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The Official Tourist Guide of Guyana 2018

Prince Harry and Vice President Allicock at Kaieteur Falls www.exploreguyana.org


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Guyana, Growing into a Green State By The Department of Environment- Ministry of the Presidency

The Cooperative Republic of Guyana, located on South America’s North Atlantic Coast is truly special. It boasts an enviable and unparalleled quota of natural resources which includes but is not limited to: • The second highest percentage of rainforest cover in the world- 85%; • Rich biodiversity – home to some of the world’s rarest flora and fauna; • Significant reserves of freshwater; and • A mix of renewable energy resources - solar, wind, hydro, biomass to guarantee an industrial energy revolution. Recently, the Government has identified the concept of a Green Economy to advance the sustainable development of the resources of the country. This policy shift is far-reaching and demonstrates the commitment of the Government and People of Guyana to good governance and inclusive environmental, social and economic development. This concept not only responds to the current global realities of climate change, food loss and the economic crises but it also offers the promise of a diversified growth strategy that utilises the country’s rich natural resources. Additionally, it fortifies the sustainable developmental trajectory of the country as the pathway to securing a good life for all Guyanese. In 2012, the Organization for Economic Development posited that “Green growth is a matter of both economic policy and sustainable development policy as it tackles two key imperatives together. These are: • the continued inclusive economic growth needed by developing countries to reduce poverty and improve wellbeing; and • improved environmental management needed to tackle resource scarcities and climate change.’’ In light of the foregoing and in considering the fact that world is in the throes of an undeniable shift in its weather pattern as a result of warming global temperatures, the Government of the Cooperative Republic of Guyana stands tall as a proud and reliable global partner in embarking upon world-class initiatives for sustainable development. The development of the region’s first Green State Development Strategy (GSDS) is indicative of this commitment. It will guide Guyana's economic and social development for the next 15 years and seeks to build on the successes of all previous developmental strategies, inclusive of the Low Carbon Development Strategy and the Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper. The attainment of a Green State will be driven by Guyanese, both in the diaspora and at home. Ideally the GSDS will lay the foundations for inclusive green economic and social growth, provide a roadmap for achieving the United Nations Sustainable Development Targets, and outline a long term vision for a prosperous and equitable future. The objective of the strategy is to reorient and diversify Guyana’s economy, reducing reliance on traditional sectors and opening up new sustainable income and investment opportunities in higher value adding and higher growth sectors. Through a multi-sectoral stakeholder consultation process, a Framework of the Green State Development Strategy and Financing Mechanisms document was developed to map prioritised areas for incorporation in the GSDS. Seven thematic areas were prioritised for inclusion in the strategy. These areas will serve as the vehicle to transition the country into a Green State.

These themes are: 1. Green and Inclusive Structural Transformation; 2. Sustainable Management of Natural Resources; 3. Energy – Transition Towards Renewable Energy; 4. Resilient Infrastructure and Spatial development; 5. Human Development and Well Being; 6. Governance and Institutional Foundations; and 7. International Cooperation and Trade Importantly, the seven thematic areas are aligned to the 2030 United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) for ease of achievement. Each theme has specific strategic areas for further development following further nationwide consultations. All Guyanese from private, public or non-government sector have an obligation to attend these consultations to make their suggestions for priority actions under the GSDS. Achievement of this Green State will be supported by a myriad of financial mechanisms. In particular Official Developmental Aid, Fiscal Revenues, Domestic and International Private Finance. Guiding these investments will be a sound financial plan that considers fully the Green Economy and necessary sectors that will drive this change. Remarkably, Guyana has gained membership to Partnership for Action on Green Economy (PAGE) which is a United Nations mechanism to receive expert guidance and advice on transitioning to green, inclusive development. One of the UN Agencies, UN Environment has been providing technical support to the Government to develop the GSDS. In the words of His Excellency President David Arthur Granger, “Guyana’s Green State Development Strategy will be based on the sustainable use of biodiversity and a decarbonised approach that endeavours to provide an inclusive and better quality of life for all Guyanese within the ecological limits of our country’s natural resources, and with the relevant, physical and human capital”. We therefore look forward to working with all stakeholders to ensure that his vision becomes a reality for the benefit of our children and our children’s children. NOTES: The Department of Environment (DoE) was established in September 2016. Its mission is to develop a robust, world-class environmental system that safeguards the integrity of the natural environment and protects public health through the development and adoption of appropriate, sustainable and coherent policies and programmes. The DoE is responsible for coordinating and integrating the work of four Agencies that are under its purview. These are the Environmental Protection Agency, Protected Areas Commission, National E Parks Commission and the Wildlife Conservation and Management Commission. TheXDoE is also responsable for coordinating all activities that relate to the development of the P L country’s third national development strategy – The Green State Development Strategy. Contact Us: Telephone Number: 592 663 6313/6314 Email: ddoe.motp@gmail.com Facebook: www.facebook.com/DeptEnv

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The Official Tourist Guide of Guyana 2018 EXPLORE GUYANA is designed and published annually for the

Tourism and Hospitality Association of Guyana (THAG) in association with the Ministry of Business with responsibility for Tourism and the Guyana Tourism Authority (GTA) by:

Advertising & Marketing Services (AMS)

213 B Camp Street P.O. Box 101582, Georgetown, Guyana Tel: (011592) 225-5384

Publisher & Editor: Lokesh Singh lokeshslu@gmail.com

Associate Editor: Andrea de Caires

Project Coordinator: Nerissa Moore

Advertising Sales: Lokesh Singh Lesa Fleming Fiaz Yamin Nerissa Moore

Graphic Design:

Advertising & Marketing Services Heimant Ram

Editorial Contributors:

Waldyke Prince H.E. Greg Quinn Dr. Soumi Sengupta Carinya Sharples Major General (Rtd), Joe Singh Purnima Totaram Avenash Ramzan

Marco Barneveld Kevin Daby Jackie Darling Andrea de Caires Salvador de Caires ChĂŠri Frank Kata Henry Norah Henry

Contributing Photography: Alex Arjonn www.REELguyana.com Kevin Daby Andrea de Caires Salvador de Caires Raquel Thomas-Ceasar Matt Hallet Caroline Henry Samantha James Rene Koster Dr. Burton Lim Michael Lam www.TheMichaelLamCollection. com Explore

Guyana

2018 Outside

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Leon Moore www.journeyguyana.com FB:leonmoorenatureexperience Kensington Palace Sharon Paul Kenneth and Hannah M. Pierre Waldyke Prince Rupununi Music & Art Festival www.rupununifestival.com Surama Eco Lodge Kenneth Shivdyal Andrew Snyder Antoinette Sonaram 10/25/17

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Front Cover Photo: Kensington Palace

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The Offic ial Tourist

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GUYANA

On the Cover:

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Prince Harry and Vice President Sydney Allicock at Kaieteur Falls CM

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Š Copyright 2018. Reproduction of any material without the permission of AMS is strictly prohibited. @eldoradorum

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of Guyan

G U Y A N A

The Officia l Tourist Guide

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Prince Harry

and Vice Presid ent Allicoc k at www.explor eguyana.org Kaieteur Falls

AMS and THAG wish to express sincere thanks and appreciation to all parties who have assisted in making this publication a reality.

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The Official Tourist Guide of Guyana 2017

CONTENTS

About the Tourism and Hospitality Association of Guyana (THAG) The Tourism and Hospitality Association of Guyana (THAG) was established on January 6, 1992 by individual operators working in the industry. THAG is a member of the Private Sector Commission and the Caribbean Hotel and Tourism Association. It was initially called the Tourism Association of Guyana but evolved into Tourism and Hospitality Association of Guyana in recognition of the magnitude of the industry. It is the umbrella body of all tourism related restaurateurs, tour operators, travel agents, hoteliers, transportation services and community based tourism providers among others. THAG has pursued a partnership with the Government of Guyana in the development and expansion of various aspects of the tourism industry; generic marketing, training and development; positioning individual members locally, regionally and internationally to operate with the highest standards in the industry. THAG is headed by an Executive Board comprising a President, Vice President, Treasurer and four Committee Members. The Secretariat is headed by an Executive Director whose responsibility is the day to day management of the Association. THAG’s permanent staff is the Executive Officer. THAG has formed invaluable alliances with varying stakeholder groups for the enhancement of Guyana’s cultural, social, built and natural environment as a tourism destination.

Guyana, South America. Undiscovered

INTRODUCTION AND WELCOME 4 - 5 - 6 - 8 - 11 -

Credits About THAG Welcome – President of Guyana Welcome – THAG Welcome – Minister of Tourism

MAPS 13 - Map of Guyana 14 - Map of Georgetown / Architectural Treasures EXPLORE GUYANA 16 - January 2018 18 - Explore Guyana Essay Contest FEATURE ARTICLES 22 - February 2018 26 - The Berbice River: The River That Bears Witness 30 - March 2018 34 - Kaieteur Falls Our Trip of A Lifetime 36 - Conservation Warriors of the Rupununi Region 40 - April 2018 44 - People of Guyana Alex Arjoon 46 - May 2018 50 - Prince Harry Visits Guyana

Tourism & Hospitality Association of Guyana, Private Sector Commission Building Waterloo Street, North Cummingsburg, Georgetown, Guyana, South America.

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June 2018 The Diane McTurk Scholarship Educational Tourism Budding Scientists Feed Off Nature In Guyana’s Rainforest

Tel: 011 592 225 0807 / 225 0817 Email: info@exploreguyana.org thag.secretariat@gmail.com Website: www.exploreguyana.org Facebook: Tourism and Hospitality Association of Guyana

62 - July 2018 66 - People of Guyana - Michael Lam 68 - August 2018

72 - GT Motorsports Karting for Everyone 74 - September 2018 78 - Community Based Tourism 80 - The Incredible Cassava Plant 82 - October 2018 84 - Our Overland Trip to Kaieteur Falls An Incredible, Memorable and Life Changing Experience 86 - Memories of Guyana – Surama to Iwokrama by Dugout Canoe 88 - November 2018 93 - Demerara Rules The Waves 94 - December 2018 FUN & FOOD 98 - Enjoy Guyana Like A Guyanese: Street Food ABOUT GUYANA 100 - Country Facts, Government, Travelling, Money & Business THAG TRAVELLER 105 - Accommodations Georgetown & Environs 107 - Eco-Resorts, Interior Lodges & Attractions 110 - Tourism Service Providers

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Welcome

President of the Republic of Guyana Guyana

A Haven for Eco-Tourism The Cooperative Republic of Guyana is the biggest, most beautiful and bountiful of the countries of the Anglophone Caribbean. Located on the continent of South America, Guyana is at the heart of the Guiana Shield, one of the world’s last remaining pristine blocks of tropical rainforest characterised by high levels of endemic flora and fauna. Guyana is home to several of the world’s giants. The largest anacondas, ants, anteaters, armadillos, bats, caimans, eagles, fish, jaguars, otters, rodents, snakes, spiders, storks, toads, turtles and vultures in the world are to be found here. There are more species of birds in our most southernmost region than there are in all of Western Europe. Guyana’s landscape – the shell beaches of the low coastlands, the grasslands, wetlands, highlands, lakes, rainforests, rapids, rivers and waterfalls – are all beautiful to behold. Guyana is a haven for lovers of nature. Our country offers a number of attractive eco-tourism experiences including bird-watching, boating, eco-lodges, hiking, mountain trekking, safaris, yachting and wildlife exploration. I congratulate the Tourism and Hospitality Association on the publication of this issue of the Explore Guyana magazine. I am confident that it will provide useful information about the amazing ‘green state’ – Guyana.

H.E. BRIGADIER DAVID GRANGER President Co-operative Republic of Guyana

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A Warm Welcome

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oday in Guyana, we are on the verge of a new era, that of oil production. Although there is great excitement in the air, and hopes sore high for new development, we are determined not to lose our individuality, our culture or our heritage. We are committed to the preservation of our natural resources, our amazing wildlife, vast savannahs and untouched rainforests.

Andrea de Caires President

Treina F. Butts Executive Director

Kevin Daby

Vice President

Mitra Ramkumar Treasurer

With all of that in mind, we welcome you to the only English speaking country in South America; where the Harpy Eagle roams, where the Giant Anteater ambles across the Savannahs. Here the Indigenous First Peoples are waiting to welcome you to their Community Owned and Operated Eco Lodges in the Hinterland. You won’t find the crowds that can spoil a wonderful sighting of a spectacular animal or endemic bird. Here the people are genuinely glad to talk to you and share their country and culture. Upon your return home, you will enthrall people with your unique stories of your time spent in this undiscovered destination. Whether it is a boat trip up an uncharted river, where you meet no one, but a troop of two hundred monkeys staring at you more than you stare at them or being mesmerized by the spectacle of the longest single drop waterfall in the world, surrounded by pristine rainforest. We promise you an unforgettable experience. We will entice you with our mix of cultures, evident in our cuisine, a true fusion of flavours, from Eastern curries with European flavours to coconut infused African based rice and ‘provisions’. And of course, when you add in the Portuguese garlic pork and the Indigenous Pepperpot and Tuma pot with cassava bread or farine, you know you can be nowhere else but Guyana.

Davie Sukhdeo

Committee Member

Alexandra Correia Committee Member

Andrea de Caires President

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So, wherever you go in Guyana, we will welcome you! We are glad you are here and we look forward to sharing all of the magic and tastes that make Guyana unique.

Camille Boodhoo Committee Member

Jacqueline Allicock Committee Member


New Thriving Restaurant - Providence Branch

NEW THRIVING Authentic Chinese Cuisine In Guyana

Our magnificent Exotic Chinese Restaurant Complex, with its multiplicity of Sections and Services and excellent Cuisine, stands out as a pride and delight of Guyana and the Caribbean ...

New Thriving Restaurant - Main Street Branch

Our VIP facilities are available for special occasions, corporate meetings, parties and other functions. Make your reservation to secure our VIP rooms. Main Street deck with live entertainment, Conference centre with Internet access Lecturn, P.A system Wide screen TV & Four private rooms. The Management and Staff of our delightful Restaurant Complex place a high priority on the diligent implementation of our goal – of always offering Service of Quality, Value and Excellence.efore.

Block M Providence, East Bank Demerara, Guyana Telephone: Order/Delivery & Pickup: +592 265-7882-4 Reservations: +592 265-7885 info@newthrivingonline.com

32 Main Street, Georgetown, Guyana. Telephone: Order/Delivery & Pickup: +592- 225-0868, 225-1730 VIP Floor: +592-225-0038

www.newthrivingrestaurant.com

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Welcome

Minister of Business with Responsibility for Tourism It is my pleasure to welcome you to the 2018 edition of Explore Guyana. This is Guyana’s official tourism magazine and is designed to provide an informative glimpse into the world of attractions that make up Guyana’s unique tourism product. Skilled writers bring to life their experiences in remote parts of our un-trampled hinterland, while some of our most fascinating species of flora and fauna are depicted in stunning photographs that are sure to excite nature lovers. Guyana is yet to become a mainstream tourist destination and this lush green paradise remains relatively unexplored. The Government of Guyana, through its Department of Tourism and the Guyana Tourism Authority, supports tourism development in all ten of Guyana’s administrative regions and is working with communities and other stakeholders to expand and improve the range of visitor activities. A rich diversity of people, natural attractions and well-preserved natural ecosystems make our country well worth visiting, and this is precisely what we invite you do. Turn the pages of Explore Guyana to find out more about the people and places that make Guyana one of the top emerging destinations on the planet. Congratulations to the Tourism and Hospitality Association of Guyana for, once again, showcasing Guyana in this high-quality annual publication.

