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CHANEL


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CHANEL


PHOTOGRAPHED BY BRUCE WEBER


FEATURES 142 146 148 154

159 Clockwise from top left: Elizabeth Holmes (page 154); Philip Green (page 162); Bruce Springsteen with manager Jon Landau (page 128).

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THE BOOK OF BRUCE By DAVID KAMP For 50 years, rock icon Bruce Springsteen has turned his struggle into songs, his unrest into performance. Today, as he wraps up a top-selling tour and publishes a 500-page memoir, he is coming to terms with life out on the wire. Photographs by Annie Leibovitz. HALEY’S COMET Spotlight on Haley Bennett, who is suddenly co-starring with everyone from Denzel Washington to Amy Schumer. By Krista Smith. Photographs by Sebastian Kim. VUITTON’S MASTER CLASS Spotlight on the long-dispersed Shchukin Collection, 275 masterpieces being re-united next month at the Fondation Louis Vuitton, in Paris. By James Reginato. THE ART OF THE DONALD By ALISON JACKSON What Donald Trump does between tweets, taunts, and tirades has been a mystery. The veil is parted by an artist known for discerning the scene behind the scenes. THE TALENTED MS. HOLMES By NICK BILTON Silicon Valley fell hard for Theranos founder Elizabeth Holmes, showering her with money and praise. But the promise of her world-changing start-up was an illusion. Following a suicide, an exposé, and several investigations, the world’s youngest female self-made billionaire has been left with nothing except questions. PLAYING HER OWN SONG Spotlight on Carole Bayer Sager, whose autobiography shares the stories behind some of pop music’s biggest hits. By Sheila Weller. Photograph by Art Streiber. HIPPER BY THE DOZEN Spotlight on 12 of must-stream TV’s rising stars, teens and twentysomethings displaying their generation’s edge. By Julie Miller. Photograph by Lauren Dukof. OUTRAGEOUS FORTUNE By WILLIAM D. COHAN When Topshop tycoon Sir Philip Green of-loaded the struggling retail chain BHS for just one pound, Britons cried foul. Now, with thousands of BHS jobs and pensions at risk, as Green plays with a new yacht and jet, many in the nation are rooting for his comeuppance.

ON THE COVER Bruce Springsteen’s hair products by Living Proof. Grooming products by MAC. Hair by Chris McMillan. Makeup by Yvette Beebe. Set design by Mary Howard Studio. Local production assistance by10-4 Inc. Styled by Mary Ann Flippin. Photographed exclusively for V.F. by Annie Leibovitz in Clichy, France. 20

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S PR I NGSTE EN P HOTO GRA PH ED BY A NN I E LE I B OVI TZ . P HOTO GR A PH S BY CA RL O S CH AVA RR ÍA / T H E N EW YO RK T IM E S/ RE DUX (H OL M ES ) , F RO M J OH N F ROST N EW S PA P E RS ( GR E EN )

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168 170 176 Clockwise from top left: Aja Naomi King (page 65); Ronald Reagan’s U.S. Institute of Peace (page 120); Mary Astor on trial (page 176).

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CHEKHOV, PLEASE Spotlight on Tony-winning playwright Stephen Karam, who has adapted Chekhov for both Broadway and Hollywood. By Jim Kelly. Photograph by Gasper Tringale. BROADWAY’S BIG SCOOP Spotlight on the latest revival of The Front Page, with a gold-standard cast led by Nathan Lane and John Slattery. By Jim Kelly. Photograph by Mark Seliger. THE OTHER INTERNET By WILLIAM LANGEWIESCHE In the unregulated underbelly of the Web lies the Dark Net, where wars are fought and hackers roam. Last year, when one security expert thwarted a cyber-attack of unprecedented scale, the extent of the digital threat became all too clear. Photo illustration by Matthieu Bourel. THE ECSTASY & THE AGONY By EDWARD SOREL In 1936, Hollywood star Mary Astor gave the performance of her life: on the witness stand, facing a vengeful ex-husband, slavering tabloids, and her own very indiscreet diary. An adaptation from a new book, with illustrations by the author, revisits that great American sex scandal. SURFBOARDS TO BILLBOARDS At 19, model Jordan Barrett is fashion’s “It Boy,” with Hollywood on his mind. By Derek Blasberg. Photograph by Richard Phibbs. LAPO LUXURY By MARK SEAL Since leaving the family business, Lapo Elkann, grandson of the late Fiat patriarch Gianni Agnelli, has launched a network of high-style ventures, exploring the possibilities of re-invention for his products, his country, and himself. Photographs by Wayne Maser.

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KING OF QUEENS Fall plaids, tweeds, and checkered looks. My Desk: chef Daniel Humm. Haute News. My Place: jewelry designer Gaia Repossi. British beauty invasion.

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31 DAYS IN THE LIFE OF THE CULTURE Peter Lindbergh in focus. Wagamama comes to N.Y.C.; a ilm trove unearthed in the Yukon; Gadget Guide. Hot Type. According to Masters of Sex’s Lizzy Caplan; Watch List. Hot Tracks: Rita Ora. CONTINUED ON PAGE 30

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K IN G PHOTO GR A PHE D BY W I LL I A MS & HIR A KAWA ; DR E SS BY CHA N EL ; E A RR I NGS BY GE O RG J E N SE N ; B RACE L ET BY J E NN I FE R F I S HE R. I LL USTR ATI O N S: TO P, BY B A RRY B L I TT; B OTTO M, BY E DWA RD SO RE L . FO R DE TA I L S, GO TO VF.COM /C RE DI TS

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AROUND THE WORLD, ONE PARTY AT A TIME The worlds of fashion, art, and philanthropy converge at Natalia Vodianova’s Love Ball, at the Fondation Louis Vuitton, in Paris.

COLUMNS 117 120 Clockwise from top left: Lapo Elkann (page 184); the International Best-Dressed List (page 97); Hot Type (page 80); the Dark Net (page 170).

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THE 2016 INTERNATIONAL BEST-DRESSED LIST This year’s roster anoints a principal ballerina, a prime minister, and two Tony-winning Hamilton stars. Find out which style idols inspire their looks. OH! WHAT A DREADFUL YEAR By JAMES WOLCOTT This year is shaping up to be one of the all-time worst, with too many legends lost (Ali, Bowie, Prince), the planet heating up, and an endless drumbeat of gun violence and terrorism. And then there’s Trump. THE FOG OF PEACE By MICHAEL KINSLEY Ronald Reagan’s nod to the anti-nuke movement, the U.S. Institute of Peace has a $111 million home on the Washington mall and a $35 million budget. Sadly, its existence makes no sense. Illustrations by Barry Blitt. GHOSTS IN THE STAR MACHINE By JOSH DUBOFF A vibrant social-media presence is now essential for any actor, politician, or Kardashian. But behind many celebrity tweets, Instagrams, and Facebook posts is a professional consultant, working to make sure the client seems … authentic. Photo illustrations by Darrow.

ET CETERA 44 53 58 88 200 30

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CONTRIBUTORS EDITOR’S LETTER GIANTS AND JESTERS LETTERS HARD LESSONS IN THE DETAILS TARAJI P. HENSON PROUST QUESTIONNAIRE INA GARTEN OC TOB ER

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E L KA NN P HOTO GRA P HE D BY WAY NE MA S ER ; S UN GL A S SE S A N D B R ACE L ET BY I TA L I A I N DE PE NDE NT. P HOTO I LL UST RATI ON BY MAT TH IE U BO U RE L ( DA R K N E T) . PH OTO GR A PH S: TO P R IGH T, F ROM L E F T, F RO M RE X /S HUT TE RSTO CK, F RO M PAC IF ICCOA STN E WS. CO M, F RO M RE X/ SH UTT E RSTO CK/ ZU MA PR ES S, BY F RA Z E R H A RR IS O N/ GE TT Y IM AG ES , F RO M VCG /G ET T Y I MAGE S ; B OT TO M, BY TI M H OUT.

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.co This month, VF.com gets a new look, with three sites dedicated to the people, subjects, and stories you like best

HIVE

Covering Silicon Valley, Wall Street, and Washington, D.C.

WHAT’S NEXT FOR FOX NEWS? After the most powerful man in cable news, Roger Ailes, was jettisoned from the empire he built, Fox News is on the brink of implosion. Sarah Ellison reports on who’s leeing—and who’s ighting—inside the embattled network. TRUMP’S LAST CHANCE With a dramatic drop in the polls, some are saying the tyranny of Trump may be coming to a close. T. A. Frank follows the candidate on the campaign trail to determine whether he’s just down—and not out.

HWD

Obsessing over TV, ilm, awards, and more

MAKING HISTORY Ava DuVernay continues to break Hollywood barriers

LIGHTS, CAMERA, SNAP For decades, V.F. has specialized in spotting rising stars. On September 13 and 14, we lex those muscles on Snapchat Discover, with an exclusive portfolio of 12 TV actors on the verge of stardom. Get to know Shameik Moore, Jeremy Allen White, Katherine McNamara, and more through portraits, videos, and interactive features.

VANITIES

Tracking celebrity, fashion, and—why not?—royals

ACQUIRED TASTE From Karl Lagerfeld’s Diet Coke devotion to Tom and Gisele’s forbidden foods, a portfolio showcases the unorthodox diets of the rich and famouss and plumbs the origins of food overshare culture. KITTY CONFIDENTIAL Princess Diana’s niece Lady Kitty Spencerr may not be in line for the throne, but she has become the aristocratic darling of the Instagram age. The British blueblood opens up about fame, family, and growing up royal. 34

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VI DE O STI L LS BY J ER E MY E L KI N, RUS S EL L HO U GHTE N , A N D VA N CE S PI CE R. F RO M TO P: J ACK ET BY NE IL BA R R ET T, SW E ATE R BY S A NDRO , PA N TS BY A .P. C.; SH IRT BY COACH, PA N TS BY OF F I CI N E GÉ NÉ RA L E ; D RE SS BY A LTUZ A R RA ; F OR DE TA I L S , G O TO V F.CO M /CR E DI TS

from the director’s chair. The Selma director, behind this month’s Queen Sugarr series and the upcoming ilm adaptation of A Wrinkle in Time, opens up about leaning in and charging ahead from behind the camera.


