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THE WAG

COMPLIMENTARY

magazine

an informative, entertaining read about dogs & their companions SPRING 2018

GO AHEAD... UNLEASH YOUR

Parntyimal A

WHAT’S LURKING IN THE DESERT?

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DOG FOOD PACKAGING & LABELS — BREAKING THE

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THE WAG magazine an informative, entertaining read about dogs & their companions SPRING 2018 | Volume 2 Issue 2 PUBLISHERS Gary Lex Penny Lex EDITOR Penny Lex DESIGNER Amy Civer PHOTOGRAPHER Vicky Cummings PROOFREADER Sue Maves SALES & MARKETING Gary Lex WRITERS & CONTRIBUTORS Teresa Bitler Cherese Cobb Bruce Dell, RPh, MS, DPh Eric Johnson Joyce Becker Lee Penny Lex Kathleen Maci Schmidt DISTRIBUTION Times Media Empty Bowl Pet Food Pantry/ Animals in Disaster THE WAG magazine an informative, entertaining read about dogs

& their companions

THE WAG mag

SUBSCRIPTIONS $24/year (4 issues) 14844 N. Greenhurst Ave. Fountain Hills, AZ 85268 ADVERTISING INQUIRIES Gary Lex • 715-497-8073 gary@thewagmagazine.com Penny Lex • 507-202-3929 penny@thewagmagazine.com IDEAS AND COMMENTS Penny Lex • 507-202-3929 penny@thewagmagazine.com thewagmagazine.com THE WAG magazine is published quarterly by Lex Ventures, LLC 14844 N. Greenhurst Ave. Fountain Hills, AZ 85268 THE WAG magazine

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. Printed in the U.S.A.

FROM THE EDITOR

O

ne of the great joys of getting a new puppy is the fun in watching them grow, transforming right before your eyes from that little bundle of fluff into a real dog. Recently, however, I experienced another transformation of the canine kind. Something I feel is just as good. Penny Lex It’s been nearly a year since we adopted Skippy. Found wandering the streets, and after several attempts at placement and in foster care, Skipper was running out of options. He was about two years old then and fearful. Oh, so fearful. Of everything and everyone. From the TV remote to a bottle of water, a comb, pen, or a book, friends, family…you name it, he was afraid. He showed fearful aggression by running up and barking at people but then quickly running away. It was as if he were saying “Hey, don’t mess with me because I’m tough and can take care of myself.” But to the contrary, he was very scared, so after sounding big and tough, he would run and hide. Unfamiliar with toys, Skippy reacted to them as though they were just other instruments used for abuse. He cowered upon touch, carried his head very low, and found solace in only two things— spending time in his kennel and being cradled in our arms while we’d carry him around in the swimming pool. We gave Skippy his space and plenty of time to acclimate to us and his new environment. We left his kennel door open so he could come and go as he wanted and told visitors to our home to simply ignore him—not make eye contact. Over a period of months, Skippy began to sense his environment was safe. That he isn’t going to be hurt, and that this is his real home. Some of the most heartwarming moments of the past year were when Skip came out of his kennel during the middle of the night, jumped up on the bed, blessed us with some slobbery kisses and then returned to his lair. He’s done that on several occasions and I interpret the gesture as his way of expressing thanks. Skippy still flinches at unexpected sounds or rapid movements, but he has a host of toys (many of which he knows by name) that he loves to play with. He’s also making great strides in gently approaching houseguests and accepting affection from others. No, we didn’t get to see or experience the rapture of Skippy as a pup; but witnessing his growth in confidence, trust, and restoration of pluck has truly been an incredible joy. Wishing you a sensational Spring,

Penny

Penny Lex, Editor & Publisher thewagmagazine.com | Spring 2018

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THE WAG magazine

SPRING 2018 | CONTENTS FEATURES

12

9 Collars, Harnesses & Leads

Making the best choice for your pet

18

By Joyce Becker Lee

12

Dangers Lurking in the Desert

Animals, insects, reptiles, and birds of prey that can pose a threat to your dog

By Kathleen Maci Schmidt

14 Party Animal—

Unleashing Yours

Invite some friends and kick up your paws!

14 22

By Penny Lex

16 Doggie Daycare

Finding the best place for your dog to stay and play

DEPARTMENTS

18

8

By Eric Johnson

HEALTH & WELLNESS Protein-Losing Enteropathy By Joyce Becker Lee

Canine Cuisine

Kibble, canned, custom, raw By Teresa Bitler

20 Breaking the Code of

10 Ask Your Veterinary

By Teresa Bitler

THE WAG

COMPLIMENTARY

magazine

an informative, entertaining read about dogs & their companions

On the cover: Seven-month-old Boxer pup, and party animal, Flair Freeman.

SPRING 2018

GO AHEAD... UNLEASH YOUR

Parntyimal A

WHAT’S LURKING IN THE DESERT?



Pharmacist About… Playing ‘Catch’ With Your Dog By Bruce Dell, RPh, MS, DPh

CANINE CUISINE

+DAYCARE

DOGGIE

&

Springtime treats

DOG FOOD PACKAGING & LABELS — BREAKING THE

CODE

THE WAG magazine | Spring 2018

IN EVERY ISSUE

From the Editor | 3 Smile for the Camera | 6 Rescue Directory | 27

Rescue

By Penny Lex

SIT/STAY/PLAY/READ

24

Book Review

By Maia Haag

25

If My Dog Could Talk

WAG’s Word Search

TOUCHING TAILS

THIS ‘N THAT

17  E gg-stra special

22  Surrendered Souls

26

KIBBLE, CANNED, CUSTOM, RAW

4

TO THE RESCUE

CHEW ON THIS

Dog Food Packaging and Labels

Learn the lingo and how to interpret the bag

9

F  our’s Company— A Legacy of Love By Penny Lex

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Smile for the camera We’d Love to Hear from You! Send photos of your dog to penny@thewagmagazine.com

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1. Cowboy. 2. Mollie 3. Dixie. 4. Teddy. 5. King. 6. Voodoo. 7. Sophia-Claire. 8. Midnight.

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6 HEY READERS –  “FOUND IT” & WON!

THE WAG magazine an informative, entertaining read about dogs

& their companions

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THE WAG mag

CeCe Varone was the drawing winner in our last issue’s FIND IT & WIN contest. Her Australian Cattle dog, Digby, is now sporting a custom-made leather collar courtesy of Willow Lake Leather. Digby’s new custom-made collar. 6

Congratulations Digby and thanks to all who participated. Watch THE WAG for more FIND IT & WIN contests.

THE WAG magazine | Spring 2018


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THE WAG magazine an informative, entertaining read about dogs

THE WAG Welcomes New Advertisers:

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HEALTH & WELLNESS

Protein-Losing Enteropathy By Joyce Becker Lee

A

ll dogs occasionally lack appetite or vomit a bit or have a touch of diarrhea. Usually the problem is caused by a change in diet, a move, or even a brief illness and doesn’t last long. But sometimes the problem is severe and doesn’t go away, and your vet might suggest testing for ProteinLosing Enteropathy, or PLE. While not terribly common, PLE is a health problem worth learning about.

some talk about PLE coming from kibble, Dr. Carter says this is a fallacy: “There is no evidence that any one particular food type contributes to the development of this condition, although some types of IBD and PLE may start with an underlying adverse reaction to food or food allergy.” He adds that the triggers for each dog differ, so there is no way to predict whether a certain food will trigger PLE. Note

If left untreated, PLE can be fatal. What Is PLE? According to Dr. Todd Carter, DVM, DACVIM, Clinical Assistant Professor at Midwestern University in Phoenix, and a specialist in small animal internal medicine, PLE is an intestinal disorder that comes from the malabsorption of protein in the body. As food moves through the intestines, nutrition is picked up by blood or lymph and transported to the rest of the body. In PLE, protein is not absorbed causing various health problems. Causes PLE is not a disease in itself but is a syndrome triggered by something else. The most common causes are inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and certain types of cancer, such as intestinal lymphoma. Another main cause is lymphatic disease (intestinal lymphangiectasia, or IL), a disruption or blockage of the lymph nodes, which in turn interferes with the transport of protein. Other causes of PLE might include food allergies, parasites, fungal or bacterial gastroenteritis, intestinal ulcers, malnutrition, or congestive heart failure. While there has been 8

