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He went on to say that bicycles have the potential to change more than just social conditions in developing nations. Riding a stationary, bicycle powered water fountain, Ravenscroft explains his thoughts on the role of bicycles in sustainable development. “In addition to using bicycles to get to work and bike and get to school and back and to carry your crops to market place, you can also use them to generate power,” he said, demonstrating. By attaching a belt around the rear wheel and connecting the belt to an electrical generator, a bicycle can produce small amounts of electricity. According to Cornell University, Lance Armstrong can produce 500 watts of sustained energy for twenty minutes. Ravenscroft believes there is a genuine potential for bike-powered sustainability in developing nations. He cites Working Bikes Nordic-Track-powered television and bicycle-powered stereo as examples. “In a developing country, one kid could pedal and all the kids could have power…light in the library for example,” Ravenscroft said. A young boy, maybe five years old, looks at the bicycle-fountain in wonder. Ravenscroft sets him atop the seat, and the boy pedals away. All the while he stares backwards at the water spout, giggling. “It’s just to get people to talk to us,” Working Bikes member Sanford “Sandy” Rotter said, pointing to the bicycle-fountain. Rotter, an engineer in the field of electronic research and development, disagrees sharply with Ravenscroft’s views about bicycle-powered sustainability. “People have an idea that you can get energy back from gym clubs,” Rotter said, referring to manually-powered exercise machines like the ones at the University of Wisconsin-

News-Working Bikes  

story for media milwaukee

News-Working Bikes  

story for media milwaukee

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