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Editor GRAYDON CARTER Managing Editor CHRIS GARRETT Design Director CHRIS DIXON Executive Editor DOUGLAS STUMPF Features Editor JANE SARKIN Creative Director (Fashion and Style) JESSICA DIEHL Photography Director SUSAN WHITE Deputy Editors AIMÉE BELL, DANA BROWN, MARK ROZZO, STEPHANIE MEHTA Associate Managing Editor ELLEN KIELL Legal Affairs Editor ROBERT WALSH Director of Special Projects SARA MARKS Copy Editor PETER DEVINE Research Director JOHN BANTA Beauty Director SUNHEE GRINNELL Executive West Coast Editor KRISTA SMITH Art Director HILARY FITZGIBBONS Photography Research Director JEANNIE RHODES Deputy Art Director TONYA DOURAGHY Deputy Director of Special Projects MATT ULLIAN Fashion Market Director MICHAEL CARL Associate Legal Affairs Editor AUSTIN MERRILL Associate Copy Editor DAVID FENNER Production Director PAT CRAVEN Research Editors MARY FLYNN, DAVID GENDELMAN Assistant Editors CAT BUCKLEY, LOUISA STRAUSS Deputy Research Editor ALISON FORBES Reporter-Researchers BRENDAN BARR, SIMON BRENNAN, SUE CARSWELL, BEN KALIN, WALTER OWEN, MICHAEL SACKS Assistant Copy Editor ADAM NADLER Associate Art Director KAITLYN PEPE Editorial Finance Manager GEOFF COLLINS Editorial Business Manager SARAH SCHMIDT Senior Photography Producer KATHRYN MACLEOD Senior Photography Research Editors ANN SCHNEIDER, KATHERINE BANG Accessories Director DAISY SHAW-ELLIS Photography Editor CATE STURGESS Associate Photography Editor RACHEL DELOACHE WILLIAMS Special Projects Manager ARI BERGEN Art Production Director CHRISTOPHER GEORGE Copy and U.K. Production Director CARLA ZANDONELLA Copy Production Manager ANDERSON TEPPER Executive Assistant to the Editor DAN GILMORE Assistant to the Editor NATHAN KING Assistant to the Managing Editor DANA LESHEM Fashion Editor RYAN YOUNG Market Editor ISABELLA BEHRENS Menswear Market Editor CHRISTOPHER LEGASPI Fashion Associate KELLI ORIHUELA Features Associates BRITT HENNEMUTH, MAXWELL LOSGAR Editorial Business Associate CAMILLE ZUMWALT COPPOLA Editorial Associates MARY ALICE MILLER, ´ KA LEORA YASHARI, MARLEY BROWN Editorial Assistants BEN ABRAMOWITZ, ISABEL ASHTON, JULIA VITALE Research Assistant ELLA BAN Editor-at-Large CULLEN MURPHY Special Correspondents BOB COLACELLO, MAUREEN ORTH, BRYAN BURROUGH, AMY FINE COLLINS, NICK BILTON Writers-at-Large MARIE BRENNER, JAMES REGINATO Style Editor–at–Large MICHAEL ROBERTS International Correspondent WILLIAM LANGEWIESCHE London Editor HENRY PORTER Paris Editor VÉRONIQUE PLAZOLLES European Editor–at–Large JEMIMA KHAN Editor (Los Angeles) WENDY STARK MORRISSEY Our Man in Kabul TOM FRESTON Our Man in Saigon BRIAN MCNALLY Our Man on the Street DEREK BLASBERG Architecture Consultant BASIL WALTER Editorial Consultant JIM KELLY Senior Editorial Adviser WAYNE LAWSON Editor, Creative Development DAVID FRIEND vanityfair.com Director MICHAEL HOGAN Editor MATTHEW LYNCH Editor, The Hive JON KELLY Deputy Editor KATEY RICH Projects Editor KELLY BUTLER Photography Editor CHIARA MARINAI Executive Video Producer ERIC LEFFLER Video Production Director JEREMY ELKIN Social Media Editor JEFFREY TOUSEY Hollywood Editor HILLARY BUSIS News Editor BENJAMIN LANDY Vanities Editor LAUREN LE VINE Story Editor KIA MAKARECHI Line Editor STEPHANIE HORST Staff Photographer JUSTIN BISHOP Film Critic RICHARD LAWSON Senior Staff Writers JOSH DUBOFF, JULIE MILLER, JOANNA ROBINSON Staff Writers LAURA BRADLEY, KENZIE BRYANT, YOHANA DESTA, EMILY JANE FOX, MAYA KOSOFF, TINA NGUYEN, ABIGAIL TRACY, HILARY WEAVER Senior Producer ALYSSA KARAS Associate Line Editors AMIRAH MERCER, CYNTHIA PULEO Associate Producer JARONDAKIE PATRICK Editorial Associate ELISE TAYLOR Photo Associates BENJAMIN PARK, LAUREN JONES Social Media Associates CHRISTINE DAVITT, MOLLY MCGLEW Development: Engineering Manager MATTHEW HUDSON Product Director ZAC FRANK Senior Manager, Analytics KRISTINNE GUMBAYAN Software Engineers EDDY ESPINAL, TYLER CHADWICK Front-End Engineer RAFAEL FREANER Contributing Editors HENRY ALFORD, KURT ANDERSEN, SUZANNA ANDREWS, LILI ANOLIK, ROBERT SAM ANSON, JUDY BACHRACH, CARL BERNSTEIN, PETER BISKIND, BUZZ BISSINGER, HOWARD BLUM, PATRICIA BOSWORTH, MARK BOWDEN, DOUGLAS BRINKLEY, ALICE BRUDENELL-BRUCE, MICHAEL CALLAHAN, MARINA CICOGNA, EDWIN JOHN COASTER, WILLIAM D. COHAN, RICH COHEN, JOHN CONNOLLY, STEVEN DALY, BEATRICE MONTI DELLA CORTE, JANINE DI GIOVANNI, KURT EICHENWALD, LISA EISNER, SARAH ELLISON, BRUCE FEIRSTEIN, NICK FOULKES, STEVE GARBARINO, A. A. GILL, PAUL GOLDBERGER, VANESSA GRIGORIADIS, MICHAEL JOSEPH GROSS, LOUISE GRUNWALD, BRUCE HANDY, DAVID HARRIS, JOHN HEILPERN, REINALDO HERRERA, CAROL BLUE HITCHENS, A. M. HOMES, LAURA JACOBS, SEBASTIAN JUNGER, DAVID KAMP, SAM KASHNER, MICHAEL KINSLEY, EDWARD KLEIN, BETSY KENNY LACK, FRAN LEBOWITZ, ADAM LEFF, DANY LEVY, MONICA LEWINSKY, MICHAEL LEWIS, DAVID MARGOLICK, VICTORIA MATHER (TRAVEL), BRUCE MCCALL, BETHANY MCLEAN, PATRICK MCMULLAN, ANNE MCNALLY, PIPPA MIDDLETON, SETH MNOOKIN, NINA MUNK, ELISE O’SHAUGHNESSY, EVGENIA PERETZ, JEAN PIGOZZI, WILLIAM PROCHNAU, TODD S. PURDUM, JOHN RICHARDSON, LISA ROBINSON, DAVID ROSE, RICHARD RUSHFIELD, NANCY JO SALES, ELISSA SCHAPPELL, MARK SEAL, GAIL SHEEHY, MICHAEL SHNAYERSON, SALLY BEDELL SMITH, JAMES B. STEELE, MATT TYRNAUER, CRAIG UNGER, DIANE VON FURSTENBERG, ELIZABETH SALTZMAN WALKER, BENJAMIN WALLACE, HEATHER WATTS, JIM WINDOLF, JAMES WOLCOTT, EVAN WRIGHT, NED ZEMAN In Memoriam INGRID SISCHY (1952–2015), FREDERIC MORTON (1924–2015), CHRISTOPHER HITCHENS (1949–2011), TIM HETHERINGTON (1970–2011), DOMINICK DUNNE (1925–2009), DAVID HALBERSTAM (1934–2007), MARJORIE WILLIAMS (1958–2005), HELMUT NEWTON (1920–2004), HERB RITTS (1952–2002) Contributing Photographers ANNIE LEIBOVITZ BRUCE WEBER, JONATHAN BECKER, MARK SELIGER, PATRICK DEMARCHELIER, LARRY FINK, TIMOTHY GREENFIELD-SANDERS, SAM JONES, JONAS FREDWALL KARLSSON, NORMAN JEAN ROY, SNOWDON, MARIO TESTINO, GASPER TRINGALE Contributing Artists HILARY KNIGHT, ROBERT RISKO, TIM SHEAFFER, EDWARD SOREL, STEPHEN DOYLE Contributors Senior Photography Producer RON BEINNER Special Projects Art Director ANGELA PANICHI Digital Production Manager H. SCOTT JOLLEY Associate Digital Production Manager SUSAN M. RASCO Production Manager BETH BARTHOLOMEW Associate Editor S. P. NIX Photo Associate JAMES EMMERMAN Accessories Associate ALEXIS KANTER Art Associate SUSAN WIDDICOMBE Photography Production Assistant KALINA KRABEL Photo Assistant MARINA VERE NICOLL Stylist DEBORAH AFSHANI Communications Executive Director of Communications BETH KSENIAK Deputy Director of Communications LIZZIE WOLFF Associate Director of Communications/Contributing Style Editor, VF.com RACHEL TASHJIAN Communications Assistant ANDREA WHITTLE Relations/Research Associate ANNABEL DAVIDSON

Publishing Director ANNIE HOLCROFT

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Associate Publisher TIA GRAHAM Fashion Director EMMA MARSH Corporate Business Director CLAIRE SINGER Advertising Director KATHERINE PITCHER Account Executive JAMIE WEEDEN Promotions Manager LAURA PATERSON Managing Editor, Supplements HOLLY ROSS Chief Sub-Editor, Supplements ANNA BLOMEFIELD Sub-Editor, Supplements THOMAS BARRIE Creative Director, Promotions and Supplements JAMES SLOCUM Art Director, Promotions and Supplements SCOTT MOORE Photo Editor, Supplements ZOË GAHAN Acting Photo Editor, Supplements TANJYA HOLLAND PARKIN Associate Editor, Print and Digital CHARLOTTE OWEN Assistant Editor, Digital ISOBEL THOMPSON Manager, Italy VALENTINA DONINI Associate Publisher, U.S. SHANNON TOLAR TCHKOTOUA Paris Office HELENA KAWALEC Regional Sales Director KAREN ALLGOOD Manager, Dubai PRASAD AMIN Manager, India RACHNA GULATI Head of Management Accounts BIJAL KHATRI Marketing Director JEAN FAULKNER Deputy Marketing and Research Director GARY READ Associate Director, Digital Marketing U.K. SUSIE BROWN Circulation Director RICHARD KINGERLEE Newstrade Circulation Manager ELLIOT SPAULDING Creative Design Manager ANTHEA DENNING Subscriptions Director PATRICK FOILLERET Marketing and Promotions Manager MICHELLE VELAN Assistant Marketing and Promotions Manager CLAUDIA LONG Subscriptions Manager ELLIE CRANE Production Director SARAH JENSON Commercial Production Manager XENIA DILNOT Commercial Senior Production Controller LOUISE LAWSON Commercial and Paper Production Controller MARTIN MACMILLAN Senior Production Controller HELEN CROUCH Production Coordinator SAPPHO BARKLA Digital Project Manager CHARLOTTE TOOTH Tablet Producer RUSSELL PROWSE Tablet Production Controller LUCY ZINI Tablet Production Coordinator SKYE MEELBOOM Condé Nast International Director of Communications NICKY EATON Deputy Publicity Director HARRIET ROBERTSON Acting Publicity Manager RICHARD PICKARD Head of Digital WIL HARRIS Finance Director PAM RAYNOR Financial Control Director PENNY SCOTT-BAYFIELD H.R. Director HAZEL MCINTYRE Deputy Managing Director ALBERT READ

Managing Director NICHOLAS COLERIDGE VANITY FAIR IS PUBLISHED BY THE CONDÉ NAST PUBLICATIONS LTD., VOGUE HOUSE, HANOVER SQUARE, LONDON W1S IJU (Tel.: 020 7499 9080; Fax: 020 7493 1345) Directors JONATHAN NEWHOUSE (Chairman), NICHOLAS COLERIDGE (Managing Director), STEPHEN QUINN, ANNIE HOLCROFT, PAM RAYNOR, JAMIE BILL, JEAN FAULKNER, SHELAGH CROFTS, ALBERT READ, PATRICIA STEVENSON

Editorial Director THOMAS J. WALLACE Chairman, Condé Nast International JONATHAN NEWHOUSE

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ANNIE LEIBOVITZ Contributing Photographer Annie Leibovitz irst photographed Bruce Springsteen in 1981, for the cover of Rolling Stone, then again, three years later, for the cover of his album Born in the U.S.A. For “The Book of Bruce,” on page 128, Leibovitz photographed Springsteen in concert in Paris and at home in New Jersey. “I had been thinking about Bruce recently,” she says. “I admire him now more than ever—his work as an artist, his values, his generosity, his joy. The shoot was very emotional for me, because of our history and because I love his music so much.”

CALDER JEWELLERY FOR LOUISA GUINNESS GALLERY SHOT BY ALEXANDER ENGLISH

Alexander Calder Legend has it that jewellery was one of the first things the great 20th-century artist Alexander Calder created—for his sister’s dolls. Now, a new exhibition, Alexander Calder; The Boldness of Calder at the Louisa Guinness Gallery, London, (September 27–November 5) will show Calder’s extraordinarily avantgarde jewellery alongside archival and comtemporary photographs of it on the wearer. louisaguinnessgallery.com

WILLIAM LANGEWIESCHE For “The Other Internet,” on page 170, International Correspondent William Langewiesche learned the secrets of the post-Snowden digital arms race from one of the world’s elite anonymous hackers. “In that very small community of people like him, there is an acute paranoia— security fears permeate you every moment of your day,” says Langewiesche. “It was striking after spending a week with him how that was beginning to afect even me.”

EDWARD SOREL In “The Ecstasy & the Agony,” on page 176, an adaptation from Mary Astor’s Purple Diary, out next month, Contributing Artist Edward Sorel tells the story of a star-crossed actress—the subject of a notorious Hollywood sex scandal—who became his unlikely muse. “I still believe that if only I had met her before her irst love, John Barrymore, I could have made her happy,” Sorel says.

BOTTEGA VENETA’S CABAT BAG IN CROCODILE

ANNIVERSARY

Later, Gator! When Tomas Maier joined luxury Italian house Bottega Veneta 15 years ago as Creative Director, he didn’t set out to reinvent the wheel. Instead, Maier concentrated on utilizing the house’s unique craftsmanship, of which the Cabat bag must be the ultimate example. As the brand celebrates its 50th anniversary, the new-season Cabat comes in exquisitely soft crocodile skin—quite the birthday gift. bottegaveneta.com

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NICK BILTON Wrapping up his investigation of the scandal surrounding Theranos, Elizabeth Holmes’s besieged blood-test company, Special Correspondent Nick Bilton took a quick drive to the headquarters itself, for “The Talented Ms. Holmes,” on page 154. “I imagined there’d be snipers on the roofs, armed guards, but it was really desolate,” Bilton says. “My mouth was agape when I saw only one young security guard, at the edge of the parking lot, taking what appeared to be a selie.”

L E I BOV IT Z PHOTOGR A PH ED BY K ATHRY N M A C L E OD . PHOTO GRA P HS BY CHR ISTO PHE R MI CHEL ( B ILTON ) , L E O SO RE L ( S O RE L ) , G A SPE R T RI NG A LE ( L A N GE WI E SCH E)

EXHIBITION

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MARK SEAL For “Lapo Luxury,” on page 184, Contributing Editor Mark Seal got in a Ferrari and traversed Milan, then went boating in Miami, both with Lapo Elkann, the scion of the Italian billionaire family of Fiat fame. He examined Elkann’s newest venture: completely customized sports cars, boats, and planes. “He just lives in a Lapo universe,” says Seal.“Everything there is heightened—color, energy, action—and almost everybody falls in love with Lapo and his lifestyle.”

GUISEPPE ZANOTTI’S ‘CASSIE’ SHOE

OPENING

Third Time’s a Charm This autumn sees the opening of luxury Italian footwear designer Giuseppe Zanotti’s third London store, with a threestorey flagship on Mayfair’s Conduit Street. ‘Footwear designer’ doesn’t quite cut it though, as the brand has announced that the new boutique will house not just men’s and women’s shoes but bags, ready-to-wear, jewellery, a dedicated bridal section and even children’s shoes. giuseppezanotti.com/uk

DAVID KAMP Contributing Editor David Kamp grew up 20 miles north of Freehold, New Jersey, the hometown of Bruce Springsteen, this month’s cover star and the subject of Kamp’s proile, “The Book of Bruce,” on page 128. “It’s alchemic, what he’s done with central New Jersey,” says Kamp. “He saw the same run-down, post-industrial towns that I did, but found poetry rather than dreariness. That takes a special kind of mind. He and David Chase [The Sopranos creator] really awakened my home-state pride.”

ALISON JACKSON Artist Alison Jackson uses look-alikes to explore celebrity culture. But for “The Art of the Donald,” on page 148, Jackson struggled to ind a willing look-alike for Trump. “No one was coming forward. Strange, when there were many Obamas, Blairs, and Thatchers.” Her greatest challenge, naturally, was the hair: “It was very intricate work. We had to use glue.” See more of Jackson’s faux-Trump images in her forthcoming book, Private, out this Christmas.

A RENDERING OF THE NEW NIRAV MODI BOUTIQUE

OPENING

PHOTO GRA P HS F ROM A L I SO N J ACKSO N STU DIO ( J ACKS ON ) , BY NATHA N P O DSH A DLE Y ( SE L IGE R ) , GA S PE R TR I NG A LE ( KA MP, SE A L )

NIRAV MODI

MARK SELIGER As the luxury boutiques on Bond Street continue to be revamped en masse, it’s exciting to see a newcomer amongst them. Established Indian high jeweller Nirav Modi’s London flagship is a welcome breath of fresh air to the city’s high jewellery mecca, with his exquisitely unique melding of Indian motifs, patented diamond cuts and sophisticated Western design ideals. We’re in for a treat. uk.niravmodi.com

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“We found a room in the post oice on Eighth Avenue in Manhattan, built in 1913,” says Contributing Photographer Mark Seliger, who shot the cast of the current Broadway revival of the 1928 classic The Front Page for “Broadway’s Big Scoop,” on page 168. “So it was sort of period-appropriate.” The talent quickly made the most of the setting. “They knew their characters well and played into them more and more as we grouped them together.” CON TI NUED ON PAGE 50

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MENSWEAR

Cerruti’s New Vibe Widely credited with breathing new life into Gieves & Hawkes, Boston-born designer Jason Basmajian’s fans have been eagerly awaiting the fruits of his new labour. The autumn collection for Italian brand Cerruti 1881 is the first with Basmajian at the helm, and won’t disappoint. In masculine mineral shades of charcoals and earthy browns, in leather, shearling, and cashmere, it’s the epitome of sartorial sophistication. cerruti.com

REINALDO HERRERA, AMY FINE COLLINS, AND AIMÉE BELL “To be best-dressed means having individuality, imagination, and discipline,” says V.F. Special Correspondent Amy Fine Collins. Collins and her V.F. colleagues Graydon Carter, Aimée Bell, and Reinaldo Herrera are the keepers of the annual International Best-Dressed List, on page 97, which was established by fashion publicist Eleanor Lambert in 1940 and later bequeathed to the four V.F. editors. The 2016 List—a result of tallying thousands of ballots sent to fashion observers around the world—features a mix of venerable veterans and natty newcomers. Observes Herrera, “The List, as always, is a very interesting—and controversial—salad.”

