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Serving Fountain Hills & the Surrounding Area

Winter 2015-16

an informative, entertaining read about dogs & their companions ComplimentAry

Howli-Day

GIFT GUIDE DANGERS OF THE DESERT Be aware – protect your dog

CELEBRITY Pet Matchup

Feeding The Soul From An Empty Bowl

Listen Up Learn what your dog is trying to tell you


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Look what he got from the

Dog Rescue... A lot of

LOVE!

And so can you! The internet is filled with endless resources for dog rescues and pet adoption. And we have a list worth checking out on page 29. Man’s best friend could be right around the corner from you. Have a look today!

Please support and spread the word about dog rescues and no-kill shelters. The life you save could be your next best friend. Promote the healthy long life of a beautiful canine companion. Thank you!


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16 coVer storY

Feeding the soul From an empty bowl

Pet food pantry serves up more than the usual fare By Michele Enli

8

24 15

19

FeAtures

7 taking the bite

out of Pet Liability

8

Insuring against accidents caused by your companion By Penny Lex

14 celebrity dog Matchup

Can you guess who shares the limelight with whom? By Zac Wood

Friends of the Fountain

See who’s visiting this favorite, celebrated Fountain Hills setting By Michele Enli

19 dangers of the desert Bobcats and scorpions and snakes, oh my! By Zac Wood

to the rescue

doing business

12 rescue Pals

15

By Penny Lex

28

Proper disposal of doo By Zac Wood

22

howli-day gift guide A few ideas from Santa

24 Listen up

A lesson in canine communication By Evangeline Uriyu

spike’s treats

The shopping venue of every dog’s dream By Penny Lex

sit/stAY/PLAY/reAd

21 Wag Word search

10 the scoop on Poop

book reviews

Holy Cow! All Dogs Go to Kevin By Terri Schlichenmeyer

in every issue From the Editor

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Smile for the Camera

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Rescue Directory

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What’s Happening

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Index of Advertisers

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www.thewagmagazine.com

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Facts & Trends

** According to the 2015-2016 APPA National Pet Owners Survery, basic annual expenses for dog owners include:

68%* own pets Number of U.S. households owning a pet

2015

Toys

2014

Vitamins

2013

Groomer/ Grooming Aids

Total U.S. Pet Industry Expenditures estimated for 2015

Routine Vet

$60.59 BILLION ** expenditures

Food

Households with dogs

Kennel Boarding

56.7 MILLION * Surgical Vet Visits

own dogs

$551

$333

$269

$235

$83

$62

$47

$58.04 billion actual expenditures in 2014

*According to the 2015-16 APPA National Pet Owners Survey **Gathered by APPA from various market research sources and are not included in the organization’s bi-annual National Pet Owners Survey

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Serving Fountain Hills & the Surrounding Area

THE WAG

magazine an informative, entertaining read about dogs & their companions

winter 2015-16 Volume 1

Welcome to the premier issue of THE WAG magazine! THE WAG magazine is dedicated to these beloved creatures that warm our hearts, make us laugh, lick our tears, teach us untold lessons, and without passing judgment, channel a lifetime of unconditional love.

issue 1

publiSHerS Gary Lex Penny Lex editor Penny Lex deSigner Tammy Eggiman SAleS & mArKeting Gary Lex WriterS Michele Enli Penny Lex Terri Schlichenmeyer Evangeline Uriyu Zac Wood

________________

THE WAG magazine is published quarterly By Lex Ventures, LLC 14844 N Greenhurst Ave Fountain Hills, AZ 85268 SUBSCRIPTIoN RATE $20/YEAR 4 ISSUES REMIT CHECK To ADDRESS ABoVE

THE WAG magazine All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. Printed in the U.S.A.

________________ For Advertising Information

gary lex 715-497-8073 gary@thewagmagazine.com

From the editor Retirement and yen for a petfriendly community in a warmer climate prompted the recent relocation for my husband Gary and me from the Midwest to sunny Arizona. The beautiful, dog-centric community of Fountain Hills is now home; and we, along with our nine-yearold “puppies” Baxter (Wheaten) and Cloe (Bichon boss/diva), couldn’t be any happier. We love dogs; and it’s the appreciation for the blessed bond between canines and their companions that prompted our creation of this publication. Our goal is to assist dog owners in providing the best possible care for their pet, champion the efforts of rescue groups, and simply celebrate the joys of sharing one’s life with a d-o-g. We’d like to hear from our readers and welcome your feedback. If you have ideas for articles, suggestions, comments, upcoming events, or a rescue group you’d like listed, please send them to info@thewagmagazine.com. And don’t forget to forward photos of your furry friends for our Spring (available in February) issue “Smile for the Camera” section.

gary

baxter

We hope you enjoy the information shared in this issue. Woof!

Penny Cloe

Penny Lex, Publisher & Editor

Article Information or Comments

penny lex 480-466-7548 penny@thewagmagazine.com

A special thank you to our advertisers who support our passion for dogs and the mission to keep them healthy and safe.

www.thewagmagazine.com www.thewagmagazine.com

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We'd love to Hear from you! Send photos of your dog to penny@thewagmagazine.com

Buster & Taylor

Xena is 2 years old. She loves to sit in the pool then come in the house & sleep on my bed.

Amari & Griffin

Hondo & Alfred

Parker age 5, Pit Bull mix. We adopted Parker 3.5 years ago after losing our 13.5 year old Rhodesian Ridgeback, Reggie. We fostered him first, to see if he would be a fit - he is part worm & squirmed his way into our hearts & the hearts of everyone who meets him!! Sweetest & laziest boy ever & a complete gentleman!

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Hi, my name is Sweetie & I’m a curly blonde Labradoodle. My demeanor is that of the aristocratic Poodle, but my personality is all Labrador. I love everyone! In fact I am the loveliest girl in the world. - Ron & Penny Latko

Roo age 11, Boxer mix. We adopted Roo 2 years ago from Southern California. He had been on CraigsList & luckily, a Rhodesian Ridgeback Rescue was able to pull him. We saw his picture when our Rhodesian Ridgeback breeder shared him on Facebook - his picture touched that place in our hearts where Reggie resides. He is the biggest love ever & such a happy boy! Nothing better than a senior!

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Saffy age 6 & Shelby age 3, both Rhodesian Ridgebacks. Saffy the total diva. If Saffy ain’t happy, nobody’s happy, & Shelby the total tomboy. - Nancy Wulff and Rich Alfano, Fountain Hills

Daphne Blake Manno is 3 years old & she loves to be the center of attention & gossip about other dogs.

Sherlock is 3 years old he absolutely loves to eat as much as he can then run away from home for hours on end. -Jonathan Manno (son of Maria & Gasoper Manno), Mesa


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taking the

By Penny Lex

of

Pet Liability

A sobering statistic from 2012 notes that over onethird of homeowner’s insurance claims were pet related. And according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 4.7 million people in the United States are bitten by dogs annually.

When it comes to situations where your pet is involved in someone’s injury, it’s advantageous not only to know who is liable for what but also how you can ensure adequate coverage for everyone’s protection.

DOG Bite LAw

Arizona has what can be referred to as a “dog-bite law.” The Arizona Statute 11-1025. Liability for Dog Bites reads in part: The owner of a dog which bites a person when the person is in or on a public place or lawfully in or on a private place including the property of the owner of the dog, is liable for damages suffered by the person bitten, regardless of former viciousness of the dog or the owner’s knowledge of its viciousness. Statue 11-1027. Reasonable Provocation as Defense states, “proof of provocation of the attack by the person injured shall be a defense to the action for damages. The issue of provocation shall be determined by whether a reasonable person would expect the conduct or circumstances would be likely to provoke a dog.” Say your dog is in your vehicle with the window cracked open and someone reaches inside and gets bitten. There would likely be no liability under the dog bite statute as the person placed their hand where one was not legally entitled to be.

HOMeOwner’S inSUrAnCe

Out

When it comes to your abode, most people understand that there’re some provisions for pets via their homeowner’s insurance. According to Anton Vierthaler, Broker/owner Tag Insurance Services Inc., “most homeowner’s insurance policies cover incidents,

most commonly dog bites. Some policies cover this to the full personal liability limits listed on the declaration while others limit the liability to a specific amount.”

Anton also noted that most homeowner’s insurance companies will not insure a home where these particular dog breeds (or any mix of the breeds) exist: Staffordshire Terrier (Pit Bull), Rottweiler, German Shepherd, Presa Canario, Chow Chow, Doberman Pinscher, Akita, Wolf-hybrid, Mastiff, Cane Corso, Great Dane, Alaskan Malamute, Siberian Husky. However, there are other carriers (non standard) that will insure these breeds.

OtHer CAnine COVerAGe

It’s not just a “bite” that might find you and Fido approaching the bench, but there are other situations in which injury may occur. For example, you’re walking your dog down the street and stop to chat with an elderly woman. Your pooch greets her and in his excitement of pursuing the nearest tree, circles her with the leash; she falls and breaks her hip. It wasn’t an aggressive act but injury did occur. or you’re at the dog park and while innocently playing, a new friend delivers a firm paw to your dog and injuries result. Fortunately, in addition to insurers that provide coverage for a pet’s medical needs, some companies offer dog or canine liability insurance in various states and for all breeds. They cover things like veterinary bills if your dog hurts another dog or animal, damage your dog causes to other people’s property, attorney fees if your case goes to court, and loss of wages to an injured party. Some of those companies base premium rates on breed, weight, age, gender and bite history. Consideration is also given to the responsibility of the owner by proof of obedience or other specialized training.

wHAt iF …

Make sure to read the fine print on your insurance policy and communicate with your agent. If your insurer insists on excluding your dog, ask about a separate umbrella policy or seek coverage from a specialized dog liability insurance company. If an incident occurs, seek legal counsel from a reputable source. www.thewagmagazine.com

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s d n e i r F

of the

By Michele Enli

n i a t n u Fo

Photography by Michele Enli

Described as one of the most pet-friendly towns around, Fountain Hills has a population of over 23,000 people and at least 7,000 registered dogs. With ratios like this, it’s no wonder that The Fountain is a favorite gathering haunt for people and their pets.

