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THE WAG

COMPLIMENTARY

magazine

an informative, entertaining read about dogs & their companions WINTER 2017

GOOD Chemistry

The Science Behind the Human-Canine Connection

DOGS TEACH OWNERS

About LIFE & LOVE

MICHAEL VICK’S DOGS CHAMPION THE BREED


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THE WAG magazine | Winter 2017


THE WAG magazine an informative, entertaining read about dogs & their companions WINTER 2017 | Volume 2 Issue 1 PUBLISHERS Gary Lex Penny Lex

—Gene Hill 

From the Editor

EDITOR Penny Lex

T

DESIGNER Amy Civer PROOFREADER Sue Maves SALES & MARKETING Gary Lex WRITERS C.J. Anderson Teresa Bitler Joyce Becker Lee Penny Lex Terri Schlichenmeyer Zac Wood DISTRIBUTION Times Media THE WAG magazine is published quarterly by Lex Ventures, LLC 14844 N. Greenhurst Ave. Fountain Hills, AZ 85268 SUBSCRIPTION RATE $24/YEAR - 4 ISSUES THE CHECK WAGTOmagazine REMIT ADDRESS ABOVE an informative, entertaining read about dogs

No man can fully understand the meaning of love unless he’s owned by a dog.

& their companions

THE WAG mag

THE WAG magazine

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. Printed in the U.S.A.

ADVERTISING INQUIRIES Gary Lex 715-497-8073 Gary@thewagmagazine.com IDEAS AND COMMENTS Penny Lex 507-202-3929 Penny@thewagmagazine.com www.thewagmagazine.com

he holidays have passed, we’re into the New Year, and coming very soon is one of my favorite holidays—Valentine’s Day. I’ve always enjoyed celebrating the joys of love from relationships I hold dear to my heart—those with family, friends and of course, dogs. Therefore, I’ve peppered this issue with amore including some interesting lessons about life and love that our readers have learned from their dogs (page 12). Some folks readily admit to loving dogs more than people. For those who question how that can possibly be, the answer isn’t rocket science. Quite simply, it’s L-O-V-E. Find out more about the strong, loving connection between dogs and humans on page 16, Good Chemistry. There’s nothing more empowering than overcoming something you thought you couldn’t do. And there’s nothing more rewarding than knowing you’ve made a positive difference. Author Teresa Bitler recently enjoyed the benefits of both from volunteering at Best Friends Animal Sanctuary near Kanab, Utah. Teresa, like so many dog lovers, hadn’t donated her time to animal shelters because, well, it’s just too hard on the emotions. I wonder how many of us can relate to that? I mean it’s pretty hard to mop up puddles from dogs at the shelter when you’re creating more from your tears than you’re picking up. Teresa’s Touching Tail (page 22) tells how she risked her emotions and made a difference, not only in a dog’s life, but also her own. (Note to self: add volunteering at an animal shelter to New Year’s resolutions.) There’s so much more to read in this issue and…you might notice our new “look.” As always, we love staying in touch with our readers and welcome your thoughts and ideas for THE WAG. Please drop us a note at: penny@ thewagmagazine.com. We want to hear from you! Here’s to all the love that we’re blessed in sharing with our four-legged friends and a wonderful Winter season. Woof!

Penny Penny Lex, Editor & Publisher THE WAG magazine | Winter 2017

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THE WAG magazine

WINTER 2017 | CONTENTS FEATURES

10  Rapamycin

You want your dog to be with you forever but…

16

By Zac Wood

12 What THE WAG magazine

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Readers Have Learned from Dogs

About Life and Love Entertaining and profound

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 ichael Vick’s Dogs Are M Good “Newz” for Pit Bulls

Thanks to a Second Chance From fighting to fending for their breed By Teresa Bitler

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12

Good Chemistry

The Science Behind the Human-Canine Connection Why puppy love is so strong

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By Joyce Becker Lee

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Building Resiliency in Your Pet

Preparing your dog for life’s unexpected events By C.J. Anderson

20 Grooming for a Successful Career

Schools that teach the art of dog grooming By Teresa Bitler

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DEPARTMENTS HEALTH & WELLNESS

8 Healthy Canines = Healthier Canines

SIT/STAY/PLAY/READ

24 Book Reviews

Earnest Unlikely Companions By Terri Schlichenmeyer

25 WAG’s Word Search

22 TOUCHING TAILS

Overcoming Emotions to Volunteer at a Shelter

An inspirational read for those too tender-hearted to volunteer By Teresa Bitler

IN EVERY ISSUE From the Editor | 3

Smile for the Camera | 6

Some of What’s Happening | 26 Rescue Directory | 28

Index of Advertisers | 31 4

THE WAG magazine | Winter 2017


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Smile for the camera We’d Love to Hear from You! Send photos of your dog to penny@thewagmagazine.com

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5 6

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1. Chester shares the perfect pose. 2. Vigilance by Señor (or Joey). 3. Tyson readies for another round of the lake. 4. Lavern & Shirley; sisterly love. 5. Best friends Benson and Maggie. 6. Oberon catching a snooze in his very own patch of clover. 7. Ace taking a break. 8. Cold weather calls for a three-dog night. Koshou, Oliver & Seamus. 9. What’s a few gray hairs? Charlie. 10. Another day at the office for Shay, CCO (chief canine officer). 11. Maisey Grace. 12. Juneau. You are forever in our hearts.

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Barking Back

COMMENTS FROM OUR READERS

I loved the article in the Fall issue about The Critter Doc! Amazing woman! The Wag is a great publication. I share it with all my friends and we can never wait for the next issue to come out. Keep ‘em coming! – Jeanine Swensen Scottsdale, AZ

When I picked up The Wag for the first time I found it a pleasant surprise from the usual magazine. Owning dogs most of my life it brought a smile to my face. Not only was it fun to read, but also informative. Here I thought I knew everything about dogs...was I wrong. This is truly a great fun and informative magazine about dogs that even non-dog owners will enjoy. – Ron Latko, Fountain Hills, AZ

I just want to say that I love The Wag magazine. It is very informative for pet owners. The pictures of other peoples’ pets makes me smile. So glad that I discovered it! Keep up the good work. – Bonnie Long, Fountain Hills, AZ

We really like the variety of topics and interesting articles you have. We have two dogs and two cats. How about including cats in The Wag? – Don Hampton, Gilbert, AZ

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THE WAG magazine | Winter 2017

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HEALTH & WELLNESS February Is National Pet Dental Health Month

Healthy Canines = Healthier Canines BRUSHING UP ON GOOD DENTAL CARE By Zac Wood

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ental hygiene is important in dogs just as in humans, and the signs of a problem are similar. Your dog’s breath, tooth color, and behavior are all critical indicators of their dental and overall health. Bad breath can have dozens of causes from simple to serious. Tooth discoloration usually indicates a problem or warns you that a cleaning is overdue. A toothache or tooth injury is indicated by a dog’s unwillingness to eat or play and might cause more serious issues. Luckily, dental health isn’t that complex for most dogs. Bad breath might be caused by tendencies to taste nasty things, a normal dirty mouth, or an underlying medical condition. If doggie breath is the problem, and not just the symptom, it can easily be solved with dental treats, like Greenies® Dental Chews Dog Treats, or with brushing. In addition, bad breath and obvious mouth sensitivity may also be symptomatic of a dead or broken tooth. A broken tooth should always be removed professionally as it can lead to serious infection. When in doubt, ask your vet. Brushing a dog’s teeth can be as simple and fun as scratching their belly or brushing their coat. If you have a puppy, spend time touching his mouth and rubbing his gums. Entice him by putting a dab of flavorful doggy toothpaste on your finger for him to lick. Let him get used to having his gums massaged and teeth gently rubbed. It’s much like taking the time to massage your puppy’s paws. He gets accustomed to the experience and is less likely

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to have issues in the future when getting groomed or having his nails clipped. As with any other behavior, you can teach your dog to tolerate and

Using a special doggy brush, you can clean normal tartar and plaque from your dog’s teeth just like you do for your own.

even enjoy the brushings with treats, yummy doggie toothpaste, toys, and other rewarding acts. Choose a time when your dog is more relaxed and you’re not in a hurry. While some dogs just aren’t keen on the whole tooth-brushing deal, some

thoroughly enjoy it and look forward to the event almost as much as going for a walk. Dog toothpaste is flavored like dog treats, which is good news, since you should never use human toothpaste on your pets. Human toothpaste often contains high levels of fluoride which is poisonous to dogs. And since dogs aren’t known to “swish and spit,” the product gets ingested. Using a special doggy brush, you can clean normal tartar and plaque from your dog’s teeth just like you do for your own. Tartar is the invisible layer of crud that accumulates on teeth, while plaque is the visible buildup of gunk. This buildup, if left untreated, can invite gum irritation and even bacterial infection. Regular brushing cuts down on the need for professional veterinary cleanings (which you may still need) and can help prevent complications. As in humans, canine periodontal disease and gingivitis are serious concerns. This can cause a great deal of discomfort, so much so that your dog may eat less, stop playing with toys, and lose weight. Infections can spread and make matters worse. In all aspects of dog companionship, you have to pay attention to your pet. Regular care of your dog’s teeth can keep him healthy, could save you money, and the end result is something you’ll both be able to smile about.