SEBASTIAN KIM Sebastian Kim shot Haley Bennett for the irst time three years ago. “Since then, she’s done so much with her career,” Kim notes. “She’s one of those starlets who are just going to explode.” Kim was delighted to revisit Bennett, for “Haley’s Comet,”on page 142. “Haley was so easygoing but so sophisticated, and really excited to get into character. She’s just easy to photograph.”

MILLI MILLU BERLIN BAG

CHARITY

A Bag, A Life

MICHAEL KINSLEY

P HOTOGR A PH BY G A SPE R T RI NG A LE ( KIN S LE Y ) . IL L UST RAT I O N BY R I SKO

Award-winning luxury handbag brand Milli Millu may have only launched six years ago, but its bags and accessories are already sold in over 50 countries. However, it’s the brand’s permanent charity initiative A Bag, A Life, which most impresses. Rather than just paying lip-service to philanthropy with a one-off donation, the company funds a set of life-saving vaccinations and treatments for children in need around the world with every single bag sold. millimillu.com

In “The Fog of Peace,” on page 120, Kinsley probes the history of the United States Institute of Peace, which was created in 1984 to “manage international conlict without violence.” Kinsley notes that, like everything in the government, it even has a ive-year plan. “It’s a good number, ive— conveniently guaranteed to put the plan beyond the next election. If the public knew that war could be ended in ive years, they might ask that it be done in four. Or at least I would.”

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ANNI E LE I BOVITZ

GIANTS AND JESTERS

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ost of us just and his performances but above take it for granted that prominent all about the personal background people present one person to the he describes in the memoir (the public and then, when they’re of distant father; the tight, workingduty, revert to someone completely class neighborhood; the continudifferent. Dr. Seuss didn’t much ing bouts of depression) with honcare for children, for instance. esty, humor, and love. Relecting Groucho Marx used to correon “Born to Run” and why this spond with T. S. Eliot. Groucho’s signature song still seems so fresh, “silent” brother, Harpo, was a faSpringsteen says something wise vorite of the F.D.R. White House that I think also applies to books, set. There are even people in this buildings, and especially to famicountry who pray that beneath Republican strongman Donald lies: “A good song gathers the years in. It’s why you can sing it Trump’s epically vulgar exterior lies a thoughtful, Diogenes-like with such conviction 40 years after it’s been written. A good song igure who will become apparent to voters before November 8. takes on more meaning as the years pass by.” Alas, much as I hate to be the bearer of bad news, this isn’t going to happen. Strip away the racism, hatred, and bullying of Trump’s n Silicon Valley, where the products can be ephemeral and the public image and you just get more of it. values diicult to fathom for anyone born before the Reagan adBruce Springsteen, on the other hand, comes pretty much as he ministration, nothing is more important than a company’s own presents himself—a thoughtful, hardworking pillar of American music, history—its narrative (real or semi-real) as told to investors and to the not to mention an extraordinary musician and performer who has trav- tech press. Few companies had a better story to tell than Theranos, eled the world for decades, most of that time backed by his legendary the blood-testing start-up that Elizabeth Holmes founded as a E Street Band. It’s just over 40 years since the blockbuster success of 19-year-old at Stanford. She soon dropped out and within years “Born to Run”—and the album of the same name—landed Spring- had raised hundreds of millions of dollars to create a technology steen simultaneously on the covers of Time and Newsweek. If there’s that the company claimed could test for hundreds of diseases with anyone you want truly to be the person he seems to be, it’s the soulful, a simple pinprick of blood. In an industry obsessed with conquering the impossible—and, of course, making the world a better gray-vested, down-to-earth guy from Freehold, New Jersey. And he is exactly that. Vanity Fair’s David Kamp caught up place—she was regarded as a modern-day heroine. Unfortunately, the story wasn’t quite that simple. Through a sewith Springsteen in Gothenburg, Sweden, where he gave a physical, four-hour concert that would have leveled a man half his age. ries of reports in The Wall Street Journal and investigations by fedThis one was about midway through this year’s River Tour, with 75 eral authorities, it has become clear that the Theranos technology could not do what the comappearances in the U.S. and pany said it could do. Indeed, Europe. Despite the punishing as V.F. Special Correspondent schedule, Springsteen has also SOME PRAY THAT BENEATH Nick Bilton reports in “The found time to write a memoir, DONALD TRUMP’S Talented Ms. Holmes,” on which is due out this month. page 154, Holmes is being I should emphasize that I’m EPICALLY VULGAR EXTERIOR investigated for allegedly havusing the word “write” in its LIES A THOUGHTFUL, ing known for years that her literal sense, rather than in the technology did not yield the Donald Trump sense of writextraordinary results she had ing. Every word in the book is promised.  Theranos operSpringsteen’s. ated under a cloak of secrecy In “The Book of Bruce,” unlike that at any traditional on page 128, Kamp talks to medical company. Holmes is Springsteen about his music

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EDITOR’S LETTER alleged to have rejected the concerns of her chief scientist, who, fearing the loss of his job, took his own life.

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apo Elkann and his grandfather Gianni Agnelli, the fabled jet-age industrialist, have made regular appearances in Vanity Fair over the years. Gianni, whose chief profession was head of the automotive giant Fiat, was one of the most stylish icons of the second half of the last century. He was a man whom women swooned over and other men emulated. As Rich Cohen observed in a 2013 V.F. Spotlight on Elkann, “Gianni wore his watch outside the cuf and hiking boots with bespoke suits, intentionally did his tie wrong, and never looked anything but perfect.” Elkann inherited his grandfather’s impeccable sense of design and style and has been inducted into V.F.’s International Best-Dressed List Hall of Fame. (Note: Agnelli is the subject of an HBO documentary due next year. It is directed by Nick Hooker. I am one of the producers.) As for Agnelli’s grandson, following successful ventures in fashion, which included branding everything from sweatshirts to luggage to baseball caps with the Fiat name or logo, and designing $1,400 carbon-iber sunglasses that were inspired by his grandfather’s allblack racing yacht, Elkann has embarked on his newest venture, Garage Italia Customs. As V.F. Contributor Mark Seal reports in “Lapo Luxury,” on page 184, the company customizes boats, airplanes, cars, and motorcycles at every level of detail and with every imaginable material, color, and design, representing Elkann’s stated ideals of rebirth and transformation. Those ideals have guided his own choices since his nearly fatal 2005 drug overdose—a bizarre and unhappy episode that Seal chronicled in his 2006 article “Driven by Dynasty.” In another act of rebirth, Elkann is renovating an abandoned modernist icon to serve as the global headquarters of his operation: the Temple of the Automobile, a sprawling Agip gas station designed in 1952 by the great midcentury architect Mario Bacciocchi. Meant to serve as both a gas station and an automobile club, and occupying a landmark site in Milan’s Piazzale Accursio, it was, writes Seal, “a curvaceous, boomerang-shaped beacon” in the city. The building was in a state of neglect when Elkann irst noticed it, but it soon will be a sensational showplace and clubhouse for Elkann’s automotive designs and his customers.

know about Sorel is that he’s almost as good with a typewriter (to use a word he’ll understand) as he is with brush and pen. For as long as I’ve known him he’s been talking about writing and illustrating a book about Mary Astor and her so-called Purple Diary. Astor played opposite Humphrey Bogart and Sydney Greenstreet in The Maltese Falcon, among other roles. She was never my cup of tea, but she certainly was Ed’s. Indeed, she had been the object of his unrequited passion since he was a kid. The 1930s scandal surrounding the Purple Diary—believed to be salacious, but never made public—reached into the worlds of Hollywood, Broadway, and publishing. It dominated national headlines. Ed Sorel inally wrote the book he had long been talking about, and in “The Ecstasy & the Agony,” on page 176, he gives us a taste of it, along with six splendid illustrations. With this combination of words and pictures Sorel achieves something Mary Astor never did—a perfect marriage.

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ou might have thought that Donald Trump was sui generis, but Britain has its own version: Sir Philip Green. (The “Sir” part was added in 2006 courtesy of embattled former prime minister Tony Blair.) Green, who has built a retail empire of fast-fashion discount stores like Topshop and Topman, is, along with his wife, Tina, reported to be worth $5.7 billion. The ruckus he has caused this year has to do with his decision to unload British Home Stores—a beloved institution, similar to Woolworths—to a former racecar driver and serial bankrupt, for £1. This was after Green had paid himself and his family more than half a billion dollars from BHS’s revenues in a span of just three years. When the chain went under this spring, a year after Green unloaded it, many of the 11,000 employees were put out of work, and the pension plan, which covers 20,000 current and former employees, was found to be underfunded by roughly $800 million. He owns three yachts. The most recent, Lionheart, a 295-foot showboat that looks like a giant running shoe, was delivered just as BHS collapsed. A few weeks earlier, he had taken possession of a new, $66.5 million airplane, a top-of-the-line Gulfstream G650. Given the mess he has left behind, the optics, as businesspeople are fond of saying, are not brilliant. Meanwhile, Green’s wife, who is the principal owner of his businesses, is a resident of incomehe great illustrator and caricaturist Edward Sorel is tech- tax-free Monaco, a “sunny place for shady people,” as Somerset nically 87, but from all outward signs he’s trapped in the Maugham once said of the region. The BHS hoo-ha made Green body of a trim 65-year-old. His sharp-edged political out- non grata in England, but even the famously lax Monegasques look, his love of movies and the stage, his readiness with a story must be worried that he is giving their country, a notorious haven or a quote, and his default setting of mordant resignation—none for tax avoiders, a bad name. Subtlety has never been Green’s strong suit. For his 50th-birthday of this has really changed in the decades I’ve known him. Talk to Sorel and you’ll learn that everything has been going downhill. party, he dressed up as a Roman emperor. Beyoncé sang at his Except that Sorel himself isn’t—he just keeps getting better. (Of son’s $6.4 million Bar Mitzvah, in a giant pop-up synagogue at the Grand-Hôtel du Cap-Ferrat. Green is brash, unscripted, lamboycourse, you’ll get an argument about that from him.) About 10 years ago I asked him to paint murals for a venerable ant, and utterly disrespectful. Who does that sound like? During Greenwich Village restaurant near my house that I was re-doing an investigation of the BHS debacle by Parliament, Green implied with some friends. By then, Sorel had been publishing work in that his current woes are the product of other people’s “envy and every magazine you’ve heard of for half a century—and I hoped jealousy,” which, “my doctor told me, are two incurable diseases.” He then added, “I have done he’d be ready to move on nothing wrong.” to the Sistine Chapel phase For “Outrageous Fortune,” of his career. He accepted SIR PHILIP GREEN on page 162, V.F.’s crack fithe challenge and painted a IS BRASH, UNSCRIPTED, nancial and business reporter tapestry of marvelous cariWilliam  D. Cohan spoke to catures—historic Greenwich FLAMBOYANT, AND Green over several days and Village writers and artists, UTTERLY DISRESPECTFUL. peered into the dark corgadabouts and lâneurs—for ners of his inancial empire. the walls of the Waverly Inn. The United Kingdom has Before long he was paintits share of problems these ing murals for another New days, but at least Green isn’t York restaurant I was a part running for prime minister. of, the Monkey Bar. What many people don’t —GRAYDON CARTER

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LETTERS

HARD LESSONS An elite New England prep school in an idyllic setting deals with some ugly history; readers celebrate a Hollywood icon’s centennial; our list of extraordinary women’s colleges gets a little longer

THE HILLTOP The campus of St. George’s School, in Middletown, Rhode Island.

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our article about St. George’s struck a chord on this side of the Atlantic. During that same period, many genteel and even grander British prep schools had similar goings-on. I, along with about 30 other boys over a twoyear period, was sexually attacked by a male French teacher. He was eventually reported by another boy and was quietly dismissed to “further” his “career” in “politics.” What was extraordinary was that parents were informed and nobody dared to take any further action. It was a taboo subject: too embarrassing to discuss at school get-togethers, at teas, or even with other parents. They all hoped that the horror of what had actually happened to their kids would just “go away.” NAME WITHHELD London, England OC TOB ER

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want to thank Benjamin Wallace for his hard work and thorough account of a multi-layered and complex tragedy [“St. George’s Hidden Dragons,” August]. Many of us have endured a kind of trauma by association and have been deeply immersed, as Wallace mentions, in supporting survivors and processing the ordeal online. Social media is both exhausting and beautiful. Maybe the nickname St. Gorgeous should stick, because through all the pain and ugliness tremendous caring has emerged. The bravery of survivors to bring the truth into the light is nothing less than gorgeous.


LETTERS

W IN THE USA: Condé Nast CHAIRMAN EMERITUS: S.I. Newhouse, Jr. CHAIRMAN: Charles H. Townsend PRESIDENT & CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER: Robert A. Sauerberg, Jr. ARTISTIC DIRECTOR: Anna Wintour IN OTHER COUNTRIES: Condé Nast International CHAIRMAN AND CHIEF EXECUTIVE: Jonathan Newhouse PRESIDENT: Nicholas Coleridge VICE PRESIDENTS: Giampaolo Grandi, James Woolhouse, Moritz von Lafert, Elizabeth Schimel

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hat happened to those students in the 70s and 80s is horrific. Obviously it was handled poorly, but to suggest that [headmaster] Eric Peterson is somehow guilty of brushing of St. George’s responsibility is ridiculous. Once the investigation was over, he opened his oice and talked to everyone. That doesn’t seem like a person trying to cover things up. He is about the greater good, a subject he not only talks about but also practices. My son was lucky enough to be an ’09 graduate. The Hilltop is one of the most magical places on earth. And not just for its beauty, but for the experiences, the bonds, and the education its students and faculty create together. St. George’s today, as run by Eric Peterson, is not the same place it was when the crimes took place.

cent female. In my irst class, one student was called on to “open” the case and then another to “clean up.” I was designated as the cleanup hitter. Later, I asked the professor why he had chosen me, as I was one of the few with a non-business background (journalism). His reason was that I had attended Wellesley. He always ended the first day with a woman from one of the Seven Sisters schools, as she would be the least intimidated in the mostly male setting despite not having had men in her undergrad classes. On HBO’s Veep, it was recently revealed that Julia Louis-Dreyfus’s character, POTUS, had gone to Smith. If Hillary Clinton (Wellesley ’69) wins in November, fiction will become reality and our irst female U.S. president will be a women’s-college graduate.