On any given day, the grounds around The Fountain in the towns’ Fountain Park are filled with the lively steps and happy smiles of dogs and their companions as they meet, greet, and make new friends. Let’s see who’s visiting The Fountain right now.

There’s Bambie, a Chihuahua rescue that’s approximately two years old and her companion, Terry.

Teddy, a nine-year-old Yorkie, and Brady, an eight-year-old Maltese, and their companion, Matt.

Wylie, a Pomeranian, and his companion, Nat.

Sherman, a six-month-old Malinois Shepherd rescue and his companion, Manon.

Half shepherd, quarter lab, quarter Leonberger rescue Charlie and her companion, Terry.

A “mixture of a lot of love,” two-year-old rescue Scooby, and his companion, David.

Coming to The Fountain from Rio Verde as often as he can is Wally, a chiweenie that is seven, and his companions Marty and Rick.

Barney, a seven-year-old beagle rescue, his friend, Chelsea, a sixteen and a half-year-young Yorkie, and Barney’s companion, Debbie.

Yuki, a 13-year-old Shiba Inu rescue, and companion, Bonita. The smile on Yuki’s face is priceless as friends pass by and the freedom to enjoy walking is expressed.

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That’s just a very small sampling of the countless, beautiful dogs and their humans reeling in the joys of The Fountain scene. Another popular sniff and stroll spot in the heart of Fountain Hills is the Avenue of the Fountains. The prelude to the big fountain, the Avenue offers a parkway of green grass, beautiful fountains, benches for kicking back and relaxing, and drinking fountains with varied heights to accommodate people and their dogs.

Lucy, a seven-month cocker spaniel rescue from Sheriff Joe’s MASH Unit, and her companion, Christine. Christine says that Lucy gets SO excited at seeing other friends on her walk that she cannot contain herself.

Fortunately, friends of The Fountain don’t need to go far for a beverage or snack, as there are numerous pet-friendly eateries close by that welcome furry friends to their patios. They include Arrivederci Cucina Italiana, All American Sports Grill, Sofrita’s, Phil’s Filling Station, Flapjacks, Euro Pizza Cafe, and Mountainview Coffee. Some establishments have pet-friendly priorities, so don’t be surprised if your four-legged friend gets his complimentary beverage first, before your selection arrives.

Spirit, an American Eskimo, and Indy, a Samoyed, and their companions, Linda and Michael. Spirit and Indy pause to romp and play with each other as they make their way around the fountain.

Cassie, a chocolate lab rescue that’s six, and Rocco, a nine-year-old American Staffordshire Terrier, and their companion, Andi.

Fountain Park is a master-planned idea centered around activities for the whole family, including pets. The 64-acre recreational expanse was built in 1970 and is the mainstay in the town center. The park includes the focal point which is the 29-acre, 100 million gallon lake with an epic fountain in the middle. The grandiose, world-famous feature spews water 330 feet high every hour, on the hour for 15 minutes between 9 am and 9 pm and can be seen from miles around. There’s also an 18-hole championship disc golf course; children’s playground; restrooms; various picnic areas; and drinking fountains for everyone, including water bowls for dogs to leisurely take a lick and a lap. Fountain Hills acquired the park in May, 1997 from MCO Properties, Inc. Shortly thereafter, the Parks and Recreation Commission developed a new plan that included an outdoor amphitheater; 7200 linear feet of lighted walkways; five picnic ramadas

Rocco is so happy to be on his walk that he takes himself onto the grass and just starts rolling about.

with tables and barbecues and a children’s playground with unique water features. Many people and organizations have given to this popular locale including Joseph and Marge Knudson Brown, who were early pioneers from Iowa (19702013). The Browns were quiet advocates and visionaries for many Fountain Hills’ community causes, including enhancements of Fountain Park. The Browns are continuing to leave a legacy and pay-it-forward as their estate gave $25,000 to create the Joe and Marge Brown Legacy Plaza in Fountain Park. The Plaza includes a large seating area of stone along with a sculpture entitled “Spirit of the Saguaro” by artist Don Kenworth. The sculpture beautifully depicts Marge’s love for the desert, the saguaro itself, along with flowers, hummingbirds, cactus, wrens and butterflies.

Michele is a freelance writer with a passion in photography, animal communication, canine massage, and elder pet care. Along with writing, she currently does pet sitting, volunteering to help animals and leads Laughter Yoga sessions. She wants to help bring a voice to the voiceless (animals) and lives with her 16-plus-year-young Yorkie, Chelsea.

FOUNTAIN PARK HOURS: 6:00 a.m. - 11:00 p.m. i 12925 N. SAGUARO BLVD. i FOUNTAIN HILLS, AZ www.thewagmagazine.com

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I poop, you scoop! Any questions?

THE SCOOP

ON POOP

By Zac Wood

When you accept the responsibility of a dog, you’re accepting more than just remembering kibble and the “I promise I’ll walk her every day!” You’re accepting the chore of keeping your dog’s impact on the environment negligible–you’re signing up for poop duty. It’s inescapable: whether it’s an indoor mess, maintaining the backyard, or following behind on walks.

HEALTH & ENVIRONMENTAL HAZARDS If you eschew the responsibility, the consequences are numerous. The most obvious is the simple comfort of the area: a yard or park full of doggie landmines is unpleasant for all parties. A pile of poo can be bad for the grass underneath, smothering the healthy green and leaving ugly, dead yellow patches behind. The smell and the piles are only symptomatic of the real problems: dog feces can host disease, and of course the piles attract disease-carrying flies that can infiltrate homes. Your pet’s little biological bombs can carry and spread Giardia, roundworms, hookworms, Salmonella, and E.coli, as well as parvovirus and coronavirus. The Environmental Protection Agency has categorized dog waste as a nonpoint source of pollution. Additionally, all Phoenix Metro Area cities have fees and fines up to $3,000 for owners who don’t clean up after their dogs (blind persons with service dogs are exempted).

PROPER PICK UP & DISPOSAL The chore, no matter how necessary, still isn’t pleasant. There are several methods and products to make the “business” business easier. In your backyard, any one of the scooper devices at your local pet store will allow you to relocate the offending mess into a container for disposal. That container should be airtight with plastic bags and kept away from common areas like your patio, pool, and grill. The container should be regularly emptied into the city’s trash collection service. When you’re not at home, you should always carry small plastic bags for cleaning up after your dog. Those bags should be immediately sealed, and deposited in a city garbage can. Not having a bag, or not wanting to carry a full bag to the trash, is no excuse for leaving your pup’s piles behind. Of course, another solution exists. As with any dirty job, you can pay someone else to do it for you. Numerous Valley services offer dog walking, yard cleaning, and more. No matter the size of your pack, and whether you do it yourself, make it part of the kids’ chores, or hire a professional, cleaning up after your dogs must be part of your animal ownership routine. It makes you happier, it makes the neighbors and fellow trail walkers happier, and it keeps your entire family healthy. Zac is a US Navy veteran, a freelancer, and a juggler. A Valley native, he lives in North Phoenix with his wife, too many cats, and, of course, two rescued pit-mixes (named after minor Harry Potter characters).

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Maggie’s Pooper Picker Uppers provides yard cleaning and pickup services, from single visits before an event to thrice weekly. Since 2002, Maggie’s has offered services at homes, common interest areas, parks, businesses, and more. 602.499.0668 www.maggiespetwasteremoval.com/ Services.html Matt’s Poop Up is the winner of multiple Angie’s List Super Service Awards, and is the Official Pooper Scooper for the Arizona Diamondback Bark in the Park event. A straight-forward pricing structure offers discounts for military, first-responders, retirees and handicapped customers. Technicians are uniformed professionals with gear (and shoes) sanitized before each visit. 480.593.7163 www.mattpoopup.com Poopy Do has been “Dooin’ The Business™” long enough to be recognized as a Phoenix Magazine “Best of the Valley” service. Poopy Do offers customized schedules, no contracts, and a 100% satisfaction guarantee. 602.956.1048 623.435.1301 480.970.1877 www.poopydo.com


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to tHe reSCue By Penny Lex

The majority of rescues are found in Fountain Hills and brought to Pal’s Inn with hopes of locating the pet’s owner. Rescue Pals attempts to reunite the dog with his person by posting on various Facebook pages and Craigslist, ad placement in the Fountain Hills Times, and by putting up fliers and posters in the area where the dog was found. If the owner Dasher and Princess enjoy the fresh air & attention isn’t located, Rescue Pals from volunteers Susan Dawson & Christine Schaeken takes the dog under their wing. They assume responsibility for general care, get the dog vacFive years ago when Christine Schaeken, cinated, spayed or neutered if Susan Dawson and Maureen Glunz were necessary, and provide compensation training for the Susan G. Komen Three for food and board. The rescue then Day Breast Cancer Walk, they developed goes up for adoption. a partnership with Pal’s Inn Pet Resort and began taking a few rescued canine friends with them on their hikes. It didn’t take long for the ladies to expand their efforts and subsequently establish Rescue Pals – a 501(c)(3) non-profit, dog rescue and rehabilitation organization. ADDRESSING THE NEED “We were surprised to find such need for a dog rescue here in Fountain Hills,” says Susan. “But the community has stepped up and supported our efforts at every turn, engaging and getting involved from the very beginning.” Two annual garage sales, additional fundraisers, as well as monetary donations have allowed Rescue Pals to cover over $17,000 annually in medical expenses and boarding fees for helpless animals. As a result, over 250 dogs have been rehabilitated and placed in their new, forever homes.

