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UNSETTLED GROUND: ARCHITECTURE AFTER NATURE


GEOFUTURES: ARCHITECTURE AND THE ANTHROPOCENE Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute_ School Architecture_ Thesis_2015 - 2016 Chris Perry_ Design Critic/ Thesis Advisor/ Mentor Amy Gecelter_ Student/ Designer


Contents


6 10 12 14 24 34 48 62 70 80 88

Thesis Statement Topic Research Strangely Familiar|Research Statement Research|Content Breakdown Dark Ecology The Uncanny Film Noir Formal Research Petrified Wood Ruins Site Analysis Three Natures Onuskis Manor Lithuania Catalog

92 96 104

Unsettled Ground: Architecture after “Nature� Design Proposal Concept Diagrams Renders

114 116

Documentation Bibliography Picture Citations


UNSETTLED GROUND: ARCHITECTURE AFTER NATURE

6

Thesis Statement


The Anthropocene Era is defined by drastic shifts in planetary landscape morphologies and ecosystems triggered by the rapid expansion of human existence and dominance on Earth. Before the advent of modern civilization, humans existed in societies that would otherwise seem primitive and strange in today’s perspective. We are becoming increasingly aware that this shift is associated with many unsustainable side effects, of which the most stark is global warming. Unsettled Ground fosters a consciousness of the ever-changing relationship between humans and their environment by intentionally blurring the boundary between the strange and the familiar. Unsettled Ground consists of a large tree-like structure situated within an overgrown forest at an uninhabited ruin site in Lithuania. Visitors experience the “tree” by ascending and descending a helical ramp, from which they can look inwards towards an exposed central atrium, and outwards towards the surrounding wilderness. The exposed atrium tapers in at the tree’s base, creating a forced ecosystem that features diurnal species at the top and nocturnal species at the darker bottom. All species - humans included - are obligated to interact at an artificial pond that sits at the floor of the atrium and serves as the ecosystem’s primary source of water. Beginning with the initial walk through the forest to reach the exhibit, visitors are challenged to evaluate the complex and dynamic relationship between humanity and the remainder of the natural world. The construction of the tree itself evokes the uncanny - symbolized by the clash between the structure’s artificial qualities and it’s striking resemblance to its wilder surroundings. The geometry of the structure further enhances this confusion by compelling visitors to reconsider their own personal notions of inside versus outside. The design evokes an awareness of the unknown, providing visitors with a glimpse of the forgotten relationships among humans and non-humans that are necessary for our planet’s preservation.

Unsettled Ground

7


1.3

1.6

1.8

01

01

Strangely Familiar

Strangely Familiar

1.1

8

Topic Research

01

Strangely Familiar


Lea

While the surrealist its wa infl chance was hard atiswo the arbitrary had givenfamili pur becom subjective day off, whic under intent to sleep in. Asuncan int about the theories of The Br aware Kant, logic had quietly asked the question,crisis. How backg chance and slim chance specie same thing? This snapp Dark the fu surrealist out of his gam 1.5 While the surrealist was at play, The first heThe had claritym chance was hardtime at work. enviro arbitrary had given purpose a become the strange to f subjective day off, which had allowed little w

STRANGELY STRANGELY FAMILIAR FAMILIAR 1.2

1.4

1.7

While the surrealist was at play, chance was hard at work. The arbitrary had given purpose a subjective day off, which had allowed Beresford, intent to sleep in.As Rickey intent dreamt Film intent to sleep in. As intent dreamt about the theories of Breton and the pl about the theories of Breton and Kant, logic had quietly arrived and Kant, logic had quietly arrived and solve asked the question, How come fat asked the question, How come fat outsid chance and slim chance mean the chance and slim chance mean the he rea same thing? This snapped the same thing? This snapped the surrealist out of his game and for the surrealist out of his game and for the once The first time he had clarity that enabled first time he had clarity that enabled the strange to become familiar. the strange to become familiar. Dark - Rickey Beresford, 2012 Exhibition

Learning how the Unca its influences and qualitie is the perfect combination - Rickey Beresford, 2012 Exhibition familiar, though 1.10 if someth Uncan becomes too strangeFilm andN Learning how the Uncanny is created; Learning how the Uncanny is created; understand it starts to neg its influences and qualities. Uncanniness its influences and qualities. Uncanniness combinationqualities. of strange and uncanny is the perfect combination of strange and is the perfect familiar, though if something familiar familiar, though if something familiar The Dark Ecology crea becomes too strange and hard to becomes too strange and hard to understand it starts to neglect all its among human 01 awareness Strangely Familiar understand it starts to neglect all its uncanny qualities. uncanny qualities. Dark the Ecology puts The Dark crisis. Ecology creates The Dark Ecology creates the awareness among humans of background the ascurrent to lose th awareness among humans of the current crisis. Dark Ecology puts humans in the crisis. Dark Ecology puts humans in the species, so we can thrive background as to lose the ideal of all background as to lose the ideal of all we can Ecology thrive as one opposes mass. hu species, so we can thrive as one mass. species, so Dark 1.8 1.2 Dark Ecology opposes humans fearing Dark Ecology opposes humans fearing the future but rather embr the future but rather embracing the now. the future but rather embracing the now. The more we learnmore about the The we learn about The more we learn about the Strangely environment, the more weFamiliar realize how9 environment, the more we realize how environment, the more w little we know, which leads to fear. little we know, which leads to fear.


STRANGELY FAMILIAR While the surrealist was at play, chance was hard at work. The arbitrary had given purpose a subjective day off, which had allowed intent to sleep in. As intent dreamt about the theories of Breton and Kant, logic had quietly arrived and asked the question, How come fat chance and slim chance mean the same thing? This snapped the surrealist out of his game and for the first time he had clarity that enabled the strange to become familiar.

10 Topic Research

- Rickey Beresford, 2012 Exhibition


Researching the Uncanny and its creation; its influences and qualities. Uncanniness is the perfect combination of strange and familiar, though if something familiar becomes too strange and hard to familiarize it begins to neglect all its uncanny qualities. The Dark Ecology creates the awareness among humans of the current crisis and pushes for humans to move to the background as to lose the ideal of all species, so we can thrive as one mass. It opposes humans fear of the future but rather embraces the now. The more humans engage with the environment, the more humans realize how little they know, which leads to fear. Film Noir expresses these ideas through it’s plot line. The protagonist is hired to solve a mystery he feels he is on the outside, as he gets deeper into the case he realizes he is mixed up in it. The fear sets in once the protagonist realizes. These topics compliment each other; Dark Ecology being the condition, the Uncanny being the aesthetic effect, and Film Noir being the cognition. This thesis design stems from these initial criteria and concerns. A ruin site in Lithuania was chosen because the humans were all vacated after the estate burnt down during WWII, once this happened the boundaries of human vs. non-human blurred. The project chooses to embrace and design around these conditions with the intent of bringing humans back to the site through a museum centralized on the overgrown estate. The museum itself blurs the boundaries of inside and outside creating a very unique space among ecology as we know it.

Research Statement 11


darwinism

echoes

human_nonhuman_interdependence

inconsistent

coexistence

no species

strange stranger

delicacy

infinite

artificial exist fear_unkown

all_beings lose_nature gain_ecology

dissatisfaction

castration_complex

aesthetics fateful dread hesitation repressed animistic

unheimlich_heimlich 'sand-man'

'un'=repression

horrifying

dread

buried_alive

truth_process strange_strangers

intimate cynical

journey

gilt

shame

echoes

ambiguous interconnected conflict_of_judgement 'olympia' uncertainty imagination_reality

strangely_familiar blurred

ironic

self-observation

inevitable

same_face gloomy

'blade runner' hidden...surface

frankenstein

uneasy

'blue_velvet'

cycle

soul

gruesome

unexpected

realization

shaddows helpless

central_character_after_death

evil past

hard-boiled_detective

12 Topic Research

'double'

narrator

'angel heart'

deep_focus

satire

rare


Humans can survive externally from 'nature,' for nature has lead us to this current crisis. Nature is the ultimate lost object distanced from humankind. This goes beyond anthropocentrism, no longer interpreting humankind as normative. We shall explore the unknown, and embrace our existence rather than live with fear.

A feeling that arouses fear, dread, and creeping horror. The unexpected resurfacing of something repressed. Results: 1. Something that is not uncanny in fiction would be so in real life. 2. There are many more ways of creating uncanny effects in fiction than in real life.

Noir films generate a protagonist who believes they are investigating a crime they have no relation to, but gradually discovers they are seemingly incorrect and personally involved. The protagonist becomes caught up in what is reality and what is fiction, thus the film gets blurred. The protagonist falls inside an investigation he once thought he was on the outside.