TIMOTHY STACK

JEAN MCCORMICK

Montecito, California

Wellesley ’81 Alexandria, Virginia

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hanks to Vanity Fair for including Olivia de Havilland in its Sisters Issue [“De Havilland’s Bumpy Flight,” by William Stadiem, May]. With her recent 100th birthday, the oldest surviving Hollywood legend certainly deserved a proile. If de Havilland is remembered for more than her films, it should be for the tenacity she demonstrated in winning “the de Havilland decision,” her landmark court case against Warner Bros. in 1944, which prevented any studio from stretching the contract of an artist beyond seven years. The fates of many actors were forever changed by her strength of will. Long live Olivia! CARYLIE FORTE

BULGARIA

Montgomery, Illinois

Glamour

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hank you for William Stadiem’s wonderful piece on Olivia de Havilland. For a century, de Havilland has been beautiful, elegant, and supremely talented. Her magniicent performances brought the characters Melanie Wilkes and Catherine Sloper to life and left them indelibly imprinted on our memories. And, as her decision to leave Hollywood for Paris in the 1950s amply shows, de Havilland also possesses two other ine qualities: genuineness and intelligence.

ROMANIA Glamour

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am delighted you shed a favorable light on the continuing value of women’s colleges. I was surprised to see Mills College described as the “lone” women’s college in the California/Northwest region. Scripps College, a women’s college in Claremont, in Southern California, is nationally ranked among the best U.S. liberal-arts colleges by U.S. News & World Report. DEBORAH DAVID Scripps ’72 London, England

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was somewhat shocked that in your article about women’s colleges you did not include Spelman College, a fouryear liberal-arts women’s college located in Atlanta, Georgia. Spelman, founded in 1881, is one of America’s oldest historical ly black colleges for women and is also ranked in the top 10 of women’s colleges, not to mention its long list of impressive alumnae. BARBARA WINSLOW Professor emerita, Brooklyn College Brooklyn, New York

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MICHAEL M. SHELTON

hen my daughter, Paloma Nikolic (Mount Holyoke ’14), made known her choice of college, I got used to telling people, “No, it’s not a girls’ school, with no men. It’s a women’s college, with no boys.”

Washington, D.C.

SUSANNA STARCEVIC

RUSSIA

San Diego, California

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THAILAND Vogue, GQ, Vogue Lounge Bangkok

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UKRAINE Vogue, Vogue Café Kiev

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hank you for Lisa Birnbach’s article on women’s colleges [“Degrees of Separation,” May]. When I attended Harvard Business School, in the late 1980s, my class of 800 was only 23 per-

Letters to the editor should be sent electronically with the writer’s name, address, and daytime phone number to letters@vf.com. All requests for back issues should be sent to subscriptions@vf.com. All other queries should be sent to vfmail@vf.com. The magazine reserves the right to edit submissions, which may be published or otherwise used in any medium. All submissions become the property of Vanity Fair. OC TOB ER

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A l l I s VA N I T I E S . . . N o t h i n g I s F a i r

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Gentlemanly  fall fashion 

Inside Daniel Humm’s Eleven Madison Park kitchen

p. 66

p. 68

What’s haute p. 70

2016

Gaia Repossi’s passport to Japan p. 72

HOT LIPS p. 74  … and more!

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KIN G W EAR S A D R E S S BY P R ADA; E A R R IN G S BY JE N N IFE R F I S H ER .

AGE: 31. PROVENANCE: Los Angeles. ALL EYES ON ME: “I’ve been performing since I was a child; my mother would have to pull me aside and tell me that I wasn’t onstage. I was a cheerleader, president of choir, and in the school play.” IVY LEAGUE: Aja earned a master’s from the Yale School of Drama. “It was the best three years of my life. I will treasure it forever.” SHONDALAND: After a string of independent films and canceled TV series, Aja struck gold as driven law student Michaela Pratt in Shonda Rhimes’s How to Get Away with Murder, opposite Viola Davis. “I love these women for creating an environment where we can all be free, engaged, and not worry about being perfect.” HISTORY IN THE MAKING: This month, Aja’s heart-wrenching performance as Cherry in Nate Parker’s film The Birth of a Nation brings Nat Turner’s 1831 slave rebellion to life. “I was standing on top of an auction block on my very first day—it made me superbly grateful to be living in our time.” RULE BREAKER: The film nabbed the Grand Jury Prize at Sundance and broke records with its $17.5 million sale to Fox Searchlight. “Nate went beyond what your average person in this industry can ever dream of achieving. We’ll all be able to look back and say, ‘We did that.’ We’re starting a conversation.” OSCAR’S GIRL: “I’m going to take it as it comes. For now, it fills me with joy to make my parents proud.” — KRISTA SMITH

AJA NAOMI KING

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VANITIES Market

Gucci Princetown tartan slipper, £515. (gucci.com)

Fred Leighton cuff links, price upon request. (212-288-1872)

CHECK MATE

Cartier Drive de Cartier small-complication watch, £4,550. (cartier.com)

Burberry merino-andcashmere topcoat, £2,325. (uk .burberry.com)

Plaids, tweeds, and checkered patterns are the season’s go-tos for dapper gentlemen Lands’ End silk knit tie, $74. (U.K. price subject to exchange rate.) (landsend.com)

Moscot sunglasses, £250. (moscot.com)

Gucci houndstooth jacket embroidered on back, £1,850. (gucci.com)

Rolex Oyster Perpetual AirKing watch, £4,150. (rolex.com)

Grenson Dylan suede wing-tip brogues, £205. (grenson .com)

Tod’s Sartorial leather loafers, £1,050. (tods.com)

Begg & Co. Emu Gable scarf, £185. (beggand company .com)

Sean Connery as James Bond with his Aston Martin DB5 in 1964’s Goldfinger.

Cole Haan Hamilton Grand Oxford shoes, £210.25. (colehaan.com)

2016 Land Rover Defender 90 Heritage, price upon request. (Selected U.K. dealerships)

Bally mixed-wooland-silk trousers, £425. (bally.com) Oliver Peoples glasses, £250. (Oliver Peoples stores)

Ermenegildo Zegna wool blazer, £1,390. (zegna .com)

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Anderson & Sheppard suede belt, £185. (shop. andersonsheppard .co.uk)

Valextra casual briefcase, £1,650. (valextra.com)

Pryma by World of McIntosh headphones, £378. (pryma .com)

Patek Philippe Perpetual Calendar watch, £69,650. (patek.com)

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Salvatore Ferragamo shirt, £320. (ferragamo.com)


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VANITIES

wiss-born Daniel Humm is the fêted chef and co-owner of Eleven Madison Park, and the NoMad and NoMad Bar at the eponymous hotel. Humm began working in kitchens at just 14, and at the age of 24 earned his irst Michelin star in Switzerland. In 2006

My Desk DANIEL HUMM

he became the executive chef of Eleven Madison Park. Three Michelin stars and six James Beard Awards (among many other accolades) later, the restaurant is one of New York’s most coveted reservations. Herewith, a look at Humm’s “desk”—the chef’s workstation in his acclaimed kitchen.

After 25 years in the kitchen, I walk in every day with the same excitement, focus, and drive I had when I was a kid.

I consider our pass like an operating table. It is important to see absolutely every single detail before the plate leaves and heads to the guest.

Words I live by: “Make It Nice.” These

were some of my first words in English when I came to the U.S. many years ago. Ten years later, they have become the name of our company and our motto.

Mauviel

copper pans are the RollsRoyce of cookware.

This is a firstedition Waldorf cookbook from 1896—a remarkably influential book with so many iconic recipes in it.

One of the only dishes I feel like I’ve perfected—the lavender -andThis mini custom-made grill is a fun way to bring a bit of familiarity to the table. We went to one of the best local ceramics artists to create our beautiful plateware—Jono Pandolfi.

I’ve been using Victorinox Swiss Army knives since my father gave

me a set when I was 14. It was the perfect gift as I began my culinary journey. This particular knife I personally designed.

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These are my Caran d’Ache

I sketch every single dish. Some become reality, some remain art. I keep all the sketches, marked by season and by year, and this one is for summer 2016. The page is opened to a dish called “asparagus, morels and quail egg.”

sketch pencils— the only ones I use.

P H OTOG R A P H

BY

FLOTO & WARNER

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honey duck.


VANITIES

Obsessions from People We’re Obsessed With

Haute News S U R F, S H O P, R E A D , AND OBSESS

CALIFORNIA GIRLS alibu’s Ranch at the Pier, a former baitand-tackle store, has had a chic makeover by partners Alice Bamford and Ann Eysenring. Bounty hunters can shop for surfboards, ceramics from the duo’s One Gun Ranch, and bath, body, and cashmere treats by lifestyle queen Lady Bamford (Alice’s mother). Not to mention hook and line. Peerless. (ranchatthepier.com) —A L I C E B - B

Amy Sedaris Actress, author

“I’m obsessed with starting lists.” “I’m very obsessed with my godson. I zero in on him like a cat does with a mouse.” “And then there’s the rabbit.”

EYE ON...

Riding High

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Burberry is unveiling the Bridle bag in its September 2016 collection. The Italianmade satchel is a fashionable nod to classic British equestrian designs and the brand’s outdoor heritage. (burberry.com)

Joseph Altuzarra Designer

Filmmaker Andrew Haigh. Njideka Akunyili Crosby. “I was so blown away the first time I saw her paintings.” Chef ’s Table (Netflix).

OPEN BOOK

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he iconic creative director Grace Coddington is releasing a second volume of her celebrated work. Grace: The American Vogue Years (Phaidon) features her collaborations with 17 photographers—including Annie Leibovitz, Mario Testino, David Sims, and more— over the last 15 years. A pitch-perfect, and gorgeous, compendium.

Zosia Mamet Actress

D.S. & Durga perfume. Y7 yoga. Stranger Things (Netflix).

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Wining and dining in Manhattan from uptown to downtown: (1) Thank you for being a friend! A Golden Girls–themed restaurant, Rue La Rue Café, is coming to Washington Heights. (2) A classic returns. Danny Meyer’s storied Union Square Cafe is reopening on 19th Street and Park Avenue South. (3) Keith McNally and Tom Colicchio are debuting two new restaurants (Augustine and Fowler & Wells, respectively) in the Beekman—a landmark Financial District property which just underwent a massive renovation.


VANITIES My Place GAIA REPOSSI

aia Repossi, the creative director of the fabled Repossi jewelry house, founded by her great-grandfather, is known for her lawless designs. Of duty she channels her artistic sensibilities by unwinding at her favorite spot: the Benesse Art Site Naoshima—a modern complex of museums, installations, and more on Japan’s “Art Island,” Naoshima.

FAVORITE LUGGAGE BRAND: Louis

Vuitton—Pégase Légère 55 in black (1) or Zéphyr 70 in cobalt. PACKING LIST: Books. I’m currently reading Par la Présente Je N’appartiens Plus à l’Art, by Joseph Beuys. Also a solar-panel battery charger, sunglasses, organic sunscreen, and the Ubud perfume oil from Ayurveda Apothecary (2). TRAVEL PLAYLIST: Brightblack Morning Light’s live album. FAVORITE PLACE TO STAY: Benesse

3

House, Oval Building (3). The rooms are very Japanese-like, but you feel you are projected into a future, the one [Pritzker Prize– winning architect] Tadao Ando envisions with a great aesthetic. It’s a very visual experience. WHAT TO WEAR: Vintage shorts from the military-surplus store Doursoux, in Paris; Charvet shirts or pajamas; Loewe linen shirt; straw hat from Capri (4); Céline leather sandals (5).

Museum—there’s a James Turrell piece (6) where the ceiling is cut as an artwork, so you can see the sky. It’s incredible. 4

FAVORITE STORE: The Lee Ufan

Museum. They sell small editions of drawings by Lee Ufan, and very well-curated paper goods from Japan (notebooks, ile holders, pens I use for drawing, etc.) that I love to draw on and take back to the oice.

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MUST-DOS: Read and meditate. MUST-EAT: Tofu on the Benesse House restaurant’s menu. 2

MUST-KNOW LOCAL RULE:

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You have to be quiet. For the Japanese, being loud is considered very rude.

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CAN’T BE MISSED: The Chichu Art


VANITIES Beauty LONDON CALLING

Delicately handcrafting a bottle. Insets: left, Sarah Burton; right, McQueen Parfum.

Sixty Candles

Night Bloomers enowned creative director Sarah Burton has made a fragrant masterpiece for Alexander McQueen. Inspired by Burton’s love for night-blooming lowers, McQueen Parfum has intoxicating notes of sambac jasmine, tuberose, and ylang-ylang. The scent’s intricate bottle features antiqued gold feathers—a perfect complement to the couture fashion house. (£285; Harrods) —S U N H E E G R I N N E L L

Jo Malone London debuts its Basil & Neroli collection this month. The layered assemblage of Cologne, Home Candle, and more takes an aesthetic cue from the Swinging 60s— fashionable, fresh, and playful. (From £28; jomalone.co.uk)

1

London Eye

— CAT

BUCKLEY

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cclaimed fashion artist David Downton has collaborated with Eyeko for the irst-ever beauty product to bear his trademark touch. This month, the coveted British eye-makeup brand will launch a limitededition set, designed with Downton, which puts beauty in the brushstroke for lashes, liner, and brows. (£80; eyeko.com)

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— LO U I SA

ROYAL TREATMENT

ST R AU S S

4

6

Hot Lips 1. MAC Cosmetics Liptensity in Gumball. (£15.50; maccosmetics.co.uk) 2. By Terry Rouge-Expert Click Stick in No. 16 Rouge Initiation. (£24; byterry.com) 3. Yves Saint Laurent Vernis à Lèvres Vinyl Cream in No. 402 Rouge Remix. (£26; yslbeauty.co.uk) 4. Rodin Billie on the Bike. (£28; panachecosmetics.com) 5. Lipstick Queen Black Lace Rabbit. (£22; Space NK stores) 6. Nars Velvet Lip Glide in Unlaced. (£21; narscosmetics.com) 74

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Perfumer Clive Christian’s gardens on his Cheshire, England, estate inspired Noble VII, a pairing of two fragrances arriving Stateside this month. Cosmos Flower evokes a feminine scent, while Rock Rose offers a masculine counterpart. (50 ml. for £350; Harrods) —SHG

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Æ WAGAMAMA

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GADGET GUIDE p. 78 HOT TYPE

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WHAT TO WATCH p. 82 HOT TRACKS: RITA ORA

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AND MORE …

A FINE LINE

From left: Cindy Crawford, Tatjana Patitz, Helena Christensen, Linda Evangelista, Claudia Schiffer, Naomi Campbell, Karen Mulder, and Stephanie Seymour.