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RAPAMYCIN

A new drug that could extend the healthy lifespan of dogs By Zac Wood

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does work out to the average ten-year life-span of a canine being oneseventh of the average seventy-yearhuman; so maybe one-to-seven is not all that misguided. However you count, most humans would agree—there just aren’t I’d consider it. If there wasn’t any cost associated with enough years to a dog’s life and it and no behavior changes, I’d be willing to try it and just we’d like more. While every vet will recommend regular visits, frequent stop if there were any side effects or reactions. tests, preventative medicines, and high-quality food, there may be another course of action finding its way to Rx pads in your town. a drug that, in certain cases, gives the cultural zeitgeist. Actually, the AKC Rapamycin, also called sirolimus, animal increased vitality, energy, and says that the dog’s first calendar year could possibly add years to his life? is like 15 human-years, and the second was first discovered as a naturallyoccurring molecule created by Rapamycin might be just what the is like nine. After that, each year is bacteria in the soil of Easter roughly five for your pup. This, of doctor ordered. Island in the South Pacific. It The American Kennel Club (AKC) course, is dependent on breed, but ow old is your dog? How do you convert that into a “dog years” equivalent? If you could, would you dose your pups with

cautions that equivocating dog ages is not perfect and is certainly more complicated than the one-to-seven ratio that somehow entered the

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THE WAG magazine | Winter 2017


was originally processed into an antifungal medicine but had immunosuppressant side effects. Fortunately, there are circumstances where repressing your immune system is beneficial: organ transplants. The medicine, marketed as Rapamune, is regularly prescribed, long-term, to prevent transplant rejection. The medicine is being researched for applications in human and veterinary medicine. While there are several potential uses, one hope is for use as a life-extending medication. Arlan Richardson, PhD, of the Reynolds Oklahoma Center on Aging, told CNN, “It’s the best bet we have.” In some cases, mice dosed with rapamycin were living up to sixty percent longer than their peers and showed a slower rate of decline in cognitive function. Mice bred for studying Alzheimer’s showed a promising resistance to the affliction. Dogs treated with small doses of the drug have exhibited increased activity, even when old and sick; some owners have reportedly said their dogs were running and jumping like puppies again. It is currently difficult to find a veterinary office that will prescribe rapamycin, and many have not even heard of it. The drug, however, is the main factor behind efforts at the Dog Aging Project, which is conducting long-term multi-phase research into prolonging healthy canine lives. The initiative is collecting information on untreated dog aging, as well as the effects of various doses of rapamycin in dogs of varied ages and breeds. Together, this information will provide a good look at what can be done to extend the forever period a

dog has in your home. Ken Wood, who has been raising dogs as go-everywhere companions for forty years, says using the medication would be a situational decision. “Specifically, if I had a healthy dog with a good mix of genetics, I would not; and if I had a dog with genetic health issues…, I might.” “Our long-lived Golden, Cassie, she was from a healthy line of dogs,” continued Wood. “She lived a largely

cut. “His wounds not healing would be a problem,” says Simmons. “I’d consider it. If there wasn’t any cost associated with it and no behavior changes, I’d be willing to try it and just stop if there were any side effects or reactions.” The testing program is free, but participants are not otherwise compensated for their time. The study’s website, www. dogagingproject.com, has information on registering for the

if I had a healthy dog with a good mix “of Specifically, genetics, I would not; and if I had a dog with genetic health issues…, I might. ” outdoor life with plenty of exercise and lots of self-directed activity.” Cassie was with the family for fifteen years, and Wood credits her longevity to an active lifestyle, as well as a diet of raw venison with cooked brown rice. When asked if she’d enroll her dog in the study, Elisia Simmons, 28, went straight to a critical point. “It would depend. It would depend on the side effects.” Her dog Koshou is a threeyear-old black-and-white border collie with plenty of youthful spirit. The full-strength transplant medicine given to humans has a nasty list of warnings, including cancer, diabetes, infections, and slow healing. “You have to be concerned about [the] side effects,” warns Matt Kaeberlein, co-director of the Dog Aging Project. Koshou is incredibly active and has gotten the occasional scrape or

trial: “Dogs must be at least 6 years old, 40 pounds in weight minimum and in good health, without significant pre-existing conditions.” A board of veterinary experts will select candidates that would receive regular doses of the drug and medical examinations assessing cardiovascular health, cognitive function, and cancer incidence. “But, in general, making a dog’s life longer isn’t something I’m that worried about,” remarked Simmons. “I have a dog expecting him to live for so many years, so it’s not a concern of mine now. Maybe, years from now when he’s advanced in age, I’ll feel differently.” Right now, Koshou is currently too young for the trial. Perhaps, by the time he is middle-aged, rapamycin will be on the market for any dog. When it is, will you try it?

THE WAG magazine | Winter 2017

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WHAT DOGS HAVE TAUGHT OUR READERS ABOUT LIFE & LOVE

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I’ve learned that I really only need a quarter of the space on my king-sized bed. My two dogs seem to need more.

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Patience. Lola has taught me to slow down, have patience and enjoy the moment. I’ve learned to trust the judgment of my dog when it comes to the character of people. Nine times out of ten, my dog has been right.

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THE WAG magazine | Winter 2017

4 5

I’ve learned the true meaning of loyalty and commitment.

My dogs have taught me how much we humans complicate things. I communicate with and observe my dog. He makes it all very simple. That’s how life should be. Us humans mess things up.

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When my dog is happy, it makes me very happy. I get so much enjoyment out of seeing her be so happy and gay.

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Punctuality. If I’m not on time, there are consequences.

My dog has taught me the meaning of true, pure love.

How to get to the bank (where they give treats). Harley and Chico remind me where to turn to get to the bank.

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All life is very short. You need to make the most of and savor every single minute you have with your dog.


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THE WAG magazine | Winter 2017

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PHOTOS: Best Friends Animal Sanctuary

Lucas bears the scars from his years as a grand champion.

Michael Vick’s Dogs Are Good “Newz” for Pit Bulls

THANKS TO A SECOND CHANCE By Teresa Bitler

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ife was a nightmare for the 51 pit bulls rescued in 2007 from Bad Newz Kennels, the illegal dogfighting ring bankrolled by then Atlanta Falcons quarterback Michael Vick. Chained to buried car axles, they drank water from bowls containing algae and fought for their lives. While the fighting dogs ran on treadmills and hung from rubber rings to strengthen their jaws, others were used as studs or as bait dogs to test younger animals. All bore deep scars—both physical and emotional— from their experiences there. At the time, most agencies, including the Humane Society of the United States and PETA, believed dogs like these couldn’t be rehabilitated. Not only did they pose a risk to people and other animals, it was argued, but they were so

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THE WAG magazine | Winter 2017

traumatized by their experiences that it was more merciful to euthanize them. And that’s exactly what did happen to most dogs rescued from fight situations . . . until Vick’s dogs were rescued. The high profile case drew attention to the cruelty of dog fighting; an outraged public began flooding the judge’s office with emails and letters begging that the pit bulls, now considered evidence in Vick’s trial, be given a second chance. After Vick pled guilty and agreed to pay $928,000 towards the dogs’ care and treatment, the judge agreed the dogs shouldn’t be euthanized as a whole. Instead, he ordered that each dog undergo an individual evaluation to determine whether any could be rehabilitated. Expecting they’d only be able to save a handful of dogs, an assessment

team—led by the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA), Best Friends Animal Society (BFAS), and Bay Area Doglovers Responsible About Pit Bulls (BAD RAP) in San Francisco—tested the dogs’ reactions to humans, food, toys, and other dogs. Of the 51 rescued pit bulls, only one had to be euthanized because of aggression and another due to her injuries. Two others died before the assessment. The remaining 47 showed promise. Fifteen of the most adoptable went to rescue organizations throughout the country where they spent at least six months in foster care before becoming available for adoption. Ten more went to BAD RAP, and the 22 most difficult cases went to Best Friends Animal Sanctuary outside of Kanab, Utah.