THE WAG magazine | Spring 2018

also that as a congenital condition, PLE is most common in SoftCoated Wheaten Terriers, Yorkshire Terriers, Rottweilers, Basenjis, and Norwegian Lundehunds, though it can be found in other breeds as well. Symptoms Dr. Carter explains that when proteins leak into the colon, they act as a magnet to hold fluid, resulting in diarrhea and vomiting, two symptoms of PLE. In a rectal exam, the veterinarian might find thickened intestinal loops and swollen lymph nodes. Because the body is not getting the protein it needs, it draws it from the muscles, causing weight loss and lethargy. Other symptoms include fluid retention in the abdomen and chest, which can cause breathing difficulty. A heart murmur or unusual lung sounds are other indications of PLE. Tests Because PLE is a syndrome and not a disease, your vet will look for the underlying cause of symptoms and will test for the two types of proteins—albumins and globulins— both usually eliminated when PLE is

present. Full tests include complete blood work and a chemical panel to check protein levels and electrolytes, as well as liver and kidney function. A fecal check is also indicated to look for parasites. Perhaps the most definitive test is an endoscopy, which allows the vet to visually check for intestinal abnormalities and possibly do a biopsy. An ultrasound and/or X-ray might also be performed to look for tumors or ulcers and check the heart. The most extreme test would be exploratory surgery for evaluation and further biopsies. Treatment If left untreated, PLE can be fatal. But if it is caught in time, it can be controlled. Dr. Carter explains that treatment depends on the underlying cause. If a tumor or mass is found, treatment might be surgery and/or chemotherapy. IBD might be treated with combinations of diet therapy and steroids. Depending on the cause, treatment might include ulcer medication or prednisone, fluid draining, injections of vitamin supplements, or even deworming. Often, a low-fat, digestible diet will be prescribed. Conclusion So what can a pet-owner do to avoid PLE? According to Dr. Carter, “There’s really no way to predict and avoid PLE. We don’t really know the triggers,” he says, “so there’s nothing owners can do proactively other than watching for signs of gastrointestinal distress.” His advice: “Don’t wait. If you see your pet losing weight and having chronic issues with diarrhea, take it in to a vet sooner rather than later.”


COLLARS, HARNESSES, & LEADS MAKING THE BEST CHOICE FOR YOUR PET By Joyce Becker Lee

W

hen a dog enters your life, one of your first purchases should be a collar and leash. A collar’s purpose is twofold: it offers a place to attach your dog’s tags, and when combined with a leash, it provides a method for controlling your pet. Collars and leashes range from basic to specialized, with varied costs, depending on the size and weight of the dog, materials, and special features. They can also make a fashion statement and serve as a reflection of your pet’s personality. Here’s some basic information on what’s what.

COLLARS/HARNESSES • Flat collar. Inexpensive, sturdy and comfortable, usually in nylon or leather. Choose from: – Belt. Closes with a buckle –Q  uick-release. The clasp allows for quick removal –B  reakaway. Comes apart to avoid choking in case of rough play or catching on something • Rolled collar. Tubular, of nylon or leather strips with a smaller contact area so thick fur won’t mat down. • Martingale. Large loop held together by a slip loop with a design that prevents both slipping off and choking. Preferred for small-headed dogs like greyhounds. • Head halters. Wrap around the nose to control pulling. • Specialty collars. These can include things like GPS tracking systems or LED lighting for night walks. Some are even rechargeable, either by solar-power or USB cable. • Control collars. Provide maximum control. – Choke or Slip. A chain with metal loops that tighten when pulled. – Prong. Prongs dig into the neck to control pulling.

– Shock. Sends a slight electric current to stop an undesirable behavior. Can run $100 or more. Control collars should be used with care and proper training only to avoid harm, either physically or mentally. Keep in mind that most trainers prefer positive reinforcement to modify behavior. In fact, the discomfort might confuse your dog, causing him to counter with other negative behavior. • Harness. Surrounding the neck and torso, these can be simple flat nylon or complex with several adjustable rings. Styles include: –B  ack connect or traditional. Moves pressure from throat to chest and abdomen, but actually encourages pulling (think sled dogs). The attachment ring for the leash is on the back. –F  ront connect. The leash attaches in the front of the chest to guide the dog and prevent pulling. Not sure what’s best for your pooch? Consult your veterinarian on best choice—collar or harness—based on your dog’s breed and any medical special needs.

LEADS Standard. Four to eight feet long, flat or rolled, of nylon or leather with a hand loop at the top for comfort. Retractable. Varying lengths and weights depending on the size of the dog, these allow the dog a little more space to sniff around, but with a little practice the handler can quickly pull him back. Best for good walkers who like a little more room to roam. Adjustable. Allows you to lengthen or shorten the leash for training or walks. Hands-Free. Wraps around your waist. Great for runners or when pushing a stroller.

Slip. These leads can be seen at dog shows as handlers use them during competition. By passing the handle of the leash through a metal ring to form a loop, you put the loop over the dog’s head. Pulling the handle then tightens the loop around the dog’s neck. A good temporary fix if you don’t have a collar but not for use as a regular leash. Multiple or separate coupler. Good selection for dog walkers or multiple dog families. An inexpensive coupler attaches to a regular leash. Bike. Gives the dog flexibility in length as he trots alongside a bicyclist. Around $40–50, but can be found for less. Lighted. Like the LED collar, great for night walks.

SIZING IT ALL UP Make sure your selections are the correct size and fit for your dog. Know your pet’s weight, measurements, and refer to manufacturer’s sizing information when appropriate. To measure collar size, use a tape measure and place around your dog’s neck, just below the head. Add two inches for adjustment (hair growth, weight gain). The collar should be snug, but loose enough to easily fit 2–3 fingers between the neck and collar. For harnesses, measure around your dog’s chest just behind the front legs. Add two inches for adjustment and refer to manufacturer’s recommendations. Remember to: • Watch for any chafing or irritation from collars or harnesses; • Check the fit periodically (changes occur with weight gain/loss, fur growth); • Clean collars and leashes regularly. thewagmagazine.com | Spring 2018

9


CHEW ON THIS Ask Your Veterinary Pharmacist About…

Are You Playing ‘Catch’ With Your Dog? By Bruce Dell, RPh, MS, DPh highly contagious fungal disease of the skin. On your pet, look for skin irritations with circular red marks in the center along with hair loss. In humans, look for the same red patches. This is entirely treatable with oral medication

Bruce is a senior pharmacist at Roadrunner Pharmacy, a veterinary-exclusive compounding pharmacy in Phoenix.

A

reader recently asked, “Can humans ‘catch’ anything from dogs?” Great question! While I think the entire world would be a much better place if we were all licked by dogs more often, it is possible for Fido to pass along some diseases to people. The good news is that if your pup is basically healthy, vaccinated, and you wash your hands (and other exposed areas) after handling your buddy, the chances of incident are very small. Overall, it’s wise not to expose mucous membranes and open wounds to direct contact with your fur baby; you and I both know where they’ve been all day! Be that as it may, here are some common zoonotic diseases (diseases transmitted by animals) that are entirely possible to get from your bow wow. It is totally possible for your best pal to transmit ringworm—a 10

THE WAG magazine | Spring 2018

Many bacteria and parasites can be hiding in dog saliva or feces. and topical preparations. Some of the more disgusting things you can catch from your pooch are tape, hook, and round worms— usually from dog feces. Use that pooper scooper and don’t walk barefoot where your dog does. Many bacteria and parasites can be hiding in dog saliva or feces that can wreak havoc with humans. Campylobacter and salmonella are bacteria that can be transferred through feces, especially diarrhea. Giardia and cryptosporidium are protozoans than can affect humans after contact with infected dogs. Humans will note stomach cramps and diarrhea. Wear gloves when cleaning up dog waste and wash your hands thoroughly afterwards. Rabies is a virus that is spread through bites;

and if the dog has it, it was likely contracted from an infected wild animal. In humans, look for fever, headache, confusion, agitation, and sleepiness. This is a true emergency. Both you and your buddy need immediate attention. This list is not meant to be allinclusive, these are just common examples. As dog owners we need to be cognizant of the possibilities and just be smart about our encounters; thorough hand washing after touching animals is very wise, especially prior to meals. Be aware of disease transmission when cleaning up after your dog and take precautions. Make sure that your pet is always updated on his necessary vaccines, too. Regular veterinary checkups are key. The next time your dog tries to lick your face, instead of worrying about some exotic infection, it might be more prudent to think about what your dog last licked. That might be a scarier consideration.