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This photograph, taken by Peter Lindbergh in Brooklyn in 1991, is one of more than 400 images included in Peter Lindbergh: A Different Vision on Fashion Photography (Taschen), out this month, celebrating the vision of the German photographer known for launching the supermodel sensation of the 90s.

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FREEZE FRAMES

Inside Wagamama, the U.K.-based noodle bar coming to N.Y.C. this month.

ilmmaker Bill Morrison’s haunting new documentary— Dawson City: Frozen Time, which will have its North American premiere at the New York Film Festival this month—explores the chance discovery of a cache of century-old silent films in a once booming Canadian gold-rush town. Why Dawson City? Deep in the Yukon, it was the end of the line for movie distribution. The reels had been stored for safety in an empty swimming pool, which was covered over and forgotten. Then one day, along came a bulldozer. For Lawrence Weschler’s account of the story behind the story, go to VF.com.

— MARY

ALICE MILLER

The

WAGAMAMA WAY and inspiring empires—Momofuku’s David Chang credits Wagamama with his decision to become a chef—the beloved restaurant makes its New York debut this month. A vast space overlooking Madison Square Park bears the signature sleek interior and shared seating, while the menu features customizable ramen, weekend brunch, and Wagamama’s irst-ever full bar-and-cocktail list. Casual in spirit and elevated in style, it’s a sophisticated spot for the slurping crowd. — LO U I SA ST R AU S S

Gadget Guide 1

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The tech marketplace is littered with virtualreality headsets, but here’s an even newer device: (1) Avegant’s Glyph (£530) looks like a pair of headphones, but slides down over your face to project images directly onto the retinas. Think of it as a futuristic and discreet way of watching movies (including 3-D ilms) on

a light, or catching up on prestige TV without disturbing a sleeping partner. When you’re ready to stop being antisocial, turn up the volume on the (2) Bang

& Olufson Beoplay A1 (£188), a sleek Bluetooth speaker that boasts a 24-hour battery life and enough omnidirectional sound to power a backyard party. And

now for everyday use:

(3) Withings Activité Sapphire (£340) is a French-designed, Swiss-made watch that comes with a calf-leather strap (and an easily swappable silicone one). You can’t tell by looking at the watch that it also tracks your steps, workouts, and sleep— and that’s the point.

—KIA

MAKARECHI

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efore lines snaked around city blocks for the latest ramen spot, and the noodle boom rocked haute cuisine, there was Wagamama. Founded in 1992 in London’s Bloomsbury district, the Japaneseinspired noodle bar pioneered a democratic dining experience: serve high-quality dishes at afordable prices, from an open kitchen to a communal table. After expanding to more than 150 locations worldwide, spawning imitators,


Jimi Hendrix at home in 1967, from Terence Donovan: Portraits (Damiani), by Philippe Garner.

f you imagine all of 20th-century literature as a haunted house, the attic where Shirley Jackson’s ghost hangs out is where you want to be. Here you will ind the macabre subject of Ruth Franklin’s Shirley Jackson (Liveright). Known largely for her 1948 short story, “The Lottery,” Jackson “believed [that] her role as a writer was to draw back the curtain on the darkness within the human psyche.” Brilliant, proliic, and ostracized, she professed herself to be a “practicing amateur witch” and claimed to have used her magic powers “to break the leg of publisher Alfred A. Knopf.” So if the attic gets too intense, I hear Flannery O’Connor is rocking on the porch and Sylvia Plath is cooking in the kitchen. In other spectral news, Ann Patchett’s Commonwealth (Harper) tells the heart-pummeling story of two families grieving over the death of a child. Shawn Levy’s Dolce Vita Confidential (Norton) details the fashion and cinema of 1950s Rome—from Pucci to Peck— with love. Frances Wilson’s Guilty Thing (Farrar, Straus and Giroux) resurrects enigmatic opium eater Thomas De Quincey. Oscar Wilde’s family is put on trial in

GOOD SPIRITS

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Emer O’Sullivan’s The Fall of the House of Wilde (Bloomsbury). Maureen Dowd bakes a cookie with razor blades for the trick-or-treating nominees in The Year of Voting Dangerously (Grand Central). Jane Jacobs is mapped out by Robert Kanigel in Eyes on the Street (Knopf). Meanwhile, inally a book about rock ’n’ roll that does what pricey cable dramas cannot: Steven Blush’s New York Rock (St. Martin’s) is rich with stories about the rise of the Velvet Underground and the ruin of CBGB. James Gleick explores the subversive origins of Time Travel (Pantheon)—where else will you ind H. G. Wells, Marcel Proust, and Woody Allen bound up together? Lastly, Ian McEwan’s Nutshell (Nan A. Talese) is told by a fetus: “The Gothic has been reasonably banished,” muses the nascent narrator, “the witches have led the heath, and materialism, so troubling to the soul, is all I have left.” Happy Halloween.

— S LOA N E

CROSLEY

A. A. Gill is feared for his barbs and comic similes that would destroy any second-rate TV or restaurant. His foreigncorresponding on the lives of refugees has been second to none. He has seemed not real with his dandy suits, loud opinions, powerful friends, and worry beads, but his memoir Pour Me a Life (Blue Rider) reveals the sweetest of men—not scared to show vulnerability—recounting his redemption from death binge to journalist with such great felicity and wit. — J A M E S F O X

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HAUNTED BY Candice Millard revisits Winston Churchill in Hero of the Empire (Doubleday). Maria Semple’s Today Will Be Different (Little, Brown) tackles small ambitions. Jade Chang pulls a fresh Little Miss Sunshine in The Wangs vs. the World (Houghton Mifflin). Tracy Kidder’s A Truck Full of Money (Random House) clicks into Kayak .com’s Paul English. Patrick Hoffman’s Every Man a Menace (Atlantic Monthly Press) trips into an Ecstasy-smuggling ring. Midcentury design is preserved in Janice Lyle’s Sunnylands (Vendome). Lynne B. Sagalyn reconstructs our nation’s darkest aftermath in Power at Ground Zero (Oxford). Robert Trachtenberg captures the Red-Blooded American Male (Amphoto). Juan Gabriel Vásquez’s Reputations (Riverhead) is slim and intense. Daniel Bergner’s Sing for Your Life (Lee Boudreaux) is an underdog with an aria. Deadly secrets take the stage in Tana French’s The Trespasser (Viking). Magic and misinformation meet in Marisa Silver’s Little Nothing (Blue Rider). Laurie Wilson gives Louise Nevelson (Thames & Hudson) her overdue spotlight. Eamon Grennan’s poems sparkle in There Now (Graywolf), while ornament hoarder Bonnie Mackay explores her Tree of Treasures (Penguin). Horses (Rizzoli) appear (sans headless riders) in Derry Moore’s photographs. — S . C .


M OV I E

APP

The last movie Caplan saw in theaters was the Blake-Livelyversus-great-white-shark thriller, The Shallows. “I love a shark movie,” she says, lamenting, “I think unfortunately I am just chasing a Jaws-type of shark movie, and I don’t know if they will ever make that [kind of film] again.”

The first thing Caplan looks at on her phone each morning is her e-mail, and, if she is “somewhat awake,” she’ll then tap on the Washington Post app. B EYO N C É S O N G

“I think right now [my favorite is] ‘Hold Up.’ I’ve always been in awe of Beyoncé. We don’t have humans on this earth that are as talented as she is. It really was Lemonade that made me an insane Beyoncé person.”

T V S H OW

Caplan recently binge-watched the Netflix sci-fi summer sensation Stranger Things. “Usually I’m a few months to years behind on the things that people are really into, but this one I watched in time,” she says. “It’s pretty much all I want to talk about to anybody, ever. I am obsessed with it.”

BOOK

White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America (Viking), by Nancy Isenberg. “I feel like now is the time to pay close attention to class in America.” She says she always has a couple of issues of The New Yorker on her bedside table as well.

ACCORDING TO:

Lizzy Caplan The Masters of Sex star, who returns this month for the show’s fourth season, recommends some people, places, and things By J O S H D U B O F F

WATCH LIST

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L AT E - N I G H T H O S T

Caplan’s cat is named “Colbert,” but she wants to make sure that you know she was a fan of his before everyone else was. “I named him Colbert when Stephen Colbert was a correspondent on The Daily Show, when it was a cooler reference, and not so, dare I say it, mainstream.”

By R I C H A R D L AW S O N

What to go see:

What to tune in to:

What to stream:

QUEEN OF KATWE

HIGH MAINTENANCE

NARCOS, SEASON TWO

WHO’S IN IT

Oscar winner Lupita Nyong’o, critical favorite David Oyelowo, and newcomer Madina Nalwanga star in director Mira Nair’s biopic.

Co-creator Ben Sinclair stars, while a host of New York–y guest actors—like Oscar nominee Amy Ryan—pop up in episodes.

Boyd Holbrook and Pedro Pascal (late of Game of Thrones) play cowboy D.E.A. agents trying to nab Wagner Moura’s scheming Pablo Escobar.

WILL REMIND YOU OF

An uplifting sports drama, except about chess instead of football.

The older stoner brother of the Girls gang.

Sicario or Traffic, only with a lighter, more GoodFellas-y tone.

WHY NOW

Both Oyelowo and Nyong’o are terrific actors whose stars are ascendant, Nalwanga is a great find, and the film’s story—about Ugandan chess prodigy Phiona Mutesi—is genuinely inspiring.

This comedy about a weed dealer and his clients—which started as a beloved cult-hit Web series—is strange, hilarious, and surprisingly touching. A good, mellow high.

Well acted and thoroughly entertaining, Narcos is oddly amiable for a show about drug cartels and murder.

WHEN YOU CAN SEE IT

In theaters this month.

Premieres on HBO this month.

VAN I T Y FA I R

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Streaming on Netflix now.

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R E S TAU R A N T S

While Caplan says there is nothing she enjoys more than a night in with her fiancé and pets, she rattles off a list of her favorite restaurants without so much as needing a breath. “I’m a big fan of Cafe Stella in Silver Lake. I grew up, since I was 19, going to Chateau Marmont, so even though that place can be a bit overwhelming, it feels very comfortable and homey for me.” In London, she likes the Wolseley.


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‘ LISA ROBINSON: You signed with Jay Z’s Roc Nation label seven years ago, when you were 18. Why didn’t they ever release your album in the U.S., and why did you just sign a new record deal with Atlantic Records? RITA ORA: I released my album everywhere else, but to tell you the truth, music speaks for itself. I’m not blaming anyone—it just wasn’t the right time. Now it’s time for a change, and I can’t wait to get into the studio. L.R.: Are you still friendly with RI TA OR A Jay Z? R.O.: First and foremost, Jay Z is my inspiration and one of my idols—lyrically, musically, business-wise. I still look up to him and his wife every day. Beyoncé was one of my biggest idols growing up. L.R.: You—along with other women—were embroiled in the “Becky with the good hair” brouhaha after Beyoncé released Lemonade. You posted a photo of yourself on Snapchat wearing a bra with a lemon print from your clothing line, and you wore a “Not Becky” pin at a Met Ball after-party. R.O.: That [pin] was a present from Katy Perry. Maybe I was the only one seen wearing it, but there were others. As for the rest of it, I’m oblivious, I’m just not the gossip queen. I ind it incredibly rude and disrespectful to women in general [when] we get accused of something that’s basically against the important part—the music. L.R.: You’ve also been a target of gossip about your ex-boyfriends— including Calvin Harris, who at one time wouldn’t let you perform “I Will Never Let You Down,” the song he wrote and produced for you. R.O.: He’s very talented… I have had a few dramas, haven’t I? I think in general I’ve learned my lesson to not talk about relationships and gossip because I’ve been at the center of it a few times and it’s not worth it. And I have been heartbroken … just once. Love is so great, but it also can be the most dangerous thing on planet earth. People do crazy things when it comes to jealousy and love.

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L.R.: Other than music, you work nonstop—on a clothing line, in movies (Southpaw, Fifty Shades of Grey, Fast & Furious 6), as a judge on The Voice and X Factor in the U.K. and now on America’s Next Top Model. R.O.: My sister, Elena, and I built my brand, and while the music part may have been diicult, we never stopped, and we became professionals at everything else. But music is my irst love; it was the thing I came into the entertainment industry to do in the irst place. L.R.: Your parents are from Kosovo, your family moved to England when you were a year old, and you’re currently an honorary ambassador to Kosovo. What does that entail? R.O.: I’m probably one of the few [musicians] to be successful from my country. Women [there] don’t have the creative freedom to express themselves and be heard. I meet girls from ages 10 to 30, and I’m working with UNICEF to create a platform where these women can express themselves. L.R.: You worked with Prince. How did that come about? R.O.: He called my manager when he was in London around four or ive years ago and said he wanted to meet me. I wouldn’t have been as nervous if it had been a royal prince, but Prince … He was one of my best friends, he literally became my guardian angel. I went to Paisley Park for about two weeks, my sister came, I recorded about four tracks there… He just had my back. He was the best person to get advice from. I still ind myself looking at the e-mails he sent to me. L.R.: You should print them out to make sure you save them.

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his is the most exciting creative time in my life,” says singer, actress, fashion designer, and television star Rita Ora. But despite having had four No. 1 singles in her native U.K., she has never released a full album in the U.S., where she is perhaps more widely known for her provocative style and rumored boyfriends. Now, with a brand-new record deal and a stint hosting VH1’s America’s Next Top Model, all of that is about to change. Here, the multitalented star talks with Lisa Robinson about music, hard work, gossip, romance, and Prince.