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also check out the fliers at Petco, Spike’s, and local veterinarian offices; visit an adoption event; or go to Rescue Pals’ page on Facebook.

If you find a dog you’d like to see, simply contact Rescue Pals (at the email address below) and they’ll be happy to schedule a meeting for you and the entire family. And if there’s already a canine in the household, there’s a “meet and greet” for them, too. “It’s important to see how the dogs interact and get along,” says Christine. “We walk them together and observe their body language. If things go well, they meet again, off leash in the courtyard of Pal’s Inn. If that encounter is positive and the family decides to proceed with adoption, we bring the rescue to the residence and do a home check. We basically look to see if the home and yard are safe for the dog. For example, we “Our relationship with Pal’s Inn Pet Resort has note if the fence or wall is continued to grow over the last five years. The high enough and that there ongoing support in the form of housing & animal are no objects that would care that they provide is critical to the successful allow bigger dogs to climb functioning of our organization.” –Rescue Pals on so they could jump over. And if a small dog, we make “Sometimes we take a dog in that has sure there are no holes or gaps that to be surrendered by its owner due to would allow an escape. If there’s a cat in unforeseen circumstances,” says Christhe house, we cat-test to be sure the cat tine. “And occasionally we’re able to take feels comfortable with the new arrival. one from Pinal County Animal Care and We need to feel comfortable leaving the Control or Maricopa County Animal dog in that environment.” Care and Control East. We prefer to resCompleted adoption applications are cue a dog that has been E-listed (schedrequired and fees are $150 or $225 for uled for euthanasia the next day) or that puppies. runs the risk of being E-listed.” FINDING YOUR PAL Rescue Pals’ adoptees are posted on a number of websites including adoptapet.com and petharbor.org. You can

KENNEL UP FOR A CAUSE Volunteers, foster homes, and donations are always needed. Rescue Pals has a troop of volunteer dog walkers who take the pooches outside for a hike and


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“It’s heartbreaking when you see dogs come in. They’re frightened & sometimes injured; but then you see the progress they make, both physically & mentally. And when you see them adopted into their forever home & get the love they so much deserve, it’s just wonderful.” –Susan Dawson

socialization at least three times a week; sometimes more frequently. Staff prefer to meet and then walk with potential volunteers, talk about the various rescues, explain kennel rules, introduce them to Pal’s Inn Pet Resort staff, see what dogs they would be able to handle, and ensure volunteers are fit enough to give the dogs a good walk.

Dasher, a Pointer mix, age 2 and Princess, a Bull Dog mix, age 7 are available for adoption. Mixed breeds Dash and Baxter will be available soon.

There’s always a dog in need of foster care. If you’re interested in opening your heart and your home to an animal in need, contact Rescue Pals for more information. Donations of money and supplies are essential to the successful operation of the rescue group. In addition to paying for boarding and medical care, cash donations are used to purchase food so that all rescues remain on a consistent diet. New or barely-used washable dog beds, or with washable covers, are always welcome, as are donations of treats, preferably grain or gluten-free. To adopt, foster, volunteer or donate, contact rescuepals85268@gmail.com www.thewagmagazine.com

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By Zac Wood Can you tell who belongs to whom? Check out these well-known celebrities and see if you can match them with their adorable canine companions. See Page 31 to see if you guessed correctly. mike greenberg – cohost of eSPn’s “Mike & Mike” show.

max A seven-year-old Standard Poodle who thinks he’s a person.

Amy Van dyken – six-time Olympic Gold Medalist swimmer now running her own non-profit foundation for those with spinal cord injuries like the one she sustained in 2014. little bit An eight-year-old Shih-Tzu Poodle who sleeps under the covers, and chews on water bottles.

Candice dupree – star Forward for the WnBA team Phoenix Mercury. boon A red Merle colored Aussie Shepherd, age 11. His long hair means he needs a good brushing before he’s photogenic!

lin Sue Cooney – newscaster at Channel 12 news for 31 years, from 1984 to 2015. She is now the Director of Community engagement for Hospice of the Valley. phoebe A five-year-old Australian Labradoodle, and her human’s first dog.

Photo by Paul Markow

roger Clyne – Arizona native and long-time local indie rock icon, is the lead singer and songwriter of roger Clyne and the Peacemakers.

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Kuma (it means bear) A five-year-old Labrador retriever, who was bred to be a showdog but has shoulders that slope too much – by a degree. He loves to run and swim with his human.

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doing buSineSS

By Penny Lex

Spike’s carries an assortment of items for

Spike’s Treats is an experience … for people and their dogs. It’s a one-stop shop, conve-

the “clean” healthy living of pets. “With the

niently located at Plaza Fountainside in Foun-

high pollen count here in the desert and the

tain Hills, for everything from cakes to

ever-changing barometric pressures, there

collars, treats to toys, and beds to a bounty

are a lot of animals who can be sensitive to

of accessories. Specializing in health, well-

the environment and have seasonal-type al-

ness and nutrition, the all-natural, holistic pet

lergies. We carry food and products to help

food store carries over 27 lines of food for

Spike, the inspiration for Michelle’s venture

with that,” says Michelle.

dogs and cats. They also have a bakery offering freshly prepared indulgences exclusively for man’s best friend. Upon entering Spike’s, pets (and their people) are welcomed by a buffet of doggie delectables. Over 12 flavors of all-natural treats with human grade ingredients are neatly displayed––ready to sniff and select.

It’s been nearly five years since Michelle Adams opened her doors at Spike’s, naming the business after her now deceased, beloved rescue American Pit Bull Terrier. “He was the first love of my life, my inspiration and reason for so much,” says Michelle. “He sampled all the treats and approved all our recipes.”

Community spirit is yet another facet of Spike’s business. In addition to donating to various events and supporting animal rescue, Spike’s does a monthly “Paws for a Cause.” Decorated mini paw treats are featured for $.95 with 100% of the proceeds donated to a designated rescue operation.

The pastries come in various shapes and sizes; and seasonal treats, as well as cakes and cookies for any occasion, are also available. Recipes for the goodies were created with the help of a certified board nutritionist, by experimentation, and meet the approval of the department of agriculture.

Flavors du jour

Photo by Ryan Deegan

“We love our customers (who are also friends) at Spike’s,” says Michelle. “We’re very grateful for the support and love we have received from this community.” www.thewagmagazine.com

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Feeding the Soul from an

Empty

From humble beginnings, Empty Bowl Pet Food Pantry (Empty Bowl) was created. What started out in July 2010 with four women, four bags of food and $40, has rapidly grown into a powerhouse making a positive impact on the lives of pets and their companions.

First Ingredients

When the Going Gets Tough

Empty Bowl began by reaching out to homeless individuals who had pets. Because the same individuals kept returning for assistance time and time again, it became obvious that more resources were needed. It was also apparent that people were willing to ask for help for their pets, but not for themselves. Empty Bowl then partnered with agencies and coalitions such as PACC911 (Phoenix Animal Care Coalition 911) and Project Connect of the United Way, so they could empower more people and impact more lives. As a result, and thanks to contributions of time, money, skills and supplies, Empty Bowl helps all pets, from birds to dogs, so they don’t go hungry AND bridges the gap so people can get the help they need to get back on their feet.

Empty Bowl provides statewide animal and pet assistance to individuals experiencing economic challenges, health problems, and/or natural disasters. Empty Bowl has a FEMA (Federal Emergency Management Agency) sanctioned Animal Disaster Team that works under the name of Animals In Disaster (A.I.D.) and works with the Arizona State Health Department to help community-wide disasters for State of Arizona Emergency Preparedness (www.medicalreservecorps.gov/). When disaster occurs, Empty Bowl is there to help however they can. FEMA responds, does their work and leaves; but the communities often need additional help. Sometimes people and animals are left to fend for themselves. This is where Empty Bowl steps back in. Once the A.I.D. team has done its work alongside FEMA, Empty Bowl continues to help the people and communities rebuild, so that they are stronger than they were before the disaster.

Peppered with Perseverance Of the four founders, CJ Anderson is the only one who remains. Realizing she could not maintain her mission alone, a board of 15 members, along with an advisory board, was formed to oversee day-to-day operations. The passion and drive that CJ had when she started Empty Bowl actually saved her life. Not once but twice. After suffering two strokes, Empty Bowl afforded CJ the opportunity to keep giving whatever she could in whatever capacity she was able in each given moment, especially after her strokes. She gained the strength she needed to heal on all levels. It gave purpose and meaning to her life.

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Empty Bowl brings hope, love, compassion and empowerment to about 200 events a year to help cover some of the costs for disaster response and the services they provide. These events, like United Ways’ Project Connect, are live drills that directly help animals and people in need. They also help prepare Empty Bowl for actual disasters.

Bowl By Michele Enli Photography by Michele Enli

This shows the dedication of the volunteers and board members, as well as the need for such services throughout the state.

Addressing the Needs Feeling it is critical for veterans to keep their service dog or pet because those companions help to keep their hearts open (and that is where healing begins), Empty Bowl partners with Veterans Stand Down. In addition to pet food, Empty Bowl gives leashes, beds, collars, cleaning supplies, bowls and over-the-counter medicines including flea and tick.