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DANGERS LURKING IN THE DESERT ANIMALS, INSECTS, REPTILES, AND BIRDS OF PREY THAT CAN POSE A THREAT TO YOUR DOG By Kathleen Maci Schmidt

L

iving in the Southwest brings with it the possibility of dangers for your dog from various desert inhabitants. Recently, while attending the Dog Safety in the Desert and Mutt Strut at McDowell Mountain Regional Park in Maricopa County, interpretive ranger Amy Roberts gave an overview of what to be aware of when it comes to pet safety in the desert environment. Sonoran Desert Toads frequent standing water at night, including your pet’s outdoor water bowl. The desert toad’s skin glands secrete a deadly toxin that covers its body while in water, and the residue of that toxin remains after it leaves. If your dog takes a drink from the contaminated water, it can get the toxin in their system. The best anecdote is to quickly rinse out your pet’s mouth with water from a hose and immediately take your dog to the vet, according to Rogers. Scorpions also are a potential threat though it’s the bite of the Small Bark Scorpion which can be serious. Brown in color and about three inches in length, this scorpion’s sting is very painful and can cause drooling, itchiness, tremors, irregular eye movement, abnormal heartbeat and blood pressure. The small bark scorpion prefers to hide in cool areas like under brush, rocks, and tree bark. Call poison control if your pet is bitten (ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center 888-426-4435). Centipedes, Millipedes and Tarantulas are considered low-risk to pets in Arizona though their bites are painful 12

THE WAG magazine | Spring 2018

and can cause swelling. Also, if tarantulas are bothered, they can flick off hairs from their rump which might cause eye or nose irritation to your pet. Black Widow and Brown Recluse Spiders are a danger to pets throughout Arizona. However, the Brown Recluse Spider poses the biggest threat to dogs. If your dog is bitten by a Brown Recluse Spider, the tissue around the bitten area will die and rot, causing a serious infection. Black Widow bites may often go unnoticed initially but can cause serious systemic symptoms if not detected. Both spiders live in cool, dark places. Javelinas are startled easily, have poor eyesight, and rely on their sense of smell. They are especially active at dawn and dusk, though they are more active during the day in cooler weather. Coyotes are the javelina’s predator so it’s understandable why a dog may be perceived as a threat; often it’s dogs that are off-leash that are at most risk. Javelinas are most irritable when they feel cornered or if their young are nearby. Should you and your dog encounter a javelina, back away slowly making sure it has an escape route. If you are on a walk and notice javelinas, throw small rocks in their direction, spray with a garden hose, and make loud noises alerting them to your presence. Gila Monsters are exceptionally rare, are protected by state law, and should be given plenty of space if encountered. They live underground except when they


Birds of Prey ... can pose a threat to small dogs weighing less than 20 pounds.

emerge to hunt or mate. The Gila Monster’s jaw locks once it has bitten. This allows them to hold onto a victim while pumping in massive amounts of venom. The jaws may have to be pried loose or the lizard submerged in water to release its bite. Gila Monsters are very slowmoving reptiles and cannot chase either a human or a pet. Bites from these reptiles occur when they are being handled or provoked, such as by a dog sniffing. Africanized Bees are a relatively new danger having arrived in Arizona in the early 1990s. These bees travel in large swarms and are easily angered and will attack as a swarm. Several dogs have been fatally attacked in Arizona since the bees’ arrival. When walking your dog wear light-colored clothing. These bees have also been known to frequently hover around traffic lights. Rattlesnakes: There are 18 different poisonous species in Arizona. Though they generally don’t hunt or eat small pets, they still present a significant danger. Be especially careful to keep your pet from sniffing around brush areas or rocks where a snake may be hiding. Of some consolation, Rogers explained, is that 25 percent of the time rattlesnakes will deliver a “dry bite,” meaning without venom. However, if your dog is bitten, keep the dog as calm as possible and get to a vet immediately. Also, consider enrolling your pet in rattlesnake readiness training which teaches dogs to avoid rattlesnakes, including their sounds and smells. Birds of Prey, including owls, falcons, eagles and

hawks, can pose a threat to small dogs weighing less than 20 pounds. The threat from these raptors increases during the migratory months of September through April. According to the Arizona Department of Game and Fish, a domestic pet may be something the raptor could use as a food source; or they may look at the pet as a potential threat to their young, especially as the young are getting ready to leave the nest. Since many birds of prey regularly hunt small animals, a pet owner’s best defense is to not leave their small pet outside alone. You can also buy a jacket for your dog that deters birds of prey by preventing talons from puncturing the dog’s skin. Bobcats, Coyotes and Mountain Lions dwell throughout Arizona. They hang around if there are sources of water and food. Bobcats can sneak through a fence or climb a tree with ease, jumping as high as 12 feet. Small dogs are vulnerable to attack if provoked, perhaps by a dog’s barking. Animal experts suggest not leaving small dogs outside alone. Should you encounter one of these animals, pick up your dog if possible, back up slowly, and make yourself look large by raising your arm or holding something above your head. Throw small rocks in its direction and make loud noises. thewagmagazine.com | Spring 2018

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Party Animal— Unleashing Yours Invite some friends and kick up your paws! By Penny Lex

I

s your dog social? Loves to play? Loves to eat? How about channeling his inner party animal (and yours) by hosting a get together for your mutual friends? For any occasion—a dog’s birthday, theme/costume party, holiday, shower for a new puppy, or…just because— gathering good friends and their four-legged buddies can make for a howling good time. Whether you choose to make it simple and easy or…whoop it up and go all out, here are some ideas to get the party started. Guest List. Perhaps you know that one of your friends is the life of the party, but how about their dog? Is he social, well-behaved, and gets along with others? Consider personalities and behavior of the furry folks and invite dogs that you know are well mannered. Don’t forget to invite those (human) friends who love dogs but don’t currently have one. They can enjoy the festivities and who knows—maybe the pleasure of the day will influence them to adopt! Venue. When choosing the location, consider the number of guests and activities you plan to have. In addition to adequate play and appropriate potty space, dogs should have access to a spot for retreat if they get tired or want to be alone.

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THE WAG magazine | Spring 2018

Invitations. Email, phone calls, texts or…mail invitations from your dog to your four-legged guests. Food and beverage for the furry folks. In addition to ample bowls of water, serve up some Mutt-tinis (H2O vessels spiked with chicken or beef broth), frozen treats, cake, or pup cakes. Get creative, but be sure to use foods that are safe for canine consumption. Décor. Whether you choose to festoon your venue or go without, is there anything cuter than a dog in a party hat? Give gift bags or festive, doggie bandanas. How about tee shirts for the dogs designed for the occasion?

Activities

Doggie Derby. Sniffing isn’t necessarily a sport but is likely cast as the first event. After the dogs get acclimated to the location and, more importantly, each other, let the games begin. •B  obbing for hot dogs. Fill a few plastic tubs with water and throw in a cooked hot dog. Let the dogs take turns bobbing for the treat. Plan for shorter tubs if you have smaller dogs attending. • Do a good ol’ fashioned cake walk. Put some paper plates in a circle on the ground (one place for each handler/dog), start some music and while it’s playing, the group walks in a circle. While they’re walking, you pull one plate so when you stop the music, one handler/ dog not landing on a plate is eliminated. Keep going until you have one couple remaining. They win! • Sniff it out. Much like an Easter egg hunt, hide some treats throughout the area and let the dogs find them. See who can find the most. Award prizes for winners of each game.


• Create a keepsake. There’s a variety of kits available to make paw print key chains, plates, stepping stones, ornaments, etc. Let guests and their dogs work together to make something very special. Or… • Unleash the inner artist of your canine guests and let them paint a picture. Paws can be dipped in non-toxic paint and then pressed to paper. Be sure to have bowls of soapy water and clean towels to rinse and wipe paws with afterwards. •H  ave a photo booth or someone designated to capture memorial shots of the affair. • Not warm enough for the big pool? Put out some water-filled kiddie pools in case the party animals want to splash and refresh. Post party, Fido should be dog tired. Not you. Plan ahead so you can have a good time, too. You don’t want to be fretting over filling water bowls while trying to set up a game while your dog is demanding your attention. If you’re having more than a few guests and activities, ask friends who won’t have dogs in attendance to help. Designate their tasks ahead of time to avoid last minute chaos. Have fun! Remember to take lots of pictures and then…share your party animals with THE WAG!

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Check for cleanliness, safety, positive discipline, and attentive staff.

D O G G I E DAYC A R E

Finding the best place for your dog to stay and play By Eric Johnson

D

oggie daycare is particularly alluring to those who have long workdays and would like a place for their pups to be other than “home alone.” Taking your dog to daycare helps to avoid accidents and boredom, provides socialization, relieves guilt and gives peace of mind just knowing your best friend is out playing and not cooped up, solo, for the entire day. THE ABCs With a host of daycare facilities to choose, prices range from $20–$90 per day. A number of them offer discounts for multiple pets. Some of the higher-priced options are modified to include additional, and sometimes luxurious, spa treatments. Bathing, nail clipping, solitary long walks, and overnight boarding are some of the à la carte options. Each business is different so make sure to shop around and find what best fits the needs of your dog, and you. MAKING THE GRADE Deciding what daycare to trust with your furry friend can be just as scary as picking one for your child. Talk to other dog owners and get their feedback, recommendations, and referrals. Look beyond the storefront and offered services. Check for cleanliness, safety, positive discipline, and attentive staff.

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THE WAG magazine | Spring 2018

Some points to consider: • Are up-to-date vaccinations required for all daycare attendees? • I s there adequate security? Indoors—are there gates or doors to prevent dogs from escaping when customers come and go? Outdoors—is fencing high enough to keep jumpers in? • I s there structure—such as a daily routine with designated play and rest time? • D  o dogs have access to shade outside and is the temperature comfortable indoors? • I s there a place for your dog to go if he gets overstimulated or wants to rest? • Are there toys? • Is there access to plenty of fresh water? • Is the staff willing to administer meds if your dog has need? •Is there a webcam so you can peek at your fur baby throughout the day? • What is the demeanor of dogs that are there? • Is there safe grouping between dog size and temperament? • How does the staff manage situations like a dog fight? • What is the ratio of staff to number of dogs? • Are staff members always in attendance of groups?


