Page 1

Healthy Horizons

Health & Wellness Magazine

Selma, 2016

Kiefer Sutherland Down in a Hole Selma

Vaughan Regional Medical Center ~ Looking to the Future

Colorectal Cancer Prevention & Screening

Carter Drug Company serving selma since 1924 2016

www.readhealthyhorizons.com

1


Aging Agingand and Disability Disability Resource Resource Center Center

Contactus usfor forinformation information on services services for Contact forseniors, seniors,people peoplewith with disabilities, and their disabilities, their caregivers. caregivers.

1-800-AGELINE or 1-888-617-0500 1-800-AGELINE 1-888-617-0500 AssistanceTransitioning Transitioningfrom from aa Long-Term Long-Term Care • •Assistance Care Facility FacilitytotoHome Home MedicaidElderly Elderlyand andDisabled Disabled Waiver Waiver • •Medicaid SenioRxPrescription PrescriptionDrug DrugAssistance Assistance • •SenioRx AlabamaCares Cares––Caregiver Caregiver Support Support • •Alabama Nutrition/ /Senior SeniorActivity ActivityCenters Centers • •Nutrition • Ombudsman – Advocates for Residents of Long Term Care Facilities • Ombudsman – Advocates for Residents of Long Term Care Facilities • Legal Services • Legal Services • State Health Insurance Program (SHIP) • State Health Insurance Program (SHIP) • Transportation • Transportation • Senior Aides – Job Training Program • •Senior Aides – Job Training Program Volunteer Opportunities • Volunteer Opportunities

2

2

Healthy Horizons Healthy Horizons


www.readhealthyhorizons.com

1


Health Wellness INVESTIGATING

FINDING

The Helms Family

About Us

Team Healthy Horizons is proud to be able to bring you our new edition of Selma! Our magazine is freely distributed throughout the Southeast. Healthy Horizons was founded 14 years ago by Mark and Kimberly. With their passion for God, community and family, this publication is a natural extension of their core beliefs and values. Our publication offers, innovative graphic design, well known feature articles and celebrities who support our mission and vision of health and wellness. We are continually refining our publication to reflect current issues and trends which are relevant in society. Owners, Mark and Kimberly Helms are excited about the refinements to our publication and are equally excited to share these changes with our community. We want to remain a vital resource for your healthcare needs and recognize our duty to conscientiously maintain relevant articles and health education to better serve our communities.

Publisher Mark Helms 256.235.1955 mhelms@cableone.net

Publisher Events Coordinator Kimberly Helms, D.H. Ed., MSN, RN 256.235.1955 khelms@jsu.edu Contributing Writers Patricia Surrett Jennifer Herndon Kim Cogle, Lori M. Quiller

2

Healthy Horizons

Operations Manager Graphics Artist Editor Kelley Bell 256.235.1955 kelley@readhealthyhorizons.com


YOUR HEALTH, YOUR CHOICE, tell them you want

Oxygen, Hospital beds, Wheelchairs, CPAP and many other Home Medical needs.

418.0085 • 2918 Citizens Pkwy • Selma

Do your employees have the best care?

Keeping everyone safe on the job is a top priority, and we take safety seriously. We want to make sure that your employees stay safe by offering pre employment testing to help prevent injuries while at work. These services include DOT certifications, physicals, drug screenings, hearing tests, eye exams, and more! In addition, when an accident happens, and someone does get hurt, we are open 7 days a week to treat the injury. Our staff is trained to evaluate injuries and communicate with you about the best course of action for getting your employee back on their feet. It is our goal to help your employees heal better, and feel better, fast, so they don’t miss time away from work!

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK!


2016

tent con 6

Vaughn Regional ~ Looking to the Future

20

Understanding Long Term Care Insurance

10

Colorectal Cancer Prevention & Screening

22

Know the Signs

12

Compassionate Healthcare for Rural Communities

30

Donavan Inn Wedding & Event Venue

16

The Unintentional Consequences

40

Fighting Alabama’s Prescription Drug Abuse Epidemic

feature

8 Down in a Hole

4

Healthy Horizons Photo’s Beth Elliott

“This record is the closest thing I’ve ever had to a journal or diary. All of those songs are pulled from my personal experiences,” says Sutherland.


Kiefer Sutherland

www.readhealthyhorizons.com

5


by Patricia Surrett

David McCormack, CEO

Dedicated medical professionals and other hardworking staff members at Vaughan Regional Medical Center (VRMC) are among the hospital’s greatest strengths, according to Chief Executive Officer David McCormack. “When I joined the hospital staff in April, I was immediately impressed by their commitment to the community,” McCormack adds. “We take our role as the main healthcare provider seriously.” The facility’s outstanding service has been recognized with a designation as a Top 6

Healthy Horizons

Performer on Key Quality Measures® by The Joint Commission, the leading accreditor of health care organizations in the United States. VRMC is one of 1,043 hospitals out of

3,300 eligible facilities across the nation to receive the status, and it’s the fourth time VRMC has been named a Top Performer. The program recognizes hospitals who improve performance in services that increase the chance of healthy outcomes for patients with conditions such as heart attack, heart failure, pneumonia, surgical care, children’s asthma, inpatient psychiatric services, stroke, venous thromboembolism, perinatal care, immunization, tobacco treatment and substance use.

“We can’t provide everything that the larger hospitals in Montgomery and Birmingham can but the services that we provide, we do better than anyone else,” McCormack says. “We’re as good as any of the larger hospitals in the region.” Looking to the future,

McCormack is working to build programs to further the hospital’s pledge to provide the best quality care for Selma and the surrounding communities. A clinic for cardiac patients is in the works, and one for people with diabetes could soon follow. “Our cardiologist wants to create a post-acute care clinic for people with congestive heart failure to allow patients to get quick checkups and monitor for potential problems that could land them back in the hospital,” McCormack says. “It also gives us the opportunity to remind them of


steps they should take to stay as healthy as possible and how to watch for early warning signs.” Teaching people to take responsibility for their health and how to manage their condition is key to the hospital’s community outreach. Helping patients achieve a better quality of life benefits the individual as well as the community, he adds. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy may also be added in the coming year. A hyperbaric chamber would benefit patients with diabetes who have wounds that won’t

heal and others with serious infections and wounds. Bringing more medical professionals to VRMC is also an important step, according to McCormack. An orthopedic surgeon recently joined the hospital, and another general surgeon may soon be on staff. “We have excellent physicians and other staff members, and we’re always looking for more to complement our team. It allows us to maintain the high standard of care we’ve set for ourselves. The new orthopedic surgeon actually approached

us. He visited Selma and loved the community so he made the decision to open a practice here.” Along with the hospital’s role as a major healthcare provider, Vaughan Regional Medical Center is important to the area’s financial well-being. The center employs 600 people and spends approximately $30 million in payroll and benefits annually. VRMC’s ripple effect on the community’s economic stability includes products and services the hospital purchases from businesses in the area as well as jobs that are created, not just by money spent by

We take our role as the main healthcare provider seriously

VRMC, but also people visiting the area for medical care. “Without us, people would have to drive an hour for treatment,” McCormack says. “We make it more convenient for local patients and we bring more people into the area for care.” To learn more about the services provided by VRMC, visit www.vaughanregional. com. The website includes a health management tool where patients can access their medical records along with information for visitors to the hospital and job seekers. www.readhealthyhorizons.com

7


Down in a Hole

Kiefer Sutherland has spent a lifetime telling stories. The award-winning actor is known for his edgy roles as an action hero in 24, a vampire in The Lost Boys, and a teenage thug in Stand By Me. With his debut album Down In A Hole, Sutherland has taken a break from sharing his characters’ stories to tell a few of his own. “This record is the closest thing I’ve ever had to a journal or diary. All of those songs are pulled from my personal experiences,” says Sutherland. Loss and heartache fill the album with a soulful, old-school country vibe, and you can hear Sutherland’s inspiration 8

Healthy Horizons

found in outlaw-music legends Johnny Cash and Merle Haggard. The title track is a raw reaction to the loss of a close friend to alcoholism, and “Calling Out Your Name” is about his high-profile split from actress Julia Roberts in 1991. Fans probably won’t be surprised that alcohol is a common theme for Sutherland’s album. The impact of the actor’s drinking has been well-documented by the media over the years, and he’s quite open when talking about it. He recently told The New York Times: “It’s been a part of my life, there’s no denying that. It’s not something I do alone.