John Garcia with Meryl, who along with Lucas was court ordered to remain at Best Friends Animal Sanctuary for life.

“It was a momentous day when the dogs arrived (at the sanctuary),” says John Garcia, who participated in the assessments on behalf of Best Friends Animal Society. “A lot of the dogs were extremely happy to be here.” Others had a more difficult time adjusting. They were afraid of everything and pancaked, making themselves as flat as possible, to avoid humans noticing them. Garcia and other staff members worked with each of the 22 dogs to socialize them and teach them basic life skills, such as how to walk on a leash or how to ride in a car. Within a year of their early 2008 arrival, the first of the Vicktory dogs, as they’ve become known, were able to be adopted out from Best Friends and other organizations. Jonny Justice is the perfect example of how far many of these dogs, once deemed too dangerous to live, have come. Adopted by his BAD RAP foster family, the little black and white pit bull has served as a therapy dog for sick children and a canine audience for those struggling with reading. He was the inspiration for a GUND stuffed animal, appeared on The Rachel Ray Show, and was the ASPCA Dog of the Year in 2014. He’s not alone. A number have become therapy dogs; quite a few, including Vick’s grand champion, Lucas, have earned their Canine Good Citizenship certificates, issued by the American Kennel Club to dogs that pass a series of 10 tests. Some have gone on to remarkable

accomplishments. Wallace is a flying disc champion, and Audie is an AKC Preferred Agility Champion. And others, such as Georgia and Mel, have become ambassadors for the breed, making public appearances and winning over hearts and minds. Garcia, who appeared with Georgia on The Ellen DeGeneres Show and Larry King Live, wasn’t surprised by the dogs’ progress. “This wasn’t our first dog fighting case,” he explains. “We knew what the outcome would be. We were just looking for a case where we could show how these dogs could be rehabilitated and how they deserved a second chance.” Vick’s dogs provided the perfect opportunity and their story fundamentally changed the way rescue organizations perceive the breed. Prior to the Vick case, most shelters automatically euthanized pit bull-type dogs, even those forfeited under the most mundane circumstances. Now, Garcia says, those organizations have “permission to care,” and as a result countless pit bulls have been spared. But, the breed still has a difficult time getting adopted and disproportionately populates shelters, especially in the

Georgia became a celebrity, appearing with John Garcia on The Ellen DeGeneres Show and Larry King Live.

Phoenix area. Garcia says it’s too bad because “pitties” are some of the most loyal and loving dogs out there. (In fact, it’s their loyalty to their handlers that motivates pit bulls to fight, not natural aggression.) Garcia encourages people to not dismiss them out of hand but give them a chance. “So many people look at pit bulls and think they’re vicious, they’re bad dogs, but they’re Georgia, they’re Mel, they’re Lucas,” he says. “They’re individuals.” If anything, the lesson to take from Vicktory dogs, once considered the worst of the worst, is that even the most traumatized dogs deserve a second chance and, given the opportunity, many will exceed all expectations. For a more detailed look at the Vicktory dogs, watch the documentary The Champions online at www. championsdocumentary.com or on Netflix. Best Friends Animal Society http://bestfriends.org/sanctuary/exploresanctuary/dogtown/vicktory-dogs

Mel was adopted by Richard Hunter, a Dallas radio show host who covered the Michael Vick dog fighting story in 2007.

Bay Area Doglovers Responsible About Pit Bulls www.badrap.org

THE WAG magazine | Winter 2017

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Good Chemistry

THE SCIENCE BEHIND THE HUMAN-CANINE CONNECTION

By Joyce Becker Lee

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e love our dogs. We coddle them, dress them, and adore them, spending billions of dollars on their care, feeding and amusement. They are our friends, our companions, and sometimes even our “children.” In fact, there’s something about the human-canine connection that goes beyond anything felt with any other pet. Scientists speculate that this bonding dates back as far as 15,000 years, when the first domesticated dogs appeared as distinct from wolves. It’s an important enough topic that research facilities set up in major universities around the globe study not only the connection between people and their pups, but also its evolution and effects. The results suggest several reasons for this bond.

The more I learn about people, the more I like my dog. —Mark Twain THE PHYSICAL CONNECTION The bond between people and dogs is not just an emotional response, but has been found to contain a physical element as well. A recent study at Azabu University’s School of Veterinary Medicine in Sagamihara, Japan, discovered that while wolves consider a direct look as a challenge, dogs enjoy gazing at their humans. In fact, when dogs and humans gaze in each others’ eyes, both brains release the hormone oxytocin, the same hormone released during contact between parents and their babies. Called the “lover’s hormone,” it creates a feeling of well-being and belonging. This sense of well-being is part of what is known as the “Secure Base Effect” and was the subject of a 2013 study at the University of Veterinary Medicine in Vienna. What it means is that to a dog, the master is a safe base from which to explore the world, and his devotion comes in part from his sense 16

THE WAG magazine | Winter 2017

of well-being. While we know that dogs evolved from the same ancestor as today’s wolves, they are genetically distinct. Even when raised as pets, wolves are still wild animals, predisposed to biting and killing. It is significant that the release of oxytocin is noticeably absent in wolves, even those raised from cubs. So our connection with dogs is a unique form of bonding, physical as well as emotional, and much like the connection with our children. Dogs react to us, to our moods and our gestures. Dr. Alexandra Horowitz, director of the Dog Cognition Lab at Barnard College, suggests: “If your dog’s gaze helps you think your dog understands you, that produces bonding.” THE BEHAVIORAL CONNECTION Of course, genetics has its place. In evolution, the most successful species are those whose genetics have randomly

adapted to environmental conditions. However, a mid-twentieth century study with foxes suggests that the evolution of dogs from wolves could have been influenced by a single behavior: that of growing comfortable with humans. To test this hypothesis, Russian geneticist Dmitry Belyaev selectively bred foxes focused on that trait. Later generations of foxes not only became more affable, but also began to take on the physical traits of dogs, such as spotted coats, curly tails and floppy ears, along with gaining the ability to read human physical cues—in short, becoming truly domesticated. It’s thought that the same type of selective breeding turned the wolves into dogs: wolves that were more open to humans were bred and raised and eventually acquired the physical attributes of dogs. While floppy ears may seem an odd indicator of domesticity, note that other than elephants, no wild animals have them.


This evolution took thousands of years, and the Belyaev study is remarkable in that he achieved noteworthy results in fewer than sixty years. THE NATURAL CONNECTION The human connection with dogs is a natural part of our love of nature. In the Biophilia Hypothesis, introduced in 1984, Biologist Edward O. Wilson, professor emeritus in Entomology at Harvard, suggests that the need to bond with other life forms is rooted in our DNA. But we raise hamsters and cats and horses and connect with them on a certain level as well. Why are dogs different? Why the interest in studying dog psychology? That bonding is being studied at the Canine Cognition Center, part of the Evolutionary Anthropology Department at Duke University. According to Dr. Brian Hare, Associate Professor and Co-Director of the Center, the Center hopes to use these findings to determine which shelter dogs and service animals will be most successful in their multi-owner lives. He says, “There are only two species that have grown up

to be adapted to human culture—humans and dogs. Dogs have been domesticated to operate in human society. Understanding dogs, then, is an avenue into understanding humans.” THE HELPING PAW Understanding dog psychology can also help match service animals to their handlers. Because of their ability to connect with people, dogs have proved vital in helping those with autism and PTSD. In both instances, a therapy dog partner can provide a calming environment and even promote reduced symptoms or the need for medication. A dog helps reduce anxiety, depression and sleep disorders, and can help move sufferers into the outside world. According to studies, the dogs can help in PTSD by calming the sufferer and helping maintain reality. They provide love and trust and can help a handler maintain a schedule and step back into society. A therapy dog can help children with autism maintain focus, while providing a safe environment and protection from the outside world and any self-injurious tendencies. The dog helps

the child move out into the world and helps serve as a connection between the two disparate realities. The evolution from wolf to dog has created a species that seems born to connect with people. Whatever the reason for the relationship, the bond between dog and human continues to be one of the most successful examples of mutual love in the world. IF YOU’D LIKE MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THE DOG-HUMAN CONNECTION, HERE ARE SOME INTERESTING WEBSITES: faunalytics.org/reference-item/dogs-secure-baseeffect/ psychologytoday.com/blog/the-athletesway/201306/why-do-adult-dogs-become-humanchildren-owners news.nationalgeographic.com/ news/2013/03/130302-dog-domestic-evolutionscience-wolf-wolves-human/ well.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/04/16/the-look-oflove-is-in-the-dogs-eyes/?_r=0 phys.org/news/2016-03-explores-prehistoricrelationship-humans-dogs.html#jCp

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Building Resiliency in Your Pets Helping Them Cope With the Unexpected By C.J. Anderson

W

hat if you suddenly have to go into the hospital, evacuate your home or leave town. The simple, predictable, day-to-day routine you share with your pets will be totally disrupted and most likely there will be stress— for you and your pets.