FOUR PAWS UP (OR DOWN?) Once you’ve selected a daycare facility, it’s generally a good idea to give it a trial run for a few times. Ask the staff for feedback about your dog’s time. Was he social and did he interact? Play? Did he seem to take to one or two particular playmates? Cultivating friendships and the comfort that comes along with them will help your dog warm up faster. Some dogs really bond with others who attend daycare on the same days or time that they do. They actually become very good friends and look forward to seeing each other. At the end of his daycare experience, your dog should be tired and relaxed. Upon the next visit, he should be eager to return. If he appears anxious and reluctant to go back, look for another alternative. Finding the right daycare can not only give you peace of mind, but bring you, and your dog, great joy.

THIS ‘N THAT Deviled Eggs for Dogs The Basics

1. Bring eggs to a hard boil in uncovered pan 2. Turn off heat and let them remain for 15 minutes 3. Rinse eggs in cold water 4. When cool, peel, cut in half lengthwise, and remove the yolk

The Fun Part

Mash the yolks and be creative by adding some of your pal’s favorite ingredients, such as plain, unsweetened yogurt; peas; banana; cooked chicken, turkey, or another food that is safe for your dog’s consumption. Mix your selection with the mashed yolks then spoon into the hollow of the egg white. You can also make an assortment of flavors to determine which one your little devil likes best.

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Please come in and check out our newly restocked retail area! We only offer the highest quality food products for your dogs and cats. Including a complete line of Stella & Chewy frozen raw and freeze dried food as well as Pure Vita, Weruva and many others. We can even accommodate special orders. We now carry a very high quality line of pet toys, collars, leashes and harnesses by Planet Dog. They are 100% guaranteed. Made from quality non-toxic materials, all of Planet Dog's toy line are produced in the USA and 2% of every purchase goes toward animal related charities. We are now including some local companies as well to support small businesses in Arizona. So come in to Pal's Inn for all your pet needs.

thewagmagazine.com | Spring 2018

17


CANINE CUISINE KIBBLE, CANNED, CUSTOM, RAW By Teresa Bitler

W

hat your dog eats can dramatically affect his health. But with so many options on the market today, it’s hard to tell whether what’s in your best friend’s dish is improving his health or harming it.

DRY KIBBLE

Until 1860, when James Spratt invented a dried mealtime biscuit, dogs primarily ate table scraps; today, dry dog food is a 9.2 billion dollar industry. Most dog owners don’t give a second thought to purchasing a bag of kibble, but the brand you choose can put your pet at serious risk. Studies have linked kibble to a number of health concerns including obesity, cancer, liver disease, kidney failure, heart disease, allergic dermatitis, and chronic digestive issues such as irritable bowel syndrome. It has also been linked to protein-losing enteropathy (PLE), a condition that makes absorbing protein difficult. That’s not to say all kibble is bad—the risk of your dog developing any of these conditions depends, at least to some extent, on the quality of the ingredients used. Dog

cause cumulative liver damage and cancerous tumors. Even kibble made with premium ingredients lacks two important components: moisture and variety. Your dog wasn’t meant to eat dehydrated foods (a dog’s natural diet contains up to 70 percent water) and feeding him the same meal every day limits the nutrients he receives.

CANNED

The cost of canned dog food is generally considerably higher than kibble. And, unlike dry food, you can’t just fill the bowl and go. Food left sitting out or in the dog’s bowl for more than an hour or so can become contaminated. Canned is, however, the fare of choice for many dogs. It tends to be more appetizing; has a longer shelf life (but must be refrigerated once opened and is best served at room temperature); contains higher amounts of water, meat, poultry and fish; is lower in carbs; and, due to the canning process, has fewer chemical additives. For seniors Poor protein quality can cause stress to or dogs with dental issues or difficulty chewing, it can be a favorable option. your dog’s organs. Some pet owners mix kibble and canned food together, using canned food to “top off” their dog’s usual dish by food may legally contain meat from dead, dying, diseased, enhancing the flavor or to entice dogs to eat when not and disabled (known as “4-D”) animals as well as proteins hungry. However, if your dog is on a therapeutic diet for a your dog can’t easily digest such as snouts and feathers. health condition, don’t add other ingredients without first Poor protein quality can cause stress to your dog’s organs. checking with your veterinarian. Grain quality is also of concern. Corn, wheat and rice BARF DIET (RAW) along with nuts and legumes can become contaminated Recognizing the health issues connected to with aflatoxins, molds that even the heat used to bake the commercially-produced dog food, veterinarian Ian kibble doesn’t destroy. Ingesting more than 0.5 milligrams Billinghurst introduced the Biologically Appropriate Raw of aflatoxin per kilogram of your dog’s body weight can Food (BARF) diet in his 1993 book, Give Your Dog a Bone. cause death within days; trace amounts over time may 18

THE WAG magazine | Spring 2018


Billinghurst argues dogs were designed to eat muscle meat still on the bone and vegetable scraps, not meats unfit for human consumption mixed with cooked grains and preserved with chemicals. Dogs who consume a BARF diet have shinier coats, healthier skin, cleaner teeth, higher energy levels, and smaller stools, he says. Critics of the BARF diet point out the bones can present a choking hazard and damage teeth, and the meals may not provide a balanced diet. Not to mention, feeding your dog raw meat can present a bacterial risk to both you and your pet in the form of salmonella and listeria monocytogenes, which can cause the rare but deadly disease listeriosis. In fact, the bacterial risk is so great the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Center for Disease Control (CDC) both recommend against feeding your pet a raw dog food in any form. You can reduce your risk by thoroughly washing your hands and any surface the raw food contacts with soap and water. Likewise, freeze raw meat until you’re ready

... bones can present a choking hazard and damage teeth... to use it, thaw it in the refrigerator (not on the sink or counter), and immediately refrigerate what your pet doesn’t eat. The FDA and CDC also recommend not kissing your dog around its mouth, not letting him lick your face, and thoroughly washing your hands after touching your dog.

PRE-MADE AND COOKED By purchasing pre-made raw food instead of making your own, you can lower your bacterial risk. A growing number of online companies sell raw and custom-made meals delivered to your door. Food made specifically for your dog is created from a profile of your pet that includes nutritional needs based on your dog’s age, size, breed, activity and allergies. Although many retailers sell “raw” dog

A puppy has different nutritional needs than a mature dog or one battling cancer. food, the Association of American Feed Control Officials (AAFCO) reports these have typically been heat-treated to prevent microbial contamination and are technically not raw. If raw is your goal, you may want to skip these; if you want to avoid salmonella and listeriosis, they might be a good option. Cooking your dog’s food—instead of serving it raw—is another option. The FDA suggests using a thermometer to make sure you’ve cooked it to a high enough temperature to kill any bacteria, throwing out uneaten food, and storing it properly in the refrigerator. Regardless of whether you cook the food or serve it raw, nutrition is key. Look for recipes developed by veterinarian nutritionists online, and avoid hazardous foods, including cooked bones, onions, grapes, raisins, chocolate, and the artificial sweetener Xylitol.

THE RIGHT OPTION FOR YOUR DOG

To find the best food for your dog, start by consulting your veterinarian, who can alert you to special nutritional needs. (A puppy has different nutritional needs than a mature dog or one battling cancer.) Next, determine your budget and how much time you have to commit to feeding your pet. Home delivery of custom food is convenient but expensive. On the other hand, it takes time and effort to make your own food. If you decide to purchase food from a retailer, learn how to read the labels. A dog food touting that it’s made “with lamb” is required to only contain 3 percent lamb; one with “lamb flavor” need only have trace amounts, according to AAFCO guidelines. The better quality ingredients, the healthier it is for your dog. Finally, read reviews on websites like Dog Food Advisor, and call the manufacturer to make sure the food’s production isn’t outsourced to multiple sites (the more factories that handle it, the more risk for contamination).

thewagmagazine.com | Spring 2018

19


BREAKING THE CODE OF DOG FOOD PACKAGING & LABELS Learn the lingo and how to interpret the bag By Teresa Bitler

W

atch any dog food commercial or look at the packaging of any brand, and you’ll get the impression that what makes its way into your dog’s bowl comes from quality ingredients you’d be tempted to eat yourself. Unfortunately, that’s often not the case. To learn what your dog is really eating, you need to be able to decode the catch phrases on the package and decipher the product label.

