the first to create imagery using automatic techniques in which forms seemed to emerge directly from the unconscious. From this he developed his own personal sign language, which simplified familiar things such as stars, birds and parts of the body. He later revealed, for example, that the white shape in this painting signified a horse.”

This piece was also in the exhibition. It is by Pablo Picasso and is called “Bust of a Woman”. It was created in 1944. The caption beside it says “This portrait of the photographer Dora Maar was painted on 5 May 1944. Her reconfigured features may reflect the complex atmosphere of the final weeks of the Nazi Occupation of Paris. Deprivation and tension remained high in the city. In February two of Picasso’s closest Jewish friends - the poets Robert Desnos and Max Jacob - had been deported. Yet there were also signs of defiance and hope: in March, Maar took part alongside Jean-Paul Sartre and Simone de Beauvoir in a clandestine performance of Picasso’s play Desire Caught by the Tail, directed by Albert Camus.

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Research - London trip/Surrealism Exhibition

I took photos of the graffiti on the skate park simply because it caught my eye. This post modern style is very popular amonst young people and some of it is really interesting. The bright colours combined with hard to read type make it a piece of art. Page 13

On the underground I saw the famous underground map infographic.

Amy Kilner Design.


Research - Form Follows Function

Viewed (24/03/2013 Internet Source)

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Amy Kilner Design.


Research - Form Follows Function

Viewed (24/03/2013 Internet Source)

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Amy Kilner Design.


Research - Form Follows Function

Viewed (24/03/2013 Internet Source)

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Amy Kilner Design.


Research - Form Follows Function

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Viewed (24/03/2013 Internet Source)

Amy Kilner Design.


Research - Form Follows Function “Interpreting “Form Follows Function”

There are two ways to interpret the phrase “form follows function”: Descriptive: beauty results from purity of function; Prescriptive: aesthetic considerations in design should be secondary to functional considerations. DESCRIPTIVE INTERPRETATION The descriptive interpretation favors simplicity to complexity. It states that beauty results from purity of function and not from ornamentation. This ideal derives from the belief that form follows function in nature. Is this really true? Actually, the opposite is true. Evolution passes on genetic traits to subsequent generations without any rationale for their purpose. Each generation of a species then finds a use for the form it has inherited. Function follows form in nature. Applying functional elements to a design is generally a more objective process than applying aesthetic elements. A functionally objective process results in designs that are timeless but may be perceived as simple and uninteresting. PRESCRIPTIVE INTERPRETATION The prescriptive interpretation prioritizes functionality over all other design considerations, including usability, ergonomics and aesthetics. Aesthetic considerations in design should be secondary to functional considerations. Is this interpretation problematic? Does it lead designers to ask the wrong questions about a given design? This interpretation would seem to lead to designers to ask what should be omitted from a design. What elements of a design do not serve a function and thus ought to be removed? Should the form of a design be determined solely by its function? Taken to the logical conclusion, every element would ultimately have the same design. Every functional item would have one and only one design. Before an object’s form could be changed, it would need to serve a different function. Better questions come from your criteria for success. What aspects of you design are critical to success? When time or resources is limited, what design trade-offs would least harm the design’s success? Sometimes, certain aesthetics will have to be abandoned, and sometimes certain functionality will have to be abandoned. Sometimes both aesthetics and functionality will need to be compromised.” (Viewed 29/03/2013, Internet Source)

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Amy Kilner Design.