Content Breakdown 13


Timothy Morton_ The Fast Track to Ecological Sadness_ 2015 Lecture_ 2.0

14 Topic Research


DARK ECOLOGY

(noun)

dark e-col-o-gy the irony, ugliness, and horror of ecology (eco in ecology originally means oikos, home) - Timothy Morton

Dark Ecology 15


Reality Rearranged_ Balance_ Tommy Ingberg_ 2010-2013_ 1.9

16 Topic Research


The woods are lovely dark and deep... - Robert Frost Nature is part of the problem - Timothy Morton In that sense dark does not necessarily have to be dark and sinister, it is also simply that which you don’t know about yet... It is an ongoing quest to find out the things in the world. - Arie Altena (NL) Sonic Arts

Dark Ecology 17


_REALITY REARRANGED _Forever _REALITY REARRANGED _Tommy_Forever Ingberg _2010-2013 _Tommy Ingberg

Reality Rearranged_ Forever_ Tommy Ingberg_ 2010-2013_ 1.9

_2010-2013

_REALITY REARRANGED _Army _REALITY REARRANGED _Tommy Ingberg _Army _2010-2013 _Tommy Ingberg _2010-2013

Reality Rearranged_ Army_ Tommy Ingberg_ 2010-2013_ 1.9 2.2

18 Topic Research


Dark ecology provides a realistic take on the current human predicament without turning to false optimism or somber tones of apocalypse. It requires people to take control, rather than sit still with the understanding that nothing bad will come of it. When we realize our connection and relationship to the rest of the world, we understand that our actions reflect all life on the planet, creating the ‘mesh’. Morton’s concept of the ‘strange stranger’ enforces this with its understanding that the more we learn about an entity, the stranger it becomes. An ecological crisis has already happened, and dark ecology is the fear, irony and ugliness attached with knowing such events are occurring. Dark ecology embraces the fact that there is and there will be an ecological catastrophe and humans are past the point of prevention, thus adopting a world without nature is more feasible than fearing its extinction. Morton believes that humans should live in coexistence rather than domination. The shift from foreground to background will allow a smooth transition from a naturefilled environment to a non-natural environment.

Dark Ecology 19


1.6

1.4

20 Topic Research

Garden of Metamorphosis_ Tetsumi Kudo_ 2008-2009_ created 1956-1986_

1.5

2.3


Architecture Without Nature_ Timothy Morton Cartons are houses for crackers. Castles are houses for kings. The more that I think about houses, The more things are houses for things.

- Mary Ann Hoberman(A House is a House for Me) Nature is partially responsible for the current problem (global warming), and ironically the word ‘nature’ was coined during the period that created this crisis. A way to fix this is to identify nonhumans as partners and coexist as one entity. Darwin’s theory of ‘no species’ enforces the blurred line between lifeforms, and abilty to define the distinction between a species and a variant is unrealistic and ever changing. Morton points out that the greater the connections between beings, the more fragile the network becomes. Morton believes that to ‘exist’ is to be inconsistent with the ability to move up and down the chain. The optimal design based on a dark ecology consists of admitting our coexistence with the toxic substances we have created and exploited and moving forward with them as one entity rather than removing them in fear of the future.

Dark Ecology 21


1.3

_nature within th

2.4 _nature within the artificial; nature being incarcerated by the man-made _Gaia’s Jam Jars _Naoko Ito _2012

The Dark Ecology of Elegy_ Timothy 2.6

Dark ecology chooses not to digest the phobic-disgus remain with it in all its meaninless inconsistency.

22 Topic Research


The Dark Ecology of Elegy_ Timothy Morton Dark ecology chooses not to digest the phobicdisgusting object. Instead it decides to remain with it in all its meaninless inconsistency. - Timothy Morton

-Dali Lama The earth is dying

Dark ecology is the ultimate reverse of deep ecology, the most rational act is to love the artificial part of another rather than searching for their naturalness and validity. Dark ecology rejects lifeforms such as humans, plants, and animals as flawless forms; nothing is perfect or fully learned. Ecology creates the fear that humans will go on living while their surroundings vanish, and emphasizes the interconnectedness of all beings. We cannot mourn for the environment because we are so deeply attached to it. Ecological fidelity is the core of dark ecology; it is a political project that may be self destructive because of its brutal truth. ‘Where nature was ecology shall go,’ replacing nature with ecology is disappointing, but a necessary reality. It is paradoxical that ecological writing kills nature for a second time when it has not fully happened the first time.

Dark Ecology 23


Sigmund Freud_ Clay Bust_ Oscar Neman (sculptor)_ 1931_ 2.7

24 Topic Research


UNCANNY

(adj.)

un-can-ny strange or unusual in a way that is surprising or difficult to understand

- Merriam-Webster

Uncanny 25


Uncanny Valley_ UIC Thesis Exhibition_ Curt Miller_ 2015_ 3.0

_ _UIC M

NON-FICTION

RY_ nt_

RY_ nt_

Ronchini Gallery_ Nimbus D’Aspermont_ Berndnaut Smilde_ 2013_ 2.8

26 Topic Research

_REA


For this uncanny is in reality nothing new or alien, but something which is familiar and old-- established in the mind and which has become alienated from it only through the process of repression. - Sigmund Freud The Uncanny draws on each artist’s relationship with their materials and the ways in which they create a sense of unease for the viewer by using the familiar out of context. - Ronchini Gallery

Uncanny 27


emont_ de_

GALLERY_ premont_ ilde_

Ronchini Gallery_ Nimbus D’Aspermont_ Berndnaut Smilde_ 2013_ 1.8

M_ Designboom_ Yaara Dekel_ Coppelius Chair_ 2014_ 2.9

ir_

M_

air_

28 Topic Research


Sigmund Freud’s 1919 essay on the Uncanny reflects his understanding that the uncanny is not simply the feeling of fear and unease, rather the feeling of something strangely familiar. He feels that one experiences the uncanny when a memory or event that was repressed in ones unconscious is now resurfacing multiple times. The uncanny is generally created more easily in fiction than non-fiction. Freud uses the example that non-humans are expected to have humanistic qualities in fiction stories where as if it were to happen in real life one would believe they were going crazy. Freud has influenced the surrealist movement through his definition of the uncanny. This creates unease by using the familiar out of context (familiar strangeness). The aim of the surrealist movement was to “resolve the previously contradictory conditions of dream and reality.” The uncanny becomes the aesthetic effect of the dark ecology expressed through film noir.

Uncanny 29


o_ Malo_

Victor Hugo_ Vieux Saint-Malo_ 1866_ 3.2

30 Topic Research

Victor Hugo_ La maison visionnee_ 1866_ 3.3

_Victor Hug _ _La maison visionne _186


Haunted Houses_ Anthony Vidler With the first glimpse of the building, a sense of insufferable gloom pervaded my spirit... There was an iciness, a sinking, a sickening of the heart—an unredeemed dreariness of thought which no goading of the imagination could torture into aught of the sublime. - Edgar Allan Poe

Anthony Vidler concludes that haunted houses embody the Romanticism period through their uncanniness. These houses which are now abandoned hold family history and nostalgia within them, and when looked at realistically, the house represents the “disturbing unfamiliarity of the evidently similar.” Haunted houses are decidedly “killed by their emptiness.” They have the ability of delivering silence and emptiness, therefore creating the experience of a deathly space such as a tomb. Haunted houses express similar qualities to that of a ruin, generally they both are abandoned and left to overgrow with past memories rather than growing memories.

Uncanny 31


3.4

3.4

_The Bride Stripped Bare By Her Bachelo _Philadelphia

Heimlich/Unheimlich_ Anthony Vidler / Sigmund Fre

32 Topic Research Some languages in use today can only render the German expression ‘an un


Heimlich/Unheimlich_ Anthony Vidler/Sigmund Freud It often happens that neurotic men declare that they feel there is something uncanny about the female genital organs. This unheimlich place, however, is the entrance to the former Heim of all human beings, to the place where each of us lived once upon a time and in the beginning. - Sigmund Freud

The uncanny enforces how the homely gradually moves into the unhomely territory. Homely (heimlich) refers to the warmth, security, and freedom from fear, which is seen to gradually take on the ominous quality of its apparent opposite, the unhomely (unheimlich). According to Freud’s Uncanny essay heimlich refers to secrets, withholding information. Heimlich becomes unheimlich through the captivity of secrets growing into horror. The more one learns the more they realize that they had no idea. The heimlich is the known which then turns into the unknown, unheimlich. They appear to eventually become one in the same as does dark ecology. _Marcel Duchamp _The Bride Stripped Bare By Her Bachelors, Even (The Large Glass) _Philadelphia Museum of Art Collection _1915-1923 3.4

Uncanny 33


Angel Heart_ Harry Angel_ Mickey Rourke_ 1987_ 1.7

34 Topic Research


FILM NOIR

(french genre)

film new-ar crime fiction featuring hard-boiled cynical characters and bleak sleazy settings -

Merriam-Webster

Film Noir 35


Blade Runner_ 1982_ 1.1

36 Topic Research


Film Noir portrays the protagonist as an ambiguous antihero, emphasizing the corruption of society. The protagonist is subject to an obscure inside-outside relationship where he remains in limbo as to where his role in the plot lies. The plot is blurred once the protagonist loses sight of what is real and what is fiction. Noir films reflect romantic irony because the main character loses sight of reality, causing him to self-reflect and enter his unconscious. It is said that film noir portrays the lives of those who returned from WWII and the difficulties they encountered trying to return to their normal lives. Timothy Morton draws a connection between film noir detectives and ecological thinking and acting people. He explains this to emphasize that humans do not really understand the environment, though once asking questions and getting involved with it they slowly realize that their daily actions effects every aspect of the environment. Similarly, in the noir films when the detective realizes he has a close connection to his case the more he gets involved. Morton encourages us to go beyond the anthropocentric way of life and no longer see humankind as the foreground species. The truth scares humankind as well as the protagonists in these films.

