Issuu on Google+

an urban healthcare  model for outpatient care  and wellness and wellness  amy d. kircher 2012 AIA Arthur N. Tuttle Fellowship


Background Best Practices A li ti Application table of contents


Study Concept and Background

PART ONE


WELLNESS • • • • • • •

OUTPATIENT

?

Location/Access to care Program components Functional adjacencies Functional adjacencies Create link wellness to outpatient care architecturally   Urban context L d Landscape design & elements d i & l t Welcoming and interactive environment

project goals

defining typology


Impacts of  Healthcare Reform  Shift Towards  Outpatient Care Outpatient Care Need for a New  Healthcare Typology Challenges to  Ch ll t Address

the concept 

• Policy changes. Accountable Care Act • Reimbursement models and soft costs (ACO, PCMH) • Health management Health management • Increase in % of population with chronic diseases • Patient‐centric era  • Changes in medical procedures and technology • Need for preventive care and wellness • Education about health d b h lh • Changing image of primary care • Organizational changes Organizational changes • New architectural spaces • Aesthetics

major issues 


Wellness

Health Ed ti Education

Chronic  Disease

Health  Literacy

Demographics

Types of  Programs

Outpatient U.S  Healthcare  System Policy  Changes

Diagnosis ACO, PCMH Management

Community  Involvement

literature review

Types of  Facilities

Urban  Models

Location

Day Surgery

Location

Insurance

Diagnostics

Access

Primary Care

Active Living &  Built Environment major topics explored

D Decentralized t li d Part of  Campus


Incorporate initiatives and published  guidelines as a foundation for ideas,  information, resources, and project goals

project goals

recent guidelines


Case Studies and Best Practices Best Practices

PART TWO


Urban    Context

Physical Context

Services Outpatient Services Offered P Preventive Care i C Wellness

Arch. Design Site Cli i D i Clinic Design Branding Facility Planning/Approach

Message to the  Community

Functional  Context Program Components Operations Functional Organization

Best practices

Connection to City Urban P bli S Public Spaces Location

Community Outreach/Programs Healthy Communities Education

case study selection


Best practices

cities visited


Message to  Community

Urban Context

Case Study

Connection   to City Urban

Bellevue Children's  Rehab

CAMH

Kasier Center for Total  Health & Capitol Hill  Medical Center Mayo Dan Abraham  Center for Healthy  Living Methodist Outpatient  Center Wellness  Facility MGH Ambulatory  Practice of the Future Mills City Clinic Polyclinic Randall Children's  Hospital UMCG Outpatient  Clinic Wellspring Medical  Center Woodburn Whittier Clinic YMCA Houston

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

  

Physical Context

 

Functional Context

Preventive    Functional  Arch  Site  Clinic  Facility  Public  Community  Healthy  Outpatient  Services  & Wellness  Programatic  Services Components Operations Organization Design Design Design Branding Planning Spaces Location Outreach Communities Education Care Offered

Services

  

 

 

 

 

Best practices

   

   

 

case study analysis

 

   

  

 

 

 


Whittier Clinic  Minnesota

HGA Architects, 2010

Mayo’s Healthy  Living Center

Amy Kircher, 2011

• Design process  • Atmosphere different  involved community  than other Mayo  • Features design for dual  facilities use by facility and for  • Abundance of natural  community after hours light and courtyard  • Concept of pocket  spaces gardens • Strategic use of high  quality materials

case studies

Mill City Clinic Minnesota

Woodburn Health  Center, Oregon

Perkins & Will, 2008

Clark/Kjos Architects

• Lobby open for  community use • Shell space used for  clinic events about  health • Natural light in a  retrofitted space

• Community wellness  center with multiple  program components • Adaptive re‐use of old  box store • Integration of daylight and courtyards

lessons learned


Message to  Community

Urban Context Connection   to City Urban

Definition

Goals

Services

Functional Context

Physical Context

Preventive    Public  Community  y Healthy  y Outpatient  p Services  & Wellness  Programmatic  g Functional  Arch  Site  Clinic  Spaces Location Outreach Communities Education Care Offered Services Components Operations Organization Design Design Design Branding

Location of facility in city and  Programs, services, and  the relation to adjacent  approach to involving  buildings.  community in facility. 