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THE WAG magazine | Winter 2017


In an emergency or disaster, no matter the kind, one thing you have to know and plan for, is your connection with your beloved pets. When you try to safeguard your four-legged friend by keeping him at home, you don’t realize that you are also getting him used to a stress–free life. There are two elements that need to happen to help your pet cope with life’s unexpected events. First, get your pet used to the unexpected: noises, people, situations and travel. Second, give him the confidence that you have the situation in hand. That he does not have to protect you.

We have to remember that pets react to what we are feeling, without explanations. We have to remember that pets react to what we are feeling, without explanations. All the pet knows is that you are scared, anxious, overwhelmed or sad. If you can’t cope or take care of a situation, how does your pet cope? Pets are either scared like their owner or feel the need to protect their human. Even a heated discussion between two, much loved pet owners can result in a pugilistic outbreak between two pets that normally get along. In a disastrous situation there may be people all around that are stressed, frustrated, scared, even hysterical. If they brush up against your dog, he will feel that energy and react. He doesn’t understand that the house is on fire or that the earth is splitting apart, just that there’s a need for him to protect or even run away.

Here are some suggestions to help prepare for emergencies that can have a traumatic impact on our pets: Socialize your dog. Take him to places where he will be exposed to people, other pets, noise and chaotic energy. Visit big box or pet stores. Spend time in parks with lots of activity or at sporting events. Be sure to start by having a professional trainer help if you are uncertain how to do this. If you take him to a dog park, walk on the outside of the enclosure. Have him sit with his back to the dogs that will come over to the fence on the other side. Have your dog practice “look at me” (the human). It is true that dogs can only focus on one thing at a time. Their only task should be to focus on what you want. Get your dog used to walking by your knee on a short, (but loose) leash. Remember that your energy will travel down that line to your pet. So many times we see dogs that sniff another dog and a fight breaks out. Or a person will try to pet your dog and get bitten because the dog is “protecting you.” If you are concerned at all about your dog biting unexpectedly, start out by getting him used to a head halter. Aside from the fact that it is so much easier to control your dog by the head when used correctly, it also makes it easier to transition to a muzzle if needed without adding stress to the dog.

In addition to her 30 years in disaster response and safety for humans and pets, C.J. participated with the producers of National Geographic’s “Dog Whisperer” TV show and has the show producer’s permission to keep using that name as she continues the work started in 2006 to help problem dogs. If you want help preparing your pets to have greater resilience, you can join our 1350 members for our monthly online meetups or in-person meetups around Arizona, by going to https://www.meetup. com/DogWhisperers/ Or for more immediate assistance, our online over 3,000 member Yahoo email list at https://groups.yahoo. com/neo/groups/ DogWhispererFans/info

Get your pet used to a pet carrier, which you can make or buy. If your pet has to go to the vet and have a procedure, you don’t want their first experience to be a traumatic one by being caged for the first time.

It’s important to know that Emergency Services do not have to accept your pets for care in an emergency if you do not have a kennel for them. This happened in last summer’s Cedar Creek wildfire. Make the container a cozy den that the pet finds safe. THE WAG magazine | Winter 2017

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Grooming for a Successful Career

A Career in Helping Dogs Look and Feel Their Best By Teresa Bitler

I

f you love animals, especially dogs, pet grooming just might be your calling. Not only do you get to interact with all breeds of dogs on a daily basis, but you can make them look their best and feel better by getting rid of excess or matted hair and trimming their nails, and providing de-shedding services. Hours are generally flexible, and the work is low stress, making it a good option for someone wanting a second career after retirement. Plus, pet grooming can be lucrative depending on where you work and how much experience you have. Most groomers work as hourly employees or contractors, earning up to $20 per hour, plus tips, according to Payscale.com. Self-employed mobile groomers can make close to $120,000 per year, minus overhead expenses, by grooming six dogs per day, five days per week. Getting started usually requires 12 to 15 weeks of study including at least 100 hours of on-the-job training. While some national chain pet stores with onsite grooming have in-house training programs, most salons require you to complete an independent training program. Here’s a look at three of the top independent programs in the Valley.

Although a school and not a salon, It’s a Dog’s World offers discounted grooming services so its students can receive real world training, much like a beauty school might offer discounted haircuts to the public. While the focus is mainly dogs, you might also have the opportunity to groom cats as well as working with other small animals, such as ferrets or guinea pigs.

IT’S A DOG’S WORLD The first grooming school in the Phoenix area, It’s a Dog’s World is also the only one that is solely a school and not a salon with a training program. Students here get individualized training from two instructors which includes handling techniques, clipper maintenance, and de-matting. The class of 10 continually rotates. You attend Tuesday through Saturday from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. until you complete the 15 week program. Every Saturday, those who have the met the program’s standards graduate, and the following Tuesday, new students take their place. 20

THE WAG magazine | Winter 2017

To enroll, you must be at least 17 years old and either have graduated high school or earned your GED. The program costs $5,000, and you will need to own your own grooming kit, which can be purchased through the school for $800.


Located in Litchfield Park, the Petstop Salon and School of Dog Grooming limits its class to just three students who complete a 450hour program alongside professional groomers. The small class size allows the instructor to provide one-on-one instruction, and because the groomers are used to working with students, they are also available to answer questions and provide direction. Most of the staff also have specialized areas of interest. For example, the program’s instructor has 20 years of experience as a veterinary technician, so students have the opportunity to learn about skin conditions and other ailments. One of the groomers researches nutrition in her spare time and is willing to share her knowledge. As a result, students receive a well-rounded education that goes beyond clipper and scissoring techniques. The program’s graduates are some of the most sought after groomers in the Valley. To apply, you must be a high school graduate or at least 18 years old. (A GED is also acceptable.) Tuition is $5,750, which includes the grooming kit and course materials.

IT’S A DOGS WORLD

1855 W. Greenway Rd., #111 Phoenix, AZ 85023 itsadogsworld.org 602-493-3647

ANIMAL BEHAVIOR COLLEGE For people who are currently employed, have children at home, or have other daytime obligations, Animal Behavior College provides a more flexible approach to becoming a groomer. You enroll online, receive materials to study at your own pace in your home, and are assigned a counselor to keep you on track. By spending 10 hours per week on the program, you can complete it in 12 months; if you can devote more, you can finish sooner. The program entails nine study sections with a test to pass after each, followed by at least 100 hours of on-thejob training, and then passing a final exam. Even though Animal Behavior College is located in California, the onthe-job training will be with a grooming facility in your area. After passing the final exam, you’ll have access to the college’s online job placement assistance for life. You must be at least 18 years old, have either a high school diploma or GED, have no felonies, and be able to meet certain physical requirements unless notified in writing. If you pay in full at the time you enroll, the cost is $3,995. This includes a grooming kit with clippers, shampoo, and conditioner as well as a six-DVD series showing you how to do various cuts, perform first aid, groom cats and more. Financing is available.