Film Noir 37


3.5

3.5

MARY SHELLEY’S FRANKENST

I busied myself to think of a story wh fears of our nature and awaken thrilli reader dread to look around, to curdl beatings of the heart. 3.5

3.5

Mary Shelley's Frankenstein plays wi to life; the one thing (1994)humans neve happen, creating lifeforms from th

STEIN (1994) MARY SHELLEY’S FRANKENSTEIN 38 Topic Research

AN


MARY SHELLEY’S FRANKENSTEIN (1994) I busied myself to think of a story which would speak to the mysterious fears of our nature and awaken thrilling horror; one to make the reader dread to look around, to curdle the blood, and quicken the beatings of the heart. - Mary Shelley

Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein plays with the idea of nature coming to life; the one thing humans never thought could and would ever happen, creating lifeforms from the dead. The protagonist, Victor Frankenstein has become a curious doctor who gets engulfed in his studies. He is attempting to finish studies that were never completed before, and once he finishes the final procedure he realizes his experiments have created this monster. Victor is shocked with horror of his creation and thus renounces his experiments, leaving the monster to live on his own in the wild. Victor Frankenstein has lost his sense of reality, and to himself has become the villain.

Film Noir 39


1.7

1.7

1.7

1.7

ANGEL HEART GELHEART HEART (1987)(1987) NGEL GEL HEART (1987) (1987)

Topic Research No matter how cleverly sneak upaon a mirror, reflection matter how cleverly you you sneak up on mirror, youryour reflection 40 atter matter how how cleverly cleverly you you sneak sneak upup onon a mirror, a mirror, your your reflection reflection always looks you straight in the eye.


ANGEL HEART (1987) No matter how cleverly you sneak up on a mirror, your reflection always looks you straight in the eye. - Louis Cyphere ‘Angel Heart’

Angel Heart creates this world where the devil (Louis Cyphere) helps the protagonist (Harry Angel) find himself; find his soul. Louis Cyphere hires Harry (a private detective) to find a man who ‘owes him money.’ On Harry’s journey he gets closer and closer to solving the mystery, but as he gets closer each person he interacts with miraculously dies; as if Louis is framing Harry. Louis Cyphere is portrayed as the devil where his name is symbolic of Lucifer the god. Louis is guiding Harry to his soul, which is of a man named Johnny Favorite who was in the army and is the man Louis wants Harry to track down. The movie gets blurred when Louis convinces Harry that he had something to do with the killing of three people.

Film Noir 41


BLADE RUNNER

(1982)

It's too bad she won't live... but then again,who does? - Gaff

1/SUBJECT MATTER: REPLICANT (HUMAN/NONHUMAN)

42 Topic Research


.HUMAN_OR_NON .HUMAN_OR_NON HUMAN HUMAN

.REAL_OR_FABRICATED .REAL_OR_FABRICATED

1.2

HUMAN OR NONHUMAN?

1.2

1.2

These images indicate that replicants experience glowing eyes and humans non glowing. Frequently replicants are unaware of their non-humanness. They are created with typical memories shared among many other Replicants. Replicants have a time cap, and fear death similar to humans. Everything involving replicants is manmade, from their souls to their eyeballs.

Th Th indic indic in in B B seen seen not not show show man man fabr fabr imag imag hold hold snak snak real real hum hum man man indic indic not not rathe rathe natu natu glow glow too too real real blurr blurr kill kill o o aspe aspe

1.2

These These images images display display that that replicants replicants contain contain glowing eyes glowing eyes and and humans humans non non glowing. glowing. Frequently Frequently replicants are are unaware unaware of of their their non-humanness non-humanness and and replicants

Film Noir 43

TT envi envi indic indic ecol ecol first first Cor Cor repl repl repl repl The The gloo gloo with with light light


.REAL_OR_FABRICATED 1.2

1.2 1.2

44 Topic Research

This stream stream of of images images This indicates that even .REAL OR the animals in Blade Blade Runner’s world world are are in Runner’s FABRICATED? seen as being synthetic and not ‘natural.’ ‘natural.’ The first first image These images to the left not The image shows Deckard searching indicate that even the for a man in Chinatown Chinatown who of in this world mananimals in who fabricates The synthetic second Blade snakes. Runner are image shows a replicant and not ‘natural.’ The image shows a replicant first holding oneshows of the theDeckard synthetic image holding one of synthetic looking a man in snakes whichforappears to be Chinatown who makes real, just just as as replicants replicants replicate replicate real, snakes. second image humans in anThe almost perfect shows a replicant holding manner. These examples manner. These examples one of snakes indicate thatthethesynthetic world does whichnature appears to be very not need need to thrive, thrive, not nature to real just like replicants rather they create their own replicate humans in an nature. Even the owl has almost perfect manner. glowing eyes eyes indicating indicating that thatThis it glowing indicates that this world it too is a replicant. Fiction and does not need nature to reality have thus thus become become reality have thrive, they create their blurred. Deckard’s mission is to own nature. The owl in the kill off the fiction (replicant) kill off the fiction bottom image(replicant) has glowing aspect of the world.that it too eyes indicating is a replicant. Fiction and reality have thus become blurred and Deckard’s mission is to kill off the fiction (replicant) aspect of the world. These two images of the environment in Blade Blade Runner Runner environment in indicate Morton’s Morton’s concept concept of of indicate


ontain Frequently nness and s, rather ave a time verything ir

too is a replicant. Fiction and reality have thus become blurred. Deckard’s mission is to kill off the fiction (replicant) aspect of the world.

.ECOLOGY WITHOUT NATURE

1.2

1.2

These two images of the environment in Blade These two images theconcept Runner render ofthe environment in Blade Runner of ecology without indicate Morton’s concept of nature. The first image ecology without nature. The is theisTyrell Corporation first image the Tyrell where which replicants are Corporation creates created, and is shaped replicants, and is shaped to to resemble a pyramid. replicate a simple pyramid. The environment is dark and The environment appears gloomy with little sun,sun, but lit up dark with no it’s’ with interior and exterior only sources of light are lighting similar tosimilar Time Square synthetic, to Time in the evening. Humans do not Square at night. Humans need natural sun light to dolife. notThis necessarily sustain displays theneed natural sunlight to sustain idea that humans can live life.nature, This enforces beyond and createthe idea‘nature.’ that humans can their own Right now naturelive is an aesthetic that is and beyond nature, very distant in createfrom theirhumans, own ‘nature.’ this world their synthetic nature Right now nature is an is incorporated lives. aesthetic into thattheir is very distant from humans, in this world their synthetic nature is incorporated into their lives. Film Noir 45


As Deckard startsthe hunting thesehesixhas away with Rachel, replicant replicants, hewith. falls in love with a that newhe model fallen in love This suggests too replicant,that who idea she is a realizes hehas hasno a limited time to live as replicant. Deckard does Rachel. At therealizes, close of but the he filmdoes he not choose to tell her or to killspend her. every last states that he wants Deckard experiences this reoccurring moment with her. dream about a unicorn. Along side his partner Gaff leaves origami statues as a remnant of his tracks. At the close of the film Gaff leaves a unicorn for Deckard to find outside his apartment. This oneOUT is unique IN because it implies that him and Deckard are having the same memories and thoughts. This means that their thoughts are linked just like replicants, foreshadowing that they too are replicants, which raises the question, do they have replicants hunting IN and what isOUT replicants? Who real or fiction? Deckard gradually realizes that he is the subject of his own investigation and runs away with Rachel, the replicant he has fallen in love with. This suggests that he too realizes that he has a limited time to live as Rachel. At the a close of the film he It takes adoes theif to catch theif. states that he wants to spend every last Gaff moment with her.