CJ Anderson gives John-David food for Bo as volunteers from Arizona Explorers 4-H Club look on. Empty Bowl is part of the Arizona Coalition Against Domestic Violence. In this effort, Empty Bowl has partnered with Gabriel’s Angels and other agencies to stop the cycle of abuse. Many abusers hold beloved pets hostage knowing a shelter will not take the animals. Or they threaten to


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harm or kill the family pet if the victim attempts to leave. With assistance from partnering agencies and public education, Empty Bowl is working with Noah’s Animal House on the grounds of The Shade Tree in Las Vegas, Nevada, to create similar facilities in Arizona for women, children AND their pets.

the volunteers to the recipients who are able to enjoy keeping their beloved pets with them at home.

The Voice of Experience CJ Anderson wants others to look for their passion. “Keep giving all you can in each moment no matter your situation, circumstance, finances, disability or illness. Get out and keep making a difference. Your giving makes a difference in the lives of the animals and people that are touched by the love and compassion that is extended. And it does not matter whether it be helping animals or people.”

John-David and his beloved pet, Bo, have been using Empty Bowl services for about four months. Bo is a two-year-old Shih Tzu/Yorkie mix service dog given to John-David when Bo was about six months old. John-David is disabled, confined to a wheelchair and suffers from seizures. Bo alerts him 10 minutes before an episode occurs. This gives John-David enough time to make a couple of phone calls, unlock the front door, put himself in a position where he will not harm himself once the seizure starts and wait, knowing help is on the way. Bo has already saved his owner’s life six times. Bo is everything to John-David. Because he’s on a fixed income, John-David is so grateful and appreciative of the help he and Bo receive from Empty Bowl.

Velvet signs up for a spay/neuter certificate. Empty Bowl helps to raise awareness at the legislative level as well. From 2010 to 2014, Arizona moved from 32nd to 8th in ranking for the Humane Treatment Laws of Animals. CJ has a passion for special needs individuals to be able to live as “normal” a life as possible. The quality pet food donated to Empty Bowl goes into a special storage area so people with service animals and seniors with mobility challenges can get healthy food for their pets. The results are minimal excess waste from the animal and less stomach upset because of the food they eat.

Velvet writes, “I’ve been homeless for about 4 years and have had a service dog with me. Empty bowl has been the only program that has been out there for people of our situation. I’ve been to just about every Project Connect in 4 yrs, and am disappointed when they’re [Empty Bowl] not here. I’ve been relying on them to feed my babies. I’m very grateful and appreciative. And now they’re helping me spay my little girl! Thank you!”

Storing the Goods Because there’s no actual business facility, Empty Bowl has storage units throughout Arizona that volunteers can easily access right in their own community where help is needed. Partnering with Palm Gate Storage allows Empty Bowl to reorganize supplies in air-conditioned comfort and to distribute anywhere from 2 to 70 pallets of food to other storage locations in Arizona or to disaster sites or coalition efforts, like Veterans Stand Down and Hope Fest.

Empty Bowl is about the individual stories and relationships that they strive to enhance, building community by bringing hearts together.

The impact Empty Bowl is able to make is now being seen all across Arizona from

Louis, Donny and Joseph receive food for their pets.

www.emptybowlpetfoodpantry.org www.facebook.com/MRCAnimalsArizona Empty Bowl Pet Food Pantry Facebook www.thewagmagazine.com

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Amber and her husband, LaFayette, volunteer for Basic Mission working the streets helping the homeless. They have been doing so for about eight years, do not have much themselves, and also need assistance. They have been getting pet food from Empty Bowl for several years now. Amber emphasized that Empty Bowl helps people out tremendously. The people who don’t know how to get help can come to Empty Bowl to receive it for their pets and then be guided to other services for themselves.

Year

2010

$ amount of pet food & pet items

Whether you’re coming or going, Climbing up the hill or heading down the trail,

I’ll herd you home!

area of distribution

$40 (start-up) (4 bags of pet food) Metro Phoenix $3,000 (end of year)

2011

$11,000

Maricopa County

2012

$357,000

5 counties in Arizona

2013

$665,000

11 counties in Arizona

Jim with his partner, Barb, states, “We have been helping empty bowl on and off for the past few years. I am disabled and not able to do a lot but try and help those with their fur babies the way I had been helped in the past.” Michele is a freelance writer with a passion in photography, animal communication, canine massage, and elder pet care. Along with writing, she currently does pet sitting, volunteering to help animals and leads Laughter Yoga sessions. She wants to help bring a voice to the animals and enjoys adventures with her Yorkie, Chelsea.

the mission of empty bowl pet Food pantry no one should have to choose

orthy, Persevering, Trustw g Tenacious and Carin

Peggy, The Working

Offering Treats for Sellers and Buyers!

Dog Realtor!

Peggy Maglio REALTOR®, ABR, RSPS, SFR RE/MAX Sun Properties

(480) 888-6474 Mobile Direct www.PeggyMaglio.com Peggy@PeggyMaglio.com

StAggering StAtiStiCS oF groWtH $600,000

between feeding their pets or feeding themselves, or worse, abandonment, in the hopes that they will be rescued.

$300,000

We help pet owners facing financial challenges, keep the promise they made to their pets to love and care for them forever.

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$0 2010

2011

2012

2013


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By Zac Wood

What you really need to know about desert creatures and canines While metropolitan Phoenix is an oasis in the Mohave, humans aren’t the only species taking shelter. Our landscaping and water features create a haven for desert creatures seeking easy food. Wildlife can be attracted to several elements of the suburban lifestyle: decorative plants; shady areas; easy food like trash, pet food, bird feeders or fallen fruit; and water sources like swimming pools, dog bowls and birdbaths. Darren Julian is one of two Urban Wildlife Specialists for the Arizona Game and Fish Department. His advice for pet safety is simple: “To keep your pets safe keep them indoors, keep a watchful eye on them in your yard, and if they have to be outside unattended or unsupervised, use a dog or pet run.” He stresses the importance of keeping desert critters away from your home. “Don’t attract wild predators to your yard or neighborhood, and most importantly, keep wildlife wild: DO NOT FEED!” While some wildlife is dangerous, most of it is also endangered or protected, so please let the animal control authorities handle any persistent concerns. If you or your dog does get bitten or stung by something, always seek immediate medical attention.

Javelinas are the size of medium dogs, but outweigh and out-vicious comparably sized pets. Javelinas are rarely overtly aggressive, though they get ferocious if threatened. They can carry rabies, distemper, and salmonella, and their incredibly poor vision can cause them to charge towards humans or animals when they are just trying to escape. Dogs, coyotes and wolves are natural javelina predators, so your pet might trigger a defensive fighting response from a wild javelina. Javelinas travel in herds and can work together to charge, trample and bite a threatening animal. If you encounter a wild javelina, it is probably not the only one in the area. Bobcats are common throughout the state, loving metropolitan outskirts, and are often found napping in the shade of parks or yards. They are rarely aggressive, but will hunt any small easy prey, including small dogs, cats, rabbits and birds. They can jump as high as 12 feet,

disdainfully bypassing most residential fencing or kennels. Bobcats can carry rabies, tend to have established territories and may be unwilling to leave an area if a litter of kittens is nearby. Julian says, “Coyotes can exist in almost any environment because they eat almost anything!” They are attracted to easy food, and will attack anything they perceive as a threat, including larger dogs. They can carry rabies, distemper, heartworms, mites, and tapeworms. They can form small packs if food is particularly abundant. Be sure to keep your dogs away. If you encounter a coyote in the wild, leave it alone. If you find them in your neighborhood, make sure they get scared away or handled by the Arizona Game and Fish Department, because they will make your neighborhood their territory. The Valley is home to many species of Spiders, but they are not all dangerous. The famous and intimidating tarantula is almost completely harmless, though dogs can experience topical and gastrointestinal irritation if they try to eat one. The real arachnid threat comes from black widows and brown recluse varieties (including the Arizona brown or the desert recluse). These spiders are not aggressive, though they will bite if their nest area is disturbed by an inquisitive nose or paw. Keeping a clear patio and yard will protect your entire household. A bitten dog should immediately be given professional medical attention.

Scorpions

and Centipedes also pose a minor threat to your pets. They are all venomous, but will cause little more than bee-sting irritation. The greatest threat in Arizona comes from the small Arizona bark scorpion, which can kill small dogs. If your dog has been stung, seek veterinary care! www.thewagmagazine.com

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During the wettest months of the spring and summer, there can be a large Desert Toad population explosion. They are not dangerous but do have a toxic gland that can hurt dogs if eaten. If your dog eats anything you don’t authorize, watch closely for signs of illness for the first few days, and get help if needed.

Gila Monsters are commonly touted as a threat in Arizona, as they are the countries’ only venomous lizard. They are quite rare and live underground, but if one is found, it might attack by biting and chewing, with a painful venom secretion and strong jaws.

There are 13 Rattlesnake species in the state; Diamondbacks are the most common, while the Mohave rattlesnake is the most venomous. The rare Arizona coral snake is also venomous, but their small size makes their bite less dangerous. If you encounter any kind of snake, do not approach it. Slowly go around, giving several feet of clearance. A threatened snake will strike at you or your dogs but will not chase or follow. If bitten, the victim will experience severe pain and should get immediate medical attention. Deaths are uncommon if the bites are quickly treated. Phoenix isn’t a dangerous place but you definitely have to be attentive. Don’t let your dogs off their leashes or out of sight. If you do run into something wild, stay away. If you or your dog gets injured, be sure to seek professional medical help as soon as possible. When you do encounter something dangerous, let the professionals handle it, since there are legal and safety issues to consider.

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Venom & poiSon ConCernS: Arizona Poison Center at 1-800-222-1222 or azpoison.com For domeStiC AnimAlS: Maricopa County Animal Care & Control at 602-506-7387 or Maricopa.gov/pets WildliFe: Arizona Game and Fish Department at 602-942-3000 or azgfdportal.az.gov/wildlife

Zac is a US Navy veteran, a freelancer, and a juggler. A Valley native, he lives in North Phoenix with his wife, too many cats, and, of course, two rescued pitmixes (named after minor Harry Potter characters).