photo by Beth Elliot

I like going out with friends after work. It’s a way of letting loose. Having said that, I can tell you that if I look back on my life any of the negative things that have happened usually have [drinking] as a root cause, whether it was a D.U.I., or fighting, or a breakup, a relationship not working. There’s a price to pay for it. If you take a look at the songs, none of them are positive.” Sutherland’s intensely personal approach to his music gives it a gritty, authentic mood, and his gritty baritone is perfect for the smoky barroom feel of the album. While Down In A Hole is his first album, it’s not the beginning of his musical career. Sutherland


learned to play the violin at an early age, and his mother bought his first guitar when he was 10 years old. He played in high school bands and went on to play almost 200 shows with a cover band. The band once opened for country music star Dwight Yoakam. The Canadian actor founded Iron Works Music with close friend and producer Jude Cole as an opportunity to nurture other artists and has been writing songs for the past 10 years. Cole encouraged Sutherland to stop sending his music to other performers and to begin recording them himself. The duo co-wrote all the tracks on Down In A Hole. The album has charted on Billboard’s Top Country Albums and Americana/ Folk Albums charts, and Sutherland recently toured North America performing in sold-out venues. He’s also appeared at the Grand Ole Opry in Nashville, and his video for the single “Can’t Stay Away” premiered on CMT’s Hot 20 Countdown. Sutherland discovered his love for country music in the early 90s while roping in rodeos. He traveled with the cowboys in a pickup truck and listened to Cash and other traditional artists. “As a kid, I idolized my older brother and he was a huge rock-n-roll fan so, of course, I was a rock fan too. If you listen to Down In A Hole, it’s basically a rock song,” says Sutherland. “After listening to Johnny Cash, it just felt natural to write music

like his.” “Shirley Jean” was inspired by Cash’s songs about life in prison. Sutherland says he appreciated the way Cash wrote about inmates with dignity. “These are people that we don’t always think about that way,” he adds. “Shirley Jean” is a letter from an inmate who’s facing his last night before his execution. The song-writing process varies for Sutherland. Sometimes he’s inspired by an idea like Cash’s songs about prison and sometimes he finds himself humming a melody that needs a line. “Either way, if I can find the time to follow through on an idea, that’s when I do my best work. When I sit down to write, there’s an idea and I have to finish it.” While making his mark in country music, Sutherland hasn’t given up his love for acting. His new ABC series Designated Survivor is a grim political drama but don’t expect any Jack Bauer-type action from his character. This time around, Sutherland assumes the U.S. Presidency although it’s unwillingly. An attack during a State of the Union address has left much of the nation’s leadership dead and, as a low-level member of the Cabinet, Sutherland finds himself next in line for the Oval Office. When he’s not working on Designated Survivor, Sutherland plans to continue making music and playing more tour dates. You can

find his tour schedule at www.kiefersutherlandmusic. com. Down In A Hole can be purchased from i-Tunes, and a special edition vinyl LP is available through Barnes and Noble. You can find the video for the “Can’t Stay Away” on Sutherland’s YouTube channel. Updates about performances, candid photos, and information about the new TV series are posted on Sutherland’s Facebook and Twitter accounts. by Patricia Surrett

Photo Beth Elliott

www.readhealthyhorizons.com

9


Colorectal Cancer Prevention& Screening

by Patricia Surrett

C

olorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths when statistics for men and women are combined, and the American Cancer Society estimates there will be 49,190 deaths from colorectal cancer in 2016. The medical professionals at Rural Health Medical Program (RHMP) are working diligently to keep those figures down in the Black Belt Region with early screening, education about prevention, and effective treatment. RHMP’s doctors are encouraging patients to be proactive and take steps to safeguard their well-being whether they’re in a high-risk category for colorectal cancer not. Risk factors include: • Smoking • Obesity • Heavy alcohol use • Diet • Lack of exercise • Age • Family medical history • Medical conditions such as type 2 diabetes

10

Healthy Horizons

RHMP’s medical staff urges patients to take action to prevent colorectal cancer by addressing risk factors that can be changed. The American Cancer Society is an excellent source for information about preventing cancer. You can call them at 1-800-227-2345 or visit their website at www.cancer.org. Race should also be considered when determining if you might be at a higher risk. African-Americans have the highest rates of incidence and mortality for colorectal cancer in the United States. It’s important to discuss your risk with your doctor and decide when and how often screening should be done. For the average person, screenings begin at age 50. Colon cancer and rectal are grouped together because they share an array of factors and can be detected with the many of the same procedures. Screenings provide a powerful tool allowing doctors to look for signs of colorectal cancer, remove polyps, and strive to prevent the cancer from spreading. When the cancer is

found early before it spreads, 90 percent of patients have a five-year survival rate. According to the American Cancer Society, there are more than one million survivors in the U.S. Unfortunately, only a little more than half of the people who should be screened have the tests. While several screening procedures are possible, a colonoscopy is one of the most well-known. During a colonoscopy, a flexible tool is used to exam the patient’s rectum and colon with a small video camera. During the procedure, the doctor can remove suspicious-looking polyps and take tissue samples for biopsy. The screening is often done in a hospital outpatient department; it may also be performed in a clinic or doctor’s office. Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer diagnosis for men and women in the U.S. but the numbers are dropping as more people learn how to manage their health and discuss proper screenings with their doctors. Still, the American


Colorectal cancer often has no early warnings signs

Cancer Society emphasizes there’s much work to be done. The organization expects 95,270 new cases of colon cancer and 39,220 cases of rectal cancer to be diagnosed in 2016. Colorectal cancer often has no early warnings but signs to watch for include: • Rectal bleeding • Blood in the stool • Abdominal cramping and pain • Weakness and fatigue • Unintended weight loss While these symptoms are usually linked to other more common conditions, it’s important to discuss any concerns with your doctor.

What you need to know about a colonoscopy Before the Procedure

knees up, and you will be covered by a drape. • You’ll be sedated for your comfort. • Air will be used to slightly inflate your colon to give the doctor a clear view during the examination. • Your blood pressure, heart rate and breathing will be monitored.

After the Procedure

• Most people feel normal once the sedative wears off. • You may feel bloated and have cramps or gas pains until the air in your colon has passed. If you experience severe pain or bleeding, vomiting, or nausea after a colonoscopy, contact your doctor’s office immediately.

• Be sure to discuss your medications with your doctor, including prescriptions and over-thecounter products. • Follow the doctor’s orders before your screening. You’ll be given a special diet and liquid laxative, and you’ll be instructed to not eat or drink anything usually after midnight on the day of the test.

During the Procedure

• The average time for a colonoscopy is 30 minutes unless your doctor finds and removes polyps which can lengthen the procedure. • You’ll be asked to lie on your side with your www.readhealthyhorizons.com

11


Providing Compassionate Health Care for Rural Communities by Patricia Surrett

Keshee Dozier-Smith, CEO, RHMP

The professional team at Rural Health Medical Program (RHMP) is dedicated to the organization’s mission of providing excellent, compassionate healthcare. While an array of factors can influence the quantity of medical services available in small towns and rural communities, there should be no disparity in the quality of treatment. RHMP is working to bridge that gap in healthcare and raise the bar for programs in the Black Belt Region with five area clinics, including Dallas County Health Center, Marion Health Center, Pine Apple Health Center, Uniontown Health Services, and Yellow Bluff-Camden Health Center. Keshee Dozier-Smith recently joined RHMP as its Chief Executive Officer. She brings more than six years of 12 Healthy Horizons

experience in organizational change, and the Selma native has a bachelor of arts degree in economics and management. “I’m working with our staff and community to develop a strategic plan that ensures we’re providing the best possible care for our patients,” said Smith. “We’re creating partnerships with local colleges, community agencies, and other medical providers to help us meet the needs in the region with an innovative, patient-first approach to healthcare.” The programs at RHMP are designed to be efficient and affordable so everyone has easy access to treatment. The organization has a sliding fee scale for uninsured patients so people are not deterred from seeking care because of the cost. Whether or not a patient has insurance does not affect the quality of their experience at RHMP’s clinics. From the office staff who help patients with paperwork to the doctors and nurses, each skilled team member maintains a high degree of professionalism and personal concern for the

patient’s well-being. Whether you need preventative services or urgent treatment, integrity and respect are integral to the value of RHMP’s programs. The organization’s services include: • Primary care • Dental care • Women’s health • Pediatrics • Podiatry • Diagnostics Along with Smith, RHMP is led by a board of directors whose members represent the Black Belt Region. Sherman Norfleet of Uniontown serves as the chairman, Cynthia Ross of Camden is the treasurer for the group, and Martha Melton of Selma is the board secretary. Other members from Selma include Kennard Randolph, Carolyn Turner, and Bessie Curtis. John Gragg of Alberta and Thomas Moore of Demopolis serve on the board as well. To learn more about RHMP, visit www.rhmpi.com. The website includes tips to promote a healthy lifestyle, patient registration forms, and contact information for the individual clinics along with services available at each facility.