HON. DOMINIC GASKIN Ministry of Business with responsibility for Tourism E X P L O R E G U Y A N A

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“Yours to Experience, Explore & Enjoy” Guyana

Arrowpoint South America

Hurakabra Resort

Warapoka

Charity

ANNA REGINA

Barima - Waini

Pomeroon - Supenaam Essequibo Islands - West Demerara

Fort Island Demerara Harbour Bridge

Demerara - Mahaica

Fort Zeelandia

CJ Internat’l E.F. Correia Int’l Airport Airport Jubilee Resort

Cuyuni - Mazaruni Hurakabra

Bartica

Mahaica - Berbice

No. 63 Beach

Sloth Island Berbice River Bridge

Rockstone

ssau

Orealla Upper Demerara - Berbice

Kurupukari Crossing

Iwokrama River Lodge

Potaro - Siparuni

Fair View

SOUTH PAKARAIMA DISTRICT

Piraiba Lodge

Governor Falls

214,970 sq km (83,000 sq miles) 746,955 (Census 2012)

Governor Light Falls

Atta Lodge

Lodge NRDDB

V Town/Community Lethem Hotels

Rewa Lodge

Pirara

Karanambu NORTH Lodge RUPUNUNI Yupakari DISTRICT Caiman House

Nappi

(GYD) East Berbice - Corentyne

Takatu Bridge Administrative Regions Major Bridge

Ori Hotel The Rupununi Eco Hotel Savannah Inn Takatu Bridge

Lethem Area

Shea Rock

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SOUTH RUPUNUNI Upper Takutu - Upper Essequibo DISTRICT

G U Y A N A

Konashen uR

Sip

iver

17 T: (592) 225.5383 - 4 F: (592) 225.5383

Email: info@amsguyana.com, Website: amsguyana.com

T: (592) 219.0096 - 6 • F: (592) 219.0093 Email: info@guyana-tourism.com Website: www.guyana.tourism.com www.guyanabirding.com

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THE CATHEDRAL OF THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION Was designed by an Englishman, Sir Leonard Stokes. Granite obtained from the quarries of Dalli and Wolga on the Essequibo River and sand from Leguan was used in the construction of this structure whose foundation stone was laid on 15 August 1915.

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DENOTES CITY HOTEL LOCATIONS Please refer to page 96 for details of Hotel listings

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STAL HOTEL

TO GRAND COA

This 280 mile wall is a Dutch-designed and British-built dyke that protects Georgetown against flooding. It is a favourite “liming”, jogging and kite-flying spot.

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RAILWAY STREET

LAMAHA STREER

ALEXANDER STREET

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MIDDLETON STREER

The monument was designed by renowned Guyanese Artist Philip Moore.

ANIRA STREET

LALUNI STREET

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JANUARY 2018

The Guianan-Warbling Antbird

(Hypocnemis cantator), is a species endemic to the Guiana Shield and is one of the most photogenic Antbirds in Guyana.

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Iwokrama River Lodge Website: www.iwokramariverlodge.org


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Explore Guyana Essay Contest There were two categories, one for primary school (1000 words) and one for secondary school (1500-2000 words). The topic was “CLEAN IT AND MEAN IT”. The Judges were authors, Mr. Ruel Johnson, Ms. Sharon Maas, GECOM Chairman, Dr. Steve Surjbally and President of THAG, Mrs. Andrea de Caires. Creativity Structure Adherence to topic Grammar WOW factor TOTAL

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30% 20% 20% 10% 20% 100%

There were countless entries, but there were two very clear first place winners. Ms. Purnima Totaram of No 2 Primary School, Fort Ordinance, Berbice won the Primary School Category and Mr. Chéri Frank of Queen’s College won the Secondary School Category. Ms. Totaram won a trip for 2 to Arrowpoint Nature Resort and Ms. Frank won a trip for two (2) to Baganara Island Resort.

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Essay Winner

“Clean it & Mean it!” By Chéri Frank

C

lose your eyes and picture a land that could only exist in a hazy dream on a summer afternoon: sapodilla-brown rivers; forests that are every shade of green you could imagine; colourful birds and creatures so unique, so breathtaking, no words can truly capture their image. Imagine the sounds: waterfalls roaring like Zeus himself; monkeys chattering; birds singing sweetly or screeching with utmost abandon. Imagine its utopia of a city: the perfect combination of nature and industrialization, with well built roads and tall buildings, but also magnificent trees and vibrant sunsets. Now, imagine all of this beauty dying. The sapodilla-brown rivers turning sickly gray, dead fishes rising to the surface; emerald forests turning brown, becoming barren; the beautiful creatures of the land choking on plastic and glass, being killed slowly; the roads decorated with piles of rubbish on either side. Unfortunately, this is not just a figment of one’s imagination, or a hellish nightmare. The beautiful land in your mind is Guyana, and the utopia is its capital city, Georgetown. Their demise is a sure possibility if we, the inhabitants, do not change our mentality and work to keep our country clean. Open your eyes. Too often, we see people drive past in cars and chuck plastic bags, empty bottles and paper wrappings out the windows. Too often, the streets look like an apocalypse has arrived, the day after Mashramani or GuyExpo. Even when people go to a restaurant, they leave the tables filthy. As they carry out these acts, they think to themselves, “Oh, someone will pick it up”, or “Well, I can’t just keep the garbage”. Many people believe that if they litter in public areas, it is no longer their responsibility. Some have argued that people litter because there are not enough easily accessible waste receptacles nearby. While this is quite true, it should be noted that in places where there are waste receptacles, such as Avenue of the Republic, litter is still strewn all over. However, because these bins are often overflowing, one can say that the fact that they are not emptied regularly adds to the problem. In the end, no one ever bothers to pick anything up, and while we do not keep the garbage close to us initially, it becomes our business when it rains and the clogged drains cause the streets to be flooded. It becomes our business when our children and other loved ones become sick. If we want a better quality of life, we need to make the effort as a society. Litter puts a strain on all aspects of our society. Not only does it clog drains to cause flooding, but it also promotes the spread of diseases by encouraging vermin and the growth of harmful micro-organisms. Litter can be a fire hazard as well, for instance, cigarette butts and paper tossed carelessly together is a recipe for disaster. In addition, litter tossed over the seawalls can be eaten by marine wildlife, such as turtles and tropical fish, poisoning them. This would have adverse effects on our ecotourism, as well as our fishing industry. Also, litter takes away from the scenic beauty of our country. Who can admire a gorgeous sunset while standing next to a pile of trash? Not to mention the stench…

Further, foreigners who visit Guyana and see the garbage that adorns our streets and trenches are disappointed. We advertise our country to the world as the breathtaking land it is supposed to be yet we fail to maintain this image in reality. Because of this, tourists develop a bad impression of Guyanese as a people, and stereotypes develop. Hence, we are affected socially, as well as environmentally and economically. There are strategies that can be put into effect by the government and individual citizens to stop littering, as well as to reverse its adverse effects on our society, environment, economy and our tourism industry. First, the government can ensure that bins are regularly emptied, and drains and trenches regularly cleaned. Overflowing bins and dirty drains and trenches tend to encourage people to throw their garbage anywhere, whereas a tidier environment may cause them to want to maintain it. In addition, more waste receptacles can be distributed, not only around Georgetown, but also in all the towns around the country, as well as the villages. If there are adequate facilities that allow citizens to neatly dispose of their waste, they are likely to make use of them. While these strategies may be rather costly initially, they would serve to save a lot of money in the long run, as expenses for unblocking drains and removing large heaps of garbage from pavements would be eliminated. In addition, keeping our country clean and free of litter would attract foreigners to visit. They will not only be better able to observe the unique beauty of Guyana, but will also notice that although our country is developing and becoming more industrialized, we have not allowed that to be detrimental to our natural environment. Also, we as citizens need to play a part in keeping our environment clean. One should always throw empty bottles, wrappers, paper and other waste into any waste receptacles nearby. However, if there are no bins within the area, one should keep their waste with them until they do find a waste receptacle, or until they get home. We should also act as “our brothers’ keepers”, that is, if we see someone littering, we should be able to tell them that what they are doing is wrong, and lead by example. In addition, it is important to be aware of the effects of littering. We should educate our acquaintances and loved ones on the ways in which littering can negatively affect each citizen, and they, in turn, must be encouraged to pass on the knowledge. Often, people litter because they believe that it is not their concern. If they learn how they can be personally affected, their mindset may change, and they may be more careful to avoid littering. We are the children of Guyana’s soil, let’s treat our motherland with respect! Finally, we need to change the way we view our environment, and learn to cherish it. The more value we place on our surroundings, the more likely we are to keep it clean, and maintain its beauty. Then, and only then, will foreigners, as well as Guyanese, be able to fully appreciate this wonderful land, in its fullest glory.

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Essay Winner

“Clean it & Mean it!” by Purnima Totaram

I

t is hard to know and think about all of the garbage being dumped on the many streets, highroads, creeks, drains and canals in Guyana. The President, Ministers and a few companies along with other persons in the community try to maintain a clean environment while others do not care. This is a major reason why not much tourists visit Guyana. Persons have come together to form clean-up campaigns and committees to help maintain the environment but I think there is more that can be done. Many countries have banded littering and also the sales of plastic utensils, e.g. food boxes and plastic cups, while in some countries the act of littering has continued. I have often thought about it and I strongly believe a law should be implemented to stop littering. There should be a special type of policemen and women to ensure that the “No littering” policy is enforced and every month they can visit restaurants and supermarkets to ensure no one stocks plastic utensils. The plastic utensils can be replaced with paper utensils instead. These utensils will not harm the environment and will rot into the ground to help form humus. In addition, paper utensils will not cause blockage in drains as would plastic utensils.

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Speaking of blocked drains, which are as much as a big deal as littering on the streets, I could think of no other thing but what an awful sight and smell it will result in. Aquatic animals have also suffered from this dreadful act. Some animals like sea turtles, which are an endangered species, have died from eating plastic bags instead of jelly-fish. This action of littering in the seas, rivers and other water running streams needs to be stopped. I think this can be avoided if the President placed bins at certain points on the road corners for citizens to use. This will

discourage them from dumping their garbage in the drains and on the streets. Also, there should be wired fences around the rivers and drains. Persons can paint it or school students could even volunteer to make decorations. This will attract tourists who wish to see and contribute to this activity. Also, the wired fences will avoid the garbage from entering the water. This will also result in growth in the aquatic life. The increase in the population of these animals will give Guyana the opportunity to display the beauty of its aquatic life. This will attract tourists and they will want to have a very close view of these gorgeous creatures. Drivers are in the habit of encouraging their passengers to throw garbage through the windows of their cars and then driving away quickly. This is yet another rule in Guyana that is broken not once but hundreds of times each day. This can be prevented if the government installs cameras on streetlights. These cameras could lead right back police stations in a special room so every time this happens the person in charge of the cameras could get a picture of the car’s number board. This system will allow for the driver to be caught and he will be penalized by paying a certain amount of money. The money gained can be used to develop and beautify the environment by building parks or maybe resorts or any other recreational places. Tourists will be attracted to these sights and will visit Guyana. Littering is a big deal and if it is not stopped, it will destroy Guyana and its natural beauty. This would stop tourists from coming to Guyana and Guyana will continue to be South America’s little secret. We can make Guyana a well known country if we avoid destroying its beauty by littering. We want to encourage tourists to visit Guyana and spread the word of our beautiful country.


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FEBRUARY 2018

The Capuchin Bird is restricted to the

Guiana Shield and is undoubtedly one of the most unmistakable cotingas, especially because of it’s incredible vocalisations which earns it the name cow or calf bird.

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Sloth Island Nature Resort Website: slothisland.com


Public Holidays

Friday, February 23rd - Republic Day

Events

FEBRUARY 2018

February 23 - Republic Day • Celebrations Nationwide The word Mashramani is derived from the Amerindian language and in translation means “the celebration of a job well done”. Mashramani, sometimes referred to as “Mash”, is observed on the 23 February - Guyana’s Republic Day - to commemorate the “Birth of the Republic”.

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F E B R February 16-17-18 - The Rupununi Music & Arts Festival 2018 The Rupununi Music & Arts Festival world music camping festival in 2018. The festival will take place at Manari Ranch, near Lethem in the Rupununi from 16th to 18th this year. Mark the dates in your diary.

February - Moraikabai Safari 5 • Georgetown to Morakabai Rainforest Tours The Safari starts in Linden and goes through a white sand savannah to the Arawak village of Moraikabai. In many places the sand is deep and this makes it very challenging, but more fun for Safari enthusiasts. Ending in Moraikaba, the only Amerindian Community in Region 5, makes for a unique and interesting destination especially for those more adventurous who want to try eating a Tacuma Worm washed down with a glass of homemade black potato “fly”.

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Christmas Falls –Painting

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Fort Nassau, Berbice River

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MARCH 2018

The stunning Guianan Cock-of-the-Rock is an amazing species most bird watchers wish to see in Guyana. It’s one of the most outrageous and beautiful birds in the Guianas.

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Arrowpoint Nature Resort Website: www.roraimaairways.com


Public Holidays

Friday, March 2nd - Phagwah Friday, March 30th - Good Friday

Events

MARCH 2018

March 2 - Phagwah • Phagwah Celebrations Nationwide Phagwah or Holi as it is commonly called is an annual Hindu Festival of Colours celebrating the arrival of Spring. This Festival was brought to Guyana by our East Indian foreparents who first came to Guyana some 180 years ago. Phagwah is said to be the most joyous and colourful of festivals and today has become a part of our national psyche and is celebrated by all Guyanese.

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March 30 - Good Friday March - Wedding Expo • Roraima Duke Lodge, Georgetown Guyana with its rich natural attractions is the perfect wedding tourism destination. Guyanese of all walks of life are expected to flock to Duke Lodge in Kingston, Georgetown for the 2018 edition of Wedding Expo. Wedding Expo will have everything that is needed for your special event

If there is one day that brings a noticeably quiet scene all around Guyana, it is Good Friday. It is traditionally a day when not many people are seen on the streets. Businesses usually close their doors on this day leaving shopping areas and town centres bare and desolate. Many attend church services throughout the day.

M A R C H

March 13 - Rose Hall Martyrs’ Day • Countrywide Observance In honor of the 15 sugar workers who met their death 105 years ago on March 13, 1913 at Rose Hall Estate

March 24-26 - Linden Expo & Trade Fair

Showcasing what the mining town of Linden is producing and a forum where micro and macro enterprises can meet and promote locally operating industries in manufacturing, agro processing and value added businesses. TO REGISTER AND FOR TICKETS CALL +592 444 2901/ 444-4057

March - The Pakaraima Mountain Safari • “An Adventure of a Lifetime” The Pakaraima Mountain Safari (PMS), the Adventure of a Lifetime, entails traveling via 4 X 4 vehicles across Guyana’s Administrative Regions 4,8,9 and 10, starting below sea level and reaching approximately 3,800 ft above sea level. The journey takes approximately 4-5 days through unfriendly terrain, covering over 600 miles, passing more than 25 Amerindian Villages before reaching its destination, Orinduik Falls on the Guyana / Brazil border.

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KAIETEUR FALLS OUR TRIP OF A LIFETIME

By, Norah and Kata Henry

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his past summer holiday, we took the trip of a lifetime. We couldn’t keep this experience to ourselves, and had to share with any who might be curious about whether a kid would really enjoy the trek to Kaieteur Falls. Sometimes traveling with kids can be tricky, but we are here to tell you-- it is worth it! Although we are American, we used to live in Guyana. We lived in Georgetown and we had many enjoyable times there going to nursery school and having awesome friends and adventures. We loved to watch the bats come out in the evening. We ate the world’s best mangoes and papaya. We even found an anaconda outside our house one day! While we were living in Guyana, we traveled around as much as we could. Our favorite place to explore was the Rupununi, where we couldn’t believe the caimans and anteaters! We have always thought that Guyana was an amazing place, and we missed so much about it when we moved to the USA in 2013. Fortunately for us, we have been able to come back to visit Guyana twice since we moved away. This past summer, we were lucky enough to discover a new, amazing sight-- Kaieteur Falls! We took off from Ogle airport one morning with ten other people. For about an hour, we flew in a small plane over the jungle of Guyana. There was an amazing sight out of our window: the beautiful green rain forest and fluffy white clouds. You can take pictures of the things you see from the airplane. After about an hour, you get your first glimpse of Kaieteur Falls! You won’t believe how huge it is!