THE PETSTOP SALON AND SCHOOL OF DOG GROOMING

5110 N. Dysart Rd., Ste. A 174 Litchfield Park, AZ 85340 petstopgrooming.com 623-547-0255 petstop@petstopgrooming.com

Animal Behavioral College

THE PETSTOP SALON AND SCHOOL OF DOG GROOMING

ANIMAL BEHAVIOR COLLEGE

800-795-3294 animalbehaviorcollege.com/grooming

THE WAG magazine | Winter 2017

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Sit/Stay/Play/Read

OVERCOMING EMOTIONS TO VOLUNTEER AT A SHELTER The Difference It Made . . . For Everyone By Teresa Bitler

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THE WAG magazine | Winter 2017


I always wanted to volunteer at an animal shelter, but I thought I wouldn’t be able to handle it emotionally. After all, I get choked up when I read about abandoned or mistreated animals; to this day, I still cry every time I see the photo of Lana, the Labrador mix who was dubbed the “saddest dog in the world” (I read she’s gone on to a loving home). Volunteering would break my heart, I thought, so I hadn’t seriously considered it until I learned about Best Friends Animal Sanctuary. Located just north of the Arizona border outside Kanab, Utah, the no-kill sanctuary provides a home for more than 1,600 dogs, cats, horses, pigs, goats, bunnies, birds, and other animals. Most will be adopted; those that aren’t have a safe place to live out the rest of their days. Knowing that eased my misgivings about volunteering because I didn’t have to worry about the fate of any dog. None were at risk of being euthanized, and most would eventually move on to happy homes. I could handle this. The morning I was scheduled to volunteer, I checked in at Dogtown with two other journalists, and our guides drove us across the road to the Puppy Care Center. No matter where you volunteer, one of your main tasks is to help socialize the animals; so as we sat on the concrete floor, we were introduced to Tank, a deaf, tan-and-white puppy. As he bounded around the room, we were encouraged to pet and interact with him. Soon, Tank was joined by two others—Hugin and Munin— and we paired off, one puppy per team, to work on the “sit” command. I have to admit I was actually having a great time. Although Tank’s beginning was so sad because he was left to die, he was now a happy-go-lucky pup that made me laugh. I knew he’d go on to a good home. After the training session, we took the puppies back to their kennels and began cleaning the outdoor runs by scooping poop, scrubbing the concrete, and squeegeeing off any residual soap. (You do have to do some work.) We moved the puppies to the clean outdoor runs and repeated the process inside. Our shift ended with each of us taking one of the puppies for two

FYI

VOLUNTEER: You can sign up online at bestfriends.org to volunteer at Dogtown or in any of the other areas. If you don’t want to work directly with animals, your help can be used doing laundry, cleaning trails, or on special projects.

STAY: Best Friends has limited on-property accommodations. Since Kanab, Utah, is just a 10-minute drive away, consider booking a room at one of the pet-friendly hotels there.

laps around the trail behind the facility. There’s a mandatory lunch break, and most visitors head to the onsite Village Café for a vegetarian meal served cafeteria style. While I appreciated the downtime, I was surprised by how eager I was to get back to work. The experience so far had been uplifting. I felt like I had been a positive influence in the puppies’ lives. My spirits fell a little, though, when I learned I had been assigned to admissions for the afternoon. Admissions is where new arrivals to Dogtown are assessed before moving into the general population, and I knew if I was going to encounter the dejected dogs I saw in photos online, it would be here. Because I was on a media tour, I didn’t have any input on where I volunteered. I didn’t feel like I could ask for another assignment, so I decided to make the best of it. As instructed, I began removing blankets and toys from the kennels. Thankfully, if anything, the dogs all seemed eager to see me until I came to Tania, a tan Corgi mix that shied away from the treat I offered. I left it on her blanket and she shyly took it as I exited. While I worked my way through the kennels, someone else followed scooping poop and washing down the runs. I then brought each dog clean blankets and toys. When I got to Tania’s kennel, I spent a few extra minutes, speaking softly until I coaxed her to take a treat from my hand. A staff member noticed Tania’s progress, and the two of us later patiently slipped a leash around her and took her for her first walk. It was then I realized I was in exactly the position I had feared. Tania hadn’t been huddled in the corner of her kennel, but the stray had been terrified of her new surroundings and the people who came with them. Rather than feeling like I needed to “rescue” her, I felt like I was making a difference. I was just one of many volunteers who would help Tania on her way to a new life in a forever home, but my role was important. Tania would have a better life because of me, and I felt good about that. I decided then and there to return to Best Friends, and maybe, I realized, I’m ready to start helping at my local shelter, too.

TOUR: If you don’t have time to volunteer, you can take a free tour instead. Tours are offered daily at 8:30 a.m., 10:00 a.m., 1:00 p.m., and 2:30 p.m.

DONATE: Check out the website to donate or to become a sponsor of the many animals in need.

THE WAG magazine | Winter 2017

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Sit/Stay/Play/Read

BOOK REVIEWS

By Terri Schlichenmeyer, The Bookworm Sez

Unlikely Companions: The Adventures of an Exotic Animal Doctor by Laurie Hess, DVM Fluffy’s not feeling very well. It’s terrible when a pet gets sick; they can’t exactly tell you what’s wrong, but he’s your baby and you know when there’s a problem. You really need to get Fluffy to the vet—but not just any veterinarian. He needs a specialist because, as in the new book Unlikely Companions: The Adventures of an Exotic Animal Doctor by Laurie Hess, DVM (with Samantha Rose), little Fluffy isn’t exactly fluffy. Moving out of their apartment was the start of a dream. When Laurie Hess and her husband, Peter, left Manhattan, they knew upstate New York was where they’d put down roots and raise a family. They’d found community there and the perfect place for Hess to open her Veterinary Center for Birds & Exotics. Iguanas may not seem like your everyday pet, but Hess might see them in a normal workday. Pigs aren’t furry like dogs, but their owners love them all the same. Parrots might not pounce, but they play and can even purr. These are her patients, but, as Hess admits, “caring for their owners is half my practice.” Sleuthing is likewise an important part of what she does. When car-tire-vs.-turtle happened, she discovered a way to repair the unfortunate victim’s shell. When an adorably tiny piglet grows into a fullbore boar, she knows how to keep that little piggy from going to market. When a dangerous “pet” comes to her clinic, she understands how to stay safe while caring for it. And when a whole herd of beloved area animals were in trouble,

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Hess leaped to find out why. Comical, active, and popular with kids and adults, doe-eyed sugar gliders were in crisis in Hess’s area: she had five dead patients, no clues, and research showed that the animals were succumbing quickly in many areas of the country. Nothing added up, but in the midst of finding a solution, Hess also found herself immersed in controversy. Tipping the scales with a snake, catching a Nile monitor, boarding a bunny, and finding a “pet” that shouldn’t be a pet, they are all in a days’ work for author Laurie Hess, as she writes in a memoir that’s part pet-lover, part personal. That latter angle is great. We get to know Hess and her family well. But let’s face it: the former is why you’d want this book, and Hess doesn’t disappoint her readers. Get ready for stories of an autistic boy and his pets, taste-testing pet food, and a fussy cockatoo. Read about birdbrains, bird brains, and a pig who loves having his nails painted. You’ll laugh about four-footed escapees. You’ll cry for the husband whose wife hates his pets. And you’ll thrill at a mystery that weaves throughout. That makes this perfect for animal lovers of all stripes and scales, fans of dogs to hogs. Furry, purry, or if you’ve got a Fluffy who really isn’t, Unlikely Companions: The Adventures of an Exotic Animal Doctor is a book you’ll like.   

THE WAG magazine | Winter 2017

Earnest by Kristin von Kreisler The day you met your dog, it was love at first sight. Those big brown eyes; that silky, shiny fur; butt-wiggles; even puppy breath were hard to resist. You couldn’t decide who picked whom, and it didn’t matter. On the day you met your dog, it was forever. But, as in the new book Earnest by Kristin von Kreisler, could the same be said for your human? The minute Anna stepped into Second Chance Shelter, she knew that she and her boyfriend, Jeff, weren’t going home alone. Jeff only wanted to “look” at the dogs. He said you got a better idea of their personalities that way. But when they met Earnest, well, that was that. He was a gorgeous three-yearold yellow Lab and on that day, they became a family of three. That made Anna enormously happy. Earnest was a sweetheart and she loved taking him to work at her Seattle-area floral shop, which was located in an old Victorian mansion that Anna’s grandmother once owned. Anna’s shop, Plant Parenthood, was humming; Anna’s friends (business co-renters of the house) were busy; and Jeff was becoming a success at his architectural firm. Life was good. Jeff didn’t know how he was going to tell Anna about his work project. He hadn’t asked for it; Cedar Place was handed to him and its completion would totally set his career. When it was done, it would be a jewel in the neighborhood—a place for community and retail, museums

and families. Something Jeff could be proud of. He’d thought through every single facet of it. Except for one thing: the project involved the demolition of the Victorian mansion that Anna loved. Though he had a solution to it all, she would be heartbroken. But she was more than just that. When Anna learned that Jeff was involved in the Cedar Place project, she was livid. How could he? Didn’t he think she’d be hurt? Jeff moved out of their condo. Anna filed for custody of Earnest. Jeff countered with a mediator. Anna started fighting for her beloved house. There was no way they could ever continue their relationship. But Earnest, and life, had other ideas. There are two basic things you should know about Earnest. It’s good, and it’s too long. On the first point, who can resist a book about a dog? I know I can’t, especially when the dog is personable but not cutesy; so I was glad that author Kristin von Kreisler was careful not to go overboard with her Earnest. He’s a charmer, but not a saccharine one. The “overboard” comes with the human characters’ back-andforth. Anna and Jeff’s fight goes on and on and on and, well, you know. I desperately wanted them to stop already. Their heel-digging comprises the majority of this book, and it’s too much. Keep that in mind and if you’re willing to endure it for the sake of an otherwise good boy-meets-girlmeets-dog romance, you’ll be fine. In that case, I think Earnest will nicely meet your needs.