Benefit from a secured bond


A R O U N D t h e WO R L D, O N E PA RT Y a t a T I M E

OCTOBER 2016

FROM PARIS WITH LOVE Fashion and art met philanthropy at Natalia Vodianova’s fifth Love Ball, held at the Fondation Louis Vuitton, in Paris. The gala, which raised more than $4 million for Vodianova’s Naked Heart Foundation, featured several musical performances and a live auction of contemporary art, including works by Sterling Ruby and Olafur Eliasson.

Natalia Vodianova and Antoine Arnault

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P H OTOG R A P H S

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Sidney Toledano and Suzy Menkes

Natalia Vodianova and Kanye West

Mario Testino Delphine Arnault

A performance by Bolshoi Ballet soloists Kristina Kretova and Andrei Merkuriev. Riccardo Tisci and Mariacarla Boscono

Lauren Santo Domingo

Bianca Brandolini d’Adda and Giambattista Valli

Petra Nemcova and Caroline Scheufele Antoine Arnault, Bernard Arnault, and Alexandre Arnault

Eugenie Niarchos and Christian Louboutin Chiara Ferragni and Marc Jacobs

Adrien Brody and Lara Lieto Lykke Li OC TO BE R

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IN THE DETAILS

What You Should Know About

TARAJI P. HENSON I A PA N O P LY O F E C C E N T R I C B I O G R A P H I C A L DATA R E : T V ’ S E M P I R E B U I L D E R

her frustration into her performance, which earned her an Oscar nomination. AFTER LOSING the Academy Award to Penélope Cruz, Henson remembers Pitt and Angelina Jolie rushing over to her to see if she was O.K. Her response: “I’m fine. Can I get some more wine?” (She prefers Pinot Noir in the evening and a chilled Sauvignon Blanc during the day.) SHE CREDITS Tyler Perry for putting her on the equal-pay track—with a more lucrative starring role in 2009’s I Can Do Bad All by Myself. THOSE PAYCHECKS have allowed her to collect six properties—one in Chicago (where she ilms Empire eight months of the year), two in Maryland, and three in Los Angeles. GROWING UP, Henson never wanted to play with Barbie as much as she wanted to be her. She is inally fulilling her Barbie dream in her Hollywood Hills home SMART COOKIE with a “glam room,” complete with a salon basin, Henson, a wall for her wigs, and a podium with a three-panel photographed mirror for her seamstress. “You know how men need TARAJI PENDA, the name chosen by Henson’s late father, in Los Angeles. their man cave? That’s my woman cave.” means “to hope” and “to love” in Swahili. HER PARENTS— Bernice, a department-store manager, and WHEN IT comes to exercise, she trades glamour for boxBoris, a janitor and metal fabricator—separated when she was two. ing gloves. She’s never used her punches outside the ring, but she HENSON’S COURAGE comes from her no-nonsense father, who taught her often threatens to: “I’ll hit you with a four, ive”—a right hook folhow to swim by throwing her into a pool. Henson also inherited his lowed by a left uppercut—“if you keep on.” knack for witty one-liners. If he were still alive, Henson says, he IN RETURN for ighting for Terrence Howard to be cast on Empire as would be calling with dialogue ideas for Cookie. Cookie’s ex-husband, Henson insisted he contribute to her vintage HER “HUSTLE,” meanwhile, comes from her mother. To pay of stu- Chanel collection. He bought her a caviar-black classic handbag dent loans, Henson once worked day shifts as a Pentagon secre- with gold chain—only it was the wrong size, which Henson immetary and night shifts singing Tina Turner covers on a Potomac diately pointed out to him. “I’ll hold it over his head,” she reassures us of the mistake. River cruise ship. UPON REALIZING she was pregnant in college, Henson recalls thinking, IN HOPES of being recognized less, Henson has retired the lashy ani“This is part of my journey. Act accordingly.” mal prints Cookie favors. UNWILLING TO compromise her education, she marched up to her ONE VICE her fame will never curb: her sacred Target shopping trips. acting teacher and told him not to bench her from performances “I go early in the morning now, wear sweats and a hat, and I don’t because she was pregnant. (He didn’t.) When it came time to grad- make eye contact with anybody. By the time I’m done I usually uate, Henson accepted her diploma with the infant Marcell in her have two carts.” arms. (Now 22, he is pursuing a career in music.) DESPITE HER material indulgences, Henson thanks God the moment AS A child, she studied Bette Davis, Lucille Ball, Goldie Hawn, she wakes up and again when she goes to bed, and sees acting Diahann Carroll, Debbie Allen, and Carol Burnett—the last of as an extension of her spirituality: “You are asking characters whom rendered her speechless during a meeting at the Holly- to use your body as a vessel.” wood Bowl. The experience was so exREFLECTING ON her success, Henson says, “I’m traordinary Henson can’t remember who just a girl from the hood who had dreams. performed that night. My angels deinitely looked over me.” DURING HER first big-budget movie, 2008’s ONE SUCH angel, her father, has another role The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, Henlined up for her: “He would always say, DEFINITELY son, who was third on the call sheet, says ‘You’re going to play Diana Ross. You’re LOOKED OVER ME.” she was paid less than 2 percent of what going to win an Oscar.’ ” Now Hollywood the star Brad Pitt received. She channeled just has to catch up. —JULIE MILLER

“MY ANGELS

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PATRICK ECCLESINE

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ST Y LE D BY J A SO N B O LDE N ; HA I R BY M A RCI A HA M ILTO N; M A KE UP BY A SHUN TA SH ER I F F; F O R DE TA I L S, GO TO V F.CO M /CR E DI TS

t shouldn’t be surprising that Taraji P. Henson—the woman responsible for Cookie Lyon, pop culture’s patron saint of confidence and survival—is just as fearless as her Empire alter ego. In 1996, as a 26-year-old single mother, the Howard University graduate left the basement of her father’s home, in Maryland, to move 3,000 miles to Hollywood, with only her son, Marcell, $700 in savings, and the belief that she would succeed as an actress. Twenty years later, the Oscar nominee has done just that—with acclaimed roles in Hustle & Flow and The Curious Case of Benjamin Button; a lead on broadcast television’s highest-rated entertainment program; and enough inspiring anecdotes to ill her memoir, Around the Way Girl, due out October 11. Ahead, Fox’s force majeure on the pluck, persistence, and animal prints that paved her path to stardom.


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P O L I S H A C T R E S S B E L L A D A R V I ( 19 2 8 - 19 71 ) D U R I N G T H E C A N N E S F I L M F E S T I VA L , 19 5 6 . C R E D I T: H AY W O O D M A G E E / P I C T U R E P O S T / H U L T O N A R C H I V E / G E T T Y

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RIVIERA CHIC Where it all happens in Cannes: the beach front at InterContinental Carlton Cannes

JET SET GO It’s 70 years since InterContinental Hotels & Resorts was founded with the aim of turning the world into a playground—and the company is still thinking blue sky

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t’s 1944. Three men are in a room. They are important men. One is Franklin D. Roosevelt, the 32nd President of the United States. The second is Nelson Rockefeller, Roosevelt’s co-ordinator of inter-American affairs. Together with the third man, they’re cooking up a plan. All three understand that inter-American affairs are top priority—Roosevelt is intent on building relations with Latin America as well as shoring up community within the USA. There’s a war on; the pull of European Fascism, and pro-Hitler and pro-Italian influences in South America, are real security threats. American air-travel, tourism and trade policy is undergoing major, forwardthinking review. What’s needed in the long term, it’s becoming

clear, is a way to promote trade, to enrich and strengthen Western Hemisphere economies. That’s where the third man comes in. His name is Juan Trippe, and by this point he’s been helming his company, Pan American World Airways, for 17 years. Some of the countries that Pan Am serves need lifting into the Modern Age. And the way to do this is to build a hotel—an international hotel, representing luxury and the standards of aspirational travel—at the end of every runway. The Modern Age was, indeed, on everyone’s lips. Space travel and television were just around the corner. Every American home had, or aspired to, the new mod cons and status symbols of twentieth-century existence: the refrigerator, the air-con, the motorcar. International travel fitted into that picture like a hand in a bellhop’s glove. And it was exciting. In the two decades that


followed the war, airlines like Pan Am were to turn the globe into a playground. And the new playboys—and playgirls—of the Western world needed somewhere suitable to stay. It’s no coincidence that InterContinental London Park Lane—like many hotels at the time—was designed with 447 rooms. At the time, this was the same as the number of seats on a 747. It was the dawn of the Jet Set. “The mass democratization of international travel and the InterContinental hotels that opened at the end of those Pan Am gateway routes were there, initially, to offer American travellers

10 things YO U D I D N ’ T K N OW A B O U T I N T E RCO N T I N E N TA L H OT E L S & R E S O RTS

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InterContinental Hotels & Resorts was the first international hotel group in the Middle East, with the Phoenicia Beirut, 1961

InterContinental London Park Lane was built on the site of 145 Park Lane, the childhood home of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II

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The Top of the Mark bar at InterContinental Mark Hopkins, San Francisco, was where wives and sweethearts drowned their sorrows after waving off their menfolk in the US Navy

4

Martin Luther King finished “I Have A Dream” at InterContinental The Willard Washington D.C. in 1963

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Grace Kelly met her Prince at InterContinental Carlton Cannes, filming Hitchcock’s To Catch A Thief

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InterContinental New York Barclay placed a birdcage in its lobby in 1945—rumoured to be the first in an international hotel. Guests’ birds were housed there

7

There are 60,000 bees on the roof of InterContinental Melbourne The Rialto, making 100kg of honey per year

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Elton John filmed the video for “I’m Still Standing” on the beach at InterContinental Carlton Cannes in 1983

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The InterContinental brand works with multiple Michelin-starred chefs, including Pierre Gagnaire and Nobu

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InterContinental Marseille-Hôtel Dieu is a former military hospital, opened by Napoleon III

the best of both worlds,” says Simon Scoot, Vice President, Global Brand Strategy at InterContinental Hotels & Resorts, “which meant local flavour alongside American comforts. It was Betty Draper stuff. Aspirational. The hotels that were built in the 1950s and 1960s had all mod cons.” By contrast, the grande dame hotels that had been built, largely with the same ideals in mind, by the railway owners a century before may have been stately, but they were by now outmoded, uncomfortable, and forbidding. They weren’t welcoming, and they weren’t fun. And the raison d’être of mid-century hotels was not just about providing board and lodging. It was about having a good time. And having a good time, in the utmost comfort, is still a priority today for the world’s largest luxury hotel brand. “Travel has threatened to become mundane,” says Scoot, “even in first class. People are jaded. We are bringing back the allure, the glamour of international travel, the InterContinental life. We want people to enjoy being abroad again.” Thus, this company that has been all about progress from the get-go is continuing to innovate with new service ideals, new properties, and new design. Visionary interior designer Tara Bernerd was recently appointed to develop a new design philosophy with an eye on the future. With over 180 hotels worldwide, the brand continues to open architecturally exciting and unique hotels, and iconic properties have been renovated to the highest contemporary standards. But the DNA is the same: luxury travel as it should be. The first hotel was bang on brief: it opened in Belém, Brazil, in 1949. Several other Latin American hotels followed, frequented by the likes of Nat King Cole, Josephine Baker and Ava Gardner in the years when South America exuded allure. The Caribbean followed; then, in the 1960s the company began to set its sights further afield. The Middle East was calling.

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eirut in 1961 was pure glamour: it had beaches, it had nightlife, it had sophisticated casinos; it had Omar Sharif in a velvet dinner jacket, it had Bardot in gingham. This was the site of the InterContinental brand’s first outpost in the Middle East—at the vanguard of international hotel companies. And from then on, the openings of new hotels, and historic acquisitions, gathered pace. There was InterContinental New York Barclay, an historic hotel with distinctive Federalist design details, built in 1926 (by Cross and Cross, who also constructed Tiffany & Co.) as part of the Grand Central Terminal expansion that created what is now Park Avenue and reinvented a whole section of Manhattan. Harold Stirling Vanderbilt, who among his many other notable achievements invented the modern game of contract bridge, lived at the hotel for 16 years and had his own squash court and gymnasium there—and the hotel has continued this tradition of innovation with its latest state-of-the-art renovation, just completed. There was InterContinental The Willard Washington D.C. (a hotel whose history is bound up with the history of the USA), where, it is said, the term “lobbying” was coined. This was after Ulysses S. Grant, one of several American Presidents to visit and stay there, was frequently petitioned by the public whilst taking his customary brandy and cigar in the lobby. There was InterContinental Carlton Cannes, a defining mark of the most glamorous town on the Riviera, the town that symbolized, and still

D E AG O ST I N I / G E T T Y ( B I R D C AG E ) ; I STO CK . CO M / E D D I E B E R M A N ( CO CK TA I L ) ; I R I N - K / S H U T T E R STO CK ( B E E ) ; M OV I E P O ST E R I M AG E A RT / G E T T Y ( TO C ATCH A T H I E F ) ; D E A / G . DAG L I O RT I / D E AG O ST I N I / G E T T Y ( N A P O L E O N I I I ) ; A L F R E D E I S E N S TA E D T / T H E L I F E P I C T U R E C O L L E C T I O N / G E T T Y ( J U A N T R I P P E ) ; P I C T O R I A L PA R A D E / A R C H I V E P H O T O S / G E T T Y ( P R I N C E S S G R A C E ) ; C E N T R A L P R E S S / G E T T Y ( M A R T I N L U T H E R K I N G )

“IT WAS ABOUT LOCAL FLAVOUR ALONGSIDE AMERICAN COMFORTS. IT WAS BETTY DRAPER STUFF. ASPIRATIONAL”


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CROSSING CONTINENTS Clockwise from top left: InterCont inental Danang Sun Peninsula Resort, Vietnam; Pan Am and InterContinental brand founder Juan Trippe; the Calanques at Cassis, near Marseille; InterContinental Amstel Amsterdam; InterContinental Carlton, Cannes; Martin Luther King; InterContinental The Willard Washington D.C.; Grace Kelly flies Pan Am


Clockwise from top left: innovative architecture at InterContinental Hangzhou, near Shanghai, China; the skyline from InterContinental Hong Kong’s Presidential Suite; the pod-like hotel at Davos; an interior at InterContinental Düsseldorf

70 YEARS of style

1946 InterContinental is born of Pan Am Airways, with the latter’s founder, Juan Trippe, at the helm

1949

1966

1978

InterContinental Hotel Grande, in Belém, Brazil, is inaugurated

InterContinental Hotels & Resorts is the first hotel brand to introduce a loyalty programme: the Six Continents Club