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Once you get off the plane, your guide will greet you and you will start your hike. The trails we went on were to Johnson’s Overlook and Boy Scout Overlook. At our first two overlooks it was too misty to see the falls, but we saw so much more. We saw many frogs since it was the rainy season. Our guide even found a rare Golden Frog for us to see! It was small and yellow. We learned that it lives in the water in the tank bromeliad and eats mosquito larvae. Although we could not yet see the falls, the frogs were so cool! Finally, at our third and final stop, we saw Kaieteur Falls! What a beautiful sight. It was really cool and so far down that we couldn’t even see the bottom. It was non-stop flowing, fast water falling straight down into the biggest gorge we had ever seen. If you looked across the gorge you could see other water falls too, such as Old Man’s Beard.

After a while, we started our hike back to the airstrip, but our adventure was far from over. On the trail right after leaving the falls, we were so, so lucky to spot a Cockof-the-Rock! Cock-of-the-Rocks are majestic birds that look like bright orange chickens. The one we saw posed for us for several minutes while we admired him, before he flew off into the jungle. Back at the air strip, we were provided with a rest and some food and drinks. We soon took back off, but before heading towards Georgetown, our pilot flew down the Potaro River and right over the edge of Kaieteur Falls! Amazing! Flying home, we saw six rainbows in the clouds over the jungle. The sights we saw on our trip to Kaieteur Falls were like nothing we had ever seen before. What an adventure from start to finish. Any kid (and their family!) would be lucky to see Kaieteur Falls.


Kata’s “don’t forget to bring list” Camera Hat Sunscreen Snacks Water Bug spray Chewing gum for your ears on the plane

Golden Frog

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Cock of the Rock

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Former Clubber Gary Sway teaching a class

Conservation Warriors of the Rupununi Region By Waldyke Prince We are the Past, the Future and the Present – the Citizen Scientists of Yesteryears & Tomorrows. As our forefathers have done in the past, we will continue to do in the future. We are the youth of the Rupununi Savannas, the Environmental Warriors of Today and the Conservation Leaders of Tomorrow. We are “Wildlife Clubbers”!

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Grass-roots success stories are the beacon of hope the world over. Within a small unique region of Guyana with extraordinary biodiversity and multiplicity of habitats, as compared to the rest of the Guiana Shield, a conservation story of multiple facets, continues to unfold. This is the story of the Wildlife Clubs among the communities of the Savannahs in Southern Guyana, that started over a decade ago. The Wildlife Clubs of the North Rupununi started with the help of Iwokrama, the National Audubon Society and the North Rupununi District Development Board (NRDDB) in November 2001. At the end of 2003, there were 14 Wildlife Clubs in 14 communities, comprising approximately 400 students between the ages of 7 – 17 years.

The Wildlife Clubs are similar to the Environmental Clubs of urban schools, learning about environmental and social issues. But their distinction lies in their unique activities. Being a wildlife club member, not only teaches you about your environment and the interdependence of the ecosystems that you live in, but more importantly the intra & inter-club activities keeps traditional skills and culture vibrant. It also gives them a sense of ownership as the custodians of their natural resources, as their ancestors did for millennia’s past, and their generation will do for millenniums to come. Thus, the clubs’ monitoring of several natural resources have aided in the administration and decision-making process of


As the wildlife clubs grew, they had many mentors and special friends who guided them along the way. Some of these special friends included; Dr. Graham Watkins, Ricardo Stanoss, Uncle Sydney Allicock, Paulette Allicock, Vanda Radzick, Virgil Harding, Samantha James, Terence Brasche, Paul Nash, Wally Prince and the late Auntie Diane McTurk, from Karanambu. A special thank you goes out to several organisations, such as the NRDDB, Iwokrama International Centre, Conservation International– Guyana, WWF-Guianas, Jacksonville Zoo-USA and EPA-Guyana. In the deep south of Guyana, there is the South Rupununi Conservation Group which is doing remarkable conservation and re-

Natural Resource Management in their respective communities and for the Rupununi region in general. Wildlife club activities include environmental clean-ups of their communities and monitoring-surveys of birds, animals and plants. The most extensive monitoring program was on the birds. This has produced years of collected data which has helped some communities to develop their Nature-based & Community Tourism. Inter-club activities at the annual Wildlife Club Festivals include archery competition, Indigenous fire-lighting methods, basket weaving, arrow making, cotton spinning, cassava grating and many other games done in a humorous competitive way. This annual event, also brings awareness of the wildlife clubs to other parts of the country, as kids from other areas will attend this 2 to 3 day event. This has led to wildlife club festivals occurring in the Moruca community, in the North West of Guyana. Some of these children have grown up to become Village Toshoas (Chiefs), Doctors (MD), Flight Attendants, Forest Rangers, Biologists, Fabric Designers and incredible Indigenous Artists, Teachers and world-standard Tour Guides. So when you visit the Rupununi region in Guyana, your friendly, very knowledgeable guides were once wildlife club members, and can be termed as ‘the Ph.D.s of the Rainforest’.

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search work on several species of wildlife, including camera-trapping of Apex predators and monitoring the endangered Red Siskin. The Red Siskin is a species that was driven to extinction in Guyana through trapping for the song-bird trade, in the 80s and 90’. A small population was rediscovered in the South Rupununi, which led to the development of a monitoring program, and presently a conservation program. Due to this successful conservation effort, the Red Siskin has become one of the most important birdwatching attractions of the South Savannahs. Their work includes banding and monitoring of this special bird. This grass-roots conservation work is done by the Wapishana people of the South Rupununi, and had initially involved the mentorship from Davis Finch and NGOs such as Panthera and Conservation International-Guyana. There are many Wapishana champions that are working with the young people on these conservation projects, but special thanks to Asaph Wilson and Leroy Ignacio of Shulinab village.

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Another species of special mention is the critically endangered Sun Parakeet. This charismatic bird is only found in the Pakaraima Mountain hills and valleys near the indigenous community of Karasabai and over the Ireng River into Brazil. Almost wiped out by the bird trade because of its beautiful plumage it is now becoming another of the important bird species for Birdwatching Tourism and through its protection and conservation brings much needed income to the community. The future is now looking bright for this species which has even been spotted moving back into the nearby Savannahs So where will the future of the Rupununi Wildlife Clubbers lead? ….” Now dats a story fuh nex Time.”.. ! To know how you can help, you can contact Samantha James: sjames@iwokrama.org and Waldyke Prince: frogprince2010@ gmail.com.


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APRIL 2018

The Black-banded Owl is a striking species of owl found across a large area in Guyana and South America. The species is found in humid forest. This is a medium-sized owl and is relatively easy to see in Guyana.

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Hurakabra River Resort Website: www.hurakabra.com


Public Holidays

Monday, April 2nd - Easter Monday

Events

APRIL 2018

April 2 - Easter Monday • Easter Celebrations Nationwide There are many Easter traditions here in Guyana. Recently, we have begun the egg decorating and hunting for the colourful eggs, this is done mainly by the children. We bake cross buns on Holy Thursday, go to church for the entire Easter weekend: Holy Thursday, Good Friday, Holy Saturday and Easter Sunday. Easter Monday is our traditional kite flying day but weeks before this day arrives, kites are already dotting the sky. Schools hold kite making competitions and also have a special day for kite flying.

Bartica Easter Regatta • Celebrations Nationwide The Bartica Easter Regatta has been around for more than 60 years. It initially begun as a wager between two captains- of what was then ‘grant boats’- to see whose engine was the fastest. It has grown over the years from boat racing to include the Miss Regatta Pageant, the oldest pageant in Guyana. Sports such as cricket, football, and dominos, not to mention swimming and regular run Bartica races have also been added.

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A P R I

April - Lethem Rodeo • Triple R Arena, Lethem, Rupununi

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Easter weekend annually in Guyana sees the hosting of the Rupununi Rodeo at Lethem, the Guyana-Brazil border town in vacquero country where competition for vacquero supremacy runs high among the various ranches of the Rupununi region. Now a popular national event, the rodeo brings thousands by bus, SUVs, and even motorbikes thronging through the road corridor leading to Lethem, or by plane. From savannah country to jungle, the trip to the border community also promises to be a scenic treat. The Rupununi Rodeo held each year over the Easter weekend in Guyana continues to generate regional and international acclaim, and is the most popular inland sporting festival in the country.

April - Car & Bike Show • Lake Mainstay Resort All roads will lead to Lake Mainstay resort, Mainstay/Whyaka Village, Essequibo, for its annual Car and Bike Show and After. The event, which has been quite a success every year, is expected to be bigger and better with a number of categories added..In the Overall group, judging will be done for the best car, best SUV/ bus, best bike (small) and best superbike. In the Artwork group, prizes will be given for the best car, bus/ SUV and best bike, while in the Auto Internal group, prizes will be awarded for the best sound car, best sound SUV/bus, loudest sound car and loudest sound SUV/bus.

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People of Guyana

ALEX ARJOON

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EG: Alex, we would like to get an idea of your early upbringing and schools and how you think it influenced your later direction in life.

EG: So, then there was High School and of course the passion of playing Squash. What or who got you involved in playing Squash?

Alex: I always seemed to be in a hurry. My grandfather who delivered almost all the babies in our family and was expected to deliver me was at a medical conference overseas when I arrived two months early. I attended Marian Academy which certainly shaped me academically and morally and I had a great time with the usual school experiences. I was blessed with a mother that was committed to environmental advocacy and she was determined that my sister and I would be exposed to it at an early age. As a result, we were there with her on her expeditions all over Guyana. Up and down the rivers and mountains, across the savannahs of southern Guyana where I learnt so much. One memorable and painful lesson was at Kyk-Over-Al where we were looking at the ruins of a Dutch Fortress in the Essequibo. I was getting out of the boat without my slippers and my mom told me to put them on. I did not pay attention as I was too excited and paid the price. The island was covered with thorny bushes and it took several hours to get them all out of my feet. Needless to say, I never did that again. Lesson learned. I had a wonderful childhood and spent more time outdoors which ingrained a love of nature at an early age. Kids today seem to spend so much time on their phones and computers that I don’t think they are aware of how much they are missing out.

Alex: My Uncle Roger, a National and Caribbean squash champ was instrumental in my starting to play at six years old. I followed in his footsteps and won the National and Caribbean Championships which was instrumental in me furthering my studies in the United States at schools which were looking for squash talent. I attended Franklyn and Marshall College and became captain of our team which taught me a lot about leadership and team work. I remain an active player and am proud to be Guyana’s Senior National Champ for the past two years and just participated in the Caribbean Championship in St Vincent where I reconnected with a lot of old friends so I have come full circle. EG: What was it like being from Guyana in an American school? Alex: At first, I felt very out of place and missed Guyana terribly, especially in the winter which made me really look forward to coming home during school breaks. However, after the strictness of the Guyana schools the liberty of choosing what I wanted to study was amazing. Every class was a discussion where my opinion mattered. As my love for and pride in Guyana grew I would share my photographs and videos with my friends. But this was a double-edged sword because after college I decided I wanted to play professional squash and earn money as a pro.


board for a lot of my ideas. I can always count on them for critical and productive review and feedback and this was instrumental in my development as an amateur producer. EG: Did Guyana give you that purpose and security you were craving? Alex: Not at first as it was challenging to find my way through a system that was very different to what I took for granted in the USA. I couldn’t even find equipment that I needed. But I had a sense of belonging and wanted to share my knowledge so I approached a local TV station and asked if I could write a show on gender equality. I knew my mother would be very happy with that. It was a great success and I am now in production for season three. Now I am travelling on my own all across the length and breadth of Guyana taking video and drone footage. I am meeting the most incredible persons you can imagine. From the tremendous feedback I am receiving I know that I am making a difference and that gives me the most satisfaction. EG: But you also worked on other projects or was that later?

EG: So, what made you change your mind about playing in a professional league in the States. Alex: I was fortunate to secure a job as a squash coach at a very elite country club which was financially rewarding and which gave me the liberty to also participate in professional tournaments. However, whilst I enjoyed coaching and playing I felt unfulfilled. I really felt that I needed a higher purpose. My parents said the decision was mine and mine alone. So even though I had started the process for a work visa I decided to return home. Needless to say some of my friends and family couldn’t understand nor agreed with my decision but it is one that I never regretted. EG: And you came back to Guyana and how did you end up in photography and videography? Alex: My parents and particularly my mother played a very important part. My mother was always behind a camera and my sister and I would sometimes “borrow” her camera and do our home movies. Imagine her pleasant surprise when quite recently she was looking for some of her older Shell Beach footage but came across an improvised concert that we had recorded when we were barely eight and six years old. During my last year in college several members of the squash team visited Guyana during spring break and I took them all over the country. One of them recorded everything we did on a Go Pro camera and when we returned to college we decided to produce a video to promote the beauty of Guyana to other students who may become interested in experiencing it for themselves. I had also done several courses in writing and poetry which I enjoyed tremendously and this was instrumental in releasing some of my previously unknown creativity. In our family we discuss any and everything and they are my sounding

Alex: The World Wildlife Fund was very generous in providing me with an opportunity to accompany one of their professional videographers on a one week production in the Rupununi and I learnt a lot. I then attended an Education for Sustainable Development workshop which was hosted by the Ministry of Education and they asked me to produce a Public Service Announcement video and we were both happy with the end result. We are now having discussions on some production for their STEM programme. I was then approached by Iwokrama to produce a documentary which was shared on social media and was well received. This was then followed by Conservation International Guyana asking me to produce their UR Nature campaign which really whetted my appetite to do more environmental awareness productions. Having the opportunity to collaborate with and work for such clients has not only given me immense satisfaction but also developed a passion to do more in this niche market. I am now travelling independently and most recently I spent time in the south of Guyana in the Rupununi and collected some amazing footage of the Lodges such as Rewa and Surama and the more remote south savannahs around Dadanawa. EG: And so, we come to your new company ‘Reel Guyana’. Where do you see yourself in five years or should I say your company ‘Reel Guyana’? Alex: In five years time I see myself being self sufficient with all the skills that are necessary for productions from the bottom up. I also see “Reel Guyana” being the leader with the most impressive archive of video footage of Guyana from East to West, North to South and in every season for every reason. I already have a Drone and the footage from above is just amazing and this is being supplemented by Go Pro Cameras on helicopters. People are always asking how I know what is the perfect moment to take a picture. My answer is that I had no professional training but I am blessed to live in Guyana where I come across the most amazing people who happen to have the most incredible landscapes in their backyards. This gives me the opportunity to capture those special photographs and video. People think you have to look for the perfect moment. That hardly ever happens to me, and the editing is where the real magic happens for me. It is where the ideas come together. EG: Alex thank you so much for your time and just keep on doing what you do. You are making Guyana a better place. Alex: Thank you so much for this opportunity to share some perspectives on who I am and where I want to go.

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MAY 2018

The Guianan Trogon is one of many birds

that is targeted on all birding trips in Guyana. This species is also called the Violaceous Trogon.

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Atta Rainforest Lodge (CATS) Website: www.iwokramacanopywalkway.com


Public Holidays

Tuesday, May 1st - Labour Day Saturday, May 5th - Indian Arrival Day Saturday, May 26th - Independence Day

Events MAY 2018

May 3- Portuguese Arrival Day • Celebrations Nationwide Guyana celebrates ‘Portuguese Arrival Day’ on 3rd May to acknowledge the achievements of the descendants of immigrants of Portuguese origin and their contribution to nation-building. Portuguese indentured immigration was started in anticipation of an expected labour shortage on the sugar plantations consequent to the emancipation of enslaved Africans. Thirty thousand six hundred and forty five (30,645) Portuguese from the Azores, Brazil, Cape Verde and Madeira came to British Guiana during the period of state-assisted immigration between 1841 and 1882.