BLADE RUNNER 2/NOIR SUBJECT: OBJECT/SUBJECT AMBIGUITY IN

IN

46 Topic Research

OUT

OUT

(1982)


.REPLICANTS HUNTING REPLICANTS? .REPLICANTS HUNTING REPLICANTS? .REPLICANTS HUNTING REPLICANTS? .ALIVE_OR_DEAD .ALIVE_OR_DEAD .ALIVE_OR_DEAD 1.2

1.2

1.2

The film The begins a retiredacop, filmwith begins retired The film begins with awith retired cop, cop,

Deckard,Deckard, getting called incalled to helpinhunt .REPLICANTS HUNTING getting to help Deckard, getting called in to help hunt hunt down sixdown replicants on Earth.onDeckard is six replicants Earth. Deckard down six replicants on Earth. Deckard is is REPLICANTS? known for beingforone of the deadliest known being one of the deadliest known for being one of the deadliest replicantreplicant huntersDEAD? on Earth,onthus whythus the why the .ALIVE OR hunters replicant hunters on Earth,Earth, thus why the

police have called him backhim to duty one back to one duty one policepolice have have calledcalled him back to duty last time.last He gets He partnered up with aup with a gets partnered last time. time. He gets partnered up with a cop, Gaff. Thefellow film starts with a retired cop, Deckard, fellowfellow cop, cop, Gaff.Gaff. Deckard starts hunting six six six beingAscalled to starts help huntthese down AsinDeckard starts hunting As Deckard hunting thesethese six replicants, he falls inhelove with a new model replicants, falls in with love a new replicants, he fallsDeckard in love awith new model replicants on Earth. is known formodel replicant,replicant, who haswho no idea she is a hasidea no idea she is a replicant, who has no she is a being one of the deadliest replicant hunters replicant. Deckard realizes,realizes, but he does he notdoes not replicant. Deckard replicant. Deckard realizes, but hebutdoes not choose thus to tell why her ortell killher her. kill her. on Earth, the police have called him choose choose to telltoher or killorher. Deckard experiences this reoccurring back toDeckard dutyDeckard one last time. partnered experiences thisgets reoccurring experiences thisHe reoccurring dream about a unicorn. Along side his side his dream anamed unicorn. Along up with a fellow cop Gaff. dream aboutabout a unicorn. Along side his partner Gaff leaves origami statues as a partner leaves origami statues partner Gaff Gaff leaves origami statues as a as a remnant remnant of his tracks. the close of close the film hisAttracks. the the film remnant of hisoftracks. At theAtclose of theoffilm As Deckard starts hunting these replicants Gaff leaves a unicorn for Deckard to find leaves a unicorn for Deckard to find Gaff Gaff leaves a unicorn for Deckard to find outside his apartment. This one is unique he fallsoutside in outside love a new replicant his apartment. This isone is unique his with apartment. Thismodel one unique it implies that himathat and Deckard because itshe implies him and Deckard whobecause has no idea is replicant. Deckard because it implies that him and Deckard are having the samethe memories and are having same memories and are having the same memories and knows but he does not choose to kill her. thoughts.thoughts. This means theirthat thoughts are Thisthat means their thoughts thoughts. This means that their thoughts are are linked just like replicants, foreshadowing justreplicants, like replicants, foreshadowing linkedlinked just like foreshadowing that they too are replicants, which raises the Deckard thisreplicants, reoccurring dream that had theyare too are replicants, that has they too whichwhich raisesraises the the question, do theyHis have replicants hunting question, do have they have replicants hunting about a unicorn. partner Gaff leaves question, do they replicants hunting replicants? Who and what is real orisfiction? replicants? and what real orhe fiction? replicants? Who and what isof real or fiction? origami statues as aWho remnant where DeckardDeckard graduallygradually realizes realizes that he isthat thehe is the Deckard gradually realizes that he is the hassubject been.ofAthisthe of the and film runs Gaff leaves ownclose investigation subject his own investigation and runs subject of hisofown investigation and runs away with Rachel, replicant he has hehis a unicorn for Deckard to find outside with the Rachel, the replicant awayaway with Rachel, the replicant he has has fallen in love with. This suggests that he too apartment. This unique because itheis too inone loveiswith. This suggests thattoo fallenfallen in love with. This suggests that he realizes realizes that he has ahe limited to live as live as thathas atime limited time realizes which that he ahas limited time to livetoand as of adoes unicorn resembles that him Rachel. At the close of close the film he does Rachel. Atclose the offilm thehe film he doesare Rachel. At the of the Deckard having the same memories or states that he wants to spend every last thatwants he wants to spend statesstates that he to spend everyevery last last thoughts. means that their thoughts are momentThis with her. moment with her. moment with her.

linked just like replicants implying that they too are replicants, which raises the question, do they have replicants hunting replicants? Who and what IN is real or fiction? OUT

IN IN

OUT OUT

Deckard gradually realizes that he is the subject of his own investigation thus runs away with Rachel, the replicant he has fallen in love with. This implies that he realizes he ININ OUT OUT OUT has a limited time toIN live as does Rachel and he states that he wants to spend every last moment with her.

Film Noir 47


Petrified Forest National Park_ Arizona_ 42,085 mi²_ 218 million years old_ 3.9

48 Formal Research


PETRIFIED WOOD pe-truh-fahy-ed woo-d

(noun)

fossilized remains of terrestrial vegetation. wood transition to stone by the process of permineralization. 3D representation of original object. requires a minimum of 10,000 years. -

Wikipedia

Petrified Wood 49


Petrified Forest National Park_ Arizona_ 42,085 mi²_ 218 million years old_ 3.9

50 Formal Research


I grow very fond of this place, and it certainly has a desolate, grim beauty of its own, that has a curious fascination for me. - Theodore Roosevelt

Petrified wood illustrates the Earth’s past, extending far beyond the existence of humankind. The fossils located in the Petrified Forest National Park were created by trees from the Late Triassic period about 225 million years ago. The National Park is located in the Painted Desert of Arizona where the fossils have resurfaced as stone tree chunks upon sandy hills. Humans have grown accustomed to deserts consisting of dry lands lacking greenery, shockingly this Painted Desert has accents of color through its versatile selection of petrified wood and sediment. These fossils have engulfed the shape of trees that stood over 200 million years ago. Surprisingly, this site has a history of once being a wetland with tall conifer trees and dinosaurs; today it has evolved into an opposing terrain. Petrified wood is portrayed as a type of sacred ruin because the history of the site has resurfaced with lively surreal objects, and these fossils are a rarity created over many millenniums. The stone-like tree fossils seem as though they are something from one’s imagination. What you see (tree) and what you feel (stone)are blurred.

Petrified Wood 51


UNCANNY STUDIES STUDIES UNCANNY PERCENT OF NATURALITY % OF NATURALITY

100%

Petrified Forest National Park.

NATURAL

52 Formal Research

ARTIFICIAL


DIES

UNCAN

UNCANNY STUDIES

BLURRED BO

% OF NATURALITY

0%

.

Manufactured Artifacts

NATURAL

ARTIFICIAL

Petrified Wood 53


UNCANNY STUDIES % OF STRUCTURAL NATURALITY

fied Petrified Forest Forest National National Park.Park. Petrified Forest National Petrified Park.Forest National Park. Petrified Forest National Park.

0%100%

100% 100%

Manufactured Manufactured Artifacts Artifacts Manufactured Artifacts Manufactured Artifac Manufactured Artifacts

0% 0%

PERCENT PERCENT OF OF NATURALITY NATURALITY PERCENT OF NATURALITY PERCENT OF NATURALITY NATURAL ARTIFICIAL PERCENT OF NATURALITY

fied Petrified WoodWood xx Petrified Wood xx xx

Petrified Wood

Petrified Wood

54 Formal Research

0% 0%


UNCANNY STUDIES BLURRED BOUNDARIES

UNCANNY STUDIES

UNCANNY STUDIES

BLURRED BOUNDARIES

BLURRED BOUNDARIES

0%

a b

0%

b

avs. b

a

a

vs.

b

b

b

ured Artifacts

c

actured Artifacts

c

0%

STRUCTURE VARIATIONS

Material Research

0%

xx

STRUCTURE VARIATIONS

Material Research

xx

Petrified Wood 55


UNCANNY STUDIES SHAPE

UNC

Tree bark applied on different objects, with different orientations

Tree ba scales a

UNCANNY STUDIES SHAPE vs. TEXTURE

Sphere

Perspective

Sphere

Top View

Sphere

Horizontal Bark

Small

Perspe

Cube

Cube

Cube

Mediu

Column

Column

Column

Large

Perspective

Perspective

56 Formal Research

Elevation

Elevation

Horizontal Bark

Horizontal Bark

Perspe

Perspe


UNCANNY STUDIES SCALE Tree bark applied to a wall at different scales and orientations

UNCANNY STUDIES SCALE vs. TEXTURE

Small Scale

Small Scale

Small Scale

Medium Scale

Medium Scale

Medium Scale

Large Scale

Large Scale

Large Scale

Perspective

Perspective

Perspective

Elevation

Elevation

Elevation

Horizontal Bark

Horizontal Bark

Horizontal Bark

Petrified Wood 57


BARK TILE Exploring the use of bark texture as a tile system and allowing it to change orientation. 3D printed