Position the facility as a  destination point within the  context of the city

• Allocate portion of site to  public usage • Locate the facility to provide  y p access from public  transportation, pedestrians,  Applications bicycles, and vehicular traffic • Relate facility to nearby  facilities architectural and site  design 

Types of services in the  Adjacencies and locations of  facility offered to patients,  different functions and  the public, and staff.  departments. 

Connect to the community to Provide a range of services  Connect to the community to  Provide a range of services Design the facility to optimize  increase health awareness of  for a variety of users, while  the functional and operational  the public and users of the  balancing soft and hard  aspects.  facility.  costs.  • Relate facility to nearby  buildings through programs  offered offered  • Include nearby businesses  and community in the design  process.  • Provide areas of the  building that can be used  “after hours” by the public

• YMCA Houston                            • CAMH  • Whittier Clinic  Case Study  • Whittier Clinic  • City Mills Clinic  • Kaiser Center for Total  Exemplars • UMCG  • City Mills Clinic • Polyclinic ‐ Seattle  • Philips Powderhorn

Best practices

• Include diagnostic and  treatment services that  keep some patient groups  out of the main hospital • Provide wellness services  that add value to the  building and attract a  range of demographics. 

Facility  y Planning

Architectural design and aesthetics  of the facility. How the clinics were  design and planned.  Create a facility that speaks of Create a facility that speaks of  health rather than illness. Change  the face of what a healthcare  providing facility can be. 

• Create adjacencies between  • Create an open and welcoming  treatment and wellness services  environment at the public level and  p where spaces and services can  spaces be shared • Design the site to allow wellness  • Evaluate the operations of the  programs to utilize the space facility in terms of hours open vs  • Give the facility a brand that  services provided represents the values of the facility  • Design the soft costs spaces to  in regards to community health  be flexible for future changes in  and wellness.  services offered services offered

• Wellspring Medical  • Mayo DACHL • Methodist Wellness  • City Mills Clinic • Bellvue Children's Rehab    • Whittier Clinic  • Wellspring Medical Center  • City Mills Clinic

case study analysis

• YMCA Houston   • Whittier Clinic • City Mills Clinic   • UMCG  • Polyclinic ‐ Seattle


Sick Patient

Traditional patient description – suffering from  a health problem and in need of diagnosis and a health problem and in need of diagnosis and  treatment. 

Well  Patient

Patient seeking preventive or routine care.  Long term follow up for chronic patients. Also includes health education and counseling.  

Non  Non Patient

All other visitors and users of the facility.  Wide range includes healthy visitors staff Wide range, includes healthy visitors, staff  and service providers, and even pedestrians  on the street.

user groups

definitions

Staff


The overlaps  between two or  more groups  represent the  interactions.

Sick Patient Well  Well Patient

user groups

Non  N Patient

interactions

The interactions  can be translated  to architectural  spaces. 


Non  Patient Sick Patient

user groups

Well  Patient

variations


Sick Patient Well  Patient

Non  Patient

user groups

Sick Patient Well  Patient

Non  Patient

variations

Sick Patient Well  Patient

Non  Patient


Application: City Master Plan and  “Flagship” Flagship  Facility  Facility

PART THREE


Generate a master plan for the city of Portland showing variations of  this facility, and demonstrate the concept of a network of urban,  decentralized, outpatient facilities. 

This project is 40,000 square foot prototype facility located in  downtown Portland, Oregon that will incorporate primary care,  diagnostic, and wellness services.  These facilities will provide outpatient and primary care services, wellness  services recreational opportunities education on a variety of healthcare topics,  services, recreational opportunities, education on a variety of healthcare topics and create a community identity related to health rather than treatment.

concept

about this project


1 2 3 4

Encourage an active lifestyle and wellness through architectural  design and space planning. (Brownson, Baker, et. al., 2001; City of New York, 2010, Frank,  Engelke & Schmid, 2003; Lee & Moudon, 2008; Nicoll & Schmid 2003; Lee & Moudon 2008; Nicoll & Zimring, 2009; Zimring, et. al., 2005) & Zimring 2009; Zimring et al 2005)