May 5- Indian Arrival Day • Celebrations Nationwide In Guyana, the holiday is celebrated commemorating the first arrival of indentured labourers from India, on May 5th 1838. On this day, the workers arrived in Guyana to work in sugar plantations. Their descendants today comprise 44 percent of Guyana’s population of over 750,000. E X P L O R E

Indian Heritage Monument Georgetown

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M A May - Mother & Daughter Pageant • National Cultural Centre, Home Stretch Avenue, Georgetown

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Flag Raising Ceremony at Durban Park Georgetown

May 26 - Independence Day • Celebrations Nationwide The Cooperative Republic of Guyana annually observes Independence Day on May 26. This holiday celebrates the anniversary of the declaration of independence from Great Britain in 1966. Guyana was first seen by Christopher Columbus in 1489, but the Dutch were the first to establish three colonies: Essequibo, Berbice and Demerara. The British assumed permanent control over the Dutch colonies in 1803, but the territory was formally ceded only in 1814. During the British rule Guyana became known as British Guiana.

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Prince Harry Visits Guyana

By: Greg Quinn British High Commissioner to Guyana

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rom the 2nd to 4th of December 2016 it was the British High Commission’s privilege to host His Royal Highness Prince Henry of Wales (better known as Prince Harry), on the first official visit to Guyana by a member of the Royal Family since 2004. What a visit this was for both the UK and Guyana. It showcased Guyana in a wonderful way. For nearly three days Guyana was in the world’s news. The visit trended number 1 on Twitter – a first as far as I can ascertain for this country. And as more than one person told me, the press coverage was priceless. This was a visit which included both formal and informal activities. Meeting His Excellency the President and other members of the Government, opposition, business community and civil society was a prelude to taking Prince Harry into the hinterland.

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The day of arrival was the formal day. The day to meet His Excellency the President, to pay respects to the war dead at the Commonwealth War Graves in Eve Leary, to lay a wreath at the Independence Arch, and to attend an official reception at my Residence. But on arrival, when we were departing the airport, Prince Harry noticed a little girl at the side of the road with a t-shirt bearing his picture. So we stopped and she greeted the Prince and presented him with some flowers. What a perfect way to arrive in Guyana. I hope the pictures that little girl’s mother took that day are treasured for years to come. Then came the second day. On a beautifully sunny Saturday, accompanied by Vice President Allicock, the delegation set off by air to travel to Surama, Fairview, Iwokrama and Kaieteur. Without a doubt the Prince was in his element and this day became a highlight of the visit.


On arrival at Surama the Prince received a traditional welcome from the Toshao, village elders, children and the choir from the Bina Hill Academy. He was introduced to some traditional dancing and was presented with a chief’s headdress before heading off to Surama school and on a tour of the village (which included the visitor lodge). Comparisons were quickly made to pictures of the Prince’s father, Prince Charles, wearing a similar headdress during an earlier visit.

Next stop saw us fly into Fairview. A stop at the school and a quick meeting with the Toshao preceded a visit to the Iwokrama Research Centre (whose Patron is Prince Charles). There the Prince was briefed on the vital work undertaken by the Centre to ensure the survival of unique forest flora and fauna. He then met Sankar the resident Black Caiman under the watchful gaze of his staff (and myself) to ensure he didn’t get too close!

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When he met the children at Surama and Fairview schools the Prince undertook some impromptu lessons. And whilst the kids started off being a little shy they soon warmed to their new teacher as he ran them through some basic mathematics and English.

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The final leg of this spectacular day was a trip to the majestic Kaieteur Falls. As with every first time visitor the Prince could not help but be in awe of this spectacular site. Countless pictures were taken whilst the Prince was given a guided tour by Omar, one of the resident tour guides. It is hard to describe how beautiful the falls were on this day. And although the water was a little low (it was December after all) that did not detract from the beauty of the view. Nothing could. The third and final day allowed Prince Harry to see the charity and advocacy work undertaken by the Government and members of the public. We took the opportunity to introduce Prince Harry to the important work the First Lady is undertaking to combat the abuse of women. At a reception at State House he met some women and girls who had been subject to some horrific abuse. But despite this abuse they were determined to move forward, bring their children up in loving environments, and show the men who had abused them what they were capable of. The Prince was clearly touched by what he heard, but more importantly impressed by the spirit he saw in everyone. Prince Harry also met the kids at the Joshua House Orphanage. Many had questions such as ‘What is it like to be a Prince?’ (that is apparently a frequently asked question). The smiles on the faces of everyone (including the Prince himself) is a memory which will remain with me. I will never forget watching the Prince sitting on a chair surrounded by all of the kids, several climbing all over him as he answered their questions. As we left Joshua House the Prince was greeted by members of the public, several of whom had been in the crowd when Her Majesty The Queen last visited in 1994.


Sadly all good things come to an end. So it was with the Prince’s visit. We waved him off at Eugene F Correia Airport with suitable pomp and ceremony (just as on arrival), thanks to the support, and music, of the Guyana Defence Force. Little did we realise that months later the impact of the visit would continue. With the support of members of the Private Sector Commission, 33 children from Joshua House visited Kaieteur in April 2017. I will be bringing footballs to Surama and Fairview schools to follow-up on the promises of Prince Harry to the kids

there. People still talk to me about the visit. It was clearly a wonderful experience for the Prince and one which he will remember for a long time. For me it was the first Royal Visit I have been on the receiving end of in 22 years in the Foreign and Commonwealth Office. So personally it was something I will always cherish. Overall it was a memorable experience for all at the High Commission who put so much effort into ensuring the visit went well. Hopefully we won’t have to wait so long for the next such visit!

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JUNE 2018

The Green-tailed Jacamar is restricted to

the Guiana Shield, from which region the Rufous-tailed Jacamar (Galbula ruficauda) is largely absent, these two species possess very similar plumage.

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Caiman House Field Station & Lodge Website: www.rupununilearners.org


Events

JUNE 2018 J U N

June - Linden River-Front Festival

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Linden River-Front Festival, will meet everyone’s expectations, given the plethora of exciting, entertaining, informal, upbeat and family-oriented activities they have planned for the various venues along the river-front. Those activities range from cycle races and parades, fishing competitions, market day and plant sale, regatta, breakfast for the elderly, swimming competitions, cricket competitions, a film festival, church services, a river-front development discussion, and a ‘Main Big River Lime’.

June 22-July 1 - Restaurant Week Guyana Restaurant Week is a culinary celebration of the best and most delicious restaurants in Guyana. During this ten-day promotion participating restaurants offer an exclusive menu at a significantly reduced price! Lunch at $2,000 and Dinner at either $4,000 or $5,000 per person.

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The Diane McTurk Scholarship

By Salvador de Caires

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iane McTurk was way ahead of her time. She was a feminist before there was feminism. She was a conservationist long before the word was invented and she was a humanist until the day she died. Diane was born at Karanambu, North Rupununi and lived there until she was six when she and her sister were sent to Georgetown for school. She always said her parents thought she was growing up too wild what with running around naked in the rain, one of her

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most cherished childhood passions. From Georgetown, she went to school in England and there met a young and dashing David Attenborough. She thought he was the most handsome man she had ever seen. Her parents had met David in the Rupununi, and had mentioned that their daughters were at school in England. He promised to check up on them and in fact did. He called the head mistress inviting the girls to lunch. It was the beginning of a long and wonderful friendship. After University, she spent some time travelling on the continent with friends and ended up as the press agent for the Savoy Group of Companies in London. Around the time of Independence in Guyana, she said she came to the realization that she had to decide which side of the Atlantic she wanted to live on. Karanambu kept calling and she finally gave in and moved back home permanently. That she was a pioneer in tourism and hospitality goes without saying. She always said, “Just because we live in the bush does not mean that we forget our manners�. She always insisted on serving hot milk for coffee and cold milk for tea and never, ever would allow powder milk on the table. There was brown sugar for coffee and white sugar for tea. She checked each of the cabins before the guests arrived to make sure all was perfect, and again as they were leaving to ensure that no one had forgotten anything. Tourists arrived as guests and left as friends.


things became more difficult, when some would ask what they should bring she replied “cash would be good”. And so, she started Karanambu Lodge as an Eco Tourism destination. She became the famous ‘Otter Lady’ quite by chance when some friends arrived at Christmas with a cardboard box making odd noises. Inside were baby giant river otters. She gave them hell for removing the babies from their holt! But when asked if she would like one, her rage disappeared and she instantly fell in love. She said she would love one, how about two. And so, her mission for the next thirty years was decided. The first otter was “Frankie”, short for Frankincense a kingly gift at Christmas. Over the years she raised and cared for fifty giant river otters. Some were real orphans and some she rescued from the animal trade. Some were runts abandoned by their parents. Raising otters is no easy task. It takes about three years for them to be able to look after themselves. Their pens have to be kept clean which is a very smelly task. They only eat fish and lots of it. She would employ a fisherman to catch fish for them. Their favorite was always Piranha which they eat head first. Many times, a local fisherman would complain that her otter had stolen his catch from his boat and Diane would pay him. She was completely devoted to her “beloved beasts” as she called them, and spoiled them terribly so much so that a few became jealous and visitors had to be careful how they approached her when she was tending to them.

Tourism at Karanambu was an afterthought, Initially, she was a balata concessionaire like her Father who set up his Balata collecting station at Karanambu in the 1920’s. Then she became a “real live South American Cowgirl” when her father got into cattle. With the decline in the cattle industry after the Rupununi uprising in 1969 and the two subsequent outbreaks of foot and mouth disease she turned to tourism. She had always entertained her friends at Karanambu. They would bring her “lavish gifts” of red wine, dark chocolate or other unattainable special treats. As

But her love of animals was not confined to otters. She had every pet one can imagine, from Tapirs to Giant Anteaters, Capybara to Jabiru Storks. They all were nurtured until they could go back to the wild. She did not keep them in cages unless for their own protection. The stories are endless, but I will save them for another day. Diane’s role as a conservationist went beyond protection of the environment and the animals to protecting the people of the Rupununi who she loved so dearly. She always stressed the importance of education. “Education is power” she would say. When she passed away in December, 2016 the Tourism and Hospitality Association of Guyana created the Diane McTurk Scholarship at the University of Guyana to celebrate her remarkable life. This scholarship is designated for a student from the hinterland to attend the University of Guyana, with a major in tourism and a minor in environmental studies. Through the generous support of the University, The Guyana Tourism Authority, The Tourism and Hospitality Association, The National Trust and The Ministry of Indigenous People’s Affairs this was made a reality. I know that Diane would be so happy and can just see her smiling and laughing and wanting to know who are we choosing to be awarded this scholarship.

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Educational Tourism Budding scientists feed off nature in Guyana’s rainforest By Carinya Sharples

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hen students arrive in Guyana’s interior to join the Operation Wallacea (Opwall) scientific research programme, it can be slightly terrifying. “For a lot of people it’s the first time they’ve ever been in a tropical rainforest,” says Hannah O’Sullivan, a Senior Herpetologist for Opwall Guyana. “Plus, working at night – out in this mysterious, dark forest – can be a really scary experience.” But everyone soon settles in and their vision adjusts to spot caiman eyes glinting on the river at night, a snake in the undergrowth, or a spider spinning a web.

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Aimed at high school and university students, the annual programme in Guyana is one of 15 Opwall projects found in 14 countries worldwide. Participants begin the trip at Iwokrama River Lodge, a well-established research centre and tranquil tourist retreat in Guyana’s vast rainforest. At Iwokrama’s central ‘field station’, students receive safety tips and short lectures from the experts, before venturing out into the surrounding rainforest and savannah to assist researchers with vital biodiversity surveys. “We’ve collected information at the same sites every year since 2011 so we can look at trends, which are important for Iwokrama’s Monitoring Programme,” explains Raquel Thomas-Caesar, Director of Resource Management and Training at Iwokrama.

Practical tasks could include anything from helping hang bird and bat nets, to setting dung-beetle traps where the bait is, er, human excrement (apparently freshness is key). Not to mention camera traps and sound recorders to capture everything from tree frogs to jaguars. Some of the sites surveyed are remote, but others are accessible to all tourists visiting Iwokrama and Surama Village: such as Turtle Mountain with its amazing views and the not-for-vertigo-sufferers Canopy Walkway in the Forest and Rock Landing in Surama. For students like Sam Crawshaw, a third year Natural Sciences student at Cambridge University, the Opwall Guyana programme


offered a way to have a go at being a field scientist in his summer holidays: “Most people [on my course] were doing 12 weeks in a lab, which seemed really boring so I did three weeks in a lab and then this – so I’m kind of seeing the two ends of what you could do if you stick with biology.” The make-up of the camp is always an international affair; foreign students, scientists and experts working alongside Guyanese scientists, Iwokrama rangers and community experts – everyone sharing their knowledge, making connections and learning from each other. The project is coordinated by Opwall Guyana Country Manager (and US Director) Scott Sveiven, but local partnerships are key to its success says Scott: “We have a really good relationship with Iwokrama and Surama Village and the fact that we take on University of Guyana interns I think is really, really cool.” “It’s all about building this network of friendships globally,” adds Kenneth Butler, who hails from Surama and provides support with logistics – and ‘herps’ (herpetology). “From an indigenous perspective, I think the spreading of culture and the closeness that we share with our land, the animals and the forest as well, that’s one of the key aspects.” For Arianne Harris, a Biology student at the University of Guyana, being an intern with Opwall Guyana was an amazing chance to explore life beyond the capital, Georgetown. “There’s a complete difference in reading about it and actually seeing it,” she enthuses. “The jungle humbles you and it makes you appreciate a lot of things that you would otherwise take for granted.” A year after joining as an intern, Arianne returned to Opwall Guyana as a junior scientist and is making good use of her new skills at university: “In third year, we have a lot of field trips so this –prepping, gearing up, being in the jungle, setting up a hammock– will really come in handy”.

And where better to learn all about Guyana’s rich ecology than in the middle of it? “I feel like students ask you questions that they wouldn’t otherwise do in a lecture theatre, because you’re around all the time – and they don’t have to ask you in front of everyone,” says Hannah. Plus you’re unlikely to find a beautiful Rainbow Boa slinking through the average classroom… Further reading and enquiries www.opwall.com www.iwokrama.org www.iwokramariverlodge.com www.iwokramacanopywalkway.com

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Giant Anteater with baby

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Manatees If you have never seen a Manatee, you need to pay a visit to the National Park in Georgetown. There are quite a few of them in one of the ponds and you can easily get them to come to you by getting a clump of grass and shaking it in the water. The story goes that sailors thought they were women and so the legend of mermaids was born. Obviously, they were at sea a long time without seeing any women and maybe also a ‘tot’ or two of Rum had helped their imagination. The West Indian Manatee is also called a sea cow. They are very gentle creatures and are easily scared and will swim away so move slowly and they will let you feed them grass for awhile.


Jabiru Stork feeding young

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JULY 2018

The Musician’s Wren (Cyphorhinus arada) One of the most beautiful voices when signing in the forest, a real musician indeed. Hence the name!

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Karanambu Lodge Inc. Website: www.karanambutrustandlodge.org/


Public Holidays

Monday, July 2nd - CARICOM Day

Events

JULY 2018

July 2nd- CARICOM DAY CARICOM stands for the “Caribbean Community,” an organization established on July 4, 1973, for the purpose of supporting a common market, coordinating foreign policy, and promoting cooperation among the 15 member states of the Caribbean: Antigua and Barbuda, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Dominica, Grenada, Guyana, Haiti, Jamaica, Montserrat, St. Kitts-Nevis, St. Lucia, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Suriname, and Trinidad and Tobago.