58 Formal Research


BARK WALL Exploring the detail one can receive creating a bark textured wall while testing the scale. One can see the pockets that are created and the potential for inhabital space within them. Both sides of the wall are different scales as seen in these two images. The larger scale allows for bigger inhabitable pockets whereas the smaller scale reads more as a texture. laser cut 2,000 sheets of paper

Petrified Wood 59


60 Formal Research


Petrified Wood 61


_Railway Station _Abkhazia, Georgia _Abandoned since 1993 _63 miles long 3.10

62 Formal Research


RUINS ru-ins

(noun)

a state of complete destruction; the remaining pieces of something that was destroyed -

Merriam-Webster

Ruins 63


_ _

INSIDE INSIDE

Hotel Salto_ Colombia_ 1923-1991_

4.0

1_ 1_

iranda_ iranda_ randa_ gium_ gium_ 1_ 1_ 1_

OUTSIDE OUTSIDE OUTSIDE

4.0

4.1

Chateau Miranda_ Celles, Belgium_ 1866-1991_

4.2

ii Mulini_ Mulini_ 64 Formal Research Mulini_ taly_ taly_

4.2

4.3


Looking at the past, from the future; I’m afraid of that... ‘future’ is a vintage notion. The ‘future’ is like when you say modern... just remember that the ‘future’ has been designed in the sixties. So when you talk about the ‘future’, it’s the sixties. So we have to create a new word to define the future, because you cannot be modern now, you cannot use the ‘future’ as a key to develop and define the future. - Francois Roche

Ruins 65


INSIDE INSIDE INSIDE 4.6

OUTSIDE OUTSIDE OUTSIDE OUTSIDE OUTSIDE OUTSIDE _Bannerman Arsenal _Pollepel, New York _1900-1967

_Bannerman _Bannerman _Bannerman _Bannerman _Pollepel, N _Pollepel, N _Pollepel, N _Pollepel, N _ 190 _ 190 _ 190 _ 190

4.7

_Onuskis _Onuskis _Onuskis _Onuskis _L _L _L _L _184 _184 _184 _184

3.6

_Onuskis Mansion _Lithuania _1847 - 1940

66 Formal Research

_Ta Prohm _Ta Prohm _Ta Prohm _TaReap, Prohm _Siem Ca _ _Siem Siem Reap, Reap, Ca Ca


Ruins are subject to scrutiny due to their so-called lack of ‘timelessness’ thought of as a once useful enclosures that are now exposed and overgrown. Ruins have evolved into art pieces and follies that humans periodically visit, thus allowing nature to ultimately take over. This perception has been created over time; the ideal of humans living in structures and nature living ‘out there’ far off in the distance. Destruction forms this magnificent ever-changing beauty. The structure still stands, but is engulfed by ‘nature’, and ‘nonhumans’. Though the site is ever changing and growing, it is becoming one with its environment. The view of inside and outside is blurred; the inside is the outside, the walls are open to the sky thus engulfed by Earth’s beauty. The fusion of nature and ‘ruins’ creates a new environment worthy of exploration. Ruins are timeless, and thus should be inhabited by humans and non-humans as one entity in the years to come.

Ruins 67


UNCANNY STUDIES COLLAGE_DIGITAL EFFECTS

Merging storm clouds with the Painted Desert in Arizona, while Merging storm clouds with the Painted Desert, and subtly dropping in a farm ubtly adding a farm house. The effect is uncanny because one house. effect is uncanny in the sense that all of these things coming together is would not expect to The see such a great storm over an inland such a bizarre scene. Experiencing esert. The house adds to the strangeness because thesuch a raging storm inland is highly unlikely, andbecome the farm messes with the scale of the desert, it turns the mountains into a mountains have its house front yard.

front yard. It could be portrayed painted ‘grass’ not the Painted Desert.

68 Formal Research


UNCANNY STUDIES COLLAGE_DIGITAL EFFECTS

Subtracting color from the scene makes the two merging

Testing the uncanniness of color/ contrast. Removing color from the scene makes all images less familiar. The mountains look as though they could the strange layers less recognizable merging them all together. looktoo unclear, thus losing be the ocean, andThe the mountains image becomes as though they could be ocean waves. The image becomes too unclear, thus losing its uncanny qualities. its uncanny qualities. Ruins 69


Gawthorpe Hall_ Engraved by Van der Hagen_ Printed by Joseph Smith_ London Harewood House Trust_ 1727_

4.9

70 Site Analysis


THREE NATURES three na-tures

(plural n.)

presents the history of human development -

John Dixon Hunt

Three Natures 71


d view of Eaton Hall_ J.Kip after L. Knyff_ ear Chester, London_ 1724-1728_

1 18th CENTURY LANDSCAPE_PERSPECTIVE 18th CENTURY LANDSCAPES

d view of Eaton Hall_ J.Kip after L. Knyff_ ear Chester, London_ 1724-1728_

OBSERVING THE THREE NATURES 2

Engraved view of Eaton Hall_ J. Kip after L. Kynff_ Chester, London_ 3 1724-1728_

1 2

3

Erlustierrende Augenweide_ Matthias Diesel_ Augsburg_ 1717-1723_ Erlustierrende Augenweide_ Matthias Diesel_ Augsburg_ 1717-1723_

1 1700s

4.10 Erlustierrende Augenweide_ Matthias Diesel_ Augsburg, Germany_

1

2 1

2 3

3 72 Site Analysis

5.0

1


For in the gardens...the industry of the local people has been such that nature incorporated with art is made an artificer and naturally equal with art, and form them both together is made a third nature, which I would not know how to name. - Jacopo Bonfadio, 1541

Sometimes I feel like a creature in the wild who’s natural habitat is gradually being destroyed.

- Lord Granthem, Downton Abbey on post WWI, 1920

Three Natures 73


1

_John Rocque’s Map of Dublin _The Royal Hospital _Kilmainham, Dublin _1757

1

1700s-1900s LANDSCAPE_PLAN 18th CENTURY LANDSCAPES

ECTIVE

OBSERVING THE THREE NATURES 2

1

Engraved view of Eaton Hall_ 1 J. Kip after L. Kynff_ Chester, London_ 1724-1728_

3

5.1

John Rocque’s Map of Dublin_ The Royal Hospital_ Kilmainham, Dublin_ 1757_

2

_John Rocque’s Map of Dublin _The Royal Hospital _Kilmainham, Dublin _1757

3

5.1 _Valley of the Sun Map _Phoenix _1920

1 _Valley of the Sun Map _Phoenix _1920

3 2

3 2 74 Site Analysis

_Valley of the Sun Map _Phoenix _1920

1

5.2


Italian humanists Bartolomeo Taegio and Jacopo Bonfadio coined the term “third nature� in the late 16th century. This third nature depicted the special combination of nature and culture(art). The view of the garden as part of a larger landscape is generally neglected. The concept of the three natures describes the history of human intervention with nature. The first being wilderness, unmediated nature; the second being the landscape consisting of infrastructure and agriculture, some human intervention; finally the third nature, the garden with total human intervention. The hierarchy of human intervention with the physical world physically shows how separated humans are from wilderness. Eighteenth century European architecture harshly depicts these three natures as seen below. The garden is very organized, structured, and enclosed even having bounding walls. The wilderness is far away in these images, almost non-existent within the distance. The controlled geometries of the garden diminish as one moves further out.

Three Natures 75


Watercolor painting of Onsukis Manor_ by Napoleon Orda_ Lithuania_ 1875_ Watercolor painting of Onsukis Manor_ Onuskis Manor used to by Napoleon Orda_ consist of allLithuania_ three naures: the Mansion and 1875_ its garden, the infratructure Manor and lake, and Onuskis used to the forest. Thethree separaconsist of all naon created by the help ures: the Mansion and of its human intervention. garden, the infrateraction of humans to tructure and lake, and create whatThe theyseparacall a the forest. livable habitat. on created by the help of human intervention. teraction of humans to create what they call a livable habitat.

ONUSKIS MANOR_PERSPECTIVE ONUSKIS MANOR

ONU

OBSERVING THE THREE NATURES

_Watercolor painting of Onuskis Manor 3 _Napoleon Orda _Rokisks, Lithuania _1875

1

23

1

2

1875

3.8

Onuskis Manor Ruins_ Photograph_ _Onuskis Manor Ruins Rokiskis, Lithuania_ _Photograph 2013_ _Rokisks, Lithuania Onuskis Manor Ruins_ _2013 After WWII Onuskis Photograph_ norRokiskis, was leftLithuania_ in ruins, culated to have been 2013_ down. The mansion in use from Afterwas WWII Onuskis 7-WWII, nowinleft unnor was left ruins, hed by humans. The culated to have been ature hasThe taken over, down. mansion rally was kicking humans in use from ray goats, cats, 7-WWII, now leftand unshed nowbyuse this siteThe as humans. ature has their takenhome. over, rally kicking humans ray goats, cats, and s now use this site as Analysis 76 Site their home.