Call now to reserve space for your advertisement in the Spring issue of

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Wag Word Search answers on page 30

WAG’S Word LiSt bark veterinarian litter companion bone canine kibble kennel chew

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HOWLI-DAY GIFT GUIDE

Santa Dress and Hat

Santa Coat and Hat

Designed by Pooch Outfitters Dress $42 – Hat $12

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*Use “SANTA20” code for an exclusive THE WAG discount of 20% off, November through December 30, 2015

Doggie Vogue

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Mayan Collars Handwoven by Mayan artisans in traditional tribal patterns, cotton ribbon is sewn to durable nylon webbing and finished with solid brass hardware and contoured quick-release buckle. Machine wash. Patterns: Sun Valley, Daybreak or Classic Red. Sizes: S (11”–15”), M (14”–20”), L (18”–25”), XL (23”– 30”). D41-045 Mayan Side-Release Buckle Collar $27.95

The Essential Dog-Walking Bag This compact carryall is large enough to hold your wallet, keys and sunglasses, along with your dog’s favorite toys and treats. Snap closure, mesh pocket for water bottle or tennis balls, waterproof cell phone pocket, bag dispenser with roll of 20 bags, and adjustable webbing crossbody/shoulder strap.

Activity Puzzle Game Clever interactive game from Swedish designer Nina Ottosson requires dogs to find the treats you hide inside by using their wits, paws and noses! Comes in three levels of difficulty. Please specify Easy, Medium or Advanced—or choose more than one and connect them for the ultimate in challenging fun! 7” sq.

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Nylon canvas with cotton lining. Colors: Gray, Sage or Denim Blue. 10”H x 7”W x 3”D. D152-065 Walkie Bag $39.95

DB1-351 Activity Puzzle Game $22.95 each

Buy any 2 or more, just $19.95 each

In The Company Of Dogs

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Fur Haven Outdoor Deluxe Pet Bed Mocha 27” x 36” $31.49

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Pup-Casso™ Art Kit

Hanukkah Dreidel Dog Toy

Paint Kit for Dogs Reg $19.99

*Use “WAGREADER” for exclusive THE WAG discount code to receive $14.99 price thru January 31, 2016 Art-Casso LLC www.Artcasso.com/products/ pup-casso-art-kit

Hanukkah Loofa 12” toy $3.89

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How to Raise a Jewish Dog The (make believe) Rabbis of the (fictional) Boca Raton Theological Seminary have developed the essential dog training program for raising a Jewish dog. $13.50 paperback Amazon.com http://www.amazon.com/ Raise-Jewish-RabbisTheological-Seminary/ dp/0316154660

Sojos Grain-Free Duck & Cherry Flavor Dog Treats $8.35

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Doggles for Dogs Fit to be Tied Dog Collars (handmade from vintage men’s neckties) $32.99-$33.99

Spike’s Treats www.spikestreats.com

The first and only protective eyewear designed just for dogs. $22.99

Doggles www.doggles.com/ dog/eyewear

Holiday Treats CD, MP3s, and Soothing Ringtones by Tom Nazziola and Music My Pet. Holiday Treats has been produced using all the sounds proven to relax dogs, cats, birds and other pets. Play it when you leave the house or whenever you and your pet need to relax. Holiday Treats CD: $12.99 Holiday Treats MP3 Download: From $0.99 Music My Pet™ for each song to $8.99 for Holiday Treats entire CD Soothing Ringtones MP3 Download: $6.99 www.musicmypet.com

www.thewagmagazine.com

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LISTEN UP Learn what your dog is trying to tell you By Evangeline Uriyu Once you learn to read your dog’s body language, a whole new world of communication with him is revealed; one that makes it so much easier to know if your dog is happy, nervous, anxious, in pain, and much more. Dogs are experts at reading our body language. Have you ever noticed how they seem to know when you are getting ready to leave, go on vacation, when you are upset, happy, going to check the mail? Since our canines depend on us for their survival, it behooves them to study our behavior to know what is going to happen. Once we understand their body language, we will have a better insight into their behavior and needs. The basic needs dogs have are the desire to obtain food, find a mate, and to feel safe. Yet there are more complicated behaviors that may be motivated by social interactions with us, other dogs, their environment, and even their age as in the example of conveying pain. Dogs have evolved their behavior to fit in with our lives. There are behaviors that they use when they are upset, feel unsafe, are confined, or are unable to handle a situation (especially separation from their people). Some of the resulting behaviors are damaging and unacceptable such as defecating or urinating in the home. Another is using fear aggression in a situation where they are afraid, such as a visit to the vet or groomer. So to understand our dog’s body language, we must understand the mentality of our dog’s original, inherent characteristics. One of the duties that our dog is hard wired for is to protect his pack. We should not discourage that yet not let it show itself through aggression. Barking at strangers is one of the ways he protects the pack. Letting the rest of the pack know there is

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“Stranger Danger” outside! When we yell “Shut Up” to the dog, his interpretation is that you are barking at the stranger as well. Who would have ever guessed that? Dogs living in a pack typically mimic each other. When a family has only one dog, it is up to us to understand some of these behaviors in order to ensure the dog’s mental health and well-being. We are not dogs but if we understand their motivations for the actions they are taking, we can then communicate with them. HOW DOGS COMMUNICATE Dogs communicate in three ways: posture, behavior and vocalization. Some are obvious like barking, crying out in pain, making those sweet whimpering sounds when we come home and fear maybe when at the veterinarian. We all understand those. There are however, some that are far more subtle.

POSTURE – OFFENSIVE & DEFENSIVE OFFENSIVE BODY APPEARANCE/POSTURE Ears brought forward, body upright, tense, watchful Raised hackles Standing on toes Tail upright and stiff Corner of mouth forward Triggers Intense interest Excitement or aggression Waiting for a ball to be thrown A new dog that he doesn’t know He’s in an area or situation that he’s not sure about


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DEFENSIVE BODY APPEARANCE/POSTURE Many times the defensive body language is triggered by fear but can also be triggered by aggression. Ears back

Body may be crouched

Nose may wrinkle

Corner of the mouth drawn back

Tail can be tucked or under his body Triggers Injury Meeting an aggressive dog Meeting a more dominant dog After a scolding

BEHAVIOR – DISPLACEMENT & CALMING The displacement behaviors are what canines use to diffuse a situation. When we use some of these, we can calm our dogs or “disarm” possible confrontations with a strange dog. How can we tell if a dog is experiencing stress? They can’t tell us so how do we know for sure? Actually they do tell us in several different ways by their behavior. These happen when the dog cannot get away from an uncomfortable, unsafe situation or state of mind. DISPLACEMENT BEHAVIOR PanTing Panting can indicate both pain and stress. If a dog is hot, just finished running or playing, panting is just normal. Yet if those activities have not occurred and he is panting, it could be an indication of stress or pain. Another way to know if dogs are in pain is by noticing if they arch their back. A posture of back arching could be a sign of pain and the cause should be investigated. Shedding We’ve all heard of the expression “Blowing coat.” When dogs tense up, especially from fear, loose hairs will be shed. Freezing Freezing is literally coming to a complete stop without moving. The dog will appear frozen and unresponsive to your presence. LoSS oF bLadder or boweL conTroL Shivering when noT coLd barking, growLing or crying random ScraTching No fleas, no skin allergies, just random scratching Looking away, Turning away Dogs know to look away, turn their heads and often bodies away from a source of stress such as the veterinarian or a more dominant canine. yawning Excessive yawning when not resting or in a restful state www.thewagmagazine.com

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Shaking hiS body When shaking his body like he does to shake away water after a bath, he is casting off a bad feeling. CALMING BEHAVIOR Not all dogs communicate in exactly the same way. These calming signals are the most common ones used to displace negative emotions and possible conflict. Keep in mind that dogs mimic our behaviors and the behaviors of other dogs or animals they live with. Therefore some of these behaviors could occur without any stressors involved. We need to observe our dogs in different situations to know what signals they are using for the situation. Dogs use these behaviors to soothe themselves and to escape from stress if there’s no alternative. There are ways to calm your dog when you observe these stress signals. Dogs know them, use them, and we can use them as well to communicate calm, safety, and well-being to them. SniFFing The ground If you’ve ever noticed two dogs meeting for the first time in a dog park, you’ll observe they never greet each other head on. They sniff the ground, looking out of the corner of their eye at the other dog while moving slowly in an arc toward the other dog until they are side by side. That is what balanced dogs do. The sniffing of the ground is letting the other dog know that he is not a big deal and to diffuse any type of conflict. Turning away or bLinking When a dog partially closes his eyes, and/or turns away, he is letting the other dog know he is uncomfortable. Dogs never stare. That is the same as a challenge and will usually end in a fight. exaggeraTed yawning When a dog makes a big yawn to another new dog, he is seeking an answer to the question “Are we good?” The other dog’s response should be an answering yawn. As humans, we can yawn to let our dog know that everything is ok. It is reassuring to him. Tongue Licking oF The noSe or LiPS Licking of lips and nose is a signal to another dog that he means no harm and is not a threat. We can use that signal when meeting a new dog we aren’t sure of, as well as not making direct eye contact, and looking around at the floor with interest.

VOCALIZATION Growling has different meanings. There is the resource guarding growl, which is a warning toward any dog trying to move in on food, favorite toy or sometimes even his favorite person, all considered special resources.