Research - Post Modernism in Graphic Design

“A late 20th-century style in the arts, architecture, and criticism that represents a departure from modernism.” (Viewed 9/4/13 Internet) “Graphic designers love new things, and new things love graphic designers - like fire loves wood. Graphic designers loved the new international corporate culture. But it was the advertising industry that ultimately won the partnership with multi-national corporations. Then graphic designers loved the new desktop publishing. But it took away a lot of our low end projects, gave us the additional responsibility of typesetting and pre-press, shortened our deadlines, and ultimately reduced our fees. Now graphic designers love the new Internet. But maybe this time we should stop and ask: “Does the Internet love graphic design?” “ (Viewed 9/4/13 Internet Source) “Postmodernism is in some way against the principles of modernism, made possibly by the rapidly changing technology. Designers had the opportunity to do things with type that would have been too difficult to experiment with in the past. An example of a popular postmodern designer that have played a significant role in the development of the thinking in this period, would be David Carson, an “American graphic designer, whose unconventional style revolutionized visual communication in the 1990s”. “No more rules” (2003) pg. 13 David Carson is arguing that it was his ignorance of rules, that allowed him to produce designs that seemed to resemble nothing ever encountered before in commercial print media. “I never learned all the things you’re not supposed to do, I just do what makes the most sense…There is no grid, no format. I think it ends up in a more interesting place than if I just applied formal design rules.’ D.Carson” (Viewed 9/4/13 Internet Source) “The last twenty-five years have seen profound changes in the field of graphic communication. One by one, the old certainties about the techniques and pruposesof graphic design have been questioned and torn apart. With the international take-up of the new technology in the 1990s, there was an explosion of creativity in graphic design, as designers and typographers reassessed their role, jettisoned existing rules and forged experimental new approaches. Graphic work became more self-expressive, idiosyncratic and sometimes extreme. No More Rules tells this story in detail, breaking down a broad and sometimes confusing field of graphic design activity into key developments and themes, such as the American new wave; punk and its aftermath; deconstructionist theory and design; the digital type revolution; typography grunge; graphic authorship and graphic agitation; retro and the vernacular; and recent new conceptual Viewed (9/04/2013 Internet Source) approaches to design. Each theme is illustrated by significant examples of work produced between 1980 and 2000 that have changed the way in which designers and their audiences think The above is a piece of Modern Graphic Design by Ryan Atkinson. As you can see it doesn’t follow basic about graphic communication.” rules that would be followed in Modernism. (Viewed 9/4/13 Internet Source)

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Research - Post Modernism in Graphic Design http://ryanatkinson.prosite.com/

Viewed (9/04/2013 Internet Source)

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Research - Post Modernism in Graphic Design http://ryanatkinson.prosite.com/

Viewed (9/04/2013 Internet Source)

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Research - Post Modernism in Graphic Design http://ryanatkinson.prosite.com/

Viewed (9/04/2013 Internet Source) In my opinion this designer uses a very post modern style, his graphic design work doesn’t follow any particular rules but it uses bauhaus style layouts and negative space to make it look sophisticated. The magazine designs work really well. I find them inspiring.

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Research - Post Modernism in Graphic Design

April Greiman with Jayme Odgers, Wet magazine cover, 1979. Source: Victoria and Albert Museum, London Viewed (9/04/2013 Internet Source)

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Research - Magazine Design (Viewed 10/04/2013 Ipad Computer Arts magazine April 2013) The computer arts magazine is a well known design brand. Its layouts are similar throughout and can be recogniseable to regular readers. The white text on a black background here shows sophistication and it also portrays that the work being shown is important which it is as it is under a section called “New Work.�

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Research - Magazine Design (Viewed 10/04/2013 Ipad Computer Arts magazine April 2013) This is another example of the layout used within this magazine. I’ve also shown the contents page. This is important as I will have to create one of these for my magazine. The first page is the contents but the second is an advert for a graphics course which will appeal to the reader.

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Research - Magazine Design (Viewed 10/04/2013 Ipad Computer Arts magazine April 2013) This is the contents page continued. As you can see design work is a key factor that makes this magazine interesting, it is packed with images.

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Research - Magazine Design (Viewed 10/04/2013 Ipad Computer Arts magazine April 2013) We can tell this magazine is popular as it includes a lot of adverts within the first few pages. We can see this on the left here before the welcome page.

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Research - Magazine Design (Viewed 10/04/2013 Ipad Computer Arts magazine April 2013) I find computer arts very influential when choosing what articles to include in my magazine but I must stick to the brief and make sure it is about form follows function and also modernism/post modernism.

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Research - Magazine Design (Viewed 10/04/2013 Ipad Computer Arts magazine April 2013) More interesting layouts to show New Work in design.

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Research - Magazine Design (Viewed 10/04/2013 Ipad Creative Review March 2012) This magazine used technology a lot quicker than CA. This app is interactive which is great for the reader using an ipad.

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Amy Kilner Design.


Research - Magazine Design (Viewed 10/04/2013 Ipad Creative Review March 2012) From this I have learnt that it is important to make the design compatible to different sizes of print/ digital. This means the brand needs to be recogniseable.

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Research - Magazine Design (Viewed 10/04/2013 Ipad Creative Review March 2012) These designs are very post modern. They don’t follow Modernist rules and they make you question the thoughts behind it.

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Research - Magazine Design (Viewed 10/04/2013 Ipad Creative Review March 2012) Other images showing the interactive layout.

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Research - Magazine Design

(Viewed 10/04/2013 Ipad Screenshot) The digital Arts magazine has a masthead that is recogniseable to readers. The covers also use a consistent colour scheme to make it look visually interesting. The image of the woman stands out like the caption says which makes it work well. Page 34

(Viewed 10/04/2013 Ipad Screenshot) The cover image on this issue catches my eye more than the one before. I love the complex illustration and the movement it creates on the page. This also has a consistent colour scheme. Amy Kilner Design.