Technology for your convenience, people for your peace of mind. In Historic downtown Selma, you’ll find Carter Drug Company, a locally-owned pharmacy integrating new technologies and services for your convenience while maintaining an awardwinning gift and apparel boutique. While Carters still feels like an old-fashioned pharmacy, there are a host of newer technologies at work that accurately and efficiently improve patient outcomes; the addition of a robot increases counting, labeling and refill speed, providing immunizations for flu, shingles and measles as well as supplying and billing diabetic supplies and nebulizers. Carters, committed to healthy and happy families since 1924.

NEW SERVICES TO SIMPLIFY YOUR BUSY LIFE Medication Therapy Management (MTM) - This is a Medicare Part D funded service that helps patients who use several prescription/ non-prescription medications, herbals, or dietary supplements or have several disease states get the best benefits from their medications by actively managing drug therapy and by identifying, preventing and resolving medication-related problems. You meet directly with a pharmacist certified in MTM. The goal is to make sure that the medication is right for the patient and their health conditions and that the best possible outcomes from treatment are achieved.

Synchronized Prescriptions Under this program, refill dates for patients using multiple prescriptions are adjusted so patients can pick them all up in a single visit. Carters will check in with patients 1 week before their pickup date to adjust for medication changes and remind patients 1 day before they are scheduled to pick up their prescriptions. The goal is to simplify the refill process while providing overview on potentially harmful drug interactions to ensure patients adhere to dosing instructions, improving outcomes.

Rapid Refills - Carters added 24 hour, 7 days-a-week refill possibilities online via carterdrug.com, via your smart phone or tablet using their iRefill app and of course via telephone. In addition, they will send prescription refill text messaging reminders and a text alert when your prescription is ready for pick-up.

Carters is an old-fashioned pharmacy with technology for your convenience and people for your peace of mind. Remember to choose locally owned businesses when possible; the vitality of our community depends on them and you. www.readhealthyhorizons.com

13


Asthma Respiratory illnesses like asthma are the number one reason why patients come to Children’s of Alabama. Asthma is an inflammatory lung disease that is very common in children and adults. Having asthma causes: • airway muscles to tighten • inflammation to increase • swelling in the airways • mucus to build up Airways become swollen, tight and narrow making it hard to breathe. Common symptoms include: • coughing which is often worse at night • chest tightness • wheezing • coughing or difficulty breathing with exercise There are two main types of asthma: persistent and intermittent. In persistent asthma, children have more frequent symptoms and flare-ups. This is caused by increased airway inflammation, swelling and narrowing that is present every day. Children with intermittent asthma have few symptoms because they only have rare times of airway swelling and narrowing. Janet Johnston, CRNP, is a nurse practitioner and asthma educator at Children’s of Alabama. She said even though there’s no cure for asthma, in most cases families can learn how to make sure their child’s asthma is well

controlled. One of the most important ways to do that is to know the triggers of asthma. Common triggers are: • respiratory infection • allergies • irritants such as smoke • exercise Oftentimes, just avoiding the triggers can help reduce the occurrence of symptoms. The exception is exercise. “One trigger you don’t want to avoid is exercise,” she said. “If the child’s asthma is well controlled, they shouldn’t have to avoid exercise.” Johnston said another concern is making sure the child gets the full dose of medicine through an inhaler alone. She recommends always using a spacer with the inhaler. “Using a spacer ensures the proper dose of medicine is going deeply in the child’s lungs,” she said. “It’s important to get the full dose of medicine. Otherwise, it’s like

We kNOw our

TRIGGERS

pouring half of it on the floor.” Johnston encourages families to have an action plan to help keep their child’s asthma well controlled. The plan should include: • seeing the child’s health care provider regularly for asthma • having clear instructions about using the inhaler and any other medicine • know what to do when symptoms increase • know when to call the doctor • know when to seek care Well-controlled asthma means a child is: • symptom-free most of the time and not needing frequent quick relief medicine • able to play and exercise like other children • sleeping through the night • not missing school or work due to frequent asthma flare ups More information about managing asthma is available at www.childrensal.org/asthma.


Got Dust? Got Dust? It's virtually impossible to avoid—and it can trigger virtually impossible to is avoid —and it canby trigger anIt's asthma attack. Asthma characterized

an asthma attack. Asthma is characterized excessive sensitivity of the lungs to various by stimuli. excessive sensitivity of the lungs to various stimuli. Certain triggers—ranging from viral infections to Certainto triggers—ranging fromparticles viral infections allergies irritating gases and in the to allergies to irritating gases and particles in the air—can make asthma worse. Each child reacts air—can make asthma worse. Each child reacts differently to the factors that may trigger asthma. differently to the factors that may trigger asthma.

We can help you recognize what makes We can help you recognize what makes your child's asthma worse and find simple your child's asthma worse and find simple solutions to reduce and avoid asthma attacks. solutions to reduce and avoid asthma attacks.

ChildrensAL.org/asthma ChildrensAL.org/asthma

Asthma Clinic Clinic Asthma Specializedasthma asthmacare carefor: for: Specialized l Children with severe asthma or asthma refractory to standard therapies l Children with severe asthma or asthma refractory to standard therapies l

Children with recurrent hospitalization and/or urgent care visits Children with recurrent hospitalization and/or urgent care visits l Children and families with unique asthma self-management education needs l Children and families with unique asthma self-management education needs l Children with co-morbid conditions that contribute to difficult disease control l Children with co-morbid conditions that contribute to difficult disease control l

Appointments made by physician referral only. For appointments, call: 205.638.9583 ChildrensAL.org/asthma Appointments made by physician referral only. For appointments, call: 205.638.9583 ChildrensAL.org/asthma

For Children’s Financial Assistance information contact 1.844.750.8950 or visit www.childrensal.org/financial-assistance For Children’s Financial Assistance information contact 1.844.750.8950 or visit www.childrensal.org/financial-assistance

www.readhealthyhorizons.com www.readhealthyhorizons.com

15

15


The Unintentional Consequence As Medicare cuts reimbursements for home medical equipment companies like HealthMark, private insurance is sure to follow. The unintentional consequence is some patients will not be able to receive/ afford the equipment and supplies they so desperately need. The lax Medicare policies of the past allowed a physician to write an order for almost anything and a patient could get it. Now, the prescription is just the start; reams of necessary supporting documentation slow the process down and are borderline preventative. Once services are provided Medicare is quick to deny reimbursement for minor issues such as signature dates and improper completion of a form. The patient almost seem like an after thought. Home medical equipment companies are being forced to discontinue some services. HealthMark, after 18+ years, will no longer provide diabetic testing supplies. The reimbursement rate is lower than cost, coupled with 16

Healthy Horizons

constant threat of Medicare taking money back for services that were legitimately provided; we simply have no choice. In addition, private insurance is cutting their reimbursements and raising deductibles, keeping patients from getting equipment or supplies. It is now routine to see deductibles as high as $3,000, if not more. Sadly, these patients had no idea until they tried to use their insurance, forcing individuals to do without the necessary services. The “unintentional consequence� of all of this is patients not getting the services they need and the results can be catastrophic. A patient not getting oxygen or tube feeding formulas for home use, or CPAP and supplies when needed, will cause further harm and drive patients to emergency rooms or skilled nursing facilities such as hospitals or nursing homes. The Home Medical Equipment industry has been fighting these changes for years; what we really need is your help. Washington D.C. listens to their constituents;

HealthMark urges you to contact them, not just once, but every time you think about it, every time you pay a premium but are denied the services you should receive. Show your disapproval and anger at those responsible, Congress. Many are struggling to survive and stay in business or at least provide the services they once did. Fight for the locally-owned pharmacies and medical equipment providers or before you know it they will be gone.


www.readhealthyhorizons.com

17


URGENT CARE Open 7 days a week!

