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ST(AIR) MOVEMENT Abbey Woods Gabrielle Stef fel Adam Oswald Veronika Jonsson UNIVERSITY OF OREGON

KINETIC ARCHITECTURE PROPOSAL APRIL 22, 2013


PROBLEM STATEMENT Within the urban environment many constraints exist which make passive forms of ventilations very difficult. In such dense environments it is often impossible to introduce cross ventilation strategies, however there are a myriad of ways in which buildings can be retrofitted to take advantage of the stack effect, especially in spaces with high internal heat gain within temperate climates. Additionally, such retrofits that look to open a building’s envelope to the sky should also consider the opportunity to access rooftops. By allowing roof access, another inhabited dimension is possible which can be used to various ends. The proposed retrofit would occur in a historic row house which experiences incredible heat gain during the summer and whose owner desires rooftop access, but without sacrificing existing living space. Therefore, the pursuit of kinetic architecture in this endeavor is for the purpose of providing roof access while also using the stack effect to passively cool the home.

CONTEXT

Typical Rowhouse Stack Ventilation

Our site is a 3,000 square foot multi-story artist row home located in the historic Georgetown neighborhood of Washington DC. This region of the country is known for hot and humid summers and can benefit greatly from utilizing stack ventilation. Structural systems frequently consist of wood beams spanning between masonry party walls, but we would expect that this addition would be part of a larger retrofit that would bring environmental systems up to date and the structural system up to seismic code. Additional structural reinforcement related to our project would roll into these upgrades. Homes of this size are on the market from $2 million to $5 million, therefore it is safe to assume that the budget is flexible. Construction Considerations Our intent is for the structure to be assembled on site with a kit of parts that can be transported through existing openings, with the likely exception of the roof system, which will require the use of a crane system.

Sustainable DC rowhouse retrofit by iSTUDIO Architects


DESIGN CRITERIA - Maintain living space: stair and railing components should not be intrusive when closed - Allow roof access - Passively cool the space - Provide shelter from rain - Provide various degrees of light exposure - Integrate railings with stair - Human powered by homeowner, family and guests, with a reasonable amount of time to open - The three components – stairs, roof, louvers – must be able to operate independently - Should include measures to prevent accidents e.g. louvering the stairs while the stair stringer is lowered. This may be a locking system that only allows one component to be operated at a time. - Stairs must meet rise/run code requirements and must have railings - Skylight roof covering must stay within the property-line footprint of the building when open - When closed, the roof must prevent water and air infiltration and should resist heat loss during the winter - The roof, when open, must resist any additional wind loads developed

Washington DC Climate Data

The mechanism is to function for the remainder of the life of the building, estimated to be 100 years. It is to be operated twice a day on average throughout this period with maintenance required only twice a year. It should take no longer than 30 seconds to fully open each time. Preferred Design Aesthetics - Mechanism is celebrated through the display of its gears - There is a clear articulation of the path of motion - Stair material acts as heat sink - “Hide and reveal” typology for railings - Sensory experience of ventilation and light is integrated Typical DC Rowhouses


Precedents

EXTERIOR PERSPECTIVE

CUTAWAY PERSPECTIVE

SECTION

ROOF PLAN

OUR ROWHOUSE


S TA I R S A S L O U V E R S


ROOF OPENING


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Kinetic Stair Proposal