InterContinental New York Barclay, one of the city’s most iconic hotels, opens

1961 InterContinental Phoenicia Beirut opens: the first international hotel in the Middle East

1975 InterContinental London Park Lane, designed by Sir Frederick Gibberd, is opened by the Duke of Wellington

P I C T O R I A L PA R A D E / G E T T Y ( P L A N E ) ; P E R T T I J E N Y T I N / R E X / S H U T T E R S T O C K ( P H O E N I C I A ) ; R O N B U R T O N / K E Y S T O N E / G E T T Y ( G I B B E R D ) ; R I C H A R D L E V I N E / A L A M Y ( B A R C L AY ) ; E A S T I M A G E S / S H U T T E R S T O C K . C O M ( O L Y M P I C S TA D I U M ) ; P I X E L J O Y / S H U T T E R S T O C K . C O M ( C H I N E S E F L A G )

BUILDING THE FUTURE


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IN THESE HOTELS, THE REASSURANCE OF THE FAMILIAR NEVER COMES AT THE EXPENSE OF INDIVIDUALITY symbolizes, the film industry in Europe, and the scene of the first meeting of Grace Kelly and her future husband, Prince Rainier III of Monaco, while Kelly was in town filming Alfred Hitchcock’s To Catch a Thief with Cary Grant in 1955. She was to marry him the following year. There was InterContinental Amstel Amsterdam, the first “grand hotel” in the Netherlands, which over the years since it first opened has welcomed the Tsar and Tsarina of Russia, HRH Queen Elizabeth II, Henry Kissinger, Gustave Eiffel, Walt Disney, Audrey Hepburn, Steven Spielberg, the Rolling Stones, and many more. Its wide corridors were constructed to allow two ladies in crinoline to pass each other with ease. InterContinental Hotels & Resorts set great store by ease, SPA AWAY insisting hotels should provide familiar comforts for guests The InterContinental when abroad. Take their Worldly Classics: an essential edit of brand’s resorts at seven cocktails that capture the glamour of the Danang, above, and InterContinental life and that need to be made consistently Bora-Bora, below the world over. So you can rest assured your Old Fashioned will be made just so, with the perfect balance of sweet and bitter. If tea’s more your thing, you can rely on it to be correctly brewed, and served—with lemon if you’re American—in the right china. But such reassurance never comes at the expense of individuality. Hotels run the gamut from grand, imposing European establishments to the resort hotels in the Far East described by Simon Scoot as “mythical”. The latter include the stunning InterContinental Danang Sun Peninsula Resort, Vietnam, InterContinental Samui Baan Taling Ngam Resort in Koh Samui, Thailand, and InterContinental Bora Bora Resort Thalasso Spa, which pioneered the over-water bungalow. All are bucket-list hotels, extraordinarily beautiful, with once-in-alifetime spas. With its newest phase of architecturally dazzling properties in Europe, the Americas and the Far East, InterContinental Hotels & Resorts is not so much moving with the times as moving ahead of them. One of the hotels, the ultra-modern InterContinental Shanghai Wonderland in China, is dug into the cliff face of a disused quarry. Where we’re going, we don’t need walls.  www.intercontinental.com #InterContinentalLife

1987 InterContinental Cairo Semiramis opens on the site of the famed 1906 hotel by the Nile

1992

2008

2018

Bill Clinton runs for President of the USA; InterContinental New York Barclay is his headquarters

InterContinental Beijing Beichen—a key landmark on the Olympic stage—opens for the China games

The future: InterContinental Shanghai Wonderland, built into a quarry

2007 The InterContinental brand’s 150th hotel, InterContinental Dubai Festival City, opens

2010 InterContinental Hotels & Resorts opens six new hotels in China and its second in NYC: InterContinental New York Times Square


ORIGINALS PAT CLEVELAND ANDRA DAY DAVEED DIGGS LADY GAGA NICKY HASLAM

WOMEN CHIMAMANDA NGOZI ADICHIE OLIVIA CHANTECAILLE ANH DUONG AURÉLIE DUPONT JANE LAUDER H.M. QUEEN MÁXIMA OF THE NETHERLANDS EUGENIE NIARCHOS ALLISON SAROFIM OLYMPIA SCARRY ZADIE SMITH

HALL OF FAME MOSES BERKSON H.R.H. CROWN PRINCESS MARY OF DENMARK TILDA SWINTON

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STYLE

PROFESSIONALS RAINER ANDREESEN ALEX BADIA ANNA CLEVELAND DELFINA DELETTREZ FENDI GIORGIO GUIDOTTI AURORA JAMES REI KAWAKUBO GINA SANDERS

SPECIAL CITATION

COUPLES

H.M. QUEEN ELIZABETH II OF THE UNITED KINGDOM OF GREAT BRITAIN AND NORTHERN IRELAND

JOHN AND LAVINIA ELKANN JUMAN MALOUF AND WES ANDERSON BARACK AND MICHELLE OBAMA CHARLOTTE AND ALEJANDRO SANTO DOMINGO

MEN JOE BIDEN VICTOR CRUZ H.R.H. CROWN PRINCE FREDERIK OF DENMARK H.R.H. PRINCE HARRY FRÉDÉRIC MALLE LESLIE ODOM JR. VITO SCHNABEL LOUIS SPENCER JUSTIN TRUDEAU RUSSELL WESTBROOK

HOLLYWOOD

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FAN BINGBING IDRIS ELBA LILY JAMES HELEN MIRREN EDDIE REDMAYNE

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Both the real Queen Elizabeth II and “pretender” Helen Mirren are honored this year, while two Hamilton stars, Canada’s Justin Trudeau, and others who got the nod reveal their style touchstones

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TOURING CAPE TOWN IN WHITE JEANS. BOTTOM, IN A BLUE JACKET AT THE INVICTUS GAMES.

Leslie ODOM JR. OCCUPATION: “Entertainer.” RESIDENCE: “N.Y.C. ” FAVORITE DESIGNERS: “David Hart, EFM, Dsquared2.” FAVORITE SHOES: “Nike Free 5.0 in

H.R.H. PRINCE HARRY OCCUPATION: Patron of

multiple charities, including Invictus Games Foundation, MapAction, WellChild; co-founder of Sentebale; ifth in line to the British throne. RESIDENCE: Kensington Palace. MOST NOTABLE ENSEMBLE OF THE YEAR: A navy suit jacket, white shirt, and Cole Haan wingtips with a bright-blue sole, worn to a Heads Together event in London.

black or my Paul Stuart brown leather lace-ups.” FASHION PURCHASE OF THE YEAR: “Woolrich Blizzard

Parka in gray. Your coat is like your car in N.Y.C.” ST YLE IDOL: “Any well-dressed man in 1959. Can’t beat the cut and dimension of men’s-wear in ’59.”

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AT A TONY AWARDS PRESS RECEPTION IN A SANDRO SUIT. TOP, IN A J. CREW JACKET.

MEN 98

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WEARING TOMMY HILFIGER TO THE DESIGNER’S SHOW AT THE PARK AVENUE ARMORY, IN NEW YORK CITY.

Vito SCHNABEL OCCUPATION: “Art dealer, curator.” RESIDENCE: “West Village, New York.” FAVORITE ITEM OF CLOTHING: “Blind Girl Surf Club trunks.” FAVORITE PLACE TO SHOP: “Turnbull & Asser.” FAVORITE SCENT: “Orange blossom.” FAVORITE SHOES: “My Asics running sneakers.” FAVORITE ACCESSORY: “My grandpa Jack’s money clip.” ST YLE IDOL: “Cary Grant.”

Victor CRUZ OCCUPATION: “Professional wide receiver for the New York Football Giants.” RESIDENCE: “Northern New Jersey.” FAVORITE ITEM OF CLOTHING: “My Saint Laurent wool bomber jacket.” FAVORITE SHOES: “Nike Air Trainer Cruz.” FAVORITE ACCESSORIES: “Hublot

IN A JAMES PERSE SHIRT AND BOTTEGA VENETA SHOES. RIGHT, IN A LORO PIANA COAT AT HIS GALLERY IN SAINT-MORITZ.

Big Bang watch, Cartier nail bracelet, Custom Kith bracelet.” ST YLE IDOL: “My father.”

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Justin TRUDEAU OCCUPATION: Prime minister of Canada. RESIDENCE: Ottawa. FAVORITE ITEMS OF CLOTHING: “A well-worn

pair of jeans, my father’s handmade native-buckskin fringe jacket.” FAVORITE ACCESSORY: “Colorful socks.” ST YLE IDOL: “Left to my own devices, Jack Sparrow. (I used to wear capes—oddly, they disappeared around the time my wife, Sophie, came into my life.)” IN A SAMUELSOHN SUIT AT THE G-7 SUMMIT IN JAPAN.

Frédéric MALLE OCCUPATION: Perfumer. RESIDENCES: New York, Paris. FAVORITE ITEM OF CLOTHING :

“Anderson & Sheppard sport jackets.” FAVORITE DESIGNERS : “Anderson & Sheppard, Levi’s.” FAVORITE PLACE TO SHOP:

“L’Art de l’Espadrille at Saint-Pierre-d’Irube.” FAVORITE SHOES: “Aubercy.” FAVORITE ACCESSORY: “My 1960s Rolex Submariner.” FASHION PURCHASE OF THE YEAR:

“Socks from Gammarelli.” ST YLE IDOL: “My father.”

IN GIEVES & HAWKES MORNING DRESS LEAVING THE DUKE AND DUCHESS OF CAMBRIDGE’S WEDDING RECEPTION, AT BUCKINGHAM PALACE. LEFT, IN A HUGO BOSS SHIRT AND KURT GEIGER SHOES.

WEARING AN ANDERSON & SHEPPARD SEERSUCKER SUIT.

OCCUPATION: Student at the University of Edinburgh. RESIDENCE: Edinburgh. FAVORITE ITEM OF CLOTHING: “My black Diesel skinny jeans.” FAVORITE DESIGNERS: “Ralph Lauren and James Perse.” FAVORITE SCENT: “Creed Aventus.” FAVORITE SHOES: “My boots: desert or Chelsea.” FASHION PURCHASE OF THE YEAR:

“Alexander McQueen skull-and-crossbones cuf links—they’re quite fun.” ST YLE IDOL: “Idris Elba always looks great in a suit or tux. I love David Beckham’s day-to-day style, too.” 100

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Louis SPENCER


Joe BIDEN OCCUPATION: Vice

president of the United States. RESIDENCE: No. 1 Observatory Circle, in Washington, D.C. MOST NOTABLE LOOK OF THE YEAR: A pin-striped

suit and blue striped tie, worn to a meeting at Government House in New Zealand.

IN A NAVY SUIT AT THE WHITE HOUSE FOR THE ARRIVAL OF THE PRIME MINISTER OF SINGAPORE.

H.R.H. Crown Prince Frederik of DENMARK

IN A TRUE RELIGION JACKET AND SAINT LAURENT SHOES, IN BROOKLYN. LEFT, WEARING PUBLIC SCHOOL DURING N.Y.C.’S MEN’S FASHION WEEK.

Russell WESTBROOK

OCCUPATION: Heir apparent

to the Danish throne. RESIDENCE: Chancellery House,

at Fredensborg Palace, and Frederik VIII’s Palace, at Amalienborg. MOST NOTABLE LOOK OF THE YEAR: Royal Danish Navy Ceremonial Full Dress Uniform, worn to a New Year’s reception at Christiansborg Palace, in Copenhagen. O CTO BE R

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IN A SUIT AND TIE AT AN EVENT HONORING KING CARL XVI GUSTAF OF SWEDEN. TOP, IN CEREMONIAL DRESS AT A NAVAL OFFICERS’ PARTY, IN COPENHAGEN.

OCCUPATION: “Professional basketball player.” RESIDENCES: “Oklahoma City and Los Angeles.” FAVORITE ITEM OF CLOTHING: “Jeans, especially my Westbrook X True Religion jeans.” FAVORITE PLACE TO SHOP: “Barneys.” FAVORITE SCENT: “Westbrook X Byredo.” FAVORITE SHOES: “Westbrook 0.2 by Jordan.” FASHION PURCHASE OF THE YEAR: “My Tom Ford wedding tuxedo.” ST YLE IDOL: “My mom.” www.vanityfair.com

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Zadie SMITH OCCUPATION: Writer. RESIDENCES: New York City and London. FAVORITE ITEM OF CLOTHING: “Backless Osman jumpsuit.” FAVORITE DESIGNERS:

“Edith Head, Miuccia Prada.” FAVORITE PLACES TO SHOP:

“Housing Works, Internet, Zara.” FASHION PURCHASE OF THE YEAR: “Giambattista Valli pleated dress with a pussy-bow neckline.” ST YLE IDOLS: “Katharine Hepburn, Zora Neale Hurston, Angela Davis, Marlene Dietrich, Grace Jones.”

IN PARIS, CLOCKWISE FROM BELOW: IN A VALENTINO DRESS AND JEWELRY OF HER OWN DESIGN; IN AN OPENING CEREMONY TOP AND THE ROW PANTS; WEARING GIAMBATTISTA VALLI TO THE DESIGNER’S SHOW.

Eugenie NIARCHOS OCCUPATION: Jewelry designer. RESIDENCE: London. FAVORITE DESIGNERS: “Giambattista Valli, Alaïa,

Valentino, Barbara Casasola, Isa Arfen.” FAVORITE PLACE TO SHOP: “1stdibs.” FAVORITE SCENT: “Fleurs d’oranger, by Serge Lutens.” FAVORITE SHOES: “Liwan loafers.” FAVORITE PIECE OF JEWELRY: “Moon earrings by Venyx.” FASHION PURCHASE OF THE YEAR: “A

vintage Saint Laurent light-blue velvet dress.” ST YLE IDOLS: “Cleopatra and my great-grandmother Gloria Guinness.”

RIGHT, IN A SHIRT BY LULU KENNEDY. LEFT, WEARING A VINTAGE THIERRY MUGLER DRESS WITH J. CREW SHOES.


IN PAULE KA AT THE 2014 FRICK COLLECTION’S CELESTIAL BALL IN NEW YORK. BOTTOM, IN DIOR AT THE 2013 NEW YORKERS FOR CHILDREN DINNER DANCE.

Anh DUONG OCCUPATION: Artist, actress, model. RESIDENCES: New York City and East Hampton. FAVORITE DESIGNERS:

“Dolce & Gabbana, DVF, Céline, Gucci, Hermès, Phillip Lim, Rag & Bone, Isabel Marant, Sybilla.” FAVORITE SCENT: “Anything by Frédéric Malle.” FAVORITE SHOES: “Embroidered sandals from Capri, espadrilles from Spain, babouches from Tangier.” ST YLE IDOLS: “Audrey Hepburn and Manolete.”