Sit/Stay/Play/Read

WAG’S

WORD SEARCH Words 4-Legged Valentine WordsThat ThatDescribe DescribeYour Your 4-Legged Valentine

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JANUARY–MARCH 2017

Some of what’s Happening 300 E. Indian School Rd. Phoenix, AZ Dog and cat adoption, family friendly, fun celebration of companion animals. Pet products, yummy eats, vet tips, music and auction prizes. www.doggiestreetfestival.org

JANUARY 28 3rd Annual Arizona Search Dogs Cornhole Tournament

JANUARY National Train Your Dog Month JANUARY 2 National Pet Travel Safety Day

10 am – 4 pm $50–$80 Fat Willy’s Family Sports Grill 4850 S. Gilbert Rd. Chandler, AZ Cornhole tournament to benefit the Arizona Search Dogs 501(c)3 www.eventbrite.com/e/3rd-annualarizona-search-dogs-cornholetournament-tickets -28409666076? aff=es2

JANUARY 14 – MARCH 26 The Celebration of Fine Art

10 am – 6 pm The Celebration of Fine Art 18400 N. Hayden Rd. Scottsdale, AZ Leashed pets are welcome to accompany you to a juried show featuring 100 of the most famous artists from across the country displaying works in all mediums. www.celebrateart.com/the-event

JANUARY 21 Paws in the Park

10 am – 2 pm Chaparral Park 5401 N Hayden Rd. Scottsdale, AZ A promotion of the Off Leash Area giving 40 businesses a chance to promote their services.

JANUARY 24 Change a Pet’s Life Day JANUARY 28 Doggie Street Festival

10 am – 4 pm Steele Indian School Park 26

THE WAG magazine | Winter 2017

FEBRUARY Spay/Neuter Awareness Month Pet Dental Health Month Responsible Pet Owners Month Unchain a Dog Month FEBRUARY 4 Goin to the Dogs 1mi/5k Walk/Run

7 – 11 am Admission $10–$30 Papago Park Softball Field 1300 N. College Tempe AZ Family fun event. Walk or run with or without your dog. Benefit for Arizona Adopt A Greyhound 501(c)3 charity. www.active.com/tempe-az/running/ distance-running-races/goin-tothe-dogs-5k-1-mile-2017

FEBRUARY 13-14 Westminster Dog Show, Madison Square Garden

FEBRUARY 14 Pet Theft Awareness Day Third Week in February –

National Justice for Animals Week FEBRUARY 18 Spay Pride Dog Friendly 5K Run/Walk

8 am – 3 pm $30–$35 Kiwanis Park S Mill Ave. & S. All America Way Tempe, AZ Proceeds benefit Panacea Animal Wellness Sanctuary and C.A.R.E. (Companion Animal Rehabilitation Emergency) Medical Fund.

FEBRUARY 28 World Spay Day MARCH Poison Prevention Awareness Month MARCH 11 WienerMania

Turf Paradise 1501 W. Bell Rd. Phoenix, AZ The largest Wiener Dog Race in Arizona. Admission $2

MARCH 13 K-9 Veterans Day MARCH 26 Paws Around the Fountain

10 am – 3 pm Fountain Park 12925 N. Saguaro Blvd. Fountain Hills, AZ Come and meet all of our wonderful senior dogs and maybe meet your new best friend! PACC911 & Rusty’s Angels Sanctuary


3

FH

fountain hills

HEARING HEALTH

Lend Me Your Ears and Enjoy Better Hearing MARTIN CASE ACA, NBC-HIS

17100 E. Shea

Blvd • Suite

616-620 • Fountain Hills • AZ 85268

480-372-8383

11am-9pm

Join the Pack Dog Whisperer Meetups for Problem Dog Solutions If you want help preparing your pets to have greater resilience, join our 1350 members for monthly online meetups. You can also join us for in-person meetups around Arizona. https://www.meetup.com/DogWhisperers/ For more immediate assistance, see our online 3,000-member Yahoo email list. https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/Dog WhispererFans/info

THE WAG magazine | Winter 2017

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RESCUE DIRECTORY 2nd Chance Dog Rescue

2ndchance.rescuegroups.org Non-profit organization dedicated to saving abandoned/ abused dogs, and provide them with shelter and a safe environment so they can regain their trust in humanity.

AARTA - Akita Advocates Relocation Team Arizona www.akitaadvocates.com

602-882-5482

Non-profit organization that finds homes for displaced Akitas through fostering.

ADOPT ME GSD

ADOPT ME GSD Facebook page

480-720-1534

Saving German Shepherds from euthanasia, providing them with medical treatment and finding loving homes.

Alaskan Malamute Rescue of Arizona

www.malamuterescue.org Alaskan Malamute Rescue of Arizona Facebook Page Rehabilitate and rehome rescued Alaskan Malamutes, assist Malamute owners, and provide education services to the public.

All About Animals Rescue www.allaboutanimalsaz.com

No-kill, foster home based, rescue.

All About Bullies Rescue

All About Bullies Rescue Facebook Page

480-227-1276

Non-profit organization that saves, rehabilitates, and rehomes bully breeds. Specializing in Pit Bulls.

Almost Home Bulldog Rescue,Inc. www.almosthomebulldogrescue.org

480-227-1276

Non-profit organization based in the Maricopa County area of central Arizona. We are dedicated to the rescue of un-wanted, neglected, and abandoned companion animals. Our focus is French and English Bulldogs from local euthanasia lists.

Amazing Aussies Lethal White Rescue of Arizona www.amazingaussies.com

602-571-5811

Non-profit organization that rescues dogs bred Merle to Merle and born blind and/or deaf by a cruel and inhumane breeding practice, so the breeders can make a few extra bucks. About 25% of every litter will come out “wrong” and are killed at birth or thrown away since they can’t be sold. It’s just a “cost of business” to the breeders, but it’s an everyday fight for us. I hope you will join us to help end this planned cruelty.

Anthem Pets

www.anthempets.org

480-287-3542

Non-profit 100% volunteer, No Kill rescue to implement a fully rounded animal welfare program that provides education and resources to the community at large and promotes responsible pet ownership. Volunteers answer calls at the 24 Hour Pet Hotline; provide medical care for abandoned and abused animals and find them qualified, loving homes; and work to reunite lost pets with their owners through use of the Pet Hotline, a Pet Search & Rescue team and a very active Facebook page.

Arizona Animal Welfare League and SPCA www.aawl.org

602-273-6852

Largest and oldest no-kill shelter in Arizona rehabilitates and rehomes more than 5,000 dogs and cats that are abandoned or that have been surrendered by their owners. We do this primarily by rescuing them from other shelters in Maricopa County where they are likely to be euthanized due to the lack of time and resources to care for them. At any one time our shelter will hold 140 cats and 190 dogs. We also have a foster parent network of approximately 90 families who provide care and shelter in their homes for puppies and kittens that are too young to be adopted, and those animals that are recovering from medical procedures or that need socialization before adoption.

Arizona Basset Hound Rescue Inc. www.azbassetrescue.org

602-225-7800 (voice mail)

Non-profit organization that provides veterinary care, food, support, and shelter to Basset Hounds, Bloodhounds and Basset Hound mixes needing assistance in Arizona.

Arizona Beagle Rescue www.azbeaglerescue.com

623-977-1355

Arizona Humane Society

Two locations: Sunnyslope Campus and Nina Mason Pulliam Campus for Compassion www.azhumane.org

602-997-7585

Pet adoptions, veterinary and spay/neuter services, retail and thrift shopping.

Arizona Labrador and Giant Breed Rescue www.azlabsandgiants.org

602-307-5227 Volunteer non-profit organization that is dedicated

to rehoming Labradors, Great Danes, Mastiffs, Elkhounds, Newfoundlands, Bernese Mountain Dogs, Saint Bernards, Irish Wolfhounds and Deer Hounds.

Arizona Pug Adoption & Rescue Network www.aparn.org

480-964-3126

Non-profit to rescue Pugs in need, provide medical care and emotional support, and place them into loving, permanent adoptive homes in Arizona.