READING THE PACKAGE

Start with the name. The fictitious “Great Plains Canine Adult Formula with Lamb” provides surprisingly few clues about what’s inside. Assuming Great Plains is the brand name, you learn it’s meant for adult dogs and is made “with lamb.” (More on what “with lamb” actually means later.) Even though a food may be designated for a specific life stage (senior), breed, or ingredient sensitivity, there are only two recognized nutrient profiles: adult and growth (puppy, including lactation and reproduction). Foods that meet one of these two profiles can be labeled “complete,” “balanced,” or “100 percent nutritious.” 20

THE WAG magazine | Spring 2018

Next, look at the taglines and read any product descriptions. Terms like “high quality,” “farm raised,” and “farm-to-table” have little meaning because they’re difficult to support. What is “high quality”? Aren’t all chickens raised on a farm of some sort (even a factory farm), and doesn’t all corn come from a farm? Similarly, “holistic” is hard to define when it comes to dog food. Generally, it refers to a nutritionally well-balanced dog food that uses only “natural” ingredients. However, marketers have a free reign to use the term “holistic” as they want. On the other hand, the Association of American Feed Control Officials (AAFCO) has set guidelines for “natural” dog food. To earn that label, the food can’t be produced

by, or subject to, a chemically synthetic process. It also can’t contain any chemically synthetic additives or processing aids (expect


those occurring unavoidably in the manufacturing process). Most dog foods can’t meet that standard because it costs too much to make a “complete and balanced” dog food without adding some synthetic vitamins, minerals, amino acids, and nutrients. “Organic” is another well-defined term although it usually refers to a specific ingredient (e.g., “organic turkey”). The AAFCO mandates that for something to be labeled “organic” it has to meet the requirements set forth by of the USDA National Organic Program, the same government entity overseeing the organic produce you consume.

example, in Fido’s Favorite Beef Dog Food, beef would need to make up 95 percent of the ingredients (70 percent when you include water).

“BEEF DOG FOOD”

contains 95% of named ingredient

“DINNER,” “ENTRÉE” OR “PLATTER” contains 25% of named ingredient

“WITH BEEF”

READING THE LABEL

The AAFCO has strict guidelines for the claims a manufacturer can make when it comes to the ingredients in its dog food. A product made from 100 percent of a specific ingredient, such as beef, must be made entirely of that ingredient with the exception of water and decharacterizing agents, such as color so it is not mistaken for human food. Named ingredients must make up at least 95 percent of the product by weight, excluding water. For

contains only 3% beef

“WITH BEEF FLAVOR” contains only trace amounts of beef

If the words “dinner,” “entrée,” or “platter” are used, the named ingredient must be at least 25 percent of the ingredients. So, Fido’s Favorite

Beef Platter is required to have at least 25 percent beef. A dog food made “with beef” would only need to have 3 percent beef while one with “with beef flavor” would only contain trace amounts, enough to add flavor. Beware, though. Manufacturers can manipulate the ingredients to give you false impressions. For example, a dog food labeled made “with bison” may contain 15 percent bison, followed by 10 percent beef meal and 10 percent chicken meal. Although bison is listed first, the meat is primarily beef and chicken, not bison. Near the ingredient list, you’ll find the guaranteed analysis, a list of the percentage of protein, fat, fiber, and water in the food. These percentages can help you compare dry kibble to dry kibble but, because of the difference in moisture content, not dry to canned. Finally, don’t put too much stock into feeding trials. According to the AAFCO, a manufacturer needs only eight healthy dogs to participate in a 26-week trial. The food passes if six of the dogs complete the full trial with no signs of nutritional deficiencies (or excesses) and with none losing more than 15 percent of its starting weight.

PetHealth OPC Formula with Glucosamine for Dogs & Cats TM

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This exclusive product can be purchased at 7712 E Indian School Rd. Scottsdale, AZ 85251 (480) 990 9561 or www.petsolutions.online

■ Helps maintain healthy cholesterol levels ■ Helps maintain healthy circulation ■ Helps maintain joint flexibility ■ Helps promote cardiovascular health

thewagmagazine.com | Spring 2018

21


TO THE RESCUE

Surrendered Souls Rescue By Penny Lex

“We are the bridge that allows

them to progress into a new life filled with love and happiness.” Mary Ann Everett

Savina, tetanus survivor, and her sister Macy.

F

or the past four years, Mary Ann Everett has been operating Surrendered Souls Rescue (SSR)—a small, 501(c) (3) nonprofit that rescues, rehabilitates, and rehomes sick, injured, or otherwise medically fragile dogs that would otherwise not have a chance of survival and face an increased risk of euthanasia. “We rescue dogs with cancer, Valley Fever, tick fever, heartworms, broken bones, neurological issues, and everything in between,” says Mary Ann, SSR founder and director. SSR takes in medical dogs from local shelters in Maricopa and Pinal Counties, as well as occasionally from neighboring California. They also partner with Yavapai Humane Society and Humane Society of Yuma. “And, we take in owner surrenders when owners cannot afford medical care and want to surrender their dog,” says Mary Ann. She explains that SSR is not breed specific and the only criteria for SSR taking in a dog is that

Come Visit THE WAG magazine 22

THE WAG magazine | Spring 2018

the animal must have a severe medical condition. At present, SSR has 18 medical dogs in rescue but only three medically cleared for adoption. “There are times we rescue dogs that we later find out cannot be saved,” explains Mary. “At that point, the dog stays in hospice foster with me or with another family until they pass.” Potential adopters must fill out an application and pass a home check. If there are other animals in the residence, a meet and greet is required. Sometimes adopters like to do short-term fostering before they finalize the adoption…just to be sure the dog will be a good fit for their home. Operating out of her home and with the assistance of volunteers who help Mary Ann with adoption events and transports, SSR relies on donations from fellow dogloving supporters. All donations go toward medical expenses, food, vaccinations, spay/neuter, microchipping, and licensing of rescues. Not large enough to

>

MAY 26 - 27

Phoenix Pet Expo

Mary Ann and her dog, Lacey.

qualify for grants or corporate sponsorship, some of the medical expenses throughout the year are paid personally by Mary Ann. X-rays, ultrasounds, blood work, testing, surgery…“as you can imagine, it gets expensive rescuing these medical dogs,” says Mary Ann. While SSR regularly receives donations of food, supplies, and money, as with all rescues—more is always needed. Surrendered Souls Rescue 480-584-2730 www.ssrescue.org

>

WestWorld of Scottsdale, AZ


thewagmagazine.com | Spring 2018

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SIT/STAY/PLAY/READ

BOOK REVIEW Reviewed by Cherese Cobb

If My Dog Could Talk by Maia Haag For almost 20 years, I See Me!, a Minnesota-based company, has offered personalized picture books to mark special occasions like adoptions and birthdays, as well as holidays, including Easter and Hanukkah. “Our mission is to build self-esteem in children by celebrating uniqueness,” says Maia Haag, the Co-founder and President of I See Me! “The message in our books is about how special and unique the child is.” From fairies to pirates to knights, I See Me! has delighted over one million children worldwide by turning them into the main characters of magical worlds. If My Dog Could Talk ($29.99) is I See Me!’s first personalized pet book. Being a dog owner herself, Haag explains the book’s emotional importance: “We have a Golden Retriever (named Jet) who’s a beloved member of our family and at the same level as our kids. I wanted to write a book that celebrated the relationship that families have with their pets…in a personalized way.” Hilariously narrated from the dog’s perspective, the story asks why family members don’t shake when they’re wet, why they don’t drive with their heads outside of the car, and why they never try to chomp on the mail. When ordering the illustrated, rhyming storybook, you can choose from 12 different dog shapes and five colors to create 24

THE WAG magazine | Spring 2018

the main character—the dog that closely resembles your pet. You can also customize your pet’s name, add two photos of your dog,

memorial for any dog” Haag said. If you have a first name that’s on the verge of extinction—and spent most of your childhood disappointed that you could never find it on anything in souvenir shops—you’ll adore the book’s illustrations. Susan Batori, an award-winning artist from Budapest, Hungary, scribbles your name on every page of the book. Look for it on towels, coffee cups, and even a plane’s banner. The perfect gift for all ages, If My Dog Could Talk is a must-have for

A personalized storybook narrated from the dog’s perspective.

include a personalized dedication, and select up to four dog lovers to be characters in the story. “When you order it (which takes roughly five minutes), you can also check a box indicating whether your pet has passed away, [so] it makes a beautiful

dog lovers. More of a cat person? Haag teased that a fantastic feline title is under wraps. To order your own personalized picture book, visit iseeme.com or call 1-877-744-3210.


SIT/STAY/PLAY/READ

WAG’S WORD SEARCH PUZZLE & Hawks MY! Bobcats,Bobcats, Bees &Bees Hawks - OH– OH MY! Find the theDesert DesertDangers Dangers Find S N T Y T B E D E P I T N E C T B

N O I L N I A T N U O M Z Q Z L B

R I N J A V E L I N A E P X W Z Z

A P L O S P I D E R S T J M J R L

T R M R R L V T L N T O L D B N X

Sonoran Desert Toad Javelina Eagle SonoranCentipede Desert Toad Javelina Bobcat Falcon

Eagle Centipede Bobcat Falcon African Bee Tarantula

T L E S N O C S P Z Z T N P P E T S N O L X R N F A A M A T Y N L I J Q C D U L O L G E T K RW P S L W T V B Y O C E Q G N E A G W T B R R R O K W B M Y L R M L N Z MW African Bee Tarantula Scorpion Millipede Spiders Hawk

See answers on page 30

A L T M P L K P L N E G L L B Y N

K Z R A Y N J R A I A R E Q J B R

E T M L C D T C W P P R T L R K M

L D Y I T B I L Z Y K E A T Y Q N

N Y N G Q R O B R K Y W D T O Z P

X Z B P F Z Z B N J Y R A E Y A G

V D N A M M Z P J X L J T H X N D

Gila Monster Rattlesnake Mountain Lion Scorpion Coyote Owl

Millipede Spiders Hawk Gila Monster Rattlesnake Mountain Lion thewagmagazine.com Coyote Owl

| Spring 2018

25


FOUR’S COMPANY

A Legacy of Love

PHOTOS: VICKI CUMMINGS

By Penny Lex

The Harnesses - Lily, Hosea, Little One and Joe.