Incorporate learning environments throughout the building and site  d i . (Downey & Zun, 2008; Hoving, et. al., 2009; Kaiser Permanente, 2011; McCusky, 2008;  design Nahrsted, 2004; New York City Commission, 2006)

Provide access and views to nature for all user groups. (Cooper Marcus &  Barnes, 1999; Gerlach‐Spriggs, et. al., 1998; Ulrich, 1999; Rodiek, 2009)

Design building to incorporate daylighting to all major user groups.  (Joseph, 2003; Figueiro, et. al., 2002; Leather, et. al., 1998; Millard, 2011; Ulrich, 1991; Alimoglu &  Donmez, 2005)

ebd concepts

key issues


Specialty  Services PCP Clinic

Education

Ambulatoryy Services 

Treatment

Connection

Wellness Services

Recreation

Diagnostics

Retail

Community 

program concept

Nutrition

defining components


The city of Portland developed the Portland Plan  in response to the growing challenges p g g g for the city  y including growth, education, income, and  environmental concerns.   The Portland Plan was created through the  collaboration of the city and the public.  Comments and involvement from the residents of  Portland was welcome.  (Over 20,000 comments  from residents to date.) Advancing equity is the  foundation of the Portland Plan. 

master plan

based on portland plan


20 Minute  Neighborhood Analysis  based on an  individual’s needs Developed to track where  amenities are concentrated Describes in detail the  services and amenities  available Can be used to determine the  missing or lacking amenities in  a community

city master plan

portland plan


Healthy Connected  Neighborhoods Based on the 20 Minute  Neighborhood analysis.  Hubs are anchors for the 20  Minute Neighborhood. Hub could be a community  center, park, school, housing,  or any public gather place. 

city master plan

portland plan


Healthy Connected  Neighborhoods Priority to create a network of  city greenways. Greenways at different  scales:  • preservation of forests • development of parks • tree canopy growth • neighborhood sidewalks • pedestrian boulevards pedestrian boulevards

city master plan

portland plan


Neighborhood Demographics Can be used to see the  missing pieces in each specific  area.  area There are no community  centers in the city center and  healthcare services are  scarce. Diverse part of the city  Diverse part of the city ranging from  high rise  commercial to high density  residential.

city master plan

portland plan


the city 

portland, oregon


city master plan

network of facilities


Neighborhood  Strip Mall

Neighborhood  Freestanding 

• Family Practice  • Family Practice and and/or d/ Pediatric  P di t i Pediatric focused P di t i f d focused • Robust recreational  • Family oriented  and wellness  education programs p g program p g • Smaller facility in size • Medium  to large  sized facility

example of types

Downtown Leased Floors 

• Family Practice and I t Internal Medicine  l M di i focused • Wellness, nutrition, &  stress management  g focused • Smaller to medium  sized facility

Downtown Freestanding 

• Family Practice and I t Internal Medicine  l M di i focused • Recreation and  wellness focused  • Medium  to large  sized facility

facilities within network


Neighborhood  Strip Mall

Neighborhood  Freestanding 

• Family Practice  • Family Practice and and/or d/ Pediatric  P di t i P di t i f d Pediatric focused focused • Robust recreational  • Family oriented  and wellness  p g education programs program p g • Smaller facility in size • Medium  to large  sized facility

example of types

Downtown Leased Floors 

• Family Practice and I t Internal Medicine  l M di i focused • Wellness, nutrition, &  stress management  g focused • Smaller to medium  sized facility

Downtown Freestanding 

• Family Practice and I t l M di i Internal Medicine  focused • Recreation and  wellness focused  • Medium  to large  sized facility

facilities within network


city master plan

downtown freestanding


Site Selection • Locate Locate building near park  building near park to encourage outdoor  activity (Zimring, et. al.  2005; Nicole & Zimring,  2009) • Add to the neighborhood  to encourage physical  activity (Lee & Moudon activity. (Lee & Moudon,  2008)  • Impact of the built  environment on physical environment on physical  activity in the community.  (Frank, Engelke, & Schmid,  2003). 