Local Circuit Motor Racing • South Dakota Circuit, Timehri, EBD Top local drivers and riders will converge at the South Dakota Circuit in July when the Guyana Motor Racing and Sports Club presents its National Race of Champions meet for 2018. The activity is set to once again pit all the leading daredevils on one track, gunning for the top podium spot in their respective category.

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“

Its brewery fresh taste is enjoyed by all and stamps its presence as the standard by which Guyanese recognise and appreciate quality and Brewery

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Have fun in

Freshness.

�

Country

Please drink responsibly. 18 and over.


Moruca Expo • Region 1 “If you have a soft spot for crabmeat and crabs in the various Indigenous Peoples’ and Guyanese cuisine, then it’s your time to take time off and enjoy the warmth and friendliness of the Lokono, Warau and Carib people of Moruca.You can even head off to Warapoka Village to see the Harpy Eagle and its nest or go fishing in the Baramanni and Waini Rivers; with great scenery and lots to do during your stay, you are bound to leave with lasting memories!”

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Kurupukari Crossing Essequibo

Savannah Drive The Savannah Drive is truly an amazing adventure and it promotes adventure tourism in Guyana. It is about linking communities through sports and heritage celebrations. It opens up the Savannah to locals and tourists, creating lasting relationships with Savannah communities. The drive takes participants along scenic landscape, including undisturbed Savannah lands, rain forest, sandy and muddy terrain with natural springs and creeks and relics of the past. It’s described as a true off road adventure.

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People of Guyana

MICHAEL LAM EG: What was it that got you hooked on photography? MICHAEL: I believe it was going into the Rupununi and seeing the Savannahs and the Pakaraimas. A group of us went in around Easter to go to the Rodeo in Lethem. This was around 2005. I was so awed and wanted to show others what I was seeing. I had a small point and shoot camera, and took many photos but while they were photos of what was there, they were not showing what I was seeing. I had to learn more, practice more to be able to convey what I was seeing to others. EG: So how did you progress? MICHAEL: Well I have always been around cameras. In 2010 a group of us, family and friends, chartered a plane to go to Kaieteur. I had been there once before, and I think I can never tire of seeing it, or being there. I had just gotten access to my very first DSLR Camera, but I had no idea how to use the camera properly, having mostly used point and shoot cameras up to then. Once again the pictures did not match what I was seeing, I was better, but I still had much more to learn. Photography is a funny sort of Art. It is about getting what your eye sees not what your brain is telling you it is seeing. There is a difference. You have to concentrate on getting what your Eyes saw, or what it was in the scene that caught your attention in the first place. E X P L O R E G U Y A N A

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EG: And what came next? MICHAEL: I suppose you could say my preferences got in the way. I try not to edit pictures, I process them. I don’t usually change a picture like taking out power lines, if and when I do I always own up to it. As a photographer, I use Lightroom not Photoshop for my photos. I felt it was dishonest to change a photo without acknowledging it. I may alter the light but I do not add or subtract elements in the frame. I am showing you what is there, but I am showing it how I see it. I also realized through personal experience that when you have a group of people taking pictures of the same thing that everyone comes up with different pictures. Everyone has a different eye.


EG: You talk about your principles and the integrity in your pictures. Where did all of this lead you.

EG: And finally what do you say to kids today with their phone cameras?

MICHAEL: Again it was a combination of things. Photography is an expensive hobby. Plane trips to the interior are expensive but people want your pictures for free. Eventually I stopped doing the Tourist thing and started focusing on the Art of photography and Photography as Art instead. I always loved going to the Seawall. I love the lines of the mudflats when the tide is out and the line of the wall itself. I would spend hours walking along the wall and the beach and just playing with the different lines. And of course I played with black and white a lot as this lends to texture and shape more in my eyes. Black and white to me was much harder, but more rewarding when you can get it right.

MICHAEL: There is so much you can do with phones these days. I always tell people, that its not the camera (device) but the person that matters, learn as much as you can about what it can (and cannot) do and be creative within its limits. Cameras on phones are amazing these days, and getting better, the sensor size is still a limitation, that can usually be seen in the size of possible prints, but it won’t stop you being creative. My advice? Read, chat, learn, experiment, mimic others in learning but find your own way to express yourself.

EG: And this of course led to an exhibition or two. MICHAEL: Yes, my first was at Castellani House in 2012, Coastal Wanderings with friend and fellow photographer Nikhil Ramkarran. It was a first for Guyana in a way, we were the first Guyanese photographers who were not named Bobby Fernandes to have an exhibition there. The introduction of the Guyana Visual Arts Competition and Exhibition was a huge boost to Art in Guyana and especially to Photography in 2012. In 2014 and 2017 the exhibition was also very successful but more importantly was that the younger talents coming up are seizing their opportunities. I think they will pass me very soon, some already have. And that is how it should be. Also it is challenging me to keep moving forward and to keep going outside the box. EG: So what are you doing these days to keep yourself engaged and excited. MICHAEL: I have not taken any proper camera photos in over a year. I have started an Instagram project that keeps me thinking, using the limitations of the phone camera and the IG app to be creative.

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AUGUST 2018

The Jabiru Stork is a huge prehistoriclooking stork. The best time to see large groups is when the ponds are shrinking in the Rupununi Savannahs at the begining of the dry season.

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Baganara Island Resort Website: www.baganara.net


Events

Public Holidays

AUGUST 2018

Wednesday, August 1st - Emancipation Day Wednesday, August 22nd - Eid-ul-Adha

CPL Cricket

Bartica Summer Regatta 18th Lake Mainstay Regatta

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297A Thomas Street, South Cummingsburg, Georgetown, Guyana 592 226 9126 226 6300 cyrilstaxiservice.8@gmail.com

Classic International Hotel & Suites

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Bartica Safari Off Road

The Bartica 4 x 4 Safari, is an expedition that allows tourists to view some of the country’s beautiful scenery, as the new route will pass through Regions Four, Five Seven and Ten.

Wakenaam Night The introduction of WAKENAAM NIGHT was meant to encourage Guyanese to visit Wakenaam, to bolster domestic tourism, and to create awareness of what Wakenaam has to offer. The event also serves as an expo. Thousands flock to the ground on an island with a population of less than 4000 persons, that is bigger than Barbados. The chutney and soca performances are captivating, as hundreds take their best dance moves to the front of the stage.

Jamzone Week of Activities

The event will take the form of a May fair and will include the popular Maypole plaiting by members of the Gold Rush Dance Troupe out of the East Coast of Demerara. In addition, there will be over $500,000 to be won in games and other activities that will be at the beach jam. Another feature this year will be a Jamzone Jingle competition where the not so recognised artistes can submit a jingle and these will be played on BOOM FM during a special segment. During this segment, the public will have an opportunity to vote for their favourite jingle and the top three winners will have a chance to perform at the Jamzone Beach Party.

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Miss Renaissance Pagent

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The Miss Renaissance Pageant will be held in August, with 11 professional women competing for the coveted title. The delegates will be introduced to the media in a sashing ceremony at the National Cultural Centre. The pageant serves as a catalyst to re-educate the public about inner beauty, creativity, cultural awareness and accomplishments of the mature Guyanese woman, 30 years and older.

Eid-ul-Adha

Naya Zamana Naya Zamana is the annual dance production of the Guyana Hindu Dharmic Sabha. It is an opportunity for students of the Dharmic Sanskritik Kendra, who are taught free of charge in Kathak and other dance styles, to showcase what they have learnt.

Eid-ul-Adha ‘Feast of the Sacrifice’, also called the “Sacrifice Feast”. It honors the willingness of Ibrahim (Abraham) to sacrifice his son, as an act of obedience to God’s command. Before Abraham sacrificed his son, God provided a male goat to sacrifice instead. In commemoration of this, an animal is sacrificed and divided into three parts: one third of the share is given to the poor and needy; another third is given to relatives, friends and neighbors; and the remaining third is retained by the family.

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G T Motorsports

Karting for Everyone

By Avenash Ramzan

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ocated in the heart of Georgetown, in the compound of the Guyana Motor Racing and Sports Club, GT Motorsports is the brainchild of Group Four race car driver, motor-racing fanatic and businessman, Vishok Persaud. Opened in 2016, racing at the facility has rapidly become a staple among motor-racing buffs. Barriers have been broken with the introduction of the first-ever go-kart rental, which taps into unchartered territories, attracting a new target group of persons who previously never ventured close to motor-racing. GT Motorsports provides entertainment to persons of all ages, as well as a safe outlet in which adrenaline and healthy competitiveness can be experienced. As the nursery for Motorsport, go-karting also offers a way in which professional racing skills can be birthed and developed. From simply renting and driving for recreation, many have been motivated and encouraged to not only compete, but also finish on the podium at the Endurance Rental Cup and Georgetown Grand Prix- GT Motorsports’ signature racing events. And don’t believe it’s for the older folks only. In giving an overview of the Georgetown Grand Prix, Persaud pointed to the deliberate attempt to identify, expose and develop a young cadre of drivers through age group racing.

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The refurbished track at GMR&SC has led to a resurgence in gokart racing, with dozens of boys and girls, some as young as six years old, using the opportunity to get involved in the sport. TOURIST ATTRACTION GT Motorsports provides the ideal spot for tourists and locals wishing to experience high speed rivalry in a safe, comfortable and welcoming environment.

Famous cricketers Reyad Emrit and Rashid Khan at the track

Rent a kart, get signed up, be entered into the database and try to record the fastest lap time on the track. Before you know it you’re the proud holder of a GT Motorsports Race Licence. Safety is paramount; hence you have a wide range of colourful helmets to choose from before you start that engine. If you’re just there for relaxation, you can play your favourite virtual reality games, in a fully air-conditioned lounge. The concession area is the perfect warm-down after a heated session on the track, your preferred ice cold beverage or snack is there for the asking. Open Tuesdays to Sundays from 14:00h to 21:00h (2pm to 9pm), this state-of-the-art facility is your home away from home; it’s the escape of the hustle and bustle of down-town Georgetown, so add it as an item on your bucket list, and come and hone your skills.


You will be happy to see your name added to some famous visitors, among them the Guyana Amazon Warriors players Rashid Khan, Rayad Emrit, Steven Katwaroo and Roshon Primus. “It was a really nice experience. It’s an adrenaline rush. You start off slow, but when you get into it, it keeps you going, so it’s very exciting and I’m sure I’ll be back here again,” Emrit said after his maiden drive on the track. “I really enjoyed it. It was my first time and it’s really fantastic here and it feels good to beat him (Emrit). We had a really good race and hopefully we’ll come again,” Khan said after winning his race with Emrit. FAMILY ATMOSPHERE If you’re not into the on-track daredevilry then you can just watch the action from the balcony while enjoying some “cutters” from the GT Motorsports snack bar, or you can rent the private hall to host your parties, social events or conferences. RENEWED SPOTLIGHT The surge in attention and renewed spotlight on the sport did not escape the attention of President Rameez Mohamed, who said, “I think that the GT Motorsports facility is the perfect nurturing ground for upcoming racers and also serves as a means of practice for current racers. The GMR&SC, which is currently an active FIA member, gives us the authority to issue FIA certified licences to all racers. Also being the sanctioning body for motor-racing in Guyana, we will be providing trained FIA Marshalls and a full safety team at every event hosted by GT Motorsports.”

Group Four driver Kevin Jeffrey has also praised Persaud’s investment in the sport, noting that motor-racing can only benefit from his contribution. “I think we should all thank Vishok Persaud for having the vision to invest in a facility like this. I envy these youngsters for what they have here- in our days we never had anything close to this, and the talent I’m already seeing from you guys…I want you to enjoy the journey, enjoy the racing,” Jeffrey intimated. Feel free to contact GT Motorsports on it’s Facebook page or call 600-7555

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SEPTEMBER 2018

The Harpy Eagle is the largest and most

powerful raptor in the Americas. It inhabits tropical lowland rainforests. Destruction of its natural habitat has caused it to vanish from many parts of its former range, however in Guyana our populations are expanding.

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Rewa Eco Lodge Website: www.rewaecolodge.com/


Indigenous Heritage Month Education Month

Events

SEPTEMBER 2018

Indigenous Heritage Month

Heritage Celebrations that aim to affirm and preserve Indigenous customs, language and traditions by showcasing the works, literature, and art of Amerindians. The one-month celebration every September has increasingly attracted local and international interest and attention as more and more Guyanese become increasingly aware of the contributions of the Indigenous Peoples in the Arts and Development.

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SEE WHAT’S GRILLING AT OMG!

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ARAWAK STEAKHOUSE Sheriff St. & Campbell Avenue | Georgetown Tel: 227-8839/227-8840 | omg@banksdih.com www.facebook.com/OMGRestaurant All major credit cards accepted. Reservations recommended. Dress Code: Elegantly Casual

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S Education Month

E P T E M B E R

Nereid’s Yacht Rally

The Nereid’s Rally was born when Italian sailor, David Matelicani, in sailing up the Essequibo River in 2011, met with Kit Nascimento, joint owner of Hurakabra River Resort with his wife Gem. Matelicani, who had already started a Marina in Saint Laurent, immediately saw the potential for developing a marina in the Essequibo River, and as such, work started to have the rally here in Guyana. The visiting yacht crews will be given the opportunity to visit Guyana’s Kaieteur Falls and other hinterland tourism attractions, as well as a day in Georgetown. The rally will depart to its final destination, via Suriname, at Saint Laurent on the Maroni River in French Guiana for an elaborate welcome by the Mayor of the town, complete with Trinidad and Tobago steel band.

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COMMUNITY BASED

TOURISM

Surama Eco Lodge

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he Hinterland of Guyana is made up of a series of sparsely populated settlements and Amerindian communities over a massive area of land that encompasses rainforests and savannah in some of the most biologically diverse areas in the world. The Amerindian communities are small villages of 200 to 1,500 people who rely mainly on subsistence farming. Here the overwhelming concern is employment. Many men migrate to earn an income in extractive industries like gold mining and timber harvesting. In some communities, the migration rate is as high as 80%, leaving behind the challenges of neglected farms, families with absentee husbands & fathers. In many cases the promised economic returns are not realized by the returning hard working men for various reasons. There is a desperate need for alternative income. Tourism has become the largest and fastest growing industry, in

Ariana

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terms of the number of people it employs. Eco Tourism is also more importantly a sustainable and green industry, that helps to preserve not only the eco-systems, but also the indigenous culture as well.

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COMMUNITY TOURISM provides the unique opportunity for Indigenous Communities to own and operate their own business as a community. Each Indigenous community owns their own lands which they manage and administer through their elected Village

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Handicraft being made


Welcome from Warapoka

Councils. The income made from tourism goes directly into the communities to assist with development and conservation. There are two distinct types of benefits, direct and indirect. Direct benefits are salaries paid to employees who work at the Lodge in the positions of managers, expert guides, cooks, housekeepers and other support positions to run the lodge. The indirect benefits are received by individuals who sell their homegrown vegetables, fresh caught fish or traditionally made handicrafts to the lodge for sale to tourists. The experience of visiting and enjoying the hospitality of the Amerindians living in the Hinterland is something very special. Wildlife, rain forests, open savannas, big rivers, and a rich and thriving culture offer guests an opportunity to have an experience of a lifetime in a region that has largely been untouched. And more importantly by spending your tourism dollars at the Lodge you are helping to preserve the Land and the Culture.