Located in front of Walmart on Hwy 14 in Selma

334.526.3240

We accept Medicaid! For life’s little emergencies! - Cold and flu - Strep throat - Broken bones - Cuts and lacerations - UTI’s - Allergies - Ear infections - Sports injuries

18

Healthy Horizons


E


Understanding Long-Term Care Insurance What is long-term care? Many people associate long-term care with the elderly. But it applies to the ongoing care of individuals of all ages who can no longer independently perform basic activities of daily living (ADLs)--such as bathing, dressing, or eating--due to an illness, injury, or cognitive disorder. This care can be provided in a number of settings, including private homes, assisted-living facilities, adult day-care centers, hospices, and nursing homes.

Why consider long-term care insurance (LTCI)? Even though you may never need long-term care, you’ll want to consider the importance of being prepared in case you ever do, because long-term care is often very expensive. Although Medicaid does cover some of the costs of long-term care, it has strict financial eligibility requirements--you might have to exhaust a large portion of your life savings to become eligible for it. And since HMOs, Medicare, and Medigap don’t pay for most long-term care expenses, alternative ways to pay for long-term care should be considered. One option is the purchase of an LTCI policy. However, LTCI is not for everyone. Whether or not you should buy it depends on a number of factors, such as (but not limited to) your age and financial circumstances. Consider purchasing an LTCI policy if some or all of the following apply: • • • •

You are between the ages of 40 and 84 You have significant assets that you would like to protect You can afford to pay the policy’s premiums now and in the future You are in good health and are insurable

How does LTCI work? Typically, and very basically, an LTCI policy works like this: You pay a premium, and when benefits are triggered, the policy pays a selected dollar amount per day (for a set period of time) for the type of long-term care outlined in the policy. Most policies provide that certain physical and/or mental impairments trigger benefits. The most common method for determining when benefits are payable is based on your inability to perform certain activities of daily living (ADLs), such as eating, bathing, dressing, continence, toileting (moving on and off the toilet), and transferring (moving in and out of bed). Typically, benefits are payable when you’re unable to perform a certain number of ADLs (e.g., two or three). Some policies, however, will begin paying benefits only if your doctor certifies that the care is medically necessary. Others will also offer benefits for cognitive or mental incapacity, demonstrated by your inability to pass certain tests.

20

Healthy Horizons


Sound Strategies to Prepare for the

Road Ahead

J.B. Morris & Associates 1003 Broad Street Suite C Selma, AL 36701 334-605-1292

Financial Services You Can Trust! My background provides me with qualifications to help you address your needs. In addition, I can work with other focused AXA Advisors Financial Professionals to bring you well-rounded product recommendations and guidance. I have been a registered representative of AXA Advisors since 1999 and have been in the industry since 1977. My designations include CLU and ChFC. I have been awarded the title of Retirement Planning Specialist by AXA Advisors based on the receipt of a Wharton Certificate in Retirement Planning. In my free time, I am involved in Vaughan Community Health Services, the Vaughan Regional Medical Center, and the Cornerstone Presbyterian Church. My wife Karen, and I have lived in Selma all our lives raising our two children here. • Estate Conservation • Retirement Income Planning • Financial Strategies

• Long Term Care Insurance • Life Insurance • Annuities

Securities offered through AXA Advisors, LLC (NY, NY 212-314-4600), member FINRA, SIPC. Investment advisory products and services offered through AXA Advisors, LLC, an investment advisor registered with the SEC. Annuity and insurance products offered through AXA Network, LLC. J.B. Morris & Associates is not a registered investment advisor and is not owned or operated by AXA Advisors or AXA Network. AGE-119142(09/16)(exp.09/18)


heart failure and blockages of blood flow to the heart. Dr. Steve Allyn, a cardiologist at VRMC, stresses the importance of knowing the risks and being proactive to protect your heart. While a family history of cardiovascular disease is one factor that can’t be altered, you can manage what’s possible, including: High blood pressure High cholesterol Diabetes Weight Diet Exercise Smoking Dr. Steve Allyn Cardiologist

According to the Centers for Disease Control, 610,000 people die from heart disease in the United States each year, and it’s the leading cause of death for men and women. The World Health Organization reports most cardiovascular diseases can be prevented with timely intervention and lifestyle changes to manage risks for heart attacks and strokes. With an early heart attack education initiative, Vaughan Regional Medical Center (VRMC) is working to reduce the impact of cardiovascular disease and promote a healthy lifestyle in the local community. Cardiovascular disease can affect the heart and blood vessels and includes many physical conditions such as congestive 22

Healthy Horizons

“Smoking is a huge cardiovascular risk. It contributes to strokes, blockages, heart disease, and other medical issues. It’s one thing that I can’t stress enough,” says Dr. Allyn. “To protect your health, you have to stop smoking.” “People in their 30s and 40s who don’t have risk factors generally don’t have heart attacks. Unfortunately, aging takes a toll on the body. That’s why it’s important to control conditions like cholesterol, blood pressure, and diabetes with diet and exercise as well as medications. We want to keep your heart as strong and healthy as possible.” The warning signs of a heart attack are often subtle and cover an array of symptoms that may happen hours, days, or even weeks beforehand. Early warning signs can include: Nausea Pressure, burning, aching, or tightness in the chest Pain that travels down one or both arms Jaw pain Fatigue


Anxiety Back pain Shortness of breath Indigestion Feeling of fullness You should call

9-1-1 for emergency

the discomfort caused by the symptoms, it’s important to see your doctor within a short period of time.” Your primary care doctor may schedule tests and refer you to a cardiologist for specialized care. Dr. Allyn says to expect a stress test to determine how your heart is functioning and possibly a heart catheterization to diagnose your heart condition. Your cardiologist will work closely with you to create a treatment plan to prevent further damage to your heart. When a patient has a heart attack, an aggressive intervention is vital. For six to eight weeks after leaving the hospital, physical activity will be severely limited to give the patient time to heal while finding the right balance of medications to prevent future heart attacks. A gradual rehabilitation program will begin with short periods of walking to regain physical stamina. “Once you’re out of the hospital, the work has just begun to get a patient on the road to recovery,” says Dr. Allyn. “Ideally, a person will take the necessary steps to manage their risks and seek medical care if they experience symptoms so we can be proactive in protecting their heart health.

assistance if you have a sudden, severe onset of symptoms or if you are having chest pain or tightness and sweating profusely. Fifty percent of sudden cardiac deaths occur outside the hospital which suggests people don’t know the signs of a heart attack or they delay calling 9-1-1. “We don’t want people to panic if they’re having these symptoms only occasionally. You know what’s normal for your body. If you have indigestion often, then that’s not a big concern for a heart attack; but, if you suddenly start having severe indigestion, then that could be a red flag,” Dr. Allyn adds. “If you’re experiencing any of these warning signs, you should contact your doctor. If the symptoms are conditions that are not normal for you or if you’re waking up at night due to

More information about cardiovascular disease, risks, warning signs, and treatment can be found at the American Heart Association’s website at www.heart.org. Cardiology resources are also available at VRMC’s website www.vaughanregional.com along with contact information for Dr. Allyn and other medical professionals.

By Patricia Surrett

www.readhealthyhorizons.com

23


Caring for your family though

RHMPI Central Office P: (334) 874-7428 F: (334) 874-7435 24

Healthy Horizons

Dallas County Health Center P: (334) 877-1490 F: (334) 877-1491

Marion Health Center P: (334) 877-1490 F: (334) 877-1491


every stage of life!