central city 

portland, oregon


the city

urban context 


HIGH RISE &  COMMERCIAL

MID RISE &  MIXED USE /  RESIDENTIAL LOW RISE &  THEATER &  MIXED USE /  ART DISTRICT RESIDENTIAL

the city

urban context 


Challenges •Small Small Site (200 Site (200’ by 200 by 200’)) •Sloped (19’ across diagonal) •Connection Connection to existing  to existing building •Limited options for service  entries •Multiple approaches to site  from public and private  transportation

the site

existing conditions


Concepts • Ability to cross site Ability to cross site • Create new public spaces • Limit size of building  Limit size of building footprint • 5 Design Variables: Image,  Enclos re H man Scale Enclosure, Human Scale,  Transparency, Complexity  (City of New York, 2010)

the site

existing conditions


Clinics Diagnostics Support/Admin Wellness Public/Retail / Support/Parking k Parking

program

preliminary stacking


Clinics Diagnostics

Entry Gardens Main Lobby Café Education Pharmacy

user groups

Entry Gardens

Sick Patient Well  Well Patient

Non  Non Patient

interactions

Massage Counseling Fit Fitness Wellness Admin Pharmacyy


Landscape Program • Limit size of building footprint • User exclusive gardens User exclusive gardens • Dense and open gardens • Public plaza Community Spaces • Gardens • Plaza • Active store front on first level Active store front on first level Locate building near park to encourage  outdoor activity (Zimring, et. al. 2005;  Nicole & Zimring, 2009) Nicole & Zimring, 2009) 5 Design Variables: Image, Enclosure,  Human Scale, Transparency, Complexity  (City of New York, 2010)

site design

concepts & parti


main entry


SITTING AREA

STAFF  TERRACE

• Skylights in staff working  area of the Diagnostics  Dept and Clinic. (Joseph,  2003; Figueiro, et. al.,  2002; Leather, et. al., 1998)

EXISTING  BUILDING

• Provide views and access  to nature (Ulrich, 2009)

PLAZA

• Create views from clinic  interior to roof top garden interior to roof top garden

ROOFTOP  TERRACE

CONTROLLED  ACCESS  GARDEN

PUBLIC  ACCESS  GARDENS

• Roof top garden access for  multiple building users  while maintaining clinic while maintaining clinic  privacy  Sick Patient

site plan

building footprint

Well  Patient

Non  Patient


SITTING AREA

• Design stairs for everyday  use. (City of New York,  2010; Nicole & Zimring,  2009)

EXISTING  BUILDING

DOCK CAR RAMP

• Integrate learning zones in  lobby and waiting areas.  y g (Downey, 2008; Nahrsted,  2004; Kaiser Permanente,  2011)

PLAZA

CONTROLLED  ACCESS  GARDENS

PUBLIC  ACCESS  GARDENS

• Add education areas that  are open and accessible to  all users and the public.  (Hoving et al 2010) (Hoving, et. al., 2010) Sick Patient

“POCKET GARDENS”

site plan

site & garden design 

Well  Patient

Non  Patient


• Design stairs for everyday  use. (City of New York,  2010; Nicole & Zimring,  2009)

SITTING AREA CAR RAMP

• Integrate learning zones in  lobby and waiting areas.  y g (Downey, 2008; Nahrsted,  2004; Kaiser Permanente,  2011)

PLAZA

PUBLIC

EDUC.

CAFÉ

CONTROLLED  ACCESS  GARDEN

PUBLIC  ACCESS  GARDENS

Sick Patient

“POCKET GARDENS”

level 1

• Add education areas that  are open and accessible to  all users and the public.  (Hoving et al 2010) (Hoving, et. al., 2010)

public & services

Well  Patient

Non  Patient


interiors

public spaces


LOCKERS

AEROBICS

YOGA

• Design stairs for everyday use. (City of  New York, 2010; Nicole & Zimring, 2009) • Overlap departments with similar  functions to create interactions  (McCusky, 2008) • Provide views to nature (Ulrich, 2009)

LOBBY

PHYS. THERAPY

• Incorporate daylighting for all users  ((Joseph, 2003; Figueiro, et. al., 2002;  p g Leather, et. al., 1998)

FITNESS Sick Patient

level 2

physical therapy & fitness

Well  Patient

Non  Patient


interiors

wellness spaces


MASSAGE

• Design stairs for everyday use. (City of  New York, 2010; Nicole & Zimring, 2009) • Provide views to nature (Ulrich, 2009)

CONSELING

• Incorporate daylighting for all users  (Joseph, 2003; Figueiro, et. al., 2002;  Leather, et. al., 1998) STAFF PHARM.