Arizona Sheltie Rescue, Inc. www.azsheltierescue.com Bill Ferrell: bkferrell@cox.net

(480) 507-7996

Cindy Reel: reelracer@aol.com (602) 843-8073 Non-profit volunteer organization that serves the entire state of Arizona with respect to the rescue of Shetland Sheepdogs.

Arizona Siberian Husky Rescue & Adoption, Inc. www.ashra.org

602-427-7226

Non-profit, volunteer-run organization that rescues Siberian Huskies and places them into qualified homes, as well as educates the public on the special needs of the Siberian Husky.

A statewide 501(c)(3) non-profit animal welfare organization comprised of volunteers dedicated to Beagle rescue and community education.

Arizona Small Dog Rescue

Arizona Border Collie Rescue

A non-profit registered 501(c)3 no kill rescue shelter. A group of volunteers that are dedicated to rescuing and saving homeless, unwanted, abandoned, neglected, and abused dogs.

www.azbcr.org

480-422-5366 (voice message)

Promotes humane treatment through rescue, rehabilitation, education and the rehoming of neglected, abandoned and unwanted Border Collies.

Arizona Boston Terrier Rescue

www.azsmalldog.org

602-944-2440

AZ Cavalier Rescue

AZ Cavalier Rescue Facebook Page

602-397-4744

www.azbtrescue.org Non-profit corporation dedicated to the rescue and rehoming of unwanted Boston Terriers, education of owners on responsible dog ownership, and education of the public on the Boston Terrier breed.

Foster run rescue for Cavaliers, English Toy Spaniels and mixes.

Animal Rescue Friends Ltd

Arizona Golden Rescue

Non-profit that focuses on rescuing all breeds of dogs from the county shelters that are going to be euthanized.

623-428-9119

623-566-9247

AZ Furry Friends Rescue Foundation

www.animalrescuefriends.org

Non-profit foster-based rescue that provides love and care for the rescued animals in a home environment. Utilizing fosters allows us to provide attention to each animals’ unique needs while also training them on how to be inside a home. 28

THE WAG magazine | Winter 2017

www.arizonagoldenrescue.org Provides emotional and medical rehabilitation and will pay for all medications and for necessary surgeries prior to adoptions being finalized for Golden Retrievers and mostlyGolden mixes.

AZ Cocker Rescue

www.azcockerrescue.org

602-757-8225

www.azfurryfriends.org

602-882-9535

Non-profit foster-based, all breed, dog and cat rescue that are at risk of euthanasia at our local kill shelters.


AZ Happy Tails Animal Rescue

www.happytailsaz.org A non-profit registered 501(c)(3) rescue group that does not have an actual shelter. All dogs are fostered in homes. Strive to educate and raise awareness of the importance of animal respect and appreciation and facilitate a low cost spay/neuter program.

AZ Mastiff Rescue (Canine Rescue Coalition, Inc.)

www.azmastiffrescue.com Non-profit dedicated to rescuing English and Neapolitan Mastiffs and other Mastiff and Giant Breeds.

AZ Paws & Claws

www.azpawsandclaws.com Non-profit 501(c)(3) charitable, all volunteer dog and cat rescue serving Arizona. Our mission is to match rescued dogs and cats with a home that will provide them with a lifetime of love and care.

AZ Shepherd Rescue

www.azshepherdrescue.org

623-256-2698

Non-profit foster-based rescue saving German Shepherds, Australian Shepherds and mixes of both from the county euthanasia list.

AZPyrs: Arizona Great Pyrenees Association & Rescue Network www.azpyrs.com

480-988-4033

Non-profit fosters and rehomes purebred Great Pyrenees throughout the entire state of Arizona.

Boxer Luv Rescue www.boxerluv.org

602-530-5671

A 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization to give new life to homeless Boxers in need and is 100% managed and run by volunteers and relies entirely on private donations, grants and revenue from Boxer Luv’s “Luv-To-Save” Thrift Shop.

Briard Rescue and Haven www.briardrescue.com

602-228-2495

Established to provide a safe place for Briard dogs. The Haven is a privately run facility, funded by private donations, ebay auctions, adoption fees and bequests.

Central Arizona Animal Rescue (CAAR)

www.caaronline.org Non-profit organization dedicated to the general welfare, sheltering and placement of animals; prevention of cruelty to animals and overpopulation; education concerning humane treatment of animals; and involvement in other animal welfare issues.

Dachshunds Only Rescue

www.dachshundsonlyrescue.com

602-550-4088

Not-for-profit, volunteer, foster-based, never-kill organization for Dachshunds. No animal is euthanized if they are too sick to be treated or too aggressive to be suitable for adoption–believe that behavioral modification techniques and positive reinforcement help to eliminate aggressive or unwanted behavior.

Desert Labrador Retriever Rescue www.dlrrphoenix.org

480-899-5227

Non-profit, all volunteer, foster-based organization that provides Labrador Retriever breed and training information on request, public education on spaying and neutering, and finding homes for the Labrador Retriever.

Desert Paws Rescue

www.desertpawsrescue.org A non-profit, no-kill, animal rescue group to rescue, rehabilitate (when necessary) and place domestic animals into stable homes; to educate the public about the responsibilities of pet ownership; and to build public awareness about the human-animal bond and its benefits to society.

The Fetch Foundation

Halo Animal Rescue (Helping Animals Live On) www.halorescue.org

602-971-9222

No-kill facility that provides a refuge for dogs and cats who might otherwise be destroyed for reasons such as a treatable injury, illness, or those that are too scared or too young to go up for adoption at the time of arrival. The thrift store helps to bring in necessary income.

Happy Tails Dachshund Rescue, Inc. www.happytailsdr.org

209-647-1251

Non-profit foster-based to save as many Dachshunds from suffering and premature death.

www.thefetchfoundation.com

Helping Orphaned Hounds (H.O.H.)

Non-profit dedicated to saving lives in the animal and human communities through innovative strategies and unique programs that supports, equips, and trains first responders by providing the life saving tools in“The FIDO BAG®” that is used by first responders to provide life saving intervention to family pets that are caught in a fire or other emergency situations; to provide a safe place for homeless dogs that were neglected or abused; and by connecting the right dog with a veteran in need of companionship, these K9(s) would serve a purpose beyond what anyone imagined.

602-680-0713

602-617-2656

Finding Fido Animal Rescue

Finding Fido Animal Rescue Facebook page A humane rescue organization dedicated to reducing euthanasia by finding loving and permanent homes for the wonderful dogs and cats, especially the senior or special needs pets.

Foothills Animal Rescue www.foothillsanimal.org

480-488-9890

A non-profit organization to save lives through the rescue, care and adoption of homeless animals; a thrift store remains the primary source of income and community interaction.

Four Peaks Animal Rescue www.fourpeaksanimalrescue.org

480-471-3520

A non-profit organization dedicated to the rescue, rehabilitation, training and placement of all species of domestic animals in need of medical care and sanctuary.

Freedom Tails Rescue

www.freedomtailsrescue.com Non-profit dedicated to rescuing animals in need.

Friends for Life Animal Rescue www.azfriends.org

480-497-8296

Dedicated to helping the homeless and stray animals living on the streets and in the deserts. We also pursue an aggressive spay/neuter program for our animals and education for the public.

Friends of Animal Care & Control www.azfriendsofanimals.org

602-882-8627

Reduces euthanasia in Maricopa County by supporting pets & people by providing free and accessible spay & neuter services in our community.

www.helpingorphanedhounds.org

Small all volunteer, no-kill, non-profit organization with two main goals: find loving homes for homeless dogs & puppies and promote spay/neuter thereby reducing the tragic consequences of pet overpopulation.

Lost Our Home Pet Rescue www.lostourhome.org

602-445-7387

Ensure that all pets have loving homes when families face major life challenges and provide compassionate options when Realtors and the community find an abandoned pet.

Lost Paws Sterilization, Education, & Rescue www.thelostpaws.org

623-396-8466

Non-profit organization that focuses on sterilization, education and rescue.

Lucky Dog Rescue

www.luckydogrescue.org

480-704-4628

Non-profit all volunteer foster-based organization dedicated to saving the lives of homeless animals from euthanasia, educating the community on responsible pet ownership and dedicated to training and what happens after the dog is in his new home.

Luv of Dogz Fund, Inc.

www.luvofdogz.org Non-profit that provides advocacy and resources for rescued, abandoned, homeless dogs and to the people who rescue and care for them.