1875 1875

1

LATVIA

1 LATVIA

1

1

LITH

LITH

PRESENT PRESENT


1847 Onuskis Manor used to consist of all three natures: the Mansion and its garden, the infrastructure and lake, and the forest. The separation created by the help of human intervention. Interaction of humans to create what they call a liveable habitat. PRESENT After WWII Onuskis Manor was left in ruins, speculated to have been burnt down. The mansion was in use from 1847 - WWII, now left abandoned by humans. The first nature has taken over, naturally kicking humans out. Stray goats, cats, and birds now use this site as their home.

Three Natures 77


ECTIVE

ONUSKIS MANOR_PLAN ONUSKIS MANOR 1 OBSERVING THE THREE NATURES

1

1

1

3

2 3 1875

IMPROVISED PAST

2 1875

PREDICTED PAST

LATVIA

IMPROVISED PAST

_ Aerial View of Onuskis Manor Ruins _ Lithuania _ 2015 _ Bing Maps

1 LATVIA

1

RUIN

LITHUANIA

RUIN

LITHUANIA PRESENT

78 Site Analysis

PRESENT PRESENT

_Aerial View of Onuskis M Ruins _Lithuania _2015 _Bing _AerialMaps View of Onuskis M Ruins These present views of the _Lithuania Onuskis _2015 Manor display how the firstMaps nature has forced it _Bing way into what used to dominantly be views third nature. These present of the trees have engulfed the how Onuskis Manor display mansion and the thait the first nature hasroads forced once led to the manor. The way into what used to was burnt off mansion, dominantly bethe third nature. the is exposed treesinterior have engulfed theto th third nature. used tha to mansion andWhat the roads heavily influenced by huma once led to the manor. The interaction, is the nowmansion, abando was burnt off and left to the first nature. the interior is exposed to thT forest stood inWhat the rear third nature. usedoftoth mansions, but nowby hashuma edg heavily influenced forward almost reaching th interaction, is now abando structure. and left to the first nature. T forest stood in the rear of th mansions, but now has edg forward almost reaching th structure.


These present views of the Onuskis Manor display how the first nature has forced its way into what used to dominantly be third nature. The trees have engulfed the mansion and the roads that once led to the manor. The roof was burnt off the mansion, thus the interior is exposed to the third nature. What used to be heavily influenced by human interaction, is now abandoned and left to the first nature. The forest stood south of the mansion, but now has edged forward almost reaching the structure.

Three Natures 79


3.6

3.6

80 Site Analysis


_Mater

Ruin

_Schem

TABLE OF CON Site

_Material Researc Des

Wood ( _Docum

Ruins (34 - 39) Bibl 3.6

_Schematic Design Pict

Site Research (40

Design Proposal _Documentation Bibliography

Picture Reference

3.6

3.6

3.8

Onuskis Manor 81


SCH

sche-

Sym purp inten thou actio obje

As an prese past unko

We s they

Rui the f 184 toda Lithu 100 struc durin spac the s The envir unin Th cons only is to and one a on reint noncurre that emb crea inha nonverti muse Onuskis Manor

82 Site Analysis DOCUMENTATION SITE

SCHEMATIC DESIGN SITE


ONUSKIS MANOR Rokiškis district, Lithuania

The exact history of the manor Onuškis and its land is unknown but the area is referenced as early as 1529. The land was owned by nobility since the 16th century, the families of known title to own the land include the last names of Rájeko, Mlekos, Kaminski and Komarai. The house ruins that are seen today were built sometime after 1847 in a Late Classicism architectural style. The manor grew to encompass a courtyard and other outbuildings that were designed in a Neo-Romantic brick style. The Onuskis Manor was an attractive structure that lived until World War II, at some time during the war the place was burned down. Today, lies a ruin without a roof and overgrown plant life. This specific ruin site was chosen because of its growing relationship with nature (1st nature). It also houses many acres of forest and what used to be a lake but has turned into a swamp, these two key features take part in human’s relationship with non-humans creating an ideal site for a folly that brings awareness to these connections.

Onuskis Manor 83


DOCUMENTATION SITE Understanding the site based on the three natures. 1st NATURE

ONUSKIS MANOR Located in the northern part of

2nd NATURE

3rd NATURE

SITE ANALYSIS_THREE NATURES Lithuania, 100 miles north of

Lithuania’s capital, Vilnius. The

N

1800s

N

present

Located in the northern part of estate consists of 32 acres. Lithuania, 100bymiles north of in the Bought Joseph Komar 18thcapital, century Vilnius. who owned until Lithuania’s The itestate his death in the mid 19th consists of 32 acres. Bought by Joseph his son Theophilos Komar century; in the 18th century who owned took over. Onuskis manor was it until his death in the mid 19th built by a famous architect of century; sonCaesar Theophilos tookAllover. thehis time, Anikino. Onuskis manor was built by the estate buildings are a famous architect of the time, arranged in the Caesar shape ofAnikino. a All the horseshoe estate buildings arestreet. arranged facing the The mansion sadly burntfacing down in the shape ofwas a horseshoe during it’s skeleton the street. TheWWII, mansion was sadly stands today. The estate burnt down during WWII, it’shas skeleton two ponds with an English stands today. The estate has two garden layout. The estate grew ponds an with an English garden impressive twenty rare layout. The estate grew an impressive twenty species and plants, including rare species andcedar plants, including enormous trees. Today the ponds into enormous cedar have trees.turned Today the the site been leftthe ponds swamps; have turned intohas swamps; run wild. site hastobeen left to run wild. This diagram documents the

N

future

84 Site Analysis

This diagram documents the site from site from creation to future. creation to future. Initiallyofit the consisted Initially it consisted three of the three natures; wilderness, natures; wilderness, infrastructure, and gardens. Post WWII infrastructure, and gardens. was burnt down it was Post burntWWII downit and abandoned, and abandoned, this let first this let first nature engulf the property. nature engulf the property. The future of the site is left to theThe first nature.future of the site is left to the first nature.


The future of the site based on the ambiguity of natures, thus creating no natures. Introduction of no natures, ONUSKIS MANOR similar to Darwin’s theory of no NO NATURES

THESIS DESIGN_THREE NATURES

N

structure enclosure

general concept

N

future growth

N

human vs. non-human habitats

trail (both)

species, where the world is seen as of ambiguous andsimilar one to Introduction no natures, cannot subject living and Darwin’s theory of no species, where non-living things to different the world is seen as ambiguous and categories. The differentiation one cannot living and nonliving among subject species appears thingsdefinite, to different categories. The but is it really? Can differentiation among species humans with mutations andappears defects still beCan humans definite, but really is it really? categorized as human? really Just as still with mutations and defects seen on this site, the third be categorized as human? Just as seen (wilderness) nature appears to on this site, the third (wilderness) nature be taking over the man- made seemsestate; to bewhat taking the mancanover be done to made site; what can be done to reincorporate reincorporate humans in the humans in the future? Once future? Once humans arehumans are reintroduced can can we really divide the reintroduced we really the land into three land divide into three natures? Timothy Morton natures? Morton uses the idea Timothy of a ‘mesh’ to uses describe the the idea of a ‘mesh’ to describe interconnectedness of all things on Earth, the interconnectedness of all and this is what I propose with this site. things on Earth, and this is Therewhat are no boundaries; one I propose with this site;entity. there shall be no boundaries.

The design starts with introduction of The into design with the columns thestarts ruin and nature. The introduction of a structure columns grow with the growthinofa the ruin among formon their site. Columns are‘nature.’ refinedThe based is gestural of a tree trunk native distance to the site; closer to site is smaller to Lithuania. It’s exposed scale,central and further from site is larger scale. atrium encourages a Also with distanceoncomes merging of new ecology what should columns, merged columns are more likely be the inside of the structure to bebut inhabited. is technically outisde. This

structure creates new boundaries among humans Onuskis Manor 85 and non-humans.


DOCUMENTATION STRUCTURE ORIGINAL ONUSKIS MANOR Recreating original OnusksisSTRUCTURE_ORIGINAL mansion to udnerstand it’s effects and qualities.

xx 86 Site Analysis

Onuskis Manor

D

Rem der sio


DOCUMENTATION STRUCTUREMANOR RUIN ONUSKIS Removing detail from original structure to unSTRUCTURE_RUIN derstand the revealed structures of the mansion ruins.