Rewa Eco-lodge was started in 2005. The first year they had only two guests. However last year they had well over 200 and continue to grow. With help from Conservation International and COMPETE Caribbean through its Cluster program, the Guyana Tourism Authority [GTA] and of course Surama Eco-lodge. Rewa Eco-Lodge has continued to grow their Tourism business. Last year they were voted by the Tourism and Hospitality Association of Guyana [THAG] the number one Lodge in Guyana. Community Tourism offers the guests the oppurtunity to be involved in the lives of the indigenous communities in the interior of Guyana. You are helping to sustain a way of life. You are helping to preserve the rich bio-diversity of Guyana. This is a product that will continue to grow and give a livelihood to the first peoples of this amazing country.

In Guyana, we have three main community lodges. Surama EcoLodge, Rewa Eco-Lodge and Caiman House. There soon will be others, as training and developing is underway in other communities. Surama is the oldest and was started in 1998. The community had to learn everything for themselves as this was a new venture for Guyana. They have used the profits from the business to provide scholarships for villagers to study to become doctors, and other professions. Profits have been used for the school and to help set up the Surama cultural group which not only performs all over Guyana, but also internationally, as well as the Caribbean. Surama has used its knowledge to help other communities such as Rewa to organize their Tourism business. Warapoka in Region One, is another community that Surama is helping to develop a Community Tourism business.

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Surama Cultural Group

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The Incredible

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he Cassava plant is considered like a mother to the indigenous people of not only Guyana but throughout the tropics. It was first domesticated about 10,000 years ago in the Amazon by the Arawaks, who brought it to Guyana on their migration to the Caribbean islands thousands of years ago. By the time of European contact in 1492 it was the staple food of native populations of Northern South America, southern Mesoamerica, and throughout the Islands of the Caribbean. Today Cassava is the third largest source of Carbohydrates in the Tropics after Rice and Corn. Surprisingly, in 2014 global production was 288 million tons and the three largest producers were not in the Americas. Nigeria produces 21% of World production followed by Thailand, Indonesia and finally Brazil. Worldwide over 800 million people depend on cassava as their primary food staple. The French called it manioc and the Spanish yucca. The importance of Cassava to many Africans is shown by the names given to the plant in many native African languages, which translates as, “there is life�.

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Cassava Bread being made

Matapee being used


Cassava being process

Cassava is a very unique plant. It is planted by cutting two twelveinch-long sections from the stems of the reaped plants and sticking them in a mounded-up hillock. Leaves appear within a few days and it is ready to be reaped in about eight to nine months. It will grow where most other crops will not. It is the main crop planted in the “slash and Burn” method of agriculture practiced by native first peoples in the Americas, as it thrives in the poor acid soils of the Rainforest and Savannahs. The Tubers are harvested and processed according to what is being made. However, the tubers contain a very toxic compound containing prussic acid that is very poisonous, and has to be extracted before it can be eaten. The tubers are harvested and taken to the cassava shed where the skin is scraped off. They are then grated into a pulp. This pulp is then placed into a Matapee and by applying downward pressure using a pole threaded through a loop in the bottom of the Matapee, the juice is squeezed out and collected in a container. This liquid is then boiled down to make Cassareep which is also a very important product. Cassareep is usually sold to make Pepperpot. Heat destroys the prussic acid and the indigenous people use it to make “Tuma pot”. The cassareep is a preservative and was very important as without refrigeration the food would spoil. There is a local legend that the Georgetown Club had a Pepperpot going for seventy- five years. Every day some more meat was added and it was brought to a boil. It never spoiled. The Tuma pot is the same except the juice is used when it is only half reduced to a gray liquid and not all the way to the thick brown liquid that is used to make the popular Pepperpot. Pepperpot gets its name from the hot peppers that were added and floated in the liquid as it was cooking. The two main products of cassava are the flat, round cakes called cassava bread and the grain like Farine. Both will keep a long time if kept dry and are used with the Tuma pot or Pepperpot. The Farine is made by soaking the tubers in water and then grating and toasting the meal in a large metal pan. It is very labour intensive work and mostly performed by the Women collectively in a cassava house or shed. It takes about one hundred pounds of cassava tubers to make fifty pounds of Farine. Interestingly farine is a French word meaning flour and was originally taken from the French “farine de Manioc”. Some other products of cassava are Tapioca, starch, and of course cassava beer, variously called Parakari or Casiri. Spanish historical records around 1554 describes a ceremony among the first peoples in which a native Shaman or priest blessed the cassava bread and divided it among those present. It was

then preserved by them to ward off the “bad eye” or sickness for the next Year. To counter the religious significance of this however the Christian Church was very strict in not allowing cassava or corn flour to be used to make the Eucharist used in the Mass. “Wheat flour was the symbol of Christianity itself”, and colonial era catechisms stated explicitly that only wheat flour could become “the body of Christ”. Never the less cassava became one of the most important food crops of the tropical World.

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Farine being made

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OCTOBER 2018 The Long-billed Starthroat is an extremely stunning

hummingbird and could easily be one of the top five most beautiful species to see in Guyana. These starthroats frequently perch out in the open, especially when hawking for insects. They also gather nectar from flowers, particularly those of large trees.

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Adel’s Rainforest Resort www.adelresort.com


Events

OCTOBER 2018 O C T O

Berbice Expo & Trade Fair The Berbice Expo and Trade Fair over the years assisted to promote small agencies and moreover highlight local products.

B E R

Rockstone Fish Festival

An annual Fish Festival held in Rockstone, a small Indigenous Village in Region 10 accessible through the Linden/Soesdyke Highway. The Fish Festival offers visitors a chance to get a glimpse of Gluck Island, partake in fishing and cooking competitions, cycling races from Linden to Rockstone, tours on the nature trails. entertainment, food and fun for the entire family.

Lethem Town Week

Lethem Town Week is an event which aims to showcase the unique offerings of Lethem and the overall diversity of the Rupununi. The week long celebration will include various events including an exhibition of local businesses And organisations, concerts, fashion shows, among others.

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Our Overland Trip to Kaieteur Falls An Incredible, Memorable and Life Changing Experience By: Dr Soumi Sengupta

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e reach and grapple for the roots and branches carefully choosing every step on the steep rocky trail whilst sucking in hot humid jungle air as sweat stings our eyes. I’ve had a few memorable visits to Kaieteur Falls, however, this time my visit to Guyana’s iconic landmark would be earned in sweat, leaving an indelible mark amongst this eclectic group of strangers, ranging in age from 20 to late 60’s, assembled through the “Guyana grape vine.” We would drive 10 hours through rough, rust coloured terrain, navigating giant potholes, jungle trails and swamp, deep into Guyana’s interior. Our aim, to camp and explore a gold mine in Mahdia then ferry our vehicles across rivers, take a metal boat up the Potaro River, sleep under the stars and explore the rich myriad of Guyana’s flora and fauna. Then crown the adventure with a grueling hike up the largest single drop waterfall on the planet, the mighty Kaieteur Falls!

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The convoy left Georgetown headed south on the Linden highway blasting a cacophony of musical genres spanning four decades. After the Linden pit-stop, the tempo changed as tyre pressures were adjusted, coolers and gear were strapped tight. Now, the “wash board” on the off-roads began. The next 45 miles would meander through deep paralell tyre tracks, unpaved roads, pot holes and loose stones gouged by the massive transport trucks with huge loads of lumber, supplies and workers in and out of Guyana’s main artery into her rich and unexplored interior. Four hours later we arrived at the famous “58 Mile” stop where we delicately regain our walking legs and downed a few cold ones. Next, a river crossing at mango Landing, and more harsh terrain. We arrive in the surreal town of Mahdia, which exudes an intense undercurrent; raw and gritty of a goldmining town. Prospectors, machine operators and “pork knockers” the freelance miners of the Guyanese interior, eye us suspiciously. Clearly, we do not be-


Kaieteur Gorge. We were amazed by the many different birds and plant life. A welcomed running commentary on everything that flew, swam, wiggled and crawled was informative and entertaining throughout. Then, seemingly serendipitous against the glaring sun, far in the distance we caught glimpses of the magnificent Kaieteur Falls. You could almost touch the excitement. Kaieteur Gorge served as the backdrop of our second camp and a short hike rewarded us with “5 Mouth Falls,” This little known waterfall was spectacular and very cold. Evening heralded another fun filled night with Guyana’s rum, the best in the world, mixed with politics and endless belly-aching laughter and a spectacular Bush Curry! At sunrise, our half clad guides in “rubber sandals” looked on with curiosity as we fumbled with our preparations. They displayed super human physical prowess coupled with an intricate knowledge of nature, They are the true formidable Bush Men. We stepped off in the intense humidity to climb the 45 degree incline. “Only another hour! Keep up! Keep up!” says our intrepid leader, keeping us moving. Mere words hardly suffice to describe the majesty of Kaieteur Falls. All the effort and preparation was more than worth it. No adjectives can truly describe the Falls. At last we all lay spent in the pools above the falls, basking in our achievements, and revelling in the satisfaction of both the journey and the destination. A few days ago we had set off as strangers. We would leave this place as lifelong friends with an incredible, shared life changing experience.

long here. A remarkable education in Geology and mining practices ensues coupled with literally seeing glistening gold being panned out of the dirt. An unforgettable BBQ and cold beers was a welcome respite with the realisation that this was the last “cold anything” we would enjoy for a couple of hot days. We strung up our hammocks and nets over the camp and listened to a range of “bush stories” of snakes, gold, bandits and bush spirits. The distant rumbles of the Howler Monkeys from the surrounding forest just added to the surreal atmosphere. At dawn a mountain of eggs, sausage and cheese was laid out before us, as we embarked on another exciting day of adventure and exploration. A drive though undulating terrain requiring the attention and skills of our 4 drivers, brought us to Pamela Landing. There, we boarded aluminium boats laden with our supplies and weaved up the dark chocolate coloured Potaro River, winding its way up the deep

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Memories of Guyana Surama to Iwokrama by dugout canoe

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oming from London the first thing you notice when you land at Surama is the air and the peace. You just want to package it up and take it home. We are met by Gary, an Amerindian of the Makushi tribe and our leader for the rest of our time in Guyana. He and a team of villagers will look after us, educate us and feed us throughout our journey. An old army truck is our transport to the Lodge where we are met with welcoming smiles and a cool drink. But no time is wasted before we are off to see the local primary/nursery school and the village. It’s lunchtime and the children are on the playground, girls neatly dressed in buttercup yellow tunics and the boys in navy shorts and white shirts. Some come over and talk to us, eager to show us their work, others are entrenched in games of football or rounders. Late afternoon, as the heat is beginning to subside, Gary takes us for our first walk in the rainforest, introducing us to some of the amazing trees and vines, their uses and dangers. It’s a veritable

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By Jackie Darling

medicine chest. Then it’s back to the lodge for a welcome beer and dinner. The next day we begin our adventure. Following a muddy track for about an hour we reach the Burro-Burro River and it’s off with the hiking boots and on with the boat shoes and lifejackets, essential attire for the rest of the trip. The river is narrow and slow moving at this point, and we frequently come across fallen trees which block our path, but our keeneyed Amerindian friends safely negotiate these hazards. Eager to point out the myriad of birds which fly over us they bombard us with names, too many to remember. Bird song surrounds us at all times, in particular that of the screaming piha and the raucous macaws. A slight ripple on the water by the riverbank reveals some giant otters hiding amongst the overhanging branches. The smells from the forest are changing all the time from damp leaves to floral smells.


We are amazed at the skills of the Amerindians as they construct our camp. Clearing an area using their machetes, cutting down some small trees to make A frames for the tarpaulins and wooden supports for our hammocks, this together with a covered kitchen, toilet and shower! All done in less than 3 hours, by which time dinner is ready. We retire early to our hammocks, exhausted by the heat and our day’s exertions, trying to ignore the sound of the gladiator frogs. Each morning we are woken promptly at 5.00am by the howler monkeys in full voice and after a quick shower of river water and a cooked breakfast we set off again. Today there is a chance to go fishing, hopefully to catch something for the pot. The river is teeming with fish and although not always successful at landing the catch you can always feel something nibbling at the bait. Not to be missed is the chance to climb Turtle Mountain, just under 1000ft high it looks out over rainforest as far as the eye can see. It’s a breath-taking sight and you begin to understand why it is so important to protect this forest when you realise the importance to the world in its production of oxygen and water. Eventually we have to say farewell to our Amerindian friends and start our journey back to Georgetown and its hustle and bustle and our eventual return to home. The people, the flora and fauna of this stunning country will remain forever in our memories. Marketed by Explore. Operated by Wilderness Explorers and Surama Eco Lodge.

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NOVEMBER 2018

The Hoatzin is the National Bird of

Guyana and is known locally as the Canje Pheasant. It inhabits swamps and mangroves all along the coast with the highest concentration in the Mahaica River.

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Piraiba Lodge Website: www.adventureguianas.com


Public Holidays Wednesday November 7th - Diwali Wednesday November 21st - Youman Nabi

Events

NOVEMBER 2018

Restaurant Week • A Culinary Celebration Guyana Restaurant Week is a culinary celebration of the best and most delicious restaurants in Guyana During this ten-day promotion participating restaurants offer an exclusive menu at a significantly reduced price! Lunch at $2,000 and Dinner at either $4,000 or $5,000 per person.

Diwali Motorcade The Guyana Hindu Dharmic Sabha’s Countrywide Motorcades have become synonymous with the celebration of Diwali in Guyana. Thousands of Guyanese of every stratum of society and cultural belief throng the roads to witness the processions of beautifully decorated and illuminated vehicles depicting the theme of Diwali. In the olden days it wasn’t unusual to see horse-drawn carts gaily bedecked for the motorcade. With the advent of advanced technology, vehicles ranging from low-bed trucks to sleek cars are carefully designed with sophisticated lights and mobile parts. The Dharmic Sabha’s motorcades are major tourist attractions.

Wednesday, November 7th- Diwali National Drama Festival

This premiere theatre festival is an annual production by the National School of Theatre Arts and Drama (NSTAD) and The Unit of Allied Arts (UAA). The National Drama Festival provides an excellent opportunity for youths who have a passion for art and culture. Plays are drawn from across the country, the best of which are showcased at the National Cultural Centre at the Finals in November. Outstanding productions and performances will be awarded with Trophies

Diwali, which literally means a row of lights, is celebrated on the 15th day of the Hindu month of Kartik. It is the darkest night of that month and is conducive to the twinkling lights that illuminate every nook and cranny. The festival encourages the participation of the entire family and it has long been the custom in Guyana for everyone in the home to gather in front of their Lakshmi murti at dusk chanting prayers and mantras before emerging to light their first diya. Prior to the day itself the home and mandirs would be thoroughly cleaned and decorated in preparation for the Goddess of light, Maha Lakshmi. The ladies of the home would in recent times design elaborate rangolis (coloured tracings on the floor) and be absorbed in making sweet delicacies for family and friends.

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N November 12th Caribbean Motor Racing Champions Tourism Awareness Month

Tourism Awareness Month to be filled with countless activities The month of November will be filled with countless activities that will draw awareness to tourism in Guyana. • • •

O V E

Restaurant Week Launch of Explore Guyana Essay Contest Winners Awarded

M B E

South Rupununi Safari

The South Rupununi Safari offers an ideal opportunity for persons to experience the outdoors, have fun and adventure, discover the picturesque beauty of miles of savannahs and explore little known places south of Guyana’s interior. Venturing into Guyana’s most remote terrain is not an easy task, whether you are crossing the Rupununi River, camping in the open or driving for miles in flat savannah lands that are teeming with flora and fauna.

Youman Nabi Muslims countrywide celebrated the birthday of the Prophet Muhammad in a celebration titled Mawlid al-Nabi, or Youman Nabi. Muslims recognise hat Youman Nabi also represents the struggles for justice, peace and equality.