Research - Magazine Design

(Viewed 10/04/2013 Ipad Screenshot) I don’t think this cover is anywhere near as strong as the newer issues. The gradient background makes it look cheap. Page 35

(Viewed 10/04/2013 Ipad Screenshot) This is the new design issue for Computer Arts. It is quite a big move for the company as their brand is already well known on the magazine shelf. It is good how they have kept the cirlce involved by putting “design matters” inside it next to the logo.

Amy Kilner Design.


Research - Magazine Design

(Viewed 10/04/2013 Ipad Screenshot) One thing i’ve noticed with Computer Arts is the continious use of block colour illustrations on their covers. I personally think they look really good and as a designer they make me want to read more. Page 36

(Viewed 10/04/2013 Ipad Screenshot) The colour scheme on this cover is bold and it catches your eye well. The use of shape and negative space makes certain parts stand out more than others. Amy Kilner Design.


Research - Magazine Design

(Viewed 10/04/2013 Ipad Screenshot) I picked out these issue covers on purpose as they remind me of the post modern style that is currently in fashion as well as Kandinskys old work.

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(Viewed 10/04/2013 Ipad Screenshot)

Amy Kilner Design.


Research - Magazine Design

(Viewed 10/04/2013 Ipad Screenshot)

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(Viewed 10/04/2013 Ipad Screenshot)

Amy Kilner Design.


Research - Magazine Design

(Viewed Internet Source) Creative Review have a simplistic cover design and logo. I’d like to take this direction with my magazine.

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(Viewed Internet Source) This version is a little older and has a different masthead. I like the use of a large masthead at the top. It makes the design look good and it helps focus the reader more on the design they have on the cover which then portrays that the magazine inside will be as good as the front.

Amy Kilner Design.


Research - Magazine Design

(Viewed Internet Source) I decided to put this in my research as it reminds me of my research on pointilism.

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(Viewed Internet Source) This style is very pop arty. It will catch the target audiences attention which is very important with a front cover.

Amy Kilner Design.


Research - Magazine Design

(Viewed Internet Source) This design uses photography as well as photo shop to enhance the image. It looks good but I think it lacks information about the issue.

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(Viewed Internet Source) As Creative review have a strong brand identity their covers can be pretty much anything and it will appeal to their target audience.

Amy Kilner Design.


Research - Grids & Layouts

(Viewed 10/04/2013 A Type Primer by John Kane)

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(Viewed 10/04/2013 A Type Primer by John Kane)

Amy Kilner Design.


Research - Grids & Layouts

(Viewed 10/04/2013 A Type Primer by John Kane)

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(Viewed 10/04/2013 A Type Primer by John Kane)

Amy Kilner Design.


Research - Grids & Layouts

(Viewed 10/04/2013 A Type Primer by John Kane)

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(Viewed 10/04/2013 A Type Primer by John Kane)

Amy Kilner Design.


Research - Grids & Layouts

(Viewed 10/04/2013 A Type Primer by John Kane)

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(Viewed 10/04/2013 A Type Primer by John Kane)

Amy Kilner Design.


Research - Grids & Layouts

(Viewed 10/04/2013 A Type Primer by John Kane)

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Amy Kilner Design.


Development Step One

Experimentation in the style of Kandinsky for an article within the magazine.

Thick bold lines are seen throughout Kandinskys work and to this day form is really important with any layout design.

I believe Kandinskys paintings were the origin of showing layout that works well.

Bold overlapping and contrasting colours are also an important aspect to this inspirational work.

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Amy Kilner Design.


Development Step One

The idea for this article is to call it “Post modernism? Childs play? When children play with plasticine they create whatever they can think of but this tends to be basic shapes. In art these shapes can reflect emotions and happenings of the time it was created. It goes completely against any rules that were made up from original art in modernism but in the current century art with a deeper meaning from something so basic is much more interesting as it makes you think. It is a visual story.

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Development Step One I could even use this sort of idea as the front cover for my magazine as they show a lot of styles of form not really following any function which would be a bold contrast to the magazine title. This will attract designers as it will make them want to know more as it isn’t such a simple design.

More tests on photoshop and illustrator.

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Development Step One Using spray paint textures from a previous project I have tried out adding another depth to the image.

The red ball seems to be the main part of this visual I have created, I’ve made it a little more obvious here by making it 3D. It stands out a little too much though. I prefer it flat.