Schematic Design

xx Manor 87 Onuskis


LITHUANIAN FOREST

BLACK ALDER

BLACK ALDER

BLACK ALDER

SILVER BIRCH

SILVER BIRCH

NORWAY SPRUCE

scaly bark, scaly reddish bark, gray scaly reddish bark, gray reddish gray trunk trunk trunk

SILVER BIRCH

tall, slim trunk tall,with slim trunk tall,with slim trunk with brown, fissured brown, barkfissured brown, bark fissured bark

NORWAY SPRUCE

NORWAY SPRUCE

SCOTS PINE

SCOTS PINE

SCOTS PINE

CATALOG CATALOG CATALOG TREE SPECIES TREE SPECIES TREE LITHUANIAN SPECIES LITHUANIAN FORESTS LITHUANIAN FORESTSFORESTS

often multi-stemmed often multi-stem and ofte with gray fungus with gray fung with

100’

100’

100’

shiny white,shiny smooth white, trunk shiny smooth white, trunk smooth trunk often with aoften cracking with a often cracking with a cracking bark bark bark

SCOTS PINE SCOTS SCOTS PINE PINE NORWAY NORWAY SPRUCE NORWAY SPRUCESPRUCE SILVER BIRCH SILVER SILVER BIRCH BIRCH BLACK ALDER BLACK BLAC ALDE LithuanianLithuanian Forests_38% Lithuanian Forests_38% Forests_38% LithuanianLithuanian Forests_22% Lithuanian Forests_22% Forests_22% LithuanianLithuanian Forests_19% Lithuanian Forests_19% Forests_19% LithuanianLithuanian Forests_13% Lithua For Coniferous ConiferousConiferous EvergreenEvergreen Coniferous Evergreen Coniferous Coniferous DeciduousDeciduous Deciduous DeciduousDeciduous Decid Age: over 300 Age:yrs. over Age: 300 yrs. over 300 yrs. Age: over 100 Age:yrs. over Age: 100 yrs. over 100 yrs. Age: over 100 Age:yrs. over Age: 100 yrs. over 100 yrs. Growth: upGrowth: to 120’ upGrowth: to 120’up to 120’ Growth: over Growth: 100’ over Growth: 100’ over 100’ Growth: 49’-82’ Growth: 49’-82’ Growth: 49’-82’ Annual Rainfall: Annual 8”-70” Rainfall: Annual8”-70” Rainfall: 8”-70” Annual Rainfall: Annual 35”Rainfall: Annual35” Rainfall: 35” Annual Rainfall: Annual 12”Rainfall: Annual12” Rainfall: 12” Adapative Plant Adapative Adapative Plant Plant Adaptive Plant Adaptive Plant Adaptive Plant Invasive Species Invasive Species Invasive Species

88 Site Analysis

Age: up to 160 Age: yrs. up toAge: 160 uy Growth: 66’Growth: - 98’ 66’ Growth - 98 Annual Rainfall: Annual 12”Rainfall: Annual1


often multi-stemmed and with gray fungus

100 yrs. 9’-82’ nfall: 12” ecies

slender trunk with gray, fissured bark smooth, gray-green bark which forms thick, cracked bark

smooth trunk cracking

BIRCH n Forests_19% s

ASPEN

ASH

BLACK ALDER

CATALOG_TREE SPECIES

BLACK ALDER Lithuanian Forests_13% Deciduous Age: up to 160 yrs. Growth: 66’ - 98’ Annual Rainfall: 12”

ASPEN Lithuanian Forests_6% Deciduous Age: up to 150 yrs. Growth: 20’ - 80’ Annual Rainfall: 7”- 40”

ASH Lithuanian Forests_2% Large Deciduous Age: up to 250 yrs. Growth: 66’ - 110’ Annual Rainfall: 30 - 60”

Lithuanian Catalogs 89


CATALOG RARE BIRDS LITHUANIAN FORESTS LITHUANIAN CATALOG RARE BIRDS LITHUANIAN FORESTSFOREST

LESSER SPOTTED EAGLE LESSER SPOTTED Nests in Lithuanian EAGLE forests: 26% Nests in Lithuanian forests: 26%

BLACK STORK Nests in STORK BLACK Lithuanian Nests in forests: 23% Lithuanian forests: 23%

COMMON CRANE COMMON Nests in CRANE Lithuanian Nests in forests: 20% Lithuanian

forests: 20%

NORTHERN GOSHAWK NORTHERN Nests in Lithuanian GOSHAWK forests: 14% Nests in Lithuanian forests: 14%

WHITE TA EAGLE WHITE T Nests in Lit EAGLE forests: 8% Nests in L

forests: 8

ABUNDANT CATALOG

10’10’

GAME ANIMALS LITHUANIAN FORESTS CATALOG GAME ANIMALS LITHUANIAN FORESTS

ROE DEER Lithuanian Forests_56% ROE DEER

Eurasian Lithuanian Forests_56% Age: max 10 yrs. Eurasian Mass: 48 lbs. Age: max 10 yrs. Mass: 48 lbs.

90 Site Analysis

WILD BOAR Lithuanian Forests_26% WILD BOAR

Omnivorous Lithuanian Forests_26% Age: max 10 yrs. Omnivorous Mass: 110 - 200 lbs. Age: max 10 yrs. Mass: 110 - 200 lbs.

RED DEER Lithuanian Forests_10% RED DEER

Herbivorous Lithuanian Forests_10% Age: max 18 yrs. Herbivorous Mass: 140 - 265 lbs. Age: max 18 yrs. Mass: 140 - 265 lbs.

ELK Lithuania ELK

Mammal Lithuan Age: 10 Mammal Mass: 500 Age: 10 Mass: 50


THERN HAWK THERN in Lithuanian HAWK s:in14% Lithuanian s: 14%

EER an Forests_10% EER ous an Forests_10%

x 18 yrs. ous 40 - 265 lbs. x 18 yrs. 40 - 265 lbs.

CATALOGS_RARE BIRDS & GAME ANIMALS

WHITE TAILED EAGLE WHITE TAILED Nests in Lithuanian EAGLE forests: Nests in8% Lithuanian forests: 8%

EURASIAN HOBBY EURASIAN Nests in Lithuanian HOBBY forests: Nests in4% Lithuanian forests: 4%

HONEY BUZZARD HONEY Nests in Lithuanian BUZZARD forests: Nests in3% Lithuanian forests: 3%

BLACK KITE Nests in KITE BLACK Lithuanian Nests in forests: 2% Lithuanian forests: 2%

SCARCE

ELK Lithuanian Forests_4% ELK Mammal - Grazers Lithuanian Forests_4% Age: 10 - 13 yrs. Mammal - Grazers Mass: 500 - 700 lbs. Age: 10 - 13 yrs. Mass: 500 - 700 lbs.

BADGER Lithuanian Forests_3% BADGER Mammal - Omnivores Lithuanian Forests_3% Age: max 10 yrs. Mammal - Omnivores Mass: 9 - 39 lbs. Age: max 10 yrs. Mass: 9 - 39 lbs.

WOLF Lithuanian Forests_1% WOLF Carnivorous Lithuanian Forests_1% Age: 6 - 8 yrs. Carnivorous Mass: 80 - 100 lbs. Age: 6 - 8 yrs. Mass: 80 - 100 lbs.

Lithuanian Catalogs 91


1

UNSETTLED GROUND

92 Unsettled Ground


DESIGN de-sign

(noun)

A plan or drawing produced to show the look and function or workings of a building, garment, or other object before it is built or made: - Oxford Dictionary

As an architect you design for the present with an awareness of the past for a future which is essentially unkown. - Normal Foster

We shape our buildings; thereafter they shape us. - Winston Churchill

DESIGN

The Anthropocene Era is defined by drastic shifts in planetary landscape morphologies and ecosystems triggered by the rapid expansion of human existence and dominance on Earth. Before the advent of modern civilization, humans existed in societies that would otherwise seem primitive and strange in today's perspective. We are As an increasingly architectaware youthat design the present with an awareness becoming this shift for is associated with many effects,is of essentially unkown. of the past forunsustainable a futureside which which the most stark is global warming. Unsettled Ground fosters a consciousness of the- Norman Foster ever-changing relationship between humans and their by intentionally blurring the Weenvironment shape our buildings; thereafter they shape us. boundary between the strange and the familiar. Winston Churchill

(noun)

Unsettled Ground consists of a large tree-like structure situated within an overgrown forest at an uninhabited ruin site in Lithuania. Visitors experience the "tree" by ascending and descending a helical ramp, from which they can look inwards towards an exposed central atrium, and outwards towards the surrounding wilderness. The exposed atrium tapers in at the tree's base, creating a forced ecosystem that features diurnal species at the top and nocturnal species at the darker bottom. All species - humans included - are obligated to interact at an artificial pond that sits at the floor of the atrium and serves as the ecosystem's primary source of water. Beginning with the initial walk through the forest to reach the exhibit, visitors are challenged to evaluate the complex and dynamic relationship between humanity and the remainder of the natural world. The construction of the tree itself evokes the uncanny - symbolized by the clash between the structure's artificial qualities and it's

Design Proposal 93


94 Unsettled Ground

Scale: N.T.S. N

UNSETTLED GROUND SITE PLAN


30’

40’

50’

60’

70’

NON-HUMAN HABITAT DIAGRAM

The Anthropocene Era is defined by drastic shifts in planetary landscape morphologies and ecosystems triggered by the rapid expansion of human existence and dominance on Earth. Before the advent of modern civilization, humans existed in societies that would otherwise seem primitive and strange in today’s perspective. We are becoming increasingly aware that this shift is associated with many unsustainable side effects, of which the most stark is global warming. Unsettled Ground fosters a consciousness of the everchanging relationship between humans and their environment by intentionally blurring the boundary between the strange and the familiar.