Y

ou don’t see many occupant door signs in senior living facilities with more than one or two names listed. But at MorningStar Assisted Living in Fountain Hills, Arizona, you’ll see one residence identified as A Family of Four. “Hosea and Lily, Joe and Little One.” That’s because although their two human children have been gone from home for 40 years, Hosea and Lily Harkness still enjoy living as a family of four. Joe is the eldest of the Harkness canine clan—about 10 years old and a Dachshund mix. Up for adoption by the Maricopa County Sheriff Rescue in 2012, his original name was Babe. That was changed, however, when Sheriff Joe walked by and visited with Hosea and Lily as they were filling out the adoption papers. Babe was then renamed “Joe.” Little One is a Chihuahua mix rescue that joined the family in 2013 at the age of about 4 years. “He was nothing but skin and bones,” explained Lily. “He was constantly nearly being stepped on so we renamed him Little One.” Lily and Little One bonded very quickly. Little One taught Joe how to play; and, up 26

THE WAG magazine | Spring 2018

until recently, when Lily was sitting in her chair, Little One would run, jump onto her lap, up to her chest and touch his cheek against hers. First on one side, then the other, and then nestle along side her in the chair. As one would expect, it took the dogs some time to adjust to the move into a new, senior living environment. While chasing ground squirrels in the back yard is no longer part of his daily exercise routine, Joe now gets a one to two mile run early each morning. Hosea rides his scooter while Joe runs on his leash alongside. “We have about four different routes and Joe gets to see different things. Sometimes we meet people,” says Hosea. Both dogs go out for a leisurely “down the street” walk each evening in addition to their walks during the day around MorningStar grounds. The Harknesses have shared their lives with a dog, or dogs, for about 50 of their nearly 63 years of marriage. Hosea’s eyes light up when sharing photos and telling stories of pets they have had in the past—each one clearly having left a legacy of love to their dear owners. “We live a more quiet, calm life here at MorningStar than we did at our home,” says Hosea. “The dogs fill up that free time with companionship and love.” With that, Lily gazes adoringly at Little One as she softly murmurs, “We just love them. That’s just the way it is.”


RESCUE DIRECTORY 2nd Chance Dog Rescue

2ndchance.rescuegroups.org Non-profit organization dedicated to saving abandoned/ abused dogs, and provide them with shelter and a safe environment so they can regain their trust in humanity.

AARTA - Akita Advocates Relocation Team Arizona www.akitaadvocates.com

602-882-5482

Non-profit organization that finds homes for displaced Akitas through fostering.

ADOPT ME GSD

ADOPT ME GSD Facebook page

480-720-1534

Saving German Shepherds from euthanasia, providing them with medical treatment and finding loving homes.

Alaskan Malamute Rescue of Arizona

www.malamuterescue.org Alaskan Malamute Rescue of Arizona Facebook Page Rehabilitate and rehome rescued Alaskan Malamutes, assist Malamute owners, and provide education services to the public.

All About Animals Rescue www.allaboutanimalsaz.com

No-kill, foster home based, rescue.

All About Bullies Rescue

All About Bullies Rescue Facebook Page

480-227-1276

Non-profit organization that saves, rehabilitates, and rehomes bully breeds. Specializing in Pit Bulls.

Almost Home Bulldog Rescue,Inc. www.almosthomebulldogrescue.org

480-227-1276

Non-profit organization based in the Maricopa County area of central Arizona. We are dedicated to the rescue of un-wanted, neglected, and abandoned companion animals. Our focus is French and English Bulldogs from local euthanasia lists.

Amazing Aussies Lethal White Rescue of Arizona www.amazingaussies.com

602-571-5811

Non-profit organization that rescues dogs bred Merle to Merle and born blind and/or deaf by a cruel and inhumane breeding practice, so the breeders can make a few extra bucks. About 25% of every litter will come out “wrong” and are killed at birth or thrown away since they can’t be sold. It’s just a “cost of business” to the breeders, but it’s an everyday fight for us. I hope you will join us to help end this planned cruelty.

Anthem Pets

www.anthempets.org

480-287-3542

Non-profit 100% volunteer, No Kill rescue to implement a fully rounded animal welfare program that provides education and resources to the community at large and promotes responsible pet ownership. Volunteers answer calls at the 24 Hour Pet Hotline; provide medical care for abandoned and abused animals and find them qualified, loving homes; and work to reunite lost pets with their owners through use of the Pet Hotline, a Pet Search & Rescue team and a very active Facebook page.

Arizona Animal Welfare League and SPCA www.aawl.org

602-273-6852

Largest and oldest no-kill shelter in Arizona rehabilitates and rehomes more than 5,000 dogs and cats that are abandoned or that have been surrendered by their owners. We do this primarily by rescuing them from other shelters in Maricopa County where they are likely to be euthanized due to the lack of time and resources to care for them. At any one time our shelter will hold 140 cats and 190 dogs. We also have a foster parent network of approximately 90 families who provide care and shelter in their homes for puppies and kittens that are too young to be adopted, and those animals that are recovering from medical procedures or that need socialization before adoption.

Arizona Basset Hound Rescue Inc. www.azbassetrescue.org

602-225-7800 (voice mail)

Non-profit organization that provides veterinary care, food, support, and shelter to Basset Hounds, Bloodhounds and Basset Hound mixes needing assistance in Arizona.

Arizona Beagle Rescue www.azbeaglerescue.com

623-977-1355

602-997-7585

Pet adoptions, veterinary and spay/neuter services, retail and thrift shopping.

Arizona Labrador and Giant Breed Rescue www.azlabsandgiants.org

602-307-5227 Volunteer non-profit organization that is dedicated

to rehoming Labradors, Great Danes, Mastiffs, Elkhounds, Newfoundlands, Bernese Mountain Dogs, Saint Bernards, Irish Wolfhounds and Deer Hounds.

Arizona Pug Adoption & Rescue Network www.aparn.org

480-964-3126

Non-profit to rescue Pugs in need, provide medical care and emotional support, and place them into loving, permanent adoptive homes in Arizona.

Arizona Sheltie Rescue, Inc. www.azsheltierescue.com Bill Ferrell: bkferrell@cox.net

(480) 507-7996

Cindy Reel: reelracer@aol.com (602) 843-8073 Non-profit volunteer organization that serves the entire state of Arizona with respect to the rescue of Shetland Sheepdogs.

Arizona Siberian Husky Rescue & Adoption, Inc. www.ashra.org

602-427-7226

Non-profit, volunteer-run organization that rescues Siberian Huskies and places them into qualified homes, as well as educates the public on the special needs of the Siberian Husky.

Arizona Small Dog Rescue

Arizona Border Collie Rescue

A non-profit registered 501(c)3 no kill rescue shelter. A group of volunteers that are dedicated to rescuing and saving homeless, unwanted, abandoned, neglected, and abused dogs.

www.azbcr.org

480-422-5366 (voice message)

Promotes humane treatment through rescue, rehabilitation, education and the rehoming of neglected, abandoned and unwanted Border Collies.

Arizona Boston Terrier Rescue

www.azbtrescue.org Non-profit corporation dedicated to the rescue and rehoming of unwanted Boston Terriers, education of owners on responsible dog ownership, and education of the public on the Boston Terrier breed.

Arizona Golden Rescue

623-428-9119

623-566-9247

Non-profit foster-based rescue that provides love and care for the rescued animals in a home environment. Utilizing fosters allows us to provide attention to each animals’ unique needs while also training them on how to be inside a home.

Two locations: Sunnyslope Campus and Nina Mason Pulliam Campus for Compassion www.azhumane.org

A statewide 501(c)(3) non-profit animal welfare organization comprised of volunteers dedicated to Beagle rescue and community education.

Animal Rescue Friends Ltd www.animalrescuefriends.org

Arizona Humane Society

www.arizonagoldenrescue.org Provides emotional and medical rehabilitation and will pay for all medications and for necessary surgeries prior to adoptions being finalized for Golden Retrievers and mostlyGolden mixes.

www.azsmalldog.org

602-944-2440

AZK9 Rescue AZK9.org

623-313-8285

AZK9 is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization founded in 2010 by a group of people who wanted to make a difference in the lives of companion animals in Maricopa County. The members of AZK9 are willing to give their time, passion and knowledge to offer proactive solutions to address the pet overpopulation. The founders realized there are many contributing factors and as a group focus on three main areas; Sterilization, Education and Rescue of the companion animals in need.