Pine Apple Health Center P: (251) 746-2197 F: (251) 746-2467

Uniontown Health Services P: (334) 628-2651 F: (334) 628-2656

YB-Camden Health Center P: (334) 682-5772 F: (334) 682-5792

www.readhealthyhorizons.com Find us online @ www.rhmpi.com

25


Collaboration is Key in Healthcare Plan Dr. Thesselon Monderson General Orthopedic Surgeon

Healthcare is a science and an art, and Dr. Thesselon Monderson is dedicated to making sure his patients receive the best of both. Dr. Monderson is a general orthopedic surgeon and recently joined Vaughan Regional Medical Center after practicing in south Florida. Compassionate care is a key element in the art of healthcare and effective medical treatment. At his practice in Selma, Dr. Monderson works to create a relationship with each patient that’s built on meaningful interactions and trust. “When you visit my office, I will evaluate your condition and your expectations. I need to understand what your hopes are for the outcome of treatment and that can vary among patients. If you’re a jogger with an injury and you want to return to your jogging routine, that’s a different approach from a patient whose joints are experiencing wear and tear from aging and unhealthy weight gain,” says Dr. Monderson. “I want my patients to be active participants in their treatment and to fully understand the options available.” Taking the time to answer questions is part of the shared decision-making process along with ensuring the patient understands their injury and what caused it. Education about lifestyle changes is vital for helping a patient get better. “Initially, I take a conservative management 26

Healthy Horizons

approach with a goal of improving the overall function of the injured area before surgery is needed. Even if surgery is necessary, we still need to address the root of the problem which is often an unhealthy diet,” Dr. Monderson adds. “Losing weight can be the biggest challenge for a patient but adopting a healthy diet can affect change. It may relieve some of the problems the patient is experiencing and reaching an optimal weight can lead to better results from treatment.” Through the collaboration of shared-decision making, a patient is encouraged to assume responsibility for their well-being and given the opportunity to align their medical choices with their goals and values. By working together, the doctor and patient can set realistic objectives and personalize treatment to improve the patient’s overall well-being. “I want to empower patients with information about the appropriate tools I can offer for their care and make sure they play a role in developing a plan for care and recovery. “Ultimately, I want you to feel better and be more active than when you arrived for your first visit,” adds Dr. Monderson. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons has created an online resource for patients at www.orthoinfo.aaos.org where you can learn about injury prevention as well as treatment and recovery options. By Patricia Surrett


How May We Serve You?

When Sylvia Alston became a widow, she was left with a very limited income. With an income barely over the limit for assistance, she had to cover her church tithes, house note, house insurance, utilities, food, and a hefty monthly medication bill of $854.46. Since she was unable to purchase a Medicare Part-D plan, she was referred to the SenioRx program through the Area Agency on Aging. The SenioRx program was able to reduce her monthly medication cost to $86.40, saving her $749.06 every month. The SenioRx program was able to ease the pain of the rising cost of prescription medication for Sylvia who says, “That is life changing!! “ If you are 55 years of age or older with no prescription drug coverage, have a chronic medical condition, and meet specific income limits, you, too, could benefit from this program. Also, in certain cases, disabled persons of any age and Medicare Part D participants in the coverage gap may be eligible for assistance. While SenioRx is one of our most important programs, the Alabama-Tombigbee Regional Commission Area Agency on Aging (AAA) offers many other programs that benefit our aging community. These programs help seniors plan and manage their lives through a system of home and community based services to maintain a lifetime of independence and dignity. Many financially and medically qualified seniors, whose needs would otherwise require nursing home placement, benefit from the services offered by the Elderly & Disabled Medicaid Waiver Program. The goal of this program is to maintain clients in their own homes surrounded by family and friends for as

long as possible. The program offers services such as homemaker, personal care, respite care, and/or home delivered meals. Screening for this program and others only takes about 15 minutes, and our qualified staff will do their best to find the services that fit your needs. With the many options available in the insurance world, seniors are often left wondering if they have made the right decision regarding their health insurance. Too often, they discover they chose poorly when they do not receive the benefits they expected. The State Health Insurance Program (SHIP) is a free insurance counseling program for Medicare beneficiaries. The program helps individuals sort through the many options and provides objective and confidential advice on issues concerning health insurance. Our staff is trained to assist with questions about Medicare, Medigap insurance, Medicaid (QMB & SLMB), SSI, longterm care insurance, hospital and medical bills. Another program offered by the ATRC AAA is the Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program. This important program seeks to improve the quality of life of residents in long-term care facilities. Our Ombudsmen advocate for quality care and fair treatment by protecting residents’ rights and identifying and reporting cases of elder abuse. For additional information about these and other programs offered by the ATRC AAA please call our office at 1-888-617-0500. The ATRC AAA offers services in the following counties: Choctaw, Clarke, Conecuh, Dallas, Marengo, Monroe, Perry, Sumter, Washington, and Wilcox.

By Jennifer Herndon Ombudsman

www.readhealthyhorizons.com

27


URGENT CARE VS. EMERGENCY CARE When you’re sick or injured, deciding where to get care is the last thing you want to worry about! Understanding your options will make your decision easier when you need immediate care. Your primary doctor is the best place to start when you are sick or hurt. They know your health history, including any underlying conditions you may have, helping them make informed choices about your treatment. But what if you get sick or injured when your doctor’s office is closed? Emergency rooms are open 24 hours, seven days a week, and they are the best place for treating severe and life-threatening conditions. An E.R. has the widest range of services for after-hours care, including diagnostic tests and access to specialists. Unfortunately, a trip to the E.R. also comes with a heavy price tag, and you could end up waiting hours before being treated. If your condition is non life-threatening but needs to be taken care of right away, then urgent care is the right choice for you! MainStreet Family Urgent Care is open seven days a week for your convenience! We accept all walk-in patients, but you can also schedule an appointment through our website or Facebook page, allowing you to get the care you need at a time that’s convenient for you! We also strive to get all of our patients in and out within an hour. That way you can get back to what really matters! From state-of-the-art digital X-ray to on-site lab work, MainStreet Family Urgent Care offers a wide variety of services to help keep your family healthy! With a full-array of rapid, diagnostic testing and a selection of prescription medications available on-site, our goal is to help you save time and money. Next time you need medical care, stop by MainStreet Family Urgent Care, and let us help you heal better and feel better, FAST!

28

Open 7 days a week | Located in front of Walmart in Selma

Healthy Horizons

334.526.3240 | www.MainStreetFamilyCare-Selma.com


When the Time is Right It should come as no surprise to anyone that the senior population is growing. A recent report conducted by AARP found that people 65 and above will increase 89% over the next 20 years with the 85 and older group growing by 74% during the same period. In 2012 life expectancy in the USA reached an all-time high - 78.8 years, as compared to 68.2 years 50 years ago. But for today’s senior, it’s not enough to just live longer, they are looking to lead lives that are healthier and more meaningful. Successful aging, living well not just living longer, depends largely on the senior’s ability to positively embrace the next chapter of their lives. Making a change is never easy and can seem over whelming but the decision to simplify your life can have huge benefits in the long run. Seniors actually retain more of their independence when they don’t feel the need to count on family and friends to meet basic needs. They can simply remain a part of their loved ones social network with all the joy that entails. One of the biggest decisions a senior will have to make as they adjust to their changing lifestyle is housing. Most will find themselves, even if subconsciously, burdened by the weight and responsibility of a big house and yard.

In the past seniors had few options, remain in their home with help, move in with a family member or enter a nursing home. Fortunately more options and services are available today. Senior Living Communities are emerging, even in small towns, as a way to meet the changing needs of seniors. Most Senior Living Communities offer a variety of services and levels of care with each community being unique. Independent Living is typically utilized by the active senior who is looking to downsize and free themselves from the responsibilities of home and yard maintenance. These residents continue to live independently but have access to a staff that will take care of maintenance, appliances and grounds in an environment that focuses on safety. Assisted Living is for the senior who may need a little extra help due to health or general aging issues. Assisted Living assures that the senior is eating well, taking their medication appropriately and socializing. Exercise and activities are provided in an atmosphere that makes participation easy and rewarding. Facilities are staffed 24 hours a day with staff ready to give help at any time. Most facilities have

the look and feel of home. Residents are part of the decision making process in regards to their care, they are free to come and go as they please and many still drive. Assisted Living makes it possible to live independently without living alone. Many seniors actually report an improved quality of life after moving to an Assisted Living Facility. Specialty Care Assisted Livings also have the look and feel of home but are especially designed for a resident with a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s or other memory impairment. Safety is a major concern for these residents, most facilities allow for plenty of room to walk and socialize but maintain a secured perimeter. Specialty Care Staff receive training focused on the unique needs of a resident with a memory impairment, allowing them to care for the resident with patience, caring and compassion. Knowing when the time is right to make the move yourself or to help a loved one make the decision remains key. One thing is certain, it’s never too early to start the education process on what’s available in your community. Being informed makes the decision much easier when the time comes. By Kim Cogle, Executive Director, Vaughan Place Senior Living Community


Photo Courtesy of Shabby & Chic Events

With a farmhouse built in the 1890s and a renovated barn surrounded by 700 acres of rolling hills, Donavan Inn is a lovely wedding venue located in Perry County. If the secluded setting and beautiful scenery aren’t enough to convince a couple that the Inn is the perfect place for their special day, the story of the owners’ courtship adds a charming touch. “We’ve been together since the first grade. It was a Wedding of the Flowers play. She was the Lily of the Valley and I was Johnny Jump 30