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Development Step One Inspired by pointilism I tried a logo design involving spray paint for the magazine. It doesn’t come across as a strong brand image so I will not take this further.

I then tried out some Kandinsky style shapes using markers. I like how bold they look. I cut out pieces of paper to start playing about with colour and form inspired by kandinsky.

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Development Step One I used spray paints to create this effect using cut outs. I really like the contrast between the white and colour. It reminds me of the contrasts that are in Kandinskys work but they do work better in my opinion here as it is more of a modern look with mixed media.

Using my spray paints I created a star like background to use to play with the remaining shapes from before.

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Development Step One The colours look better with a stronger contrast so I tried it with the blue background. I love the outcome and it reminds me of the computer arts magazine covers.

From looking at the computer arts magazines i have designed this, I think the outcome looks really interesting and could work well as part of or maybe the whole front cover of the magazine.

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Development Step One Then using a black marker I decided to add a lot more depth to the overall image.

A close up of the spray paints, would look good in an article.

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Development Step One More images of the visuals I’ve created for the front cover ideas.

More outcomes from playing with various ideas.

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Development Step One Testing in black and white to bring out the main roots of the image.

The use of colour has made the range of black white and greys vary a lot more, it really adds depth to the images.

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Development Step One

This is the black and white image of the final piece. The shadows on the shapes really add depth.

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This is the colour version. I do prefer the colour one as it is more attractive but the black and white on is still interesting. Could have them back to back for the front and back cover. Amy Kilner Design.


Development Step One

This font is called Langdon. The raised look of it makes the text bold and eye catching. I tried it in colour but then remembered if a logo can work in black and white then it can work in any colour which can be important for a brand.

This font is called Acorn. It is too sketchy and it gives off the wrong look for this magazine that I am looking for. It is too edgy.

This font is called DecoNeue-Light. It reminds me too much of a fashion magazine.

I tried moving the letters about for the logo. I don’t like the outcome, to me, this doesn’t look like a strong design for a magazine.

Experimentation in the style of Kandinsky for an article within the magazine.

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Development Step One This again, is the DecoNeue-Light font but in a different layout. As the name is quite long this font doesn’t do it any justice.

This is more like the look I want for my magazine. This typeface is called Miso.

This font is called Archive. It doesn’t work well enough for my magazine design. I want the brand to look expensive, not cheap.

This font is called Benthem. It reminds me of art in the early 1900s.

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Development Step One Masthead

Masthead

Masthead

Images / Cover

Images / Cover

Images / Cover Sub headings Masthead Masthead

Masthead

Images / Cover Images / Cover

Sub headings Images / Cover

Sub headings Page 60

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Development Step Two - Content

This is the first cover idea which is plasticine shapes inspired by Kandinsky. This is to go with my article idea called “Post Modernism, Childs play?�.

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This is also inspired by Cubism and Kandinsky

This is inspired by the Plasticine idea but done on illustrator. This would be really good on the cover as it shows modern technology.

Amy Kilner Design.


Development Step Two - Content

This is the first cover idea which uses the illustrator version of the plasticine idea. I think the boldness of the clean shapes look really eye catching. I still feel like it needs more work though.

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This is the plasticine idea but using the original photo.

This is some experiments i did playing about with spray paints and cut outs. I’ve also tried this masthead here. It works well but it still needs more work.

Amy Kilner Design.


Development Step Two - Content

I tried adding a complete white border and I really think the outcome works well. It puts more of a focus on the design image but also keeps the masthead bold and clear.

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I tried putting the sub heading text higher up and I am going to carry on with this choice as it makes it stand out more.

The black in contrast to the white border makes the image eye catching for designers. Still not sure about the choice of masthead though.

Amy Kilner Design.


Development Step Two - Content

More tests.

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This is to show the process for designers that could be compared to modernism/post modernism / before and after.

Amy Kilner Design.


Development Step Two - Content

This is the one that I think works best. It reminds me of the work by Ryan Atkinson.

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Development Step Two - Content

I had feedback and was told my masthead wasn’t strong enough so I played about with that more but still prefer the benthem font.

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Made the text smaller.

Amy Kilner Design.


Development Step Two - Content

Even though I was told in feedback that my brand logo wasn’t strong enough I still decided to go with my choice as I believe it matches the whole style that I have chosen for my magazine.

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I added a bit of a Bauhaus inspired effect by taking off a couple of corners and adding some lines to the cover.

The Two in One idea coming together.

Amy Kilner Design.


Development Step Three

The back cover was an easy decision. I used part of the front cover so that the front and back match.