Rupununi Expo

Rupununi Expo is an annual event held in the Rupununi to promote the products and services of the region. Held over two days, the event also features a Business Forum and Agriculture Fair. It is co-hosted by the Rupununi Chamber of Commerce and Industry, Ministry of Agriculture and Conservation International

R

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“Take an epic voyage of taste to the heartland of rum”

Demerara Rules The Waves By: Marco Barneveld

Photography René Koster

S

ure, it was the British Royal Navy who sailed the Seven Seas and wrecked havoc amongst its rivals for over two centuries. But if it hadn’t been for Guyana’s Demerara rum, they may not have had the “Dutch Courage” to do it, and history might well have taken a different path.

The traditional stilling techniques create distinctive flavours that, when blended, give birth to the distinguished taste of El Dorado Rum. After fifteen years of ageing in oak barrels the blend becomes soft yet full of a sweet flavour that could make even a grown man shed a tear of joy.

In fact, until 1970, rum was a vital part of the British Navy’s daily work. A ration of rum, called a “tot”, was issued to every sailor. On July 31, 1970 on a day known as Black Tot Day, the “tot” ran dry.

“Take an epic voyage of taste to the heartland of rum.” A full nose packed with dark coffee, candied orange, almonds, dark chocolate, pepper and rich vanilla. With hints of grilled tropical fruit with a smooth oaky spice – silky, vibrant and moderately full-bodied. Start drooling…

Demerara is a river in Guyana, that gorgeous little green gem of a country packed in between Venezuela and Suriname. Demerara county, on the banks of that mocha coloured river, has been steeped in the history of sugar and rum production since the 17th century. Where once there were over three hundred distilleries in the area, today Demerara Distillers operates the last remaining production in Guyana. They are the artists of alcohol that created El Dorado rum, a blend that begins life in the same nine century-old stills.

Oh, we could talk for hours about Demerara’s last fully working example of the Wooden Coffey Still or their rare French Savalle Still, and the eclectic tastes of each single rum. Why the climate of Guyana and its soil produce the world’s best sugar cane and the by-product, molasses. Or all its international medals. But why waste your time. Run off to the local liquor store, grab a couple bottles of El Dorado 15-year-old Rum and take an epic voyage of taste to the heartland of rum; Guyana’s Demerara county.

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DECEMBER 2018

The Red and Green Macaw is one

of the most widespread species across Guyana. They are amongst the most colourful birds to see and photograph

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Surama Eco Lodge Website: www.suramaecolodge.com


Public Holidays Tuesday December 25th - Christmas Day Wednesday December 26th - Boxing Day

Events

DECEMBER 2018

There is something special about the Guyanese Christmas spirit that stamps it ‘renowned and memorable’. It is genuine sincere hospitality, where rich and poor observe the old traditions of Christmas, putting their best foot forward, keeping the house spic and span, wearing the latest fashions, sharing and spreading their joy. And after your lavish servings of Pepperpot, Garlic Pork, Black Cake, Ginger Beer, Black Pudding and Souse, plus the local ‘grog’ – don’t forget to ‘eat a piece of Labba and drink the Creek Water’ – cause as the legend goes – you will visit us again – very soon – after enjoying a memorable and unforgettable ‘Christmas in Guyana’.

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Masquerades dancing in the streets

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Georgetown’s premiere boutique hotel awarded Certificate of Excellence 3 years in a row.

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2014 | 2015 | 2016

1 & 2 Area M Plantation, Le Ressouvenir, E.C.D (592) 220 1091 www.grandcoastal.com


December 25th - Christmas Day

D E Boxing Day – December 26th

St. Stephen’s Day (December 26) in Guyana is referred to as Boxing Day. This national holiday commemorates the Christian martyr who was stoned to death. In rememberance, people partake in all kinds of rough games and sports. Boxed gifts are customarily given to friends and relatives. Locals also celebrate Boxing Day by picnicking and attending parties and social events.

Old Year’s Day – December 31st The tradition of eating cook-up on Old Year’s Night has grown over the years and has become one of our cultural identifiers, something that makes us truly Guyanese. Cook-up rice is considered a peasant dish. It was traditionally created and made to be eaten at the end of the week, by which time, rations would have depleted. So, the ends and bits of meat left over would be cooked with rice and peas or beans readily available. As with most peasant dishes, it was well seasoned with the addition of fresh herbs such as thyme, green onions, basil along with onions and tomatoes. Cooking the ingredients with coconut milk added a richness that is highly favoured

C E M B E R

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Enjoy Guyana Like A Guyanese:

By: Kevin Daby

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has

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About Guyana Country Facts

EMERGENCY NUMBERS Police: 911,564, 225-6411 Police: Emergency Response Unit: 225-6411(24hrs), 226-4585 Impact: 225-2317, 227-4064-5 CID Headquarters: 225-3650, 225-8196, 226-6978 Police Headquarters, Eve Leary : 226-2487, 226-2488, 227-4656 Traffic Headquarters, Eve Leary : 227-2272, 226-9431, 227-2349 Operations, Brickdam Police Station: 227-1270, 227-1149 Fire: 912, 226-2411-13 Ambulance Service: 913 GEOGRAPHY Guyana’s the fourth-smallest country on mainland of South America after Uruguay, Suriname and French Guiana (an overseas region of France). Guyana is divided into four distinct geographical areas: the Low Coastal Plain; the Hilly Sand and Clay Belt; the Highland Region and the Interior Savannah. The area in square kilometers is 214,970 sq.km. Approximately 75% of the land area is still intact forest, and 2.5% is cultivated. The coastline is 1 metre to 1.5 metres below sea level at high tide necessitating elaborate systems of drainage canals. The most valuable mineral deposits are bauxite, gold, and diamonds. The main rivers are the Demerara, Berbice, Corentyne and Essequibo.

TIME ZONE GMT - 04:00: One hour ahead of EST. LOCATION Guyana is located on the North East Coast of South America and is the only English speaking country. Between 1 ˚ & 9 ˚ North Latitude and 57˚ & 61 ˚ West Longitude, bordering Venezuela to the West, Brazil to the South, Suriname to the East. LANGUAGE Guyana is the only South American nation in which English is the official language however the majority of the population, speak Guyanese Creole, an English-based creole language, as a first language. CLIMATE Guyana is a tropical destination that is pleasant and warm for most of the year, humid, moderated by northeast trade winds; two rainy seasons (May to June, November to January). Mean temperature of 27˚C and the average temperature range from 24˚C to 31˚C. Rainfall is approximately 2,300mm a year in Georgetown. CLOTHING Lightweight, casual clothing can be worn throughout the year. However longs are recommended for the evening along with mosquito repellent containing deet, picaridin, oil of lemon eucalyptus, as well as a variety of plant oils, such as cedar, citronella, geraniol, lemongrass, and rosemary to safeguard against mosquito bites. HEALTH There is a risk of malaria in certain parts of the interior. Consult your doctor for the required precautions if you intend to travel there. Georgetown and coastal areas are Malaria-Free. Municipal Hospitals and Health Care Centres exist within rural and outer lying communities with medivac services available in cases of emergency. Further information can be obtained from the Ministry of Health on Telephone Numbers: (592) 226-7338 or (592) 226-1366. INTERNET For most customers, internet service is available nationally through independent providers. Internet Service is also available in most hotels and at many internet cafés established across the country. Some hotels and restaurants provide WI-FI at no charge to patrons using their laptops.

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There are four daily newspapers; Kaieteur News, Stabroek News, Guyana Times Newspaper and the national paper; Guyana Chronicle Newspaper. There are nineteen (19) Television Stations, ten (10) privately owned radio stations and one (1) government operated radio station. PLACES TO WORSHIP The predominant religious groups are Christians, Hindus and Muslims. Each is well represented with its own churches, temples, mosques respectively. They are found country- wide where the major landmarks featuring traditional architecture may be seen.


Travel

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS All visitors to Guyana are required to have a valid passport to enter and depart Guyana. All visitors to Guyana should ensure that their passports have at least six months of remaining validity. Those arriving by air require an onward plane ticket.

Visa Exempt Nationals Visas are necessary for all visitors except nationals of the following countries: Commonwealth Countries, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Republic of Korea, Luxembourg, The Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Sweden and United States of America. The maximum duration of stay any visitor will be granted by Guyana Immigration, will not exceed thirty days. Please see link for complete listing: http://www.minfor.gov.gy/index.php/consular-services/travel/countries-whose-nationals-do-not-require-visas-to-enter-guyana NON EXEMPT NATIONALS All visitors to Guyana who require a visa for travel to Guyana should the Ministry of Foreign Affairs website: http://www.minfor. gov.gy/ prior to making their travel arrangements. All details regarding the Visa Application Process might be found on the Homepage of the Website under the subheading Consular Services; sub-heading Travel. • Applicants are encouraged to apply three (3) weeks to one (1) month in advance of travel. • The process period is one (1) week however this varies depending upon the nature of the case. • A letter notifying the applicant of the visa being granted will be sent to their address provided in the application. Visitors must have in their possession the original/ or copy of the document stating the visa has been granted to show to Immigration upon arrival at Cheddi Jagan International Airport -Timehri. • Payment for the visa could be made to the Ministry of the Presidency, Department of Citizenship and Immigration Services or upon arrival at Cheddi Jagan International Airport – Timehri. Visitors who wish to extend their stay must contact the Ministry of the Presidency, Department of Citizenship and Immigration Services in advance of the date he/she is expected to depart Guyana. The Ministry of the Presidency, Department of Citizenship and Immigration Services is located at 164 Waterloo Street, North Cummingsburg, Georgetown, Guyana or via email at: ministryofcitizenship.gy@gmail.com . The Central Office of Immigration, where the extension is granted, located on Camp Street, Georgetown, must also note the extension in the visitor’s passport. Travellers visiting Guyana, for purposes other than tourism, are asked to check with the Ministry of Home Affairs for further information on work permits and extended stays. For further information and guidance, visitors are encouraged to contact the Head of Immigration Support Service, Ministry of the Presidency, Department of Citizenship and Immigration Services, Guyana on Tel: (592) 226-2221, 223-7867 or contact the Guyana Foreign Office nearest to you.

TRANSPORTATION DRIVING IN GUYANA Traffic drives on the left. Seat belts are necessary by Law. If travelling to Guyana and wish to rent a vehicle during your stay, please enquire with the Customs Officer at the Airport, upon arrival into Guyana. The permit will be issued at the Airport provided the visitor has his/her international driver’s licence on their person. So be sure to walk with it. The permit is issued free of charge. Commuters to West Demerara travelling via the road transport over the Demerara Harbour Bridge are encouraged to check the bridge opening schedule (http://www.harbourbridge. gov.gy/schedule.html ) one day prior to travel. The highway, which begins on the West Coast of Demerara, is heavily trafficked since it provides a link to Parika on the East Bank of Essequibo River that has become an important centre of economic activity in the Essequibo region. Speed boats operators can be hired to take passengers to Bartica, Supenaam on the Essequibo Coast among other locations. Travel to and from some of these locations can be completed in a single day. Others will require overnight-stay based on travel time and distance from Parika. TRAVEL VIA TAXIS FROM THE CHEDDI JAGAN INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT-TIMEHRI Visitors should ONLY use the official taxi services registered to operate at CJIA. They can be identified by their uniforms (Crème Shirt-Jackets, Black Pants and ID Badges. Fares are listed at the Airport and are fixed). If a decision is made to use one of the other taxis, please agree upon the fare for the trip into Georgetown before entering the vehicle. Fares charged from Airport to Georgetown range between US$25.00 and US$30.00. TAXI AND BUSES Georgetown is well served with taxis, operating throughout the city and to and from other urban centres. Before embarking, do enquire of the rates for travel to destination of interest. Use only recognized yellow taxis or taxis bearing the logos of respective taxi services. Alternatively, do seek the guidance of the accommodation’s front desk staff to assist in your selection of service providers, possibly those that are already contracted to the facility. There are also ultra –cheap privately owned mini buses operating in allocated zones- around the city, along the coast, to the Cheddi Jagan International Airport and Linden. This arrangement extends to all mini bus routes throughout the country. Please check and confirm those fares before embarking on your journey. Travel around Georgetown by Bus: Short stops within the limits of the city are approximately GY$80.00 and longer stops G$100.00. Travelling by taxi for short distances: approximately GY$300$GY400.00, longer drops of GY$500.00 and more as these prices will vary from location to location. Taxis afford freer movement around the city. Rented cars are also available.

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RIVER BOATS & FERRIES With the opening of the Berbice Bridge between East and West Berbice, travelling time is lessened for commuters from Georgetown to Berbice and onward travel to Suriname via the crossing at Moleson Creek. A toll is charged for the Berbice Bridge based on vehicle capacity. The fee per passenger crossing with the Canawaima Ferry at Moleson Creek travelling to Nickerie, Suriname is US$11.00 one way and US$15.00 return. Commuters to West Demerara have a choice of road transport via the Demerara Harbour Bridge or by water taxis from the Seabrook Stelling to Vreed-en-Hoop, which is obliquely opposite each other. Commuters to West Demerara will use the road transport via the Demerara Harbour Bridge. Be sure to check the bridge opening schedule (http://www.harbourbridge.gov.gy/schedule.html ) one day prior to travel. The highway, which begins on the West Coast of Demerara, is heavily trafficked since it provides a link to Parika on the East Bank of Essequibo River that has become an important centre of economic activity in the Essequibo region. Speed boats operators can be hired to take passengers to Bartica, Supenaam on the Essequibo Coast among other locations. Travel to and from some of these location can be completed in a single day. Others will require overnight-stay based on travel time and distance from Parika. TRAVEL TO GUYANA’S INTERIOR Travel arrangements may be made with local busing service, jeeps, chartered planes and speedboats. A guide is advisable for longer distance travel to interior locations. RIVER BOATS & FERRIES With the opening of the Bridge between East and West Berbice, travelling time is lessened for commuters from Georgetown

to Berbice and onward travel to Suriname via the crossing at Molson Creek. A toll is charged at the Berbice Bridge based on vehicle’s capacity. Passengers travelling from Moleson Creek to Nickerie, Suriname using the Canawaima Ferry will be charged a fee of US$15.00 per passenger (3 years to adult) one way. Return fare for passengers (12yrs – Adult) will be US$20.00 . Children (3ys - 12yrs) will be US$15:00 return. TRAVEL TO GUYANA’S INTERIOR Travel arrangements may be made with local busing service, jeeps, chartered planes and speedboats. A guide is advisable for longer distance travel to the interior locations. DOMESTIC AIR SERVICE Air transportation is readily available for traveling to several parts of the hinterland, whether for business or for pleasure. Several local airlines depart from Ogle International Airport on the East Coast of Demerara and from Cheddi Jagan International Airport, Timehri. Information on their availability and movement is easily obtainable from their office and from tour operators. Private charter companies operate flight into the interior from Eugene F. Correia International Airport. (For further information, please see list of DOMESTIC OPERATORS listed under our TOURISM SERVICE PROVIDERS to arrange charter or regular service transfers to interior locations.) INTERNATIONAL & REGIONAL CARRIERS Guyana now has two international (2) airports, The Cheddi Jagan International- Timehri and The Eugene F. Correia International Airport, receiving flights from regional and international destinations. The main airport named after the late President Dr. Cheddi Jagan, The Cheddi Jagan International- Timehri is located 25 miles south of Georgetown at Timehri. Flights from Europe are routed through

DAGRON TOURS

“We offer Adventure of a Lifetime!”