Healthy Horizons

Up. Nineteen years later, I had the chance and didn’t hesitate to jump up again,” says Roy Barnett. He and his wife Inez have been married for 57 years. Donavan Inn is part of the Sturdivant Farm and has served as a home for families who worked at the dairy. The transformation into a wedding venue has been a labor of love that’s taken a few decades. “Originally, we were looking for a place to relax with our children and friends. We talked


By Patricia Surrett

about building a cabin on our family property but when the last tenants moved out of the farmhouse, my brother-in-law said we needed to take a look at it. He assured me there’s no prettier place,” Inez says. “I wasn’t too sure. The place was rundown and, I might’ve grown up on the farm, but I’m not really a country girl,” she laughs. That was in the early 1970s, and the farmhouse underwent its first renovation to become the family getaway. In 2004, the couple began another extensive project of adding

rooms, a glassed-in porch, an HVAC system, and other amenities to make it more comfortable. Now, the farmhouse has a new life as a retreat and wedding venue. One of their popular rental packages includes three days and two nights to provide a convenient spot for the rehearsal party, ceremony, and reception as well as privacy for the bride and groom along with their guests. The property has a pecan grove, a covered pier with electricity, and two lakes so there are plenty of opportunities to make memories and beautiful photos. The wedding venue also includes the Red Barn. But the barn wasn’t part of the original plan, according to Inez. “We had a wedding planner from Selma contact us about the barn several times. It was an old barn full of equipment and just seemed like too much work. We’d already had a few weddings and thought we were doing okay with the way things were.” However, it’s hard to turn down a persistent bride. A young woman asked about the barn several times and finally volunteered her large family to clean it out. “Well, I thought, we might not ever get it cleaned out on our own. This was a golden opportunity for us too,” says Roy. The barn had a partial concrete floor, and the Barnetts planned to add sawdust, but Roy is a bit of a perfectionist and nixed that idea. “That was just too messy for a wedding. He added pine flooring and a dance floor,” Inez says. Working with the brides is fun, and Roy and Inez enjoy seeing their venue transformed to reflect the wedding couples’ unique styles. One of their favorite weekends took place last October. “The couple invited their family and friends to a Halloween party. The barn was completely decorated like you would expect it to be with spider webs and such, and their guests were in costumes. The couple dressed as a bride and groom and then surprised everyone with a real wedding,” Inez says. If you need help coming up with ideas for your own wedding, that’s just one of many stories Roy and Inez can share for inspiration. While you’re at it, ask them about their lives (continued on page 35)

www.readhealthyhorizons.com

31


32

Healthy Horizons


www.readhealthyhorizons.com

33


Photo Courtesy of Shabby & Chic Events

34

Healthy Horizons


(continued from page 31)

before joining the wedding industry and you’ll get another interesting story and, as fate would have it, the family farm has always played a role. In 1963, Roy and Inez had been living away from Perry County and wanted to return home with their two small children. Inez’s father gave the farm to them so they could finance the purchase of a drug store. Roy and Inez owned the drug store for 42 years; although, Inez did take a break while she owned a local jewelry store for 17 years. Roy served on the Marion City Council for 24 years and has been on the Judson College Board of Trustees since 1968. Along the way, their three daughters grew up to be pharmacists like their father. Their granddaughter is studying to be a pharmacist and will soon be followed by their grandson. “Sometimes, Inez and I just dive off into things and then learn how to swim but we do stick with it,” Roy laughs. They’ve applied that philosophy to Donavan Inn Weddings. The venue has become a popular spot, and it’s recommended that you make a reservation at least six to eight months in advance. Spring and early fall are the busiest seasons, and the farm is also home to Donavan Fishing Lakes which are at their peak times in April, May, and October. To learn more about Donavan Inn Weddings, visit their Facebook page at Donavan Inn or the website at www.donavaninnweddings. com. You can schedule a tour of the venue by calling (334) 247-2099. www.readhealthyhorizons.com

35


Home Town

36

Flavor

Healthy Horizons


Cedar Hill Tea Cakes

It’s been well over 30 years since Kim Cogle, Executive Director of Vaughan Place Senior Living Community, brought home a new tea cake recipe. “The first time I tried them I thought they were the best tea cakes I’d ever eaten. My mother-in-law, Sue Cogle was kind enough to share the recipe with me and I’ve been making them ever since. When Cedar Hill Assisted Living opened its doors in 1997, these tea cakes were a featured item at the open house. They were such a hit they’ve been baked and served at practically every special event since that time, becoming known simply as Cedar Hill Tea Cakes. Be sure to serve with a napkin, their melt in your mouth goodness can be a little messy!

Ingredients: 4 ½ cups plain flour 1 teaspoon cream of tartar 1 teaspoon baking soda 1 teaspoon baking powder 2 sticks butter, softened 1 cup sugar 1 cup oil 2 eggs, beaten 2 Tablespoons vanilla flavoring

Mix together first 4 dry ingredients, set aside. Cream together butter and sugar. Add oil, eggs and vanilla. Combine with dry ingredients, mix well. Drop by rounded teaspoons onto cookie sheet, press dough down slightly. Bake at 325 for 15 minutes. Roll in confectioners’ sugar. Recipe courtesy of Kim Cogle, Executive Director, Vaughan Place Senior Living Community www.readhealthyhorizons.com

37


Mom’s Rum Cake Recipe

Recipe courtesy of Charles Gray Ingredients: ½ cup pecan pieces Duncan Hines butter cake mix Small vanilla instant pudding ½ cup dark rum ½ cup water ½ cup oil 4 eggs beaten Around town, Charles Gray has always been known as a man who cooks. Friends and neighbors counted themselves lucky to be the recipient of his homemade goodies. A favorite of Charles is his Mothers Rum Cake. “Mother always made these during the holidays, this cake just says Christmas to me so I wanted to share it with friends and family,” said Gray. Charles doesn’t cook as much as he used to, he and his wife Marcille are currently living the good life at Cedar Hill Assisted Living at Vaughan Place. Charles was happy to share his famous recipe with us assuring that this holiday tradition would endure for generations to come.

Preheat oven to 325. Spray Bundt pan with cooking spray. Line pan with pecans. Mix all cake ingredients and pour into Bundt pan. Bake at 325 for 50-60 minutes. Remove from oven and place on cooling rack. Allow cake to cool slightly in the pan. Rum syrup ingredients: 1 cup sugar 1 stick butter ¼ cup dark rum ¼ cup water Melt butter in a saucepan. Add sugar and water. Bring to a med boil for 5 minutes, stirring constantly. Invert warm cake onto cake plate. Use a fork to poke holes on top and sides. Spoon syrup mixture over cake. Allow to sit for 30 minutes before serving.


M O V E M B E R F O U N D AT I O N

IS THE ONLY GLOBAL CHARITY RAISING FUNDS A N D A W A R E N E S S F O R M E N ’ S H E A LT H

W H E N I T C O M E S T O T H E I R H E A LT H , T O O M A N Y M E N D O N ’ T T A L K , D O N ’ T T A K E ACTION AND DIE TOO YOUNG. WE WANT TO HELP MEN LIVE HAPPIER, H E A LT H I E R , L O N G E R L I V E S T H R O U G H I N V E S T I N G I N K E Y A R E A S :

P R O S TAT E C A N C E R , T E S T I C U L A R C A N C E R ��N��L ���L�� AND SUICIDE PREVENTION Since 2003, we’ve empowered millions of men and women to join the global men’s health movement. Through the moustaches grown and the conversations generated, we’ve raised over $710 million and helped fund over 1,000 breakthrough men’s health programs in 21 countries.

The Movember Foundation runs awareness and fundraising activities year-round, with the annual Movember campaign in November being globally recognized for its fun and innovative approach to raising money and getting men to take action for their health. We fund health programs directly through the Movember Foundation and our men’s health partners.