M.A.I.N. (Medical Animals In Need)

www.medicalanimalsinneed.com Volunteer-based, donor-driven organization dedicated to rescuing animals off Maricopa County euthanasia lists with a medical needs.

Mayday Pit Bull Rescue & Advocacy

www.maydaypitbullrescue.org Non-profit volunteer and foster-based organization that focuses on rescuing, rehabilitating and securing placement for Pit Bull and Pit Bull mixes, especially with extreme medical/behavioral and special needs, and to assist dogs from dog fighting, hoarding and other crisis/emergency situations. DIRECTORY continues on page 30 THE WAG magazine | Winter 2017

29


DIRECTORY continued from page 29

Mini Mighty Mutts Rescue www.minimightymutts.com 480-304-5654

Non-profit, all volunteer, foster-based small dog rescue not limited to any breed.

Ohana Animal Rescue

www.ohanaanimalrescue.org

480-744-5729

Non-profit, foster home based organization saving euthanasia listed animals from the county shelters.

One Dog (Arizona)

One Dog (Arizona) Facebook Page Non-profit rescue site to help network e-list (euthanasia list) and rescue dogs who need forever homes or dedicated foster homes.

Racing Home Greyhound Adoption www.racinghome.info

602-573-0940

Non-profit foster- and volunteer-based rescue to find homes for retired racing Greyhounds and other homeless Greyhounds.

R.E.S.C.U.E. (Reducing Euthanasia at Shelters through Commitment and Underlying Education) www.azrescue.org

480-598-9410

Non-profit, volunteer-driven animal rescue with no central facility and the focus is euthanasia-list rescues of cats and dogs from the county shelters.

Rescue A Golden of Arizona (RAG of AZ) www.golden-retriever.org

602-404-9663

Non-profit, shelterless, all volunteer organization dedicated to the rescue, evaluation and placement of Golden Retrievers who lost their homes through no fault of their own.

Rescue Pals

Rescuepals85268@gmail.com A non-profit organization dedicated to rescuing, rehabilitating, and rehoming dogs mostly found in Fountain Hills.

Rockstar Rescue

www.rockstarrescueaz.org

858-876-2558

Our mission is to help the hard-to-adopt cases, dogs that have suffered psychological traumas either from hoarding, fighting or abandonment situations and prepare them to become loving, household pets despite what they’ve endured.

Saint Bernard Rescue Foundation, Inc. www.saintrescue.org/arizona Non-profit for rescue of Saint Bernards.

Saving Paws Rescue

www.savingpawsrescueaz.com

480-737-6089

Non-profit, all-volunteer organization dedicated to providing veterinary care, evaluation and adoptive homes for German Shepherd Dogs, Belgian Malinois and others who are left in pounds to await uncertain fate.

Southwest Collie Rescue www.nmcollierescue.com

480-507-7996

Non-profit, volunteer, foster-based organization to rescue every purebred Collie in the area needing help, no matter how old or how sick.

Southwest German Shepherd Rescue 10am-8pm preferably weekdays Non-profit volunteer based organization committed to the rescue, rehab and rehoming of German Shepherds.

Underdog Rescue of Arizona

Friends of Arizona’s Shelter Animals

www.underdogaz.com

480-553-9311

Non-profit, foster-based dog rescue that is dedicated to rescuing and rehoming shelter dogs rescued from the euthanasia list and abandoned dogs in need.

Urban Rescues

www.urbanrescues.com Urban Rescues Facebook Page Rescuing dogs scheduled for euthanasia in Maricopa County animal shelters.

Valley of the Sun Dog Rescue www.valleyofthesundogrescue.com

480-228-0126

Non-profit, no-kill, family run animal shelter with help from volunteers and fosters that specializes in American Pit Bulls and American Staffordshire Terriers, but accepts all breeds into the rescue. We strive to increase public awareness about the gentler, humane side of a “Bully” breed.

Westie & Friends AZ Rescue, Inc. www.westieandfriendsazrescue.org

480-664-7699

Non-profit that rescues, rehabilitates and finds homes for abandoned and surrendered West Highland Terriers and their friends, educates about spaying and neutering, and stresses the need for high quality food and the importance of dental hygiene to extend their pet’s life.

Yorkie Luv Rescue

www.sahuarodachshundrescue.com

520-818-1323

Non-profit rescue that helps homeless Dachshunds find new homes. 30

THE WAG magazine | Winter 2017

Friends of Arizona’s Shelter Animals Facebook Page Volunteers who take photos of and get information about animals on the euthanasia list in local shelters, volunteer time to network the animals scheduled to be euthanized and make their photos/information available to the public and rescue groups in order to find alternative outlets for them.

Pet Social Worker/Tails of Hope www.petsocialworker.org

480-452-7997

Free online database of stray, rescued, lost and found pets in the Maricopa area. In addition, the site offers tips, instructions and links to the local Pinal County Animal Care and Control forms needed to report a lost or found pet.

Phoenix Animal Care Coalition (PACC911) www.pacc911.org

602-992-4779

Non-profit organization that works to bring together the Maricopa County animal welfare community in an interactive manner by providing opportunities for all to work together for the greater benefit of animals. Rescued Treasure’s Charity Boutique, and Chuck Waggin’ Pet Food Pantry are divisions of PACC911.

Sniff Out

White Gsd Rescue

480-567-4328

Sahuaro Dachshund Rescue

www.emptybowlpetfoodpantry.org

602-866-2880

White Gsd Rescue Facebook Page Works with Southwest German Shepherd Rescue.

Non-profit, no-kill, foster-based animal rescue to help, rescue, and rehome Rottweilers in safe adoptive and foster homes.

Empty Bowl Pet Food Pantry 602-909-7153 A pet food pantry and disaster services organization distributing free pet food through partner agencies and giving pet items to Veterans, homeless, disaster victims and others.

www.swgermanshepherdrescue.com

Rotten Rottie Rescue www.rottenrottie.com

SUPPORTING ORGANIZATIONS

www.yorkieluvrescue.com Non-profit volunteer and foster-based rescue to rescue, rehab and rehome any Yorkie cross with Yorkshire Terrier that finds itself homeless and work with communities in order to stress the importance of adopting a Yorkie in the hope of one day eliminating all puppy mills.

What’s Coming Next in THE WAG • Safe

Travel • Canines in Combat • And much, much more


Laugh out loud!

INDEX OF ADVERTISERS Word Search answers from page 25 Words That Describe Your 4-Legged Valentine M M K T

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Fountain Hills Hearing Health. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 MorningStar Assisted Living & Memory Care.. . . . . . 5 Phil’s Filling Station Grill. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 RE/MAX Sun Properties Tina Nabers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Sapori D’Italia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 That Guy’s Pizza. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 The Hills’ Pizza & Desserts.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

Zusia’s Doggie Salon & Su”Paw” Market. . . . . . . . . . 13

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WORD LIST: NAUGHTY

Fountain Fashions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

Willow Lake Leather.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

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Q T V A Z

FUNNY

Coldwell Banker Don and Jody Sullins. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

Vito’s Pizza and Italian Ristorante. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

S W W X C T Y O

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Allehunde Gym For Dogs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

THE WAG magazine | Winter 2017 SILLY

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141st Westminster Dog Show

Sunday, February 12, 2017

8 am–10 pm

Masters Agility Championship at Westminster Finals Check Local TV Listings.

Monday, February 13, 2017

8 am–4 pm Eastern

Breed judging, Junior Showmanship Preliminaries and Masters Obedience Championship (Hound, Herding, Toy and Non-Sporting Breeds). Streaming Live on FOX Sports GO (FSGO)

2 pm–4 pm Eastern

Selected live coverage of Breed judging and Masters Obedience Championship (Hound, Herding, Toy and Non-Sporting Breeds). Live on National Geographic WILD

8 pm–11 pm Eastern

Dog Show Group competitions (Hound, Herding, Toy and Non-Sporting Breeds). Live on FS1. Check Local TV Listings.

Tuesday, February 14, 2017

8 am–4 pm Eastern

Breed judging and Junior Showmanship Preliminaries (Sporting, Working and Terrier Breeds). Streaming Live on FOX Sports GO (FSGO).

2 pm–4 pm Eastern

Selected live coverage of Breed judging and Junior Showmanship Preliminaries (Sporting, Working and Terrier Breeds). Live on National Geographic WILD

8 pm – 11 pm Eastern

Dog Show Group competitions (Sporting, Working and Terrier Breeds). Best in Show. Live on FS1. Check Local TV Listings.


The wag magazine winter2017