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Play growl is an invitation to “Throw the ball darn it!” Stranger growl is a warning sound that to us sounds the same as the guarding growl but it is not. barking There are many reasons dogs bark including happiness, separation from family, when someone is at the door and during play. As humans, it is difficult for us to decipher the different pitches and patterns of their bark. That is when we have to observe what is going on in conjunction with the bark. As a general rule, high pitched barks convey friendliness, while low pitched barks have a more serious meaning. howLing Howling is used to communicate with other pack members and often used in distress as in separation anxiety. Many dogs howl when they hear sirens as well. whimPering Whimpering usually indicates pain and can occur during rough play with another dog. It can also indicate a need for potty relief and be used as an expression of joy like when an owner has returned home. HOW TO TELL IF YOUR DOG IS IN PAIN Many dogs are very stoic and do not show their pain. Yet there are things to look for: Eating less or change in activity level Hiding, or shying away from the family Licking a certain area on his body more than usual Panting

Whimpering

Limping

Postural changes; arching the back, defecating in a different way, not lifting the leg to urinate Growling if touched in a certain place A dog that never bites, suddenly bites Restlessness, pacing GOOD COMMUNICATION ENHANCES THE BOND The more we observe our dogs, like they do us, the more we understand them and the better we are at receiving their communications. Living with our canines is a joy and understanding them increases the joy even more. Use as many of the calming signals as you can when you know your dog is upset or frightened. Never hold a small dog close to your body at the veterinarian office or groomers. The message you are conveying is that this is a very bad situation that I need to protect you from. Instead, use the calming signals, and covey to him that everything is ok. Practicing communication in dog language with a dog allows him to be calm and happy in most situations.


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These are the most common postures and facial expressions dogs exhibit on a regular basis.

RESOURCE GUARDING

FEAR AGGRESSION AGGRESSION

BULLYING FEAR

FEARFUL

PLAY BOWS INVITATION TO PLAY! SUBORDINATE & DOMINANT DOG

ATTENTIVE

Dogs do speak, but only to those who know how to listen.

- ORHAN PAMUK

HAPPY,

RELAXED

CALMING/ DISPLACEMENT

NEVER A HEAD-ON GREETING

HEALTHY APPROACH

Evangeline was a Short Story Channel Manager and provider of help and guidance to newcomers to Helium, a site for writers. She wrote her first short story about a horse and a girl in the fifth grade, and has been writing ever since. She has been published in both print and electronic media focusing on dog care, health, vaccinations, and more. Evangeline is a certified Small Animal Massage Therapist graduating from the Northwest School of Animal Massage in 2005 and is an experienced pet sitter. Active in rescue, rehabilitation, and re-homing puppy mill survivors and homeless pets for more than 20 years, she has a great degree of knowledge about all types of companion animal issues. Presently, she runs the day to day operations of a large pet sitting company called Fetch Pet Care of Chandler/Gilbert, and is a freelance writer. She makes her home with three puppy mill survivors and a rescued kitty in Gilbert, Arizona. Follow her blog at http://everythingyouneedtoknowaboutpets.com

www.thewagmagazine.com

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Reviews by Terri Schlichenmeyer, The Bookworm Sez

T HE WAG mag

“Holy Cow!” by Boze Hadleigh

c.2015 Skyhorse Publishing $14.99 / $19.99 Canada 303 pages •

From the time you were old enough to communicate, you took to words like a duck to water. You’ve verbally hammed it up ever since. Yes, it’s probably driven your friends and family batty, all this talk-talk-talk of yours. And yes, there are times when what you say is a bunch of bull, but you’re not trying to start a beef. You’re just having fun because, as in the new book “Holy Cow!” by Boze Hadleigh, language isn’t for the birds. No doubt about it, we humans love our animals. We love them so much that we sprinkle references to them in our daily conversation, mostly without even thinking about it. Our shaggy dog stories are sometimes just that – but where did those old sayings, clichés, discouraging words, and tender nicknames come from? The truth, as Hadleigh shows, is an interesting, yet convoluted, tail. In many cases, animalistic words came about as description: Oxford, England, for instance, was once a place where oxen forded a river. Tell someone there’s a dogleg in the road, and they’ll know what you’re saying – plus, a road like that might make them sick as a dog. And then there are the words that really make you scratch your head: Great Britain’s hedgehog pudding isn’t made of the spiny mammals, and dogs and monkeys are much more likely to ape you than is a copyCAT. And about that famed cat curiosity? It might have been targeted at another type of animal… Or, let’s say somebody’s made you mad. Calling him a dog goes back many years – perhaps back into the mid-1800s when “the only good dog was a useful dog.” The word-that-rhymes-with-witch has always been directed at women; its first near-appearance in film was in 1939, and that was pretty scandalous. Call someone a rat and, well, that’s rather self-explanatory. The modern street use of the word “heifer” is pretty wrong, unless you’re in a barn. There really is more than one way to skin a cat (catFISH, that is). A sawhorse and a clotheshorse are similar in origin. And if you think a kitty really has nine lives, well doggone it, you’re barking up the wrong tree. Ahh, language lovers. I can practically hear you howling for this book now – and for good reason. Like a dog with a bone, you won’t want to let “Holy Cow!” go. Starting with canines and ending with birds, bees, and bugs, author Boze Hadleigh goes whole hog in explaining where many of our favorite expressions originated. But this book isn’t just horseplay – Hadleigh includes words that are archaic (but need resurrection), as well as localisms and words you’ll want to add to your vocabulary. That all adds up to fun that’s useful and, for dyed-in-the-wool linguists, it’s a golden egg. So let’s talk turkey: if it’s been a dog’s age since you last read a book about language, it’s time you find this one. You won’t sound hackneyed or feel like a dinosaur with “Holy Cow!’ Naw, this book is the cat’s meow. 28

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“All Dogs Go to Kevin” by Dr. Jessica Vogelsang

c.2015 • Grand Central Publishing • $26.00 / $29.00 Canada • 325 pages Your dog knows all the basic commands. He can SPEAK, indoor voice and outdoor voice. He’s got SIT all buttoned up, with his behind planted firmly on the floor. He can STAY all day long if you need him to, and he FETCHes like a pro – which is great. You’ll need him to fetch you some tissues when you read “All Dogs Go to Kevin” by Dr. Jessica Vogelsang. With few friends and a need for solitude, nerdy teen Jessica Vogelsang knew that she was expected to attend college but she wasn’t happy with her choices. Being a doctor “was the most palatable option” but by her senior year in college, “the luster had worn off the idea” and she was “completely confused.” Stubbornly determined, she soldiered on, until the day she followed students into a lab to observe surgery on a pig. She graduated, went home, and enrolled in veterinary school. Vogelsang came late to being an animal lover. When she was eight years old, her parents allowed a Lhasa Apso named Taffy into the household. The dog was grumpy but Vogelsang understood, since she also just wanted to be left alone. Taffy was the first dog she loved and she was rightly upset when, years later, her mother had the elderly pooch euthanized without notice. Really, though, as a veterinarian, Vogelsang understood that, too. A seize-life-by-the-throat kind of guy named Kevin had introduced Vogelsang to the man who would become her husband, and she was married by the time Taffy died. Her dog’s death made Vogelsang long for the pitter-patter of little (puppy) feet, so she and her husband adopted a Golden Retriever, Emmett, who’d been abandoned. He ultimately saved Vogelsang’s life. Goldens, however, are prone to cancer, which is what befell Emmett, who lived long enough to see two children born to the family. His death left a void that Vogelsang couldn’t bear and her children couldn’t grasp: in a misunderstanding, they thought Emmett had gone to stay with family friend, Kevin. Not forgotten, Emmett gave way to Kekoa, then Brody, then… We like to believe “that... we own [our pets],” says Vogelsang, at least until the “lease has expired.” The truth is, “We teach our dogs to ‘stay,’ but they never do.” It’s really quite trite to say “I laughed, I cried” at this book. I know it is, but I can’t help it: that about sums up what I found in “All Dogs Go to Kevin.” Author Dr. Jessica Vogelsang doesn’t just write about dogs, though. This is also a book about family, friendship, untimely loss, and making dreams come fearlessly true. It contains those behind-the-scenes tales and unique client stories you expect in a book by a veterinarian. We learn an important lesson about new motherhood that’s “delivered… by a Golden Retriever.” And yes, if you’ve ever loved and lost a pet (particularly, a dog), this book will make you laugh, and you’ll cry. At the very least, for sure, “All Dogs Go to Kevin” will make you SIT for awhile.


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reSCue direCtory 2nd Chance dog rescue

http://2ndchance.rescuegroups.org Non-profit organization dedicated to saving abandoned/ abused dogs, and provide them with shelter and a safe environment so they can regain their trust in humanity.

AArtA - Akita Advocates relocation team Arizona www.akitaadvocates.com

602-882-5482

Non-profit organization that finds homes for displaced Akitas through fostering.

Adopt me gSd

ADOPT ME GSD Facebook page

480-720-1534

Saving German Shepherds from euthanasia, providing them with medical treatment and finding loving homes.

Alaskan malamute rescue of Arizona

www.malamuterescue.org Alaskan Malamute Rescue of Arizona Facebook Page Rehabilitate and rehome rescued Alaskan Malamutes, assist Malamute owners, and provide education services to the public.

All About Animals rescue www.allaboutanimalsaz.com No-kill, foster home based, rescue.

All About bullies rescue All About Bullies Rescue Facebook Page

480-227-1276

Non-profit organization that saves, rehabilitates, and rehomes bully breeds. Specializing in Pit Bulls.

Almost Home bulldog rescue, inc.

Arizona Animal Welfare league and SpCA

Arizona Siberian Husky rescue & Adoption, inc.