EXTERIOR

B

BUILDING ENCLOSURE: INTERIOR/EXTERIOR CONDITION Interior human space among varying degrees of visual porosity with exterior nonhuman space

INTERIOR/EXTERIOR GRADIENT

Beginning with the initial walk through the forest to reach the exhibit, visitors are challenged to evaluate the complex and dynamic relationship between humanity and the remainder of the natural world. The construction of the tree itself evokes the uncanny - symbolized by the clash between the structure’s artificial qualities and it’s striking resemblance to its wilder surroundings. The geometry of the structure further enhances this confusion by compelling visitors to reconsider their own personal notions of inside versus outside. The design evokes an awareness of the unknown, providing visitors with a glimpse of the forgotten relationships among humans and nonhumans that are necessary for our planet’s preservation.

Design Proposal 95

EXTERIOR

BOUNDING ENCLOSURE

BUILDING COURTYARD: EXTERIOR/INTERIOR CONDITION Exterior nonhuman space among varying degrees of visual porosity with interior human space

TTLED GROUND CONCEPT DIAGRAMS

Unsettled Ground consists of a large tree-like structure situated within an overgrown forest at an uninhabited ruin site in Lithuania. Visitors experience the “tree” by ascending and descending a helical ramp, from which they can look inwards towards an exposed central atrium, and outwards towards the surrounding wilderness. The exposed atrium tapers in at the tree’s base, creating a forced ecosystem that features diurnal species at the top and nocturnal species at the darker bottom. All species humans included - are obligated to interact at an artificial pond that sits at the floor of the atrium and serves as the ecosystem’s primary source of water.


INTERIOR / EXTERIOR UNSETTLED ATRIUM GROUND VS. RAMPCONCEPT DIAGRAM DIAGRAMS INTERIOR/EXTERIOR GRADIENT

A

BUILDING ENCLOSURE: INTERIOR/EXTERIOR CONDITION Interior human space among varying degrees of visual porosity with exterior nonhuman space

B

EXTERIOR BUILDING COURTYARD: EXTERIOR/INTERIOR CONDITION Exterior nonhuman space among varying degrees of visual porosity with interior human space

BOUNDING ENCLOSURE

EXTERIOR EXTERIOR

INTERIOR

INTERIOR EXTERIOR

INTERIOR

EXTERIOR

Exploring the ambiguity of the interior/exterior boundaries within the enclosure. Where does the interior end and the exterior begin? The atrium is enclosde by two interor walls, but still exposed to nature. So is it really exterior or interor or both?

96 Unsettled Ground


ENCLO

INTERIOR / EXTERIOR ATRIUM VS. RAMP SECTION

EXTERIOR EXTERIOR

INTERIOR

INTERIOR EXTERIOR

INTERIOR

EXTERIOR

The forest faces one exteror side of each of the interor spaces, and the interior/exterior atrium is on the other. This allows us to question the creation of enclosures as we know them, thus playing with the uncertainty of this design.

Concept Diagrams 97


S

NONHUMAN HABITATS NON-HUMAN HABITAT DIAGRAM LIGHT GRADIENT DIAGRAM 70’

RTYARD: RIOR

n space egrees of th interior

60’

50’

40’

30’

20’

10’

0’ -4’

98 Unsettled Ground


CONCEPT DIAGRAM Exploring the species that will inhabit the central atrium. Illustrates how the structure expands up top , contracts in the middle and creates openings at the base to allow light to the ground habitats. Diurnal animals are expected to live up top, nocturnal in the middle, and both at the base. The light gradient is somewhat ambiguous and because of the slits at the base. This design welcomes a wide variety of species to its space.

Concept Diagrams 99


BARK FACADE PANEL EXPLODED AXONOMETRIC DIAGRAM

A

metal framing

B

glazing

C

concrete bark extrusion

A B C DETAIL SECTION FACADE + RAMP SYSTEM

100 Unsettled Ground CATALOG TREE SPECIES

LITHUANIAN FORESTS


BARK FACADE PANEL

EXPLODED AXONOMETRIC DIAGRAM

DETAIL SECTION

FACADE & RAMP SYSTEM

Concept Diagrams 101


DETAIL MODEL FACADE

Creating the bark appearance with the facade pieces interlocking among the glass. The grey layers exaggerate the depth of each bark piece. 3D printed/ plexi glass/ metal rods 102 Unsettled Ground


The interior and the exterior of the facade are different depths creating a unique appearance on either side. 103


104 104 Unsettled Ground


SECTION Rendered section through enclosure shows the forced and recreated relationship humans can and used to have with nonhumans. There are animals in the atrium, forest, roof, pond, gills and ground, surrounding humans from all angles. One can really experience the true scale of Unsettled Ground in comparison to the surrounding trees among the forest. Humans are experiencing the forest from a totally different perspective, like an animal crawling through the bark of an active tree; experiencing the forest as they ascend upwards.

Renders 105


2

INTERIOR HUMAN ENTRANCE

106 106 Unsettled Ground


As humans enter the enclosure they immediately experience this forced relationship among humans and nonhumans, they are expected to feel extreme discomfort. The stairs are located in a dark enclosure with no lighting, and the stairs are exposed to the exterior space with the opening of the structure below allowing nocturnal animals such as bats to fly below while the humans walk up. The stairs have gaps in them allowing humans and non-humans to inhabit the same space.

Renders 107


3

RAMP SYSTEM

108 108 Unsettled Ground


Humans experience many things as they ascend through this structure. Seen here, they can look both into the atrium and out to the forest just by walking across the ramp. The enclosure appears to be almost transparent with the use of the glass cracks in the facade. As one moves up, they experience the forest in a way they have never seen before, almost as if they are one with the surrounding birds. The ramp system allows humans to stop at any moment to view their surroundings.

Renders 109


4

ATRIUM

110 110 Unsettled Ground


The top ramp layer becomes exposed to the exterior allowing for the facade to become a railing system and for humans to really become exposed to non-humans. This allows for humans to look down into the forest from a ‘birdseye view.’ The atrium is exposed to the exterior also allowing birds and other animals to fly within it and crawl up it.

Renders 111


112 Unsettled Ground


113


2.7

DOCUMENTATION 2.8

114 Documentation


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IMAGE CITATIONS 1.1 Blade Runner 30th Anniversary Disck Cover. Digital Image. Accessed October 24th, 2015. 1.2 Scott, Ridley. Blade Runner. 1982. Screenshots from Film. 1.3 Ito, Naoko. Trapped Nature. Created 2009. Contemporary Art Museum, Raleigh, NC. Urban Nature. accessed October 7th, 2015. http://camraleigh.org/exhibitions/2011ito/ 1.4 Kudo, Tetsumi. Pollution Cultivation New Ecology. Created 1971-72. Garden Of Metamorphosis, Galleries 4,5,6, Minneapolis, Minnesota. accessed October 25th, 2015. 1.5 Kudo, Tetsumi. Cultivation by Radioactivity in the Electronic Circuit. Created 1970. Garden Of Metamorphosis, Galleries 4,5,6, Minneapolis, Minnesota. accessed October 25th, 2015. 1.6 Kudo, Tetsumi. Pollution Cultivation New Ecology. Created 1971-73. Garden Of Metamorphosis, Galleries 4,5,6, Minneapolis, Minnesota. accessed October 25th, 2015. 1.7 Parker, Alan. Angel Heart. 1987. Screenshots from Film. 1.8 Smilde, Berndnaut. Nimbus D’Aspremont. Created 2012. Ronchini Gallery, London. accessed October 19th, 2015. 1.9 Ingberg, Tommy. Balance. Created 2010-2013. Reality Rearranged, Saatchi Gallery, London. accessed October 6th, 2015. 1.10 “Borth Forest.” Digital Image. Diaforetiko. Coast of Britain. NRG Media Group. Accessed October 15th, 2015. www.diaforetiko.gr 2.0 Kers, Pieter. “The Fast Track to Ecological Sadness.” Digital Image. DarkEcology. Book Launch: The Geologic Imagination, De Balie Salon. Accessed October 28th, 2015. www.darkecology.net 2.1 Ingberg, Tommy. Forever. Created 2010-2013. Reality Rearranged, Saatchi Gallery, London. accessed October 6th, 2015. 2.2 Ingberg, Tommy. Army. Created 2010-2013. Reality Rearranged, Saatchi Gallery, London. accessed October 6th, 2015. 2.3 Kudo, Tetsumi. East and West Axes. Created 1970. Garden Of Metamorphosis, Galleries 4,5,6,

116 Documentation


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