AZ Cavalier Rescue

AZ Cavalier Rescue Facebook Page

602-397-4744

Foster run rescue for Cavaliers, English Toy Spaniels and mixes. DIRECTORY continues on page 28 thewagmagazine.com | Spring 2018

27


DIRECTORY continued from page 27

AZ Cocker Rescue

www.azcockerrescue.org

602-757-8225

Non-profit that focuses on rescuing all breeds of dogs from the county shelters that are going to be euthanized.

AZ Furry Friends Rescue Foundation www.azfurryfriends.org

602-882-9535

Non-profit foster-based, all breed, dog and cat rescue that are at risk of euthanasia at our local kill shelters.

AZ Happy Tails Animal Rescue

www.happytailsaz.org A non-profit registered 501(c)(3) rescue group that does not have an actual shelter. All dogs are fostered in homes. Strive to educate and raise awareness of the importance of animal respect and appreciation and facilitate a low cost spay/neuter program.

AZ Mastiff Rescue (Canine Rescue Coalition, Inc.)

www.azmastiffrescue.com Non-profit dedicated to rescuing English and Neapolitan Mastiffs and other Mastiff and Giant Breeds.

AZ Paws & Claws

www.azpawsandclaws.com Non-profit 501(c)(3) charitable, all volunteer dog and cat rescue serving Arizona. Our mission is to match rescued dogs and cats with a home that will provide them with a lifetime of love and care.

Dachshunds Only Rescue

www.dachshundsonlyrescue.com

602-550-4088

Not-for-profit, volunteer, foster-based, never-kill organization for Dachshunds. No animal is euthanized if they are too sick to be treated or too aggressive to be suitable for adoption–believe that behavioral modification techniques and positive reinforcement help to eliminate aggressive or unwanted behavior.

Desert Labrador Retriever Rescue www.dlrrphoenix.org

480-899-5227

Non-profit, all volunteer, foster-based organization that provides Labrador Retriever breed and training information on request, public education on spaying and neutering, and finding homes for the Labrador Retriever.

Desert Harbor Doberman Rescue azdoberescue.org

602-492-8139

Arizona’s first and only 501©(3) IRS-certified charity Doberman rescue. Incorporated in Arizona, a no-kill rescue committed to forever placements, and do best to make sure the dog taken home is suited to owner lifestyle.

Desert Paws Rescue

www.desertpawsrescue.org A non-profit, no-kill, animal rescue group to rescue, rehabilitate (when necessary) and place domestic animals into stable homes; to educate the public about the responsibilities of pet ownership; and to build public awareness about the human-animal bond and its benefits to society.

The Fetch Foundation

AZ Shepherd Rescue

www.thefetchfoundation.com

623-256-2698

Non-profit dedicated to saving lives in the animal and human communities through innovative strategies and unique programs that supports, equips, and trains first responders by providing the life saving tools in“The FIDO BAG®” that is used by first responders to provide life saving intervention to family pets that are caught in a fire or other emergency situations; to provide a safe place for homeless dogs that were neglected or abused; and by connecting the right dog with a veteran in need of companionship, these K9(s) would serve a purpose beyond what anyone imagined.

www.azshepherdrescue.org Non-profit foster-based rescue saving German Shepherds, Australian Shepherds and mixes of both from the county euthanasia list.

AZPyrs: Arizona Great Pyrenees Association & Rescue Network www.azpyrs.com

480-988-4033

Non-profit fosters and rehomes purebred Great Pyrenees throughout the entire state of Arizona.

Boxer Luv Rescue www.boxerluv.org

602-530-5671

A 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization to give new life to homeless Boxers in need and is 100% managed and run by volunteers and relies entirely on private donations, grants and revenue from Boxer Luv’s “Luv-To-Save” Thrift Shop.

Briard Rescue and Haven www.briardrescue.com

602-228-2495

Established to provide a safe place for Briard dogs. The Haven is a privately run facility, funded by private donations, ebay auctions, adoption fees and bequests.

Central Arizona Animal Rescue (CAAR)

www.caaronline.org Non-profit organization dedicated to the general welfare, sheltering and placement of animals; prevention of cruelty to animals and overpopulation; education concerning humane treatment of animals; and involvement in other animal welfare issues. 28

THE WAG magazine | Spring 2018

602-617-2656

Finding Fido Animal Rescue

Finding Fido Animal Rescue Facebook page A humane rescue organization dedicated to reducing euthanasia by finding loving and permanent homes for the wonderful dogs and cats, especially the senior or special needs pets.

Foothills Animal Rescue www.foothillsanimal.org

480-488-9890

A non-profit organization to save lives through the rescue, care and adoption of homeless animals; a thrift store remains the primary source of income and community interaction.

Four Peaks Animal Rescue www.fourpeaksanimalrescue.org

480-471-3520

A non-profit organization dedicated to the rescue, rehabilitation, training and placement of all species of domestic animals in need of medical care and sanctuary.

Freedom Tails Rescue

www.freedomtailsrescue.com Non-profit dedicated to rescuing animals in need.

Friends for Life Animal Rescue www.azfriends.org

480-497-8296

Dedicated to helping the homeless and stray animals living on the streets and in the deserts. We also pursue an aggressive spay/neuter program for our animals and education for the public.

Friends of Animal Care & Control www.azfriendsofanimals.org

602-882-8627

Reduces euthanasia in Maricopa County by supporting pets & people by providing free and accessible spay & neuter services in our community.

Great Dane Rescue of AZ Alliance www.greatdanerescueofazalliance.com

623-869-0409

Official Great Dane Rescue group for the state of AZ and have been caring for beloved Danes throughout AZ and the valley for over 20 years. Dedicated to providing the proper care and placement of Danes in need, whether they are a pound puppy or an owner turn-in.

Halo Animal Rescue (Helping Animals Live On) www.halorescue.org

602-971-9222

No-kill facility that provides a refuge for dogs and cats who might otherwise be destroyed for reasons such as a treatable injury, illness, or those that are too scared or too young to go up for adoption at the time of arrival. The thrift store helps to bring in necessary income.

Happy Tails Dachshund Rescue, Inc. www.happytailsdr.org

209-647-1251

Non-profit foster-based to save as many Dachshunds from suffering and premature death.

Helping Orphaned Hounds (H.O.H.) www.helpingorphanedhounds.org

602-680-0713

Small all volunteer, no-kill, non-profit organization with two main goals: find loving homes for homeless dogs & puppies and promote spay/neuter thereby reducing the tragic consequences of pet overpopulation.

Lost Our Home Pet Rescue www.lostourhome.org

602-445-7387

Ensure that all pets have loving homes when families face major life challenges and provide compassionate options when Realtors and the community find an abandoned pet.

Lucky Dog Rescue

www.luckydogrescue.org

480-704-4628

Non-profit all volunteer foster-based organization dedicated to saving the lives of homeless animals from euthanasia, educating the community on responsible pet ownership and dedicated to training and what happens after the dog is in his new home.

Luv of Dogz Fund, Inc.

www.luvofdogz.org Non-profit that provides advocacy and resources for rescued, abandoned, homeless dogs and to the people who rescue and care for them.


M.A.I.N. (Medical Animals In Need)

www.medicalanimalsinneed.com Volunteer-based, donor-driven organization dedicated to rescuing animals off Maricopa County euthanasia lists with a medical needs.

Mayday Pit Bull Rescue & Advocacy www.maydaypitbullrescue.org

Rotten Rottie Rescue

Westie & Friends AZ Rescue, Inc.

480-567-4328

480-664-7699

www.rottenrottie.com

Non-profit, no-kill, foster-based animal rescue to help, rescue, and rehome Rottweilers in safe adoptive and foster homes.

Sahuaro Dachshund Rescue

Non-profit that rescues, rehabilitates and finds homes for abandoned and surrendered West Highland Terriers and their friends, educates about spaying and neutering, and stresses the need for high quality food and the importance of dental hygiene to extend their pet’s life.

520-818-1323

White Gsd Rescue

Non-profit rescue that helps homeless Dachshunds find new homes.

White Gsd Rescue Facebook Page Works with Southwest German Shepherd Rescue.

Saguaro State Bull Terrier Rescue

Woof Wiggles n Wags

Non-profit volunteer and foster-based organization that focuses on rescuing, rehabilitating and securing placement for Pit Bull and Pit Bull mixes, especially with extreme medical/behavioral and special needs, and to assist dogs from dog fighting, hoarding and other crisis/emergency situations.

www.sahuarodachshundrescue.com

Mini Mighty Mutts Rescue

Saguarostatebullterrierclub.com

www.minimightymutts.com 480-304-5654

800-282-8911

Ohana Animal Rescue

Established in 2005, small group of Bull Terrier owners dedicated to this wonderfully crazy breed. Happy to help others find a Bull Terrier, place in new home, give advice, support or encouragement when living with, showing and breeding Bull Terriers.

480-744-5729

Saint Bernard Rescue Foundation, Inc.

Non-profit, all volunteer, foster-based small dog rescue not limited to any breed. www.ohanaanimalrescue.org Non-profit, foster home based organization saving euthanasia listed animals from the county shelters.

www.saintrescue.org/arizona

One Dog (Arizona)

Non-profit for rescue of Saint Bernards.