602-273-6852

602-427-7226

www.aawl.org

Largest and oldest no-kill shelter in Arizona. rehabilitates and rehomes more than 5,000 dogs and cats that are abandoned or that have been surrendered by their owners. We do this primarily by rescuing them from other shelters in Maricopa County where they are likely to be euthanized due to the lack of time and resources to care for them. At any one time our shelter will hold 140 cats and 190 dogs. We also have a foster parent network of approximately 90 families who provide care and shelter in their homes for puppies and kittens that are too young to be adopted, and those animals that are recovering from medical procedures or that need socialization before adoption.

Arizona basset Hound rescue inc. www.azbassetrescue.org

602-225-7800 (voice mail)

Non-profit organization that provides veterinary care, food, support, and shelter to Basset Hounds, Bloodhounds and Basset Hound mixes needing assistance in Arizona.

Arizona beagle rescue www.azbeaglerescue.com

623-977-1355

A statewide 501(c)(3) non-profit animal welfare organization comprised of volunteers dedicated to Beagle rescue and community education.

Arizona border Collie rescue www.azbcr.org

480-422-5366 (voice message)

Promotes humane treatment through rescue, rehabilitation, education and the rehoming of neglected, abandoned and unwanted Border Collies.

Arizona boston terrier rescue www.azbtrescue.org

Non-profit corporation dedicated to the rescue and rehoming of unwanted Boston Terriers, education of owners on responsible dog ownership, and education of the public on the Boston Terrier breed.

www.almosthomebulldogrescue.org

Arizona golden rescue

Non-profit organization based in the Maricopa County area of central Arizona. We are dedicated to the rescue of unwanted, neglected, and abandoned companion animals. Our focus is French and English Bulldogs from local euthanasia lists.

623-566-9247

Amazing Aussies lethal White rescue of Arizona

Arizona Humane Society

480-227-1276

www.amazingaussies.com

602-571-5811

Non-profit organization that rescues dogs bred Merle to Merle and born blind and/or deaf by a cruel and inhumane breeding practice, so the breeders can make a few extra bucks. About 25% of every litter will come out “wrong” and are killed at birth or thrown away since they can’t be sold. It’s just a “cost of business” to the breeders, but it’s an everyday fight for us. I hope you will join us to help end this planned cruelty.

Animal rescue Friends ltd www.animalrescuefriends.org

623-428-9119

Non-profit foster-based rescue that provides love and care for the rescued animals in a home environment. Utilizing fosters allows us to provide attention to each animals’ unique needs while also training them on how to be inside a home.

Anthem pets www.anthempets.org

480-287-3542

Non-profit 100% volunteer, No Kill rescue to implement a fully rounded animal welfare program that provides education and resources to the community at large and promote responsible pet ownership. Volunteers answer calls at the 24 Hour Pet Hotline; provide medical care for abandoned and abused animals and find them qualified, loving homes; and work to reunite lost pets with their owners through use of the Pet Hotline, a Pet Search & Rescue team and a very active Facebook page.

www.arizonagoldenrescue.org

Provides emotional and medical rehabilitation and will pay for all medications and for necessary surgeries prior to adoptions being finalized for Golden Retrievers and mostlyGolden mixes.

www.ashra.org

Non-profit, volunteer-run organization that rescues Siberian Huskies and places them into qualified homes, as well as educates the public on the special needs of the Siberian Husky.

Arizona Small dog rescue www.azsmalldog.org

602-944-2440

A non-profit registered 501(c)3 no kill rescue shelter. A group of volunteers that are dedicated to rescuing and saving homeless, unwanted, abandoned, neglected, and abused dogs.

AZ Cavalier rescue AZ Cavalier Rescue Facebook Page

602-397-4744

Foster run rescue for Cavaliers, English Toy Spaniels and mixes.

Central Arizona Animal rescue (CAAr)

www.caaronline.org Non-profit organization dedicated to the general welfare, sheltering and placement of animals; prevention of cruelty to animals and overpopulation; education concerning humane treatment of animals; and involvement in other animal welfare issues.

dachshunds only rescue www.dachshundsonlyrescue.com

602-550-4088

Not-for-profit, volunteer, foster-based, never-kill organization for Dachshunds. No animal is euthanized if they are too sick to be treated or too aggressive to be suitable for adoption–– believe that behavioral modification techniques and positive reinforcement help to eliminate aggressive or unwanted behavior.

desert labrador retriever rescue

AZ Cocker rescue

www.dlrrphoenix.org

602-757-8225

Non-profit, all volunteer, foster-based organization that provides Labrador Retriever breed and training information on request, public education on spaying and neutering, and finding homes for the Labrador Retriever.

www.azcockerrescue.org

Non-profit that focuses on rescuing all breeds of dogs from the county shelters that are going to be euthanized.

AZ Furry Friends rescue Foundation www.azfurryfriends.org

602-882-9535

Non-profit foster-based, all breed, dog and cat rescue that are at risk of euthanasia at our local kill shelters.

AZ Happy tails Animal rescue

www.happytailsaz.org A non-profit registered 501(c)(3) rescue group that does not have an actual shelter. All dogs are fostered in homes. Strive to educate and raise awareness of the importance of animal respect and appreciation and facilitate a low cost spay/neuter program.

AZ mastiff rescue (Canine rescue Coalition, inc.)

www.azmastiffrescue.com Non-profit dedicated to rescuing English and Neapolitan Mastiffs and other Mastiff and Giant Breeds.

AZ paws & Claws

www.azpawsandclaws.com Non-profit 501(c)(3) charitable, all volunteer dog and cat rescue serving Arizona. Our mission is to match rescued dogs and cats with a home that will provide them with a lifetime of love and care.

480-899-5227

desert paws rescue

www.desertpawsrescue.org A non-profit, no-kill, animal rescue group to rescue, rehabilitate (when necessary) and place domestic animals into stable homes; to educate the public about the responsibilities of pet ownership; and to build public awareness about the human-animal bond and its benefits to society.

the Fetch Foundation www.thefetchfoundation.com

602-617-2656

Non-profit dedicated to saving lives in the animal and human communities through innovative strategies and unique programs that supports, equips, and trains first responders by providing the life saving tools in“The FIDO BAG®” that is used by first responders to provide life saving intervention to family pets that are caught in a fire or other emergency situations; to provide a safe place for homeless dogs that were neglected or abused; and by connecting the right dog with a veteran in need of companionship, these K9(s) would serve a purpose beyond what anyone imagined.

Finding Fido Animal rescue

Finding Fido Animal Rescue Facebook page A humane rescue organization dedicated to reducing euthanasia by finding loving and permanent homes for the wonderful dogs and cats, especially the senior or special needs pets.

Two locations: Sunnyslope Campus and Nina Mason Pulliam Campus for Compassion www.azhumane.org

AZ Shepherd rescue www.azshepherdrescue.org

Foothills Animal rescue

Pet adoptions, veterinary and spay/neuter services, retail and thrift shopping.

Non-profit foster-based rescue saving German Shepherds, Australian Shepherds and mixes of both from the county euthanasia list.

480-488-9890

602-997-7585

Arizona labrador and giant breed rescue www.azlabsandgiants.org

602-307-5227

623-256-2698

AZpyrs: Arizona great pyrenees Association & rescue network www.azpyrs.com

Volunteer non-profit organization that is dedicated to rehoming Labradors, Great Danes, Mastiffs, Elkhounds, Newfoundlands, Bernese Mountain Dogs, Saint Bernards, Irish Wolfhounds and Deer Hounds.

480-988-4033

Arizona pug Adoption & rescue network

www.boxerluv.org

www.aparn.org

480-964-3126

Non-profit to rescue Pugs in need, provide medical care and emotional support, and place them into loving, permanent adoptive homes in Arizona.

Arizona Sheltie rescue, inc. www.azsheltierescue.com

bill Ferrell: bkferrell@cox.net (480) 507-7996 Cindy reel: reelracer@aol.com (602) 843-8073

Non-profit volunteer organization that serves the entire state of Arizona with respect to the rescue of Shetland Sheepdogs.

Non-profit fosters and rehomes purebred Great Pyrenees throughout the entire state of Arizona.

boxer luv rescue 602-530-5671

A501(c)(3)nonprofit organization to give new life to homeless Boxers in need and is 100% managed and run by volunteers and relies entirely on private donations, grants and revenue from Boxer Luv’s “Luv-To-Save” Thrift Shop.

briard rescue and Haven www.briardrescue.com

602-228-2495

Established to provide a safe place for Briard dogs. The Haven is a privately run facility, funded by private donations, ebay auctions, adoption fees and bequests.

www.foothillsanimal.org

A non-profit organization to save lives through the rescue, care and adoption of homeless animals; a thrift store remains the primary source of income and community interaction.

Four peaks Animal rescue www.fourpeaksanimalrescue.org

480-471-3520

A non-profit organization dedicated to the rescue, rehabilitation, training and placement of all species of domestic animals in need of medical care and sanctuary.

Freedom tails rescue

www.freedomtailsrescue.com Non-profit dedicated to rescuing animals in need.

Friends for life Animal rescue www.azfriends.org

480-497-8296

Dedicated to helping the homeless and stray animals living on the streets and in the deserts. We also pursue an aggressive spay/neuter program for our animals and education for the public.

www.thewagmagazine.com

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Friends of Animal Care & Control

ohana Animal rescue

602-882-8627

480-744-5729

www.azfriendsofanimals.org

Reduces euthanasia in Maricopa County by supporting pets & people by providing free and accessible spay & neuter services in our community.

www.ohanaanimalrescue.org

Non-profit, foster home based organization saving euthanasia listed animals from the county shelters.

one dog (Arizona)

Halo Animal rescue (Helping Animals live on)

One Dog (Arizona) Facebook Page Non-profit rescue site to help network e-list (euthanasia list) and rescue dogs who need forever homes or dedicated foster homes.

www.halorescue.org

602-971-9222

No-kill facility that provides a refuge for dogs and cats who might otherwise be destroyed for reasons such as a treatable injury, illness, or those that are too scared or too young to go up for adoption at the time of arrival. The thrift store helps to bring in necessary income.