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As the bad feedback was getting on my nerves I tried changing the style again but it just didn’t work.

Amy Kilner Design.


Development Step Three

Tried this logo on a black background to try make it stand out more but I didn’t think it looked right.

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As “New Graphic Design” is a long title it was hard to create a logo and i couldn’t have it all on one line.

This is my final cover and style that I will follow throughout the magazine design.

Amy Kilner Design.


Development Step Three

This is the grid I followed throughout the creation of the magazine.

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I made sure everything was kept in line 2p from the line under the header so when put together as double pages it would match.

This is a basic page ready for articles to put in on indesign.

Amy Kilner Design.


Development Step Three This is my final front cover. I chose to display it on Issuu as it looks better than an InDesign Print Screen.

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Development Step Three As you can see whilst designing I stuck to trying to keep everything in line. It was very important to keep the style consistent so readers understand the brand image of the magazine. I wanted it to be in a simple clean style with modern images so the inspirations of modernism and post modernims are seen.

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Development Step Three I chose to have a lot of images on the contents page so that the readers get a feel of what is inside the magazine. If they have just picked the print up off a shelf and have a quick flick through it is important that they see interesting designs. I stuck to the design grids and style that I previously designed.

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Development Step Three Throughout the magazine where possible I made sure that the columns were all the same size so that the text was easier to read. I also didn’t want them to go too far across the page as this is bad design and readers eyes won’t find it easy to read which makes the magazine a bit of a bore and struggle.

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Development Step Three In this article I looked mainly at the first movemen, Impressionism. But here, I also compared it to a modern version. I also included a feature here on my cover design inspired by Kandinsky.

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Development Step Three As the magazine needed to be in multiples of 4 I added some of my previous work as articles.

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Development Step Three This is the back cover design.

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Evaluation Before starting this brief I set myself goals to achieve throughout. I believe I have achieved these goals. The first was to learn about Modernism and Post modernism. After reading the book by Will Gompertz I have a much better understanding of what came before and after. It has also increased my knowledge on how art has grown so much in the past 150 years! My second aim was to learn more about magazine layout. To do this I looked at current design magazines and the style that they use. I found this part quite easy as I already read Computer Arts regularly. When it came to putting the magazine together it looks like I have skipped steps as there is no print screens of moving things around on InDesign. However, I did do a lot of this but I was heavily inspired by the layouts and grids used in Computer Arts. I’m quite happy with the outcome as it has stayed consistent. The next goal was to have a better understanding of Art Movements. If I could do this project again I would look a lot more in to post modernism as I focused mainly on modernism. I chose to do this though as it interests me how all of this got started in the first place. Without those famous artists and designers I wouldn’t be studying what I am today as design wouldn’t have matured so much. My final goal was to create appropriate designs. I personally believe I have done. At the last minute I changed the font that is used throughout the magazine to Calibri from Oranienbaum as it is easier to read and contrasts more to the header font Benthem. I did include the font Oranienbaum in some parts of the magazine design though but I didn’t use more than these 3 fonts as I wanted the magazine to be as consistent as possible. http://amykilner.co.uk/100231/1304151/portfolio/new-graphic-design-magazine-form-follows-function http://issuu.com/amylouisekilner/docs/newgraphicdesignfinal http://www.amykilner.co.uk

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References References for “New Graphic Design� Text: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Sunday_Afternoon_on_the_Island_of_La_Grande_Jatte http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georges_Seurat http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2010/03/23/does-form-follow-function/ http://www.emigre.com/Editorial.php?sect=1&id=20 http://ha065.wordpress.com/gamswen/postmodern-graphic-design/ http://www.amazon.co.uk/No-More-Rules-Graphic-Postmodernism/dp/1856692299 http://observatory.designobserver.com/feature/did-we-ever-stop-being-postmodern/30798/ Images: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fountain_(Duchamp) http://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/duchamp-fountain-t07573 http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/85/Camille_Pissarro,_Gelee_blanche_ (Hoarfrost),_1873.jpg http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/af/Vincent_Van_Gogh_-_The_Potato_Eaters.png http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Sunday_Afternoon_on_the_Island_of_La_Grande_Jatte http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georges_Seurat http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/57/Malevich.black-square.jpg/250px-Malevich.black-square.jpg http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/4/49/Kandinsky_WWI.jpg http://www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/auth/kandinsky/ http://www.archdaily.com/225792/the-bauhaus/ http://ryanatkinson.prosite.com/ http://observatory.designobserver.com/feature/did-we-ever-stop-being-postmodern/30798/

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New Graphic Design FULL