ADMIN & CONF ADMIN & CONF.

Sick Patient

Well  Patient

level 3

admin, staff, massage, counseling

Non  Patient


STAFF ROOF TERRACE

ULTRA SOUND

CARDIO.

MAMMO. STAFF WAITING

CT R/F

• Design stairs for everyday use between  clinic and diagnostic staff areas. (City of  New York, 2010; Nicole & Zimring, 2009) • Provide views to nature from select  clinic spaces and staff areas (Ulrich,  2009) • Incorporate daylighting in patient  waiting areas, for staff and selected  clinical spaces. (Joseph, 2003; Figueiro,  p ( p g et. al., 2002; Leather, et. al., 1998)

DRESSING X‐RAY

Sick Patient

LAB

Well  Patient

level 4

diagnostics

Non  Patient


• Design stairs for everyday use between  clinic and diagnostic staff areas (City of  New York, 2010; Nicole & Zimring, 2009)

CLINICS 3 PODS 3 PODS STAFF CONSULT.

WAITING

• View from clinic pubic and staff spaces  to roof top garden. Views to park block  and site design from staff work spaces.   (Ulrich, 2009) • Incorporate daylighting for all users  ((Joseph, 2003; Figueiro, et. al., 2002;  p g Leather, et. al., 1998)

ROOFTOP TERRACE

Sick Patient Well  Patient

level 5

clinics – family practice

Non  Patient


CONTROLLED ACCESS TERRACE CLINICS

EXISTING  HISTORIC  BUILDING

DIAGNOSTICS ADMIN FITNESS LOBBY

MECH. & SUPPORT PARKING PARKING

section a.

program stacking


STAFF TERRACE CONTROLLED ACCESS  TERRACE CLINICS DIAGNOSTICS WELLNESS

ADMIN

LOCKERS SERVICE

THERAPY PASSAGE

LOBBY O PARKING

MECH. & SUPPORT

PARKING PARKING

section b.

program stacking


Sick Patient Well  Patient

section b.

user circulation

Non  Patient


urban context

scale of facility


urban context

scale of facility


urban context

scale of facility


• Highlight building  activities from  pedestrian  perspective • Create different  levels of transparency  into the building • Create unique views  from the building  g from different users

from art museum


Art installation with  Portland Museum

from residential

Rheinzink – bright rolled powder coated metal panel powder coated metal panel


view from park


A special thanks to… The AIA Tuttle Fellowship Committee and The AIA Academy of Architecture for Health.  The AIA T ttle Fello ship Committee and The AIA Academ of Architect re for Health Steris for their generous sponsorship.  My Final Study Chair Prof. Kirk Hamilton and Committee Dr. Mardelle y y Shepley p y and Dr. Jon  Rodiek for their guidance and support.  and to the many individuals and organizations who assisted me along the way:  D b hS Deborah Sweetland, Alejandro Iriarte, Freek tl d Al j d I i t F k de Bos, Heather Voorhaar, Karl Sonnenberg,  d B H th V h K lS b Suanne, Barton, Stephen Black, Tom Clark, David Frum, Ron Smith, Randal Brand, Michele  Cohen Idoine, Ian Sinclair, Terry Montgomery, Alice Liang, Maggie Duplantis, Gary Oftedahl,  Jon Hallberg, Chris Backous, Allison Schwab, Courtney Duke, Massachusetts General, Mayo  g, , , y , , y Clinic and Center for Innovation, Methodist Hospital, Philips Powderhorn, City Mills Clinic,  ICSI, Kaiser Permanente, Polyclinic, Virginia Mason, Wellspring Medical Center, and  University Medical Center Groningen. 

thank you!


Amy D. Kircher adkircher@gmail.com or akircher@pspaec.com

thank you!


An Urban Healthcare Model for Outpatient Care and Wellness - Presentation