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We offer Fishing, Hiking, Wildlife River & Jeep Safaris, Birdwatching, Nature, Cultural and Beach Holidays in Guyana, South America & the Caribbean

Guyana

Brazil

Suriname

Essequibo/Mazaruni River New Amsterdam Tour

Georgetown City

River And Nature Safari Sloth Island Tour

French Guiana

Tobago

Kaieteur And Orinduik Falls Santa Mission

Paramaribo City Tour

San�gron & Saramaaca

91 Middle Street, Georgetown, Guyana, South America Tel: 592 223 7921 / 592 227 1166 Email: reservations@dagron-tours.com Website: www.dagron-tours.com


Antigua, Barbados or Trinidad. There are also direct flights from Miami, New York, Toronto and Suriname. The Eugene F. Correia International Airport, formally known as Ogle International Airport, is located on the Atlantic Ocean coast of Guyana, approximately 4 miles east of the capital, Georgetown, in the Demerara-Mahaica region of Guyana. Effective September 2009, Ogle Airport Inc., was declared an International Port of Entry to Guyana. The airport will serve international, regional and domestic destinations with aircraft in the class of Dash 8, 300’s. Currently Ogle Airport International facilitates regional transfers between Guyana and Suriname via Trans Guyana Airways and Air Services Ltd. Transfers are provided by LIAT between Guyana and Trinidad and Tobago and Guyana and Barbados respectively. The Ogle Airport International serves a dual purpose, as an international airport and as the air terminal for domestic flights travelling to and arriving from different locations across the country. CAMBIOS These are licensed currency exchange houses. Most cambios are open from 08:00hrs to 17:00hrs, and on Saturdays from 08:00hrs to 12:00hrs, sometimes to 14:00hrs. Do keep your CAMBIO receipts, you will need to produce them in order to change Guyanese dollars on departure. MONEY & BUSINESS GUIDE ATM machines are accessible to persons with ATM Debit Cards. Persons in possession of international CIRRUS Credit Cards that are Master Card and Visa Card may utilize the ATMs at Scotia Bank for cash advances when in Guyana.

BANKING HOURS Banks are open between 08:00hrs and 14: 00 hrs. from Monday to Thursday and 08:00hrs and 14: 30hrs on Friday. BUSINESS ATTIRE Men wear long or short sleeved shirts, a Jacket is optional. Shirt and tie attire is common in most offices. Females are expected to dress conservatively. CURRENCY The Guyana dollar is the only legal tender accepted in this country. It is a floating currency and the value fluctuates in accordance with the changes in the value of the US$. Visitors may exchange their currencies at banks, cambios and most hotels. The rate of the dollar fluctuates and the exchange is approximately US$1 to GY$210. TAXES DEPARTURE TAX As of February 1, 2017, the Departure Tax is no longer collected at the airports but is included into the cost of your ticket. VALUED ADDED TAX Valued Added Tax (VAT) is charged to a value of 14% on most items save those that are 0-Rated or VAT exempt. ECONOMY The agricultural sector accounts for half the national GDP, producing sugar and rice for export, with extensive timber operations and a range of other products, from coffee to fish and fruits, and fresh vegetables well –respected brands of rum. Gold, bauxite and diamonds are mined.

INFORMATIVE WEBSITES ON GUYANA

Travel and Tourism: Guyana Tourism Authority- http://www.guyana-tourism.com Tourism & Hospitality Association of Guyana- http://exploreguyana.org/ Iwokrama International Centre http://iwokrama.org/ Protected Areas Commission- http://nre.gov.gy/category/protected-areas-commission/ https://www.facebook.com/Protected-Areas-Commission INVESTING IN GUYANA: Guyana Office for Investment Guyana Lands & Survey Private Sector Commission Georgetown Chambers of Commerce- Guyana Manufacturer’s and Services Association of Guyana- NON-GOVERNMENTAL OGANISATIONS (Conservation): Conservation International Guyana – World Wildlife Fund (Guyana) - Iwokrama International Centre

http://goinvest.gov.gy/ http://www.lands.gov.gy/ http://psc.org.gy/ http://gcci.gy/ http://gmsagy.org/

http://www.conservation.org/ http://www.wwfguianas.org/ http://iwokrama.org/

MONEY

BUSINESS CONTACTS & ORGANISATIONS

CREDIT CARDS Resorts, hotels, gift shops, restaurants and tour operators generally accept major credits cards and traveller’s cheques for payment from guests. International VISA, Master Card, Maestro and Cirrus credit and debit cards can be used to obtain cash from Scotiabank Branches during banking hours or at ABMs. A similar service is also available at the Guyana Bank for Trade and Industry (GBTI) at their branches and at select ATM locations.

Berbice Chamber of Commerce and Development 12 Chapel Street, New Amsterdam, Berbice • Tel: 333 3324 Consultative Association of Guyanese Industry 157 Waterloo St, Georgetown • Tel: 225 7170, 226, 4603, Fax: (592) 227 0725 • P.O.Box # 10730 Email: goolsarrancagi@gol.net.gy, ramchancagi@gol.net.gy Forest Products Association of Guyana 157 Waterloo St. Georgetown, Tel: (592) 226 9848 • 226 2821 Fax: (592) 226 2832 Email: fpasect@guyana.net.gy

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Georgetown Chamber of Commerce & Industry 156 Waterloo St, Georgetown • Tel: 225 5846 Email:gccicommerce2009@gmail.com Website: http://gcci.gy/ GO-INVEST (Guyana Office for Investment) 190 Camp & Church Sts, Georgetown Tel: 225 0658 • 227 0653 • Fax: 225 0655 Website: http://goinvest.gov.gy/ E-mail: goinvest@goinvest.gov.gy Guyana Manufacturers & Services Association 157 Waterloo Street, Georgetown • Tel: 223 7405/6 Email: gmsaguyanaltd@gmail.com • http://gmsagy.org/ Guyana Rice Millers’ and Exporters’ Development Association • Tel: 227 3344, 227 3350 Guyana Rice Producers’ Association C/o Crane, West Coast Demerara • Tel: 254 2012, 254 2013 Guyana Tourism Authority National Exhibition Centre, Sophia, Georgetown Tel: 219 0094-6 • Fax: 219 0093 Email: info@guyana-tourism.com Website: www.guyana-tourism.com Institute of Private Enterprise Development 253 South Road, Bourda, Georgetown • Tel: 225 8949 • Email:iped@ipedgy.com •Website: http://www.ipedgy.com/ Linden Chamber of Industry and Commerce 84 Riverside Drive, Watooka, Linden • Tel: 444 2901

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Ministry of Business (with responsibility for Tourism Address: 229 South Road, Lacytown, Georgetown, Guyana Tel: +592 226 2505, Fax: +592 225 4310 Hotlines: Small Business & Consumer Affairs: 225 0665, Commerce: 225-2280; 225-6011, Licensing: 227-2718, GO-INVEST: 225 0651/ 227 0653 Email: info@minbusiness.gov.gy Ministry of Public Communications 205 Camp Street (Colgrain House), North Cummingsburg, Georgetown Tel: 225-0666 • 226-0079 CARICOM - The Caribbean Community Secretariat Turkeyen East Coast Demerara Tel: (592) 222 0001-75 • Fax: (592) 222 0172 Email: piu@caricom.org, caricompublicinfo@gmail.com Private Sector Commission Umbrella organization for more private sector business and employer’s organizations. More major companies are also members. 157 Waterloo St, Georgetown Tel: 225 0977 • Fax: 225 0978 E-mail: office@psc.org.gy •Website: http://psc.org.gy/ Tourism and Hospitality Association of Guyana (THAG) 157 Waterloo St, Georgetown Tel: 225 0807 • Fax: 225 0817 E-mail: info@exploreguyana.org / thag.secretariat@gmail.com Website: http://exploreguyana.org/


ACCOMMODATIONS Georgetown & Environs

All of these properties are members of the Tourism and Hospitality Association of Guyana, and offer the quality service we know will meet your satisfaction. TOURISM AND HOSPITATLITY ASSOCIATION OF GUYANA

Private Sector Commission Building, 157 Waterloo Street, North Cummingsburg, Georgetown The Tourism and Hospitality Association of Guyana is a private sector-led organization dedicated to lobbying, marketing and advocating for sustainable tourism development by fostering professionalism and quality service, providing benefits to members, representing membership interests and collaborating with Government to influence tourism policies. Contact us: Tel: 592 225 0807, 225-0817 Email: info@exploreguyana.org, thag.secretariat@gmail.com Website: www.exploreguyana.org Facebook: Tourism & Hospitality Association of Guyana

AMENITIES ICONS KEY Wifi Zone Email Access Wheel Chair Access

Hair Dryer

No Smoking

Dining

Money Exchange

Credit Cards

Television

Air Conditioning

Gym

Coffee Maker

Laundromat

Bar

Swimming Pool

Cafe

Iron

Airport Shuttles

24 Hr. Security

Room Service

Secure Storage

Casino

Bird Watching

Fishing

Transportation

Cycling

Sauna Masseuse

Water Slide

Hiking

Smoking

1. Aracari Resort

2. Cara Lodge

160 Versailles West Bank Demerara (1 Mile North of the Harbour Bridge, WBD) Tel: 592-264-2946-8 Fax: 592-264-2949 Email: info@aracariresort.com Website: www.aracariresort.com

294 Quamina Street, P.O. Box 10833 Georgetown Tel: 592-225-5301-5 Fax: 592-225-5310 Email: caralodge@carahotels.com Website: www.carahotels.com

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3. Grand Coastal Hotel

1 & 2 Area M Le Ressouvenir, East Coast Demerara Tel: 592-220-1091, 220-1288, 220-2046 Fax: 592-220-1498 Email: reservations@grandcoastal.com, ceo@grandcoastal.com Website: www.grandcoastal.com

5. KING’s Hotel & Residences

176 Middle & Waterloo Streets Georgetown, Guyana Tel: 592-226-1684 - 7 Emails: admin@kingsjewelleryworld.com. For orders and inquires, Email: orders.kings@live.com Website: www.kingshotel.gy

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4. Guyana Marriott Hotel Georgetown

Block Alpha, Battery Road, Kingston Tel: 592-231-2480, 231-1870 Fax: 592-231-2481 Email: mhrs.geomc.reservations@marriotthotels.com Website: www.guyanamarriott.com Facebook: guyanamarriotthotelgeorgetown Instagram: guyanamarriott

6. Palace De Leon Hospitality Inc.

60 & 61 Croal Street, Stabroek, Georgetown Tel: 592-227-7019, 226-4349 Email: leonlesruth@yahoo.com Facebook: Palace de Leon Apartments/Suites

7. Roraima Duke Lodge

8. Roraima Residence Inn

94-95 Duke Street, Kingston, Georgetown Tel: 592 231 7220, 227 2213 Fax: 592 227 3816 Email: roraimadukelodge@hotmail.com Website: www.roraimaairways.com

R8 Eping Avenue, Bel Air Park, Georgetown Tel: 592-225-9647-8, 225- 9650 Fax: 592-225-9646 Email: rriops@hotmail.com / rriops@gmail.com Website: www.roraimaairways.com


9. Windjammer International Cuisine & Comfort Inn.

27 Queen Street, Kitty, Georgetown, Guyana Contact: Carey Griffith Tel: 592-227-7478, 226-3407, 231-7044 Email windjammergy@gmail.com Website: www.windjammer-gy.com Facebook: WindjammerGy Instagram: windjammer_gy

Eco-Resorts, Interior Lodges & Attractions Adel’s Rainforest Resort

Adventure Guianas Hotel Toucanna

Akawini Creek, Pomeroon River Tel: 592 -663 -8979, 592 -695- 9065 US Tel: 301-384-2396 Email: Jessica.hatfield@gmail.com www.adelresort.com

3 Tabatinga Drive, Lethem, Rupununi, Guyana, S A. Tel 592-227-4713, 673-0039, 621-7766 Email: Info@adventureguianas.com Website: www.adventureguianas.com

Arrowpoint Nature Resort

Kamuni Creek Office: 94-95 Duke Street, Kingston, G/town Guyana Tel: 592-231-7220, 227-2213 Fax: 592-225-9646 Georgetown: Tel 225-9647-8 Fax: 592-225-9646 Email: tours.roraimaairways@gmail.com Website: www.roraimaairways.com

Atta Rainforest Lodge (CATS)

C/o Wilderness Explorers 141 Fourth Street, Campbellville, Georgetown Tel: 592-227-7698 Fax: 592-226-2085 Email: info@iwokramacanopywalkway.com Website: www.iwokramacanopywalkway.com Skype: iwokramacanopywalkway

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Baganara Island Resort

Essequibo River, Guyana, South America Head Office: Eugene F. Correia International Airport Ogle, East Coast Demerara Tel: 592 222 2525, 222 8053, 222 0264 Fax: 222-6117 Email: bookbaganara@baganara.net Website: www.baganara.net Facebook: baganaraislandresort

Hurakabra River Resort

Essequibo River Georgetown Office: 168 Century Palm Gardens, Durban Backlands, Lodge Tel: 592-225-3557, 226-0240 Mobile: 592-624-8694, 640-4497 Fax: 592-226- 0240 Email: gemmadhoo@gmail.com Website: www.hurakabra.com Facebook: Hurakabra River Resort/Hurakabra River Resort

Jubilee Resort

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Dakara Creek, Timehri Office: 106 –107 Lamaha & Carmichael Street, G/town Tel: 592-225-8915, 623-7313 Fax: 592-226- 5340 Email: jubileeresortinc@gmail.com Website: www.jubileeresort.com

Caiman House Field Station and Lodge

Yupukari Village Tel: 592-772-9291 Email: Delene Lawrence rli.delenelawrence19@gmail.com Fernando Li - rli.fernando.li@gmail.com Marcilene Dorrick- edwards.marcilene@gmail.com. Website: www.rupununilearners.com

Iwokrama River Lodge

Office: 77 High Street, Kingston, G/town, Guyana, S. A. Facility Location: Kurupukari, Upper Takatu/Upper Essequibo, Region 9 Tel: 592 225 1504, 225 1181 Fax: 592 225 9199 Email: tourism@iwokrama.org Website: www.iwokramariverlodge.org, www.iwokrama.org Facebook: www.facebook.com/iwokramatourism1, www.facebook.com/iwokramainternationalcentre Instagram: Iwokrama

Karanambu Lodge Inc.

Karanambu, North Rupununi, Guyana Lodge Cell Phone: 592 624 2111 Email: karanambulodgegy@gmail.com Website: www.karanambutrustandlodge.org


Piraiba Lodge

Rewa Eco Lodge / Rewa

Upper Essequibo River, Guyana, South America, Tel: 227-4713-673-0039, 621-7766 Email: info@adventureguianas.com Website: www.adventureguianas.com

Contact information for reservation Levi Edwards, Dicky Alvin, Mildred Ignacio, Ceona Mack Email: ecolodgerewa@gmail.com Website: www.rewaguyana.com

Surama Eco-Lodge, Surama

Surama, North Rupununi, Region #9 Guyana Email: info@suramaecolodge.com Website: www.suramaecolodge.com Phone #: 592 653 7160

Splashmin’s Resort Eco Adventure Tours

Facility: Madewini Creek, Linden Soesdyke Highway Office: 52 Hadfield Street, Worthmanville, Georgetown Tel: 592 223 7301-3, 226 0169 Email: info@splashmins.com Website: www.splashmins.com

Timberhead Eco Resort

Office Address: 10 Providence – East Bank Demerara (GEB Building) Tel: 592 233 5108, 233 5023 Fax: 592 233 6608 Email: timberhead@solutions2000.net Website: www.timberheadguyana.com 

Sloth Island Nature Resort

Georgetown Address: 91 Middle Street , Georgetown Tel: 592-223-7921, 678-4969, 610-7597, 610-2408,612-5493 Island address: Essequibo River Email: slothisland@yahoo.com Website: slothisland.com Facebook: Sloth Island Nature Resort

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TOURISM

SERVICE PROVIDERS

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Email: lokeshslu@gmail.com


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@eldoradorums

#eldorado_rum

Explore Guyana 2018  

The Front Cover features Britain’s Prince Harry with Guyana’s 4th Vice President and Minister of Indigenous People’s Affairs Hon Sydney Alli...

Explore Guyana 2018  

The Front Cover features Britain’s Prince Harry with Guyana’s 4th Vice President and Minister of Indigenous People’s Affairs Hon Sydney Alli...

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