M E N S H E A LT H S T A T ’ S 1 in 7 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in their lifetime Testicular cancer is the most common cancer in young men aged 15 - 34 years 1 in 4 adults in the US will experience a mental health problem in a given year 3 out of every 4 suicides are men Moving on a regular basis can reduce your risk of heart disease, diabetes, and cancer by up to 50% and lower your risk of early death by up to 30%

H O W T O G E T I N V O LV E D Every Movember, we challenge men to grow a moustache, or for both men and women to make a commitment to get active and MOVE or host an event, all of which spark conversations and raise vital funds and awareness for men’s health. Men and women sign up at Movember.com Choose to Grow, MOVE, or ���� Men start Movember 1st clean-shaven and grow only a moustache for 30 days Women and men commit to MOVE and �� ����������� activ� Women and men can choose to host a Movember event during the month Get friends and family to donate to change the face of men’s health

GROW, MOVE OR �O�� AND SPREAD THE WORD #MOVEMBER

VISIT MOVEMBER.COM

facebook.com/MovemberUSA

youtube.com/MovemberTV

instagram.com/Movember

twitter.com/Movember


14 in

One-in-four Americans has a direct personal link to prescription drug abuse, recent studies indicate, while most first-time abusers get their drugs from a family member or friend, and Alabama is no different. To combat this growing problem, the Medical Association of the State of Alabama is leading a multiindustry coalition of medical, business, health insurance and law enforcement organizations in the launch of a new initiative – Smart & Safe – aimed at providing education on and encouraging the safe prescription, use, storage and disposal of medication. Smart & Safe will build upon the success already realized through passage of

40

Healthy Horizons

a 2013 legislative package aimed at reducing prescription drug abuse and diversion that was spearheaded by the Medical Association. In the year following its passage, that legislative package resulted in Alabama having the largest decrease in the southeast and third-largest decrease in the nation regarding use of the most highly-addictive prescription drugs. Medical Association President Buddy Smith, M.D., said despite this progress, work must continue to provide more continuing medical education opportunities for physicians and new-and-improved resources for the public. “There is no question we continue to face an epidemic,” Dr. Smith said, “and our mission

with Smart and Safe is to stem the tide. The multi-industry group making up the Smart and Safe coalition speaks both to the size of this problem and also the extent to which this issue touches each of our lives. At the same time, it also demonstrates the commitment that we and all of our partners have to do our part within our respective professions and businesses to reduce the abuse of prescription drugs in Alabama.” Raising awareness about proper medication use is essential to preventing accidental overdose and death. According to Acting State Health Officer Dr. Tom Miller, prescription drug abuse is a significant threat to Alabama’s public health.


“The number of deaths due to drug overdose, including prescription drugs, has resulted in the deaths of 762 Alabama residents between 2010 and 2014,” Dr. Miller said. “In 2014 alone, there were 221 deaths due to drug overdoses. We wholeheartedly support the Smart and Safe campaign and the effort to tackle prescription drug abuse by promoting responsible and safe prescription use and the proper disposal of medications.”

Alabama has the

26

th

highest drug overdose mortality rate in the United States

Roughly a quarter of Americans has been touched by this epidemic. Unfortunately, these estimates continue to increase every year. “Our company commends

the Medical Association for implementing its Smart and Safe campaign,” said Dr. Darrel Weaver, medical director for Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Alabama. “According to a recent study, Alabama has the 26th highest drug overdose mortality rate in the United States, and the number of drug overdose deaths in Alabama has tripled since 1999, a majority from prescription drugs. These facts validate the critical importance of the Smart and Safe campaign, and Blue Cross is proud to support the Medical Association to help ensure its success.” Individuals’ addiction to prescription medication is a heavy burden on families that can shatter lives, whether through the effects from continued abuse of drugs or the terrible loss that can come from a fatal overdose. “Drug addiction robs Alabama families and communities of opportunity, prosperity, health, safety and perhaps most devastating of all – it steals human potential. The massive weight of addiction is potentially the greatest threat facing our state,” said Barry Matson, chair of the Alabama Drug Abuse Task Force and deputy director of the Alabama District Attorney’s Association and Office of Prosecution Services. “As a career prosecutor and addiction prevention advocate, I know efforts like this will make a difference in Alabama. I applaud the Medical Association and its partners for their determination to combat

prescription drug addiction and compassion for the citizens of Alabama.” While drug abuse directly affects families and individuals, its indirect effects on Alabama communities and the businesses therein are substantial according to Denson Henry, Vice President of Henry Brick Co., in Selma, and Co-Chair of the Business Council of Alabama’s Health Committee. “Abuse of legal and illegal drugs is expensive to business, industry and employees due to higher insurance claims, lost productivity, injuries both on and off the job…not to mention the human cost. Because of this, business and industry seek to make work places and employees drugfree. Not only is it good for the bottom line, it’s also good for affected employees, co-workers and their families. Reducing abuse can reduce these ills and increase the bottom line. Encouraging and supporting treatment and prevention can help the employee, co-workers, management and families,” Henry said. For more information about the Smart & Safe program, check out www. SmartAndSafeAL.org, and follow the initiative on Facebook and Twitter.

By Lori M. Quiller , APR

Director, Communications and Social Media Medical Association of the State of Alabama

www.readhealthyhorizons.com

41


resources Assisted Living Park Place Nursing and Rehabilitation Center LLC 334-872-3471 Vaughn Place Senior Living 334-872-3471 Audiology Central Alabama Easter Seals 334-872-8421 Central Alabama Audiology 334-872-9711 Cancer Care Centers Montgomery Cancer Center of Selma 334-872-9300 Cardiology Steven Allyn, MD FACC 334-418-6656 Selma Heart Institute 334-872-2001 Chiropractor Dr. William E. Lightfoot 334-875-7163 Allen Henderson, DC 334-872-4470 Dentist Gerald Anderson, II DMD 334-875-7031 Central Alabama Children’s Dentistry 334-875-1330

ENT Otorhinolaryngology ENT Consultants 334-872-4778

Cahaba Center-Mental Health Center 334-875-2109 Emergency-after hours service for clients

General Surgery Lakeland Surgical Clinic PLLC 334-418-6652

Medical Equipment & Supplies Healthmark Home Medical Equipment 334-418-0085

Charles Lett, MD 334-875-1440 Home Health & Rehab/Hospice Alpha Home Medical LLC 334-874-1183 Amedisys Home Health Care 334-875-2550 AseraCare 334-872-1104 Homestead Hospice of Cahaba 334-418-0566 Dallas County Home Care 334-872-2323 Gentiva Home Healthcare 334-872-6637 Warren Manor & Rehabilitation Center 334-874-7425

Selma Nephrology 334-874-6053 Dr. William Todd Sherrer 334-875-4200 Nursing Homes Lighthouse Rehabilitation & Healthcare 334-875-1868 Park Place 334-872-3471

Hospitals Vaughan Regional Medical Center 334-418-4100

Obstetrics/Gynecology Central Women’s Clinic 334-875-1440

Marquis D Heath, DDS 334-877-1490

Cyriac Madathikunnel, MD 334-872-3339

John R Holland, DMD 334-628-2651

Selma Doctor’s Clinic 334-874-9064

Julie Sams, DDS 334-872-6277 Selma Center for Cosmetic Dentistry 334-872-9341

Bruce E. Taylor, MD 334-874-8800

Healthy Horizons

Nephrology Montgomery Kidney Specialist 334-872-5212

Warren Manor Nursing Home 334-874-7425

Cecil Fuller, DDS 334-874-4615

42

Travis Medical 334-872-9377

Wiregrass Hospice 334-875-2120

Internal Medicine Jewell Hamner, MD 334-875-2276

Tucker Family Dentistry, P.C. 334-872-0486

Mid South Respiratory Services & Home Medical Equipment 334-874-7743

Mental Health Services Cahaba Center-Mental Health Center 334-875-2100

Sonja Howard, MD 334-526-1805 William Mike Stevens, MD 334-875-7173 Brent B. Whiddon, MD 334-874-3633 Oncology Central Alabama Radiation Oncology 334-872-9300 Optometrist Eyemax Vision Center 334-872-2321 Primary Eye Care Center 334-874-7024


Selma Eye Associates 334-872-6296 Song Eye Center 334-874-8787 Wyatt-Kirkpatrick Eye MD Associates 334-872-3403 Orthopedics Richard Rex Harris, MD 334-636-6262 Pediatrics Selma Pediatrics 334-872-9410 Pediatric Adolescent Medicine, Inc. 334-874-4843 Pharmacies Brown Drug Company 334-872-2326 Carter Drug Company 334-875-7223 CVS Pharmacy 334-875-8300 Dallas Avenue Pharmacy 334-872-3255 Interlink Drug Company 334-875-7686 Med Center Pharmacy 334-874-9990 Pilcher-McBryde Drug Company 334-875-7208 Swift Drug Company 334-874-4651