Happy tails dachshund rescue, inc. www.happytailsdr.org

209-647-1251

Non-profit foster-based to save as many Dachshunds from suffering and premature death.

Helping orphaned Hounds (H.o.H.) Small all volunteer, no-kill, non-profit organization with two main goals: find loving homes for homeless dogs & puppies and promote spay/neuter thereby reducing the tragic consequences of pet overpopulation.

www.lostourhome.org

602-445-7387

Ensure that all pets have loving homes when families face major life challenges and provide compassionate options when Realtors and the community find an abandoned pet.

r.e.S.C.u.e. (reducing euthanasia at Shelters through Commitment and underlying education) Non-profit, volunteer-driven animal rescue with no central facility and the focus is euthanasia-list rescues of cats and dogs from the county shelters.

rockstar rescue

480-704-4628

Non-profit all volunteer foster-based organization dedicated to saving the lives of homeless animals from euthanasia, educating the community on responsible pet ownership and dedicated to training and what happens after the dog is in his new home.

luv of dogz Fund, inc.

www.luvofdogz.org Non-profit that provides advocacy and resources for rescued, abandoned, homeless dogs and to the people who rescue and care for them.

m.A.i.n. (medical Animals in need)

www.medicalanimalsinneed.com Volunteer-based, donor-driven organization dedicated to rescuing animals off Maricopa County euthanasia lists with a medical needs.

mayday pit bull rescue & Advocacy

www.maydaypitbullrescue.org Non-profit volunteer and foster-based organization that focuses on rescuing, rehabilitating and securing placement for Pit Bull and Pit Bull mixes, especially with extreme medical/behavioral and special needs, and to assist dogs from dog fighting, hoarding and other crisis/emergency situations.

mini mighty mutts rescue www.minimightymutts.com

Non-profit, all volunteer, foster-based small dog rescue not limited to any breed.

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858-876-2558

Our mission is to help the hard-to-adopt cases, dogs that have suffered psychological traumas either from hoarding, fighting or abandonment situations and prepare them to become loving, household pets despite what they’ve endured.

www.luckydogrescue.org

480-304-5654

www.rockstarrescueaz.org

602-909-7153

A pet food pantry and disaster services organization distributing free pet food through partner agencies and giving pet items to Veterans, homeless, disaster victims and others.

Friends of Arizona’s Shelter Animals

Friends of Arizona’s Shelter Animals Facebook Page Volunteers who take photos of and get information about animals on the euthanasia list in local shelters, volunteer time to network the animals scheduled to be euthanized and make their photos/information available to the public and rescue groups in order to find alternative outlets for them.

Valley of the Sun dog rescue www.valleyofthesundogrescue.com

480-228-0126

Non-profit, no-kill, family run animal shelter with help from volunteers and fosters that specializes in American Pit Bulls and American Staffordshire Terriers, but accepts all breeds into the rescue. We strive to increase public awareness about the gentler, humane side of a “Bully” breed.

Non-profit that rescues, rehabilitates and finds homes for abandoned and surrendered West Highland Terriers and their friends, educates about spaying and neutering, and stresses the need for high quality food and the importance of dental hygiene to extend their pet’s life.

rescue pals

www.emptybowlpetfoodpantry.org

www.urbanrescues.com Urban Rescues Facebook Page Rescuing dogs scheduled for euthanasia in Maricopa County animal shelters.

602-404-9663

623-396-8466

lucky dog rescue

empty bowl pet Food pantry

480-553-9311

Westie & Friends AZ rescue, inc.

Rescuepals85268@gmail.com A non-profit organization dedicated to rescuing, rehabilitating, and rehoming dogs mostly found in Fountain Hills.

Non-profit organization that focuses on sterilization, education and rescue.

www.underdogaz.com

rescue A golden of Arizona (rAg of AZ) Non-profit, shelterless, all volunteer organization dedicated to the rescue, evaluation and placement of Golden Retrievers who lost their homes through no fault of their own.

Supporting orgAniZAtionS

underdog rescue of Arizona

urban rescues

Non-profit foster- and volunteer-based rescue to find homes for retired racing Greyhounds and other homeless Greyhounds.

lost paws Sterilization, education, & rescue www.thelostpaws.org

10am-8pm preferably weekdays Non-profit volunteer based organization committed to the rescue, rehab and rehoming of German Shepherds.

602-573-0940

www.racinghome.info

www.golden-retriever.org

lost our Home pet rescue

602-866-2880

racing Home greyhound Adoption

480-598-9410

602-680-0713

www.swgermanshepherdrescue.com

Non-profit, foster-based dog rescue that is dedicated to rescuing and rehoming shelter dogs rescued from the euthanasia list and abandoned dogs in need.

www.azrescue.org

www.helpingorphanedhounds.org

Southwest german Shepherd rescue

pet Social Worker/tails of Hope www.petsocialworker.org

480-452-7997

Free online database of stray, rescued, lost and found pets in the Maricopa area. In addition, the site offers tips, instructions and links to the local Pinal County Animal Care and Control forms needed to report a lost or found pet.

www.westieandfriendsazrescue.org

480-664-7699

phoenix Animal Care Coalition (pACC911) www.pacc911.org

602-992-4779

Non-profit organization that works to bring together the Maricopa County animal welfare community in an interactive manner by providing opportunities for all to work together for the greater benefit of animals. Rescued Treasure’s Charity Boutique, and Chuck Waggin’ Pet Food Pantry are divisions of PACC911.

White gsd rescue

White Gsd Rescue Facebook Page Works with Southwest German Shepherd Rescue.

yorkie luv rescue

www.yorkieluvrescue.com Non-profit volunteer and foster-based rescue to rescue, rehab and rehome any Yorkie cross with Yorkshire Terrier that finds itself homeless and work with communities in order to stress the importance of adopting a Yorkie in the hope of one day eliminating all puppy mills.

rotten rottie rescue www.rottenrottie.com

480-567-4328

Non-rofit, no-kill, foster-based animal rescue to help, rescue, and rehome Rottweilers in safe adoptive and foster homes.

Find word SEArcH AnSwErS BElow from page 21

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Non-profit rescue that helps homeless Dachshunds find new homes.

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Saint bernard rescue Foundation, inc.

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Non-profit, all-volunteer organization dedicated to providing veterinary care, evaluation and adoptive homes for German Shepherd Dogs, Belgian Malinois and others who are left in pounds to await uncertain fate.

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Southwest Collie rescue

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Sahuaro dachshund rescue 520-818-1323

www.saintrescue.org/arizona Non-profit for rescue of Saint Bernards.

Saving paws rescue 480-737-6089

www.nmcollierescue.com

Non-profit, volunteer, foster-based organization to rescue every purebred Collie in the area needing help, no matter how old or how sick.

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and wishes for a new year happyfilledholidays with peace & good health

From

the wag magazine

What’s Happening NOVEMBER

DECEMBER

November 14 Charity Cornhole Tournament Fundraiser, benefits Anthem Pets, Anthem Community Park. www.anthempets.org/events-2

December 1 - 12 Twelve Days of Christmas Online Auction, Anthem Pets. www.anthempets.org/events-2

November 14 Creating Your Own Will or Trust, 10-11:30 am, setting up a pet trust, Scottsdale Senior Center Via Linda, 602-223-6852 x106 Arizona Animal Welfare League & SPCA. www.aawl.org/events/free-creating-your-own-will-or-trust

December 3 United Way Project Connect, empty Bowl Pet Food Pantry, Monte Vista Nazarene, 3313 N 40th St., Phoenix, AZ 85018

November 21 Woofstock 2015: City of Chandler partnering with the American Service Animal Society & Maricopa County Animal Care & Control for pet adoptions, discounted vaccinations & microchips, pet psychic, pet photos & more. Free admission. 9 am-1:30 pm. Tumbleweed Park. November 27-December 24 Holiday Gift Wrapping Fundraiser, Anthem Walmart & Barnes & Noble Norterra. Anthem Pets. www.anthempets.org/events-2

December 5 Holiday Pet Festival by Tranquility Trail Animal Sanctuary, 10 am-5 pm, WestWorld of Scottsdale, Free. www.holidaypetfestival.com December 12 12k’s of Christmas, fun, health, & to lend a helping hand to various animal welfare groups in the Valley, Freestone Park, Gilbert, AZ. www.12krun.com

CELEBRITYDOGMATCHUP

November 28 Doggie Street Festival, Steele Indian School Park, 300 e. Indian School road, 10 am – 4 pm, Free, benefitting dog & cat adoption. www.bringfido.com/event/14955

Index of advertIsers Gretchen (GiGi) Bueter.........................25 John A. Porter, DDS..............................11 Mco reAlty, SuSAn DAwSon................13 Mco reAlty, MichAel GAnt ..................13 Monroe’S BAr & Grill ...........................21 PArkview tAP houSe BAr & Grill ........11 Phil’S FillinG StAtion Grill ....................4 re/MAx Sun ProPertieS, tinA nABerS ............................................11 re/MAx Sun ProPertieS, PeGGy MAGlio.........................................18 ScentSy, MyrnA wetzel........................21 the hillS’ PizzA & DeSSertS ..................20 zuSiA’S DoGGie SAlon .............................4

www.thewagmagazine.com

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Call to

reserve ad space for Spring issue 715-497-8073

Hide my bone... Bark at mailman... Take another nap!

T HE WAG mag


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