One Dog (Arizona) Facebook Page Non-profit rescue site to help network e-list (euthanasia list) and rescue dogs who need forever homes or dedicated foster homes.

Racing Home Greyhound Adoption www.racinghome.info

602-573-0940

Non-profit foster- and volunteer-based rescue to find homes for retired racing Greyhounds and other homeless Greyhounds.

R.E.S.C.U.E. (Reducing Euthanasia at Shelters through Commitment and Underlying Education) www.azrescue.org

480-598-9410

Non-profit, volunteer-driven animal rescue with no central facility and the focus is euthanasia-list rescues of cats and dogs from the county shelters.

Rescue A Golden of Arizona (RAG of AZ) www.golden-retriever.org

602-600-8312

Non-profit, shelterless, all volunteer organization dedicated to the rescue, evaluation and placement of Golden Retrievers who lost their homes through no fault of their own.

Rescue Pals

Rescuepals85268@gmail.com A non-profit organization dedicated to rescuing, rehabilitating, and rehoming dogs mostly found in Fountain Hills.

Rockstar Rescue

480-951-8495 602-920-1826

Saving Paws Rescue

www.savingpawsrescueaz.com

480-737-6089

Non-profit, all-volunteer organization dedicated to providing veterinary care, evaluation and adoptive homes for German Shepherd Dogs, Belgian Malinois and others who are left in pounds to await uncertain fate.

Southwest Collie Rescue www.nmcollierescue.com

480-507-7996

Non-profit, volunteer, foster-based organization to rescue every purebred Collie in the area needing help, no matter how old or how sick.

Southwest German Shepherd Rescue www.swgermanshepherdrescue.com

602-866-2880

10am-8pm preferably weekdays Non-profit volunteer based organization committed to the rescue, rehab and rehoming of German Shepherds.

Underdog Rescue of Arizona www.underdogaz.com

480-553-9311

Non-profit, foster-based dog rescue that is dedicated to rescuing and rehoming shelter dogs rescued from the euthanasia list and abandoned dogs in need.

Urban Rescues

www.urbanrescues.com Urban Rescues Facebook Page Rescuing dogs scheduled for euthanasia in Maricopa County animal shelters.

www.rockstarrescueaz.org

Valley of the Sun Dog Rescue

Our mission is to help the hard-to-adopt cases, dogs that have suffered psychological traumas either from hoarding, fighting or abandonment situations and prepare them to become loving, household pets despite what they’ve endured.

480-228-0126

858-876-2558

www.westieandfriendsazrescue.org

www.valleyofthesundogrescue.com

Non-profit, no-kill, family run animal shelter with help from volunteers and fosters that specializes in American Pit Bulls and American Staffordshire Terriers, but accepts all breeds into the rescue. We strive to increase public awareness about the gentler, humane side of a “Bully” breed.

www.woofswigglesnwags.com Facebook: WoofsWigglesnWags

602-828-2425

A 501(c)(3) all-volunteer foster-based all breed dog and cat rescue. We spay/neuter, vaccinate and microchip our animals and place them in loving “furever” homes. Check our Facebook page for adoption events and special fund raiser events.

Yorkie Luv Rescue

www.yorkieluvrescue.com Non-profit volunteer and foster-based rescue to rescue, rehab and rehome any Yorkie cross with Yorkshire Terrier that finds itself homeless and work with communities in order to stress the importance of adopting a Yorkie in the hope of one day eliminating all puppy mills.

SUPPORTING ORGANIZATIONS Empty Bowl Pet Food Pantry www.emptybowlpetfoodpantry.org

602-909-7153

A pet food pantry and disaster services organization distributing free pet food through partner agencies and giving pet items to Veterans, homeless, disaster victims and others.

Friends of Arizona’s Shelter Animals

Friends of Arizona’s Shelter Animals Facebook Page Volunteers who take photos of and get information about animals on the euthanasia list in local shelters, volunteer time to network the animals scheduled to be euthanized and make their photos/information available to the public and rescue groups in order to find alternative outlets for them.

Pet Social Worker/Tails of Hope www.petsocialworker.org

480-452-7997

Free online database of stray, rescued, lost and found pets in the Maricopa area. In addition, the site offers tips, instructions and links to the local Pinal County Animal Care and Control forms needed to report a lost or found pet.

Phoenix Animal Care Coalition (PACC911) www.pacc911.org

602-992-4779

Non-profit organization that works to bring together the Maricopa County animal welfare community in an interactive manner by providing opportunities for all to work together for the greater benefit of animals. Rescued Treasure’s Charity Boutique, and Chuck Waggin’ Pet Food Pantry are divisions of PACC911.

thewagmagazine.com | Spring 2018

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Advertise your small business services or pet-related items you wish to sell. Post your ad (maximum 30 words including headline and body of text) for $75 per issue or better yet, $200 for four!

WAGIFIEDS

Take advantage of reduced advertising rates in the Wagifieds! CUSTOM LEATHER

Submit your ads to: info@thewagmagazine.com Questions: call Penny 507-202-3929

GLASS DESIGN

PET SITTER

REAL ESTATE Real Estate for Rescues

In-Home Professional Pet Sitting Services

WILLOW LAKE LEATHER

Grant Maves 928-227-3004 • Prescott, AZ Handcrafted leather holsters, belts, fringe bags, guitar straps, flute pouches, dog collars and more. Call for more information.

ADVERTISE HERE YOUR AD HERE

Do you have a product or service that other pet owner’s need? This is your ad space.

FIREFLY GLASS DESIGN

etsy.com/shop/fireflyglassdesign Handmade Fused Dichroic Glass Treasures Personal Photos Fused on Glass Phone: 480-483- 2012 shrink60004@yahoo.com

From page 25

WAG’S WORD SEARCH Bobcats, Bees &PUZZLE Hawks - OH MY! Find the Desert Dangers ANSWERS S N T Y T B E D E P I T N E C T B 30

N O I L N I A T N U O M Z Q Z L B

R I N J A V E L I N A E P X W Z Z

A P L O S P I D E R S T J M J R L

T R M R R L V T L N T O L D B N X

T L E S N O C S P Z Z T N P P E T S N O L X R N F A A M A T Y N L I J Q C D U L O L G E T K RW P S L W T V B Y O C E Q G N E A G W T B R R R O K W B M Y L R M L N Z MW

A L T M P L K P L N E G L L B Y N

THE WAG magazine | Spring 2018

K Z R A Y N J R A I A R E Q J B R

E T M L C D T C W P P R T L R K M

L D Y I T B I L Z Y K E A T Y Q N

N Y N G Q R O B R K Y W D T O Z P

X Z B P F Z Z B N J Y R A E Y A G

V D N A M M Z P J X L J T H X N D

We offer daily visits, overnight stays, dog walking and house sitting services in 85268 and 85259. Bonded and insured. Call us at: 480-717-7778.

Shannon Shutack Berkshire Hathaway Home Services 602-696-4821 Shannon.S@bhhsaz.com shannonshutack.bhhsaz.com Refer your friends and family! Its an easy way to help earn donations for your favorite animal charity or shelter! Call for additional details.

A SNIFF OF WHAT’S COMING ... THE WAG - SUMMER ‘18 (early July) • Essential Oils • K9 Police Officer • S ummer, Playing It Cool and Safe …and a whole lot more!

INDEX OF ADVERTISERS Animal Clinic Del Rancho.. .............................. 7 Coldwell Banker, Diana Rickenbaugh.. ............... 32 Fountain Fashions........................................ 7 Fountain View Village.. ................................. 31 FUEL4LIFE/PetHealth.. .................................. 21 Midwestern University Companion Animal Clinic ... 7 MorningStar Senior Living.............................. 5 Pal’s Inn Pet Resort...................................... 17 Phoenix PETEXPO.. ...................................... 23 Raptor Shield............................................ 15 Rattlesnake Ready, LLC.. ................................ 15 RE/MAX Sun Properties, Tina Nabers ................. 11 Russ Lyon Sotheby’s Realty, Karen DeGeorge......... 2 Sapori D’Italia.. .......................................... 11 Vito’s Pizza and Italian Ristorante...................... 5


AT FOUNTAIN VIEW VILLAGE

Fountain View Village is a pet friendly community. Your pet can relax at your side and enjoy all of the comforts we have to offer. Your fur friend will love this new home as much as you will!

PLEASE CALL 480-376-2220 TO SCHEDULE A PERSONAL TOUR TODAY!

thewagmagazine.com | Spring 2018

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Ready to take the leap?

When buying or selling your home…. Use my expertise to make the ideal decision for you and your best friend!

Diana Rickenbaugh REALTOR Accredited Buyer’s Rep Graduate Realtor’s Institute Dianarickenbaugh.com diana@dianarickenbaugh.com

Call Me Today! 480 263 3649

The WAG Magazine Spring 2018  

It is the appreciation for the blessed bond between canines and their companions that prompted the creation of THE WAG magazine. Each entert...

The WAG Magazine Spring 2018  

It is the appreciation for the blessed bond between canines and their companions that prompted the creation of THE WAG magazine. Each entert...

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