Physicians Jamil Akhtar, MD 334-683-2073

Psychologist Behavioral Medicine, P.C. 334-877-3322

Steven Allyn 334-418-6656

UAB-Family Medicine Center 334-875-4148

Edgar W. Brown, MD 334-628-2651

Radiology Selma Radiology Associates 334-418-4100

Cardiovascular Institute of Selma, LLC 334-526-2200 Central Alabama Women’s Clinic 334-875-1022 Subba Rao Daggubati, MD 334-418-6646 Davis Family Medicine 334-874-0017

Urology Adult & Pediatric Urology 334-875-4200 Montgomery Kidney Specialist 334-269-0212 Physicians Choice Dialysis 334-875-5436

Glenton W. Davis, MD 334-847-0017 Dr. Samner Fahoum 334-872-0302 Dr. David Hobo 334-872-6773 Saima Kanwal, MD 334-877-1490 Main Street Family Urgent Care 334-526-3240 Marion Clinic 334-683-9085 Ernest Okeke, MD 334-872-9472

Valley Grande Pharmacy 334-875-2271

Rural Health Medical Program, Inc. Central Office 334-874-7420

Walgreens 334-875-4916

Selma Doctors Clinic 334-874-9064

Walmart 334-874-9359

Selma Medical Assiociates 334-875-2640

Physical Therapist PT Plus 334-872-2222

UAB Selma Family Medicine 334-375-4184

Rehab Associates 334-875-6110

Senior Services Area Agency on Aging 334-682-5206

Vaughan Medical Associates 334-877-4762 Podiatry Family Foot Care of Selma 334-872-5636

Copyright 2016 by Healthy Horizons Magazine. All rights reserved. Although some parts of this publication may be reprinted and reproduced, we require that prior permission be obtained in writing. Healthy Horizons is a free publication distributed locally and is supported by our advertisers. It is available in selected stores, physician offices, wellness centers, assisted living centers, hospitals and rehab centers. Please call for a location near you or if you would like copies placed at your business.

www.readhealthyhorizons.com

43


Do you need help obtaining FREE prescription medications? WE CAN HELP!

SenioRx is a prescription drug assistance program that has helped thousands of Alabamians age 55+ and persons with disabilities, regardless of age, who have been diagnosed with one or more chronic medical conditions that require daily medication. Clients receive a 3-month supply of medications from pharmaceutical companies FREE or at LOW COST, which can be renewed as long as they are eligible. SenioRx is administered by the Alabama Department of Senior Services, in partnership with the 13 Area Agencies on Aging, serving as Aging and Disability Resource Centers (ADRC) for Alabama.

1-800-AGE-LINE

800-243-5463 Your Opinion ters t a M

The team at Healthy Horizons believe feedback is crucial for continual improvement. We are asking for your feedback related to our articles and content. Please take time to complete the brief questionnaire Healthy Horizons T-Shirt for participation. By completing the below and you will receive a questionnaire you will also be entered in a quarterly drawing to a win a $50 gift card.

FREE

Where did you see our magazine? Do you currently use or would you consider using in the future any businesses listed in this publication? (including advertisers and those listed in the resource directory) Yes No a. If so, which one (s): What suggestions for improvements do you have? Mail form to: Healthy Horizons, PO Box 81, Choccolocco, AL 36254

Name Address City Phone

Shirt size desired S M 44 Healthy Horizons

Email L

State XL

XXL

Zip XXXL

All participants who send in the survey will be entered into a quarterly drawing to win a $50 gift card. All participants who send in the survey will receive a free t-shirt. Healthy Horizons reserves the right to substitute sizes based on availability. Allow six to eight weeks for your t-shirt to arrive. One per household.


Embassy Suites Montgomery MORE REASONS TO STAY

TM

If you’re organizing a meeting or any other large event in Montgomery, we have all the tools and facilities to meet your needs. Our largest meeting room offers 10,382 sq. ft. of space for your meeting or conference. What’s more, we can help you plan your wedding, banquet or any other event at our Montgomery hotel with our useful group booking tools that helps organize space, layouts and people. Set in downtown Montgomery, next to Montgomery Convention Center 9 miles from Montgomery Regional Airport via complimentary shuttle bus All-suite hotel with in-suite microwave, refrigerator and WiFi access 15,000 sq. ft. of meeting space for up to 1,000 guests and a business center Fitness center, pool and two Montgomery restaurants and bars

300 Tallapoosa Street, Montgomery, Alabama, 36104, USA

1-334-269-5055 www.readhealthyhorizons.com

45


fun & games

Word Search

OO R

S

N

G

N

I

K

O

H

C

L

H

S

I

G

N

S

S

A

S

S

L

A

O

I

S

D

G

E

V

R

E

S

E

R

P

N

N

F

E

N

E

I

P

V

P

R

N

T

H

N

A

T

O

N

I

D

S

I

R

I

T

M

T

S

O

O

B

I

O

F

R

O

O

A

Y

A

T

T

U

A

C

R

O

S

I

W

A

B

E

I

T

F

R

I

N

M

U

T

T

R

I

E

L

T

S

N

B

T

S

Y

U

P

E

S

A

H

N

I

C

T

R

H

A

T

O

I

Y

S

J

P

S

B

I

S

N

T

C

N

A

S

C

T

D

S

N

N

N

O

B

U

R

X

H

I

H

S

O

G

R

W

U

O

U

U

I

G

A

R

I

A

A

O

P

Y

U

A

N

S

F

P

L

P

L

E

N

N

E

F

I

L

C

R

U

S

H

I

S

Y

M

V

A

Y

T

S

G

A

T

N

Y

K

S

Y

E

P

D

R

C

A

N

E

T

H

N

I

T

V

L

H

Y

P

E

R

V

E

N

T

I

L

A

T

I

O

N

H

E

U

P

N

Y

U

T

V

E

L

P

D

O

M

R

O

O

A

I

I

N

A

Y

P

R

O

E

L

S

I

N

C

U

O

T

M

N

N

N

G

N

A

U

C

E

R

B

H

R

P

C

H

S

P

E

O

G

S

L

A

W

E

V

N

G

C

A

P

R

E

V

E

N

T

R

R

O

L

E

R

I

F

A

I

N

T

I

N

G

A

K

S

E

N

I

P

U

E

I

F

I

R

S

T

A

I

D

E

K

O

R

T

S

H

E

K

S

A

A

O

C

H

I

L

D

S

Y

M

P

T

O

M

S

S

S

Adult Brain Child Croup Drowning Fire Frostbite Lung Promote Shock 46

1st Aid

Sprains Unconsciousness Airway Angine Baby Breathing Choking Crush Epilepsy First Aid

Healthy Horizons

Heart Recovery Position Signs Strains Veins Amputation Arteries Bleeding Burns Circulation

Danger Eye Fitting Hyperventilation Preserve Resuscitation Skull Stroke Anaphylaxis Asthma Bones

Chest CPR Diabetes Fainting Fractures Hypothermia Prevent Safety Spinal Injury Symptoms


Easy

3

6

Sudoko 1

6 7 4 7 9 2 4 1 3 6 4 6 2 8 9 3 9 8 7 8 3 1 1 2

Hard

4 4

9 5 8 4

5 7 4 8 6 3 8 5 2 6 9

4

5

6 9 8 7 2 2

Medical Laughs As my wife and I were driving our teenage daughter to the hospital where she was scheduled to undergo a tonsillectomy, we discussed how the procedure would be performed. “Dad” my daughter asked, “how are they going to get me to keep my mouth open the whole time?” I looked through the rear view mirror and chuckled, “They’re going to give you a cell phone.”

www.readhealthyhorizons.com

47


Banking The Way It Should Be...

ˇ

Shaudonna Minor

Main Branch Manager

Dr. Brady Bostick Rives

Central Alabama Audiology

Norbert Neely

Neely Charter Service

Steven South Loan Officer

...From Anywhere! One bank is here to meet all of your financial needs, in person or online.

You’ll love our service, and our rates!

• Checking • CDs & Savings • Auto Loans • Personal Loans • Mortgage Loans • Refinancing

www.firstcahawbabank.com 24/7 telephone banking - 875-4375

48

Healthy Horizons


THE PLACE WHERE PEOPLE CHOOSE TO COME FOR HEALTHCARE

Vaughan Regional Medical Center is thankful for our wonderful community, patients, families, physicians, employees and volunteers. You are why we strive to be the best! 50

Healthy Horizons

1015 Medical Center Parkway Selma, AL 36701 334-418-4100

Hhselma2016 combined bleeds  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you