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OCCUPATION: Creative director, Chantecaille Beauté. RESIDENCE: New York City. FAVORITE DESIGNERS:

“Brunello Cucinelli, Giambattista Valli, Valentino, Erdem, Stella McCartney, Alena Akhmadullina, Delpozo.” FAVORITE PLACES TO SHOP: “Net-a-Porter, Moda Operandi, Kirna Zabête, Barneys downtown.” FAVORITE SCENT: “Le Wild, by Chantecaille.” FAVORITE SHOES: “Chloé, Charlotte Olympia, Jimmy Choo, Tabitha Simmons.” ST YLE IDOLS: “Modern: Giovanna Battaglia. Iconic: Lee Radziwill.” OC TO BE R

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FROM TOP: WEARING DOLCE & GABBANA DRESSES TO THE 2015 AND 2016 AMERICAN BALLET THEATRE SPRING GALAS; IN A SYBILLA ENSEMBLE.

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H.M. Queen Máxima of the NETHERLANDS RESIDENCE: Villa Eikenhorst, in Wassenaar, the Netherlands. HUSBAND: H.M. King Willem-Alexander of the Netherlands. NOTABLE DESIGNERS: Natan, Jan Taminiau, Valentino. MOST NOTABLE ENSEMBLE OF THE YEAR: A nude-and-gold sequined Natan dress, worn to a state dinner in Paris.

Jane LAUDER OCCUPATION: Global brand president, Clinique. RESIDENCE: New York City. FAVORITE DESIGNERS: “Valentino, Michael

Kors, Giles, the Row, Burberry, Altuzarra.” FAVORITE PLACES TO SHOP: “Net-a-Porter, matchesfashion.com, Bergdorf Goodman.” FAVORITE SCENT: “Aerin Amber Musk.” FAVORITE SHOES: “Lanvin ballet lats.”

WEARING ELIE SAAB AT A PARIS OPERA BALLET GALA.

FAVORITE PIECE OF JEWELRY: “JAR wedding band.” FASHION PURCHASE OF THE YEAR:

“Vintage David Webb watch.”

Aurélie DUPONT

ST YLE IDOL: “My sister, Aerin.”

OCCUPATION: “Dancer and director

of the Paris Opera Ballet.” RESIDENCE: Paris. FAVORITE DESIGNERS: “Hedi Slimane, Clare

Waight Keller, Isabel Marant.” FAVORITE SCENT: “Jicky, by Guerlain.” FAVORITE SHOES: “Saint

WEARING A VALENTINO DRESS AT THE HAGUE.

WOMEN

IN DONNA KARAN PANTS AND AN ISABEL MARANT TOP WITH A CATHERINE PREVOST NECKLACE AND HERMÈS BAG.

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Laurent, Manolo Blahnik, Pierre Hardy.” FAVORITE PIECE OF JEWELRY: “A ring by Aurélie Bidermann.”

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Olympia SCARRY OCCUPATION: “Artist, curator, and founder of www.elevation1049.org.” RESIDENCE: New York City. FAVORITE DESIGNERS: “Martine Rose,

Helmut Lang, Raf Simons, Adam Kimmel, Nike, Laain.” FAVORITE PIECE OF JEWELRY: “My grandfather’s solid-gold 1980 prototype Rolex watch.” ST YLE IDOLS: “Bruce Nauman; Mia Wallace, from Pulp Fiction; The Witches, by Roald Dahl; Isa Genzken; Sick Boy, from Trainspotting; the Black Panthers.”

IN A CAROLINA HERRERA DRESS AND THREEASFOUR GLOVES.

IN HAUTE COUTURE DIOR; RIGHT, WEARING A DIOR ENSEMBLE, IN PARIS.

Chimamanda NGOZI ADICHIE

Allison SAROFIM

OCCUPATION: Writer. RESIDENCES: Lagos, Nigeria,

and Columbia, Maryland. FAVORITE ITEM OF CLOTHING :

OCCUPATION: Film producer. RESIDENCES: New York City and Honolulu. FAVORITE DESIGNERS:

“Midi dress made by my tailor Razak, in Lagos.”

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FAVORITE DESIGNERS:

“Roksanda Ilincic, Gozel Green, Stella Jean.” FAVORITE SCENT: “Fresh’s Hesperides Grapefruit.” FAVORITE SHOES: “My Nicholas Kirkwood bendy-heeled pumps and Jimmy Choo booties.” FASHION PURCHASE OF THE YEAR: “MM6 by Maison Margiela black dress.” ST YLE IDOL: “Michelle Obama.” OC TO BE R

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WEARING A TIBI DRESS AT ÉDITIONS GALLIMARD, IN PARIS.

“Giambattista Valli, Céline, Valentino, Vintage YSL, the Row, the Elder Statesman.” FAVORITE PIECES OF JEWELRY: “Suzanne Belperron vintage gold pinkie rings, Brooke Astor diamond ear clips from Verdura, and my mother’s vintage Navajo turquoise.” ST YLE IDOLS: “Loulou de la Falaise, Betty Catroux, Inès de la Fressange, Millicent Rogers, Lee Radziwill.” www.vanityfair.com

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Anna CLEVELAND OCCUPATION: Model, actress. RESIDENCES: New York City and Paris. FAVORITE ITEM OF CLOTHING: “J.P.G.

PRO

[Jean Paul Gaultier] vintage black chain-link gown.”

Delfina DELETTREZ FENDI

FAVORITE DESIGNERS:

“Margiela by John Galliano, Haider Ackermann, Raf Simons, Marc Jacobs.” FAVORITE SHOES: “Azzedine Alaïa gladiator sandals.” FASHION PURCHASE OF THE YEAR: “Lanvin nude trench coat.” ST YLE IDOL:

“My mother, Pat Cleveland.” (See page 112.)

WEARING RODARTE TO THE C.F.D.A. FASHION AWARDS.

OCCUPATION: Jewelry designer. RESIDENCE: “Italy.” FAVORITE ITEM OF CLOTHING: “Amazingly cut

sur-mesure white shirt from Charvet.” FAVORITE DESIGNERS: “Fendi,

Haider Ackermann, Comme des Garçons, Balenciaga, vintage Ossie Clark, Saint Laurent, vintage Italian Alta Moda, Capucci, and Lancetti.” FAVORITE SCENT: “Pure Gold.” FASHION PURCHASE OF THE YEAR: “Vintage Ossie Clark Harlequin dress.” ST YLE IDOL: “Marchesa Casati.” WEARING FENDI AND JEWELRY OF HER OWN DESIGN TO A FENDI SHOW IN MILAN, RIGHT, AND, BELOW, TO A T- MAGAZINE COCKTAIL PARTY, IN PARIS.

IN A GUCCI DRESS WITH A BROTHER VELLIES BAG AND SHOES, IN NEW YORK CITY.

Giorgio GUIDOTTI Aurora JAMES OCCUPATION: Creative director, Brother Vellies. RESIDENCE: Brooklyn. FAVORITE ITEMS OF CLOTHING: “My vintage T-shirts from Africa.” FAVORITE PLACE TO SHOP: “Oroboro store in Brooklyn.” FAVORITE SHOES:

“Brother Vellies, of course.” FASHION PURCHASE OF THE YEAR:

“Gucci choker necklace—simple but so fun.” ST YLE IDOL: “Jane Birkin.”

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IN A BENEDETTO ANTIMI SUIT DURING MILAN FASHION WEEK.

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communication, Max Mara Worldwide. RESIDENCES: Reggio Emilia, Milan, and New York City. FAVORITE DESIGNER: “My tailor in Milan.” FAVORITE PLACES TO SHOP: “Charvet in Paris, Turnbull & Asser in London, Uniqlo.” FAVORITE SCENT: “Fracas.” FAVORITE SHOES: “John Lobb, Belgian Shoes.” FAVORITE ACCESSORY: “Cuf links (by Tifany or Seaman Schepps).” FASHION PURCHASE OF THE YEAR: “A seersucker suit by Brooks Brothers.” ST YLE IDOL: “Gilles Dufour.”

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OCCUPATION: V.P. of P.R. and


FESSIONALS Alex BADIA

WEARING A COMME DES GARÇONS/LEWIS LEATHERS JACKET WITH COMME DES GARÇONS/ SPALWART SNEAKERS.

OCCUPATION: Style director, WWD. RESIDENCE: Greenwich Village. FAVORITE DESIGNERS:

“This season I am into Sacai, Marni, and Lemaire, but I am always into Nike and Comme des Garçons.” FAVORITE PLACES TO SHOP: “LN-CC, Soto, and United Arrows.” FAVORITE ACCESSORY: “My gold chain and medal that I have worn every day since childhood.” ST YLE IDOL: “Angel del Romero Bosch (my mother’s father).” WEARING A SALVATORE FERRAGAMO JACKET, BOTTEGA VENETA SHIRT, ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA COUTURE PANTS, ADIDAS SHOES, AND AHLEM SUNGLASSES, IN MILAN.

Rei KAWAKUBO OCCUPATION: Founder and

creative director, Comme des Garçons. RESIDENCE: Tokyo. MOST NOTABLE ENSEMBLE OF THE YEAR: A red Comme des

Garçons leather jacket, black skirt, and monochrome sneakers with a black backpack, worn to the Gosha Rubchinskiy show during Paris Fashion Week.

Gina SANDERS IN A THOM BROWNE BLAZER, IN NEW YORK CITY.

OCCUPATION: Adviser, Condé

Nast and Y Combinator. RESIDENCE: New York City.

Rainer ANDREESEN

FAVORITE ITEM OF CLOTHING:

“Akris ‘4-in-1’ coat.” FAVORITE DESIGNERS: “Karl

Lagerfeld, Alber Elbaz, Giambattista Valli, Akris, Kim Hicks, Kiton.” FAVORITE PLACE TO SHOP: “10 Corso Como, Milan.” FAVORITE SCENT: “Hermès Rose Amazone.” FAVORITE SHOES: “Riding boots from Guibert Paris.” FASHION PURCHASE OF THE YEAR: “Valentino multi-print, pleated patchwork ‘Garden Party’ dress.” ST YLE IDOL: “Carolina Herrera.”

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OCCUPATION: Artist, model. RESIDENCE: “West Village, New York.” FAVORITE ITEM OF CLOTHING:

IN A RALPH RUCCI DRESS AT THE 2015 COSTUME INSTITUTE GALA.

“The Thom Browne suit that I don’t yet have.” FAVORITE DESIGNERS: “Thom Browne, Vivienne Westwood, James Perse, and J. Crew.” FAVORITE PLACE TO SHOP: “Anywhere there is a sale.” FAVORITE ACCESSORY: “Victor Garber.” FASHION PURCHASE OF THE YEAR: “A pair of blue, light wool trousers from Marni … on sale.” ST YLE IDOL: “Andrew Egan, my muse from CoolGraySeven.” www.vanityfair.com

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THE SANTO DOMINGOS ON THEIR WEDDING DAY IN GRANADA, SPAIN, IN AN EMILIA WICKSTEAD BRIDAL GOWN AND AN ANDERSON & SHEPPARD SUIT.

Charlotte & Alejandro SANTO DOMINGO HER OCCUPATION: Co-founder, partner, Tiger Chark, a strategic-consulting irm. HIS OCCUPATION: Financier. RESIDENCE: New York City. HER FAVORITE DESIGNERS: “Emilia Wickstead, Johanna Ortiz, Brock Collection.” HIS FAVORITE TAILOR: “Anderson & Sheppard.” HER FAVORITE ITEM OF CLOTHING: “My wedding dress, even though I’ll never wear it again.” HER ST YLE IDOL: “My mother, with her incredible long hair and gold jewelry.” HIS ST YLE IDOL: “My father.”

Juman MALOUF & Wes ANDERSON HER OCCUPATION: Writer, illustrator. HIS OCCUPATION: Filmmaker. RESIDENCE: New York City. HER FAVORITE ITEM OF CLOTHING: “Old Bill Blass silver sequined dress.” HER FAVORITE PLACE TO SHOP:

“Angela’s Vintage Boutique, N.Y.C.” HER FAVORITE SHOES: “Any shoes from Laure Bassal, Paris.” HER ST YLE IDOL: “My mother, writer Hanan Al-Shaykh.” HIS FAVORITE FASHION-WORLD PERSON:

“Miuccia Prada.”

COUPLES MALOUF IN A ROCHAS DRESS; ANDERSON IN A SUIT BY VAHRAM MATEOSIAN FOR MR. NED.

Barack & Michelle OBAMA

HIS OCCUPATION: “Entrepreneur”; chairman, Fiat Chrysler. HER OCCUPATION: “Wife and mother.” RESIDENCE: “Torino, Italy.”

OCCUPATIONS: President and First Lady of the United States. RESIDENCE: The White House. MOST NOTABLE LOOKS OF THE YEAR: A tuxedo for him and an ivory

HIS FAVORITE PLACES TO SHOP:

strapless Brandon Maxwell gown for her, worn to a state dinner for the prime minister of Singapore.

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THE PRESIDENT IN A BLACK SUIT AND THE FIRST LADY IN A TADASHI SHOJI DRESS, AT A CONGRESSIONAL BLACK CAUCUS FOUNDATION AWARDS DINNER, IN WASHINGTON, D.C.

“Asian markets and Anderson & Sheppard.” HER FAVORITE PLACE TO SHOP: “Pupi Solari, Milan.” HIS FAVORITE ACCESSORY: “Italia Independent sunglasses.” HIS ST YLE IDOL: “David Niven.” HER ST YLE IDOL: “Marella Agnelli.”

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John & Lavinia ELKANN


Eddie REDMAYNE OCCUPATION: Actor. RESIDENCE: London. FAVORITE DESIGNERS: “Miuccia Prada

at Prada, Sarah Burton at McQueen.” FAVORITE PLACE TO SHOP: “Barneys New York.” FAVORITE SCENT: “Tom Ford Black Orchid.” FAVORITE SHOES: “Trainers by Gucci.” FAVORITE ACCESSORY: “Omega Globemaster watch.” ST YLE IDOL: “My dad.”

HOLLYWOOD

IN A DICE KAYEK DRESS AT A PRESS CONFERENCE IN SHANGHAI. FAR LEFT, IN A PETER PILOTTO DRESS AT THE 2015 SHANGHAI INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL.

Fan BINGBING

WEARING A GUCCI SWEATSHIRT AT LAX AIRPORT. TOP, IN A PLAID VALENTINO SUIT AT THE LONDON PREMIERE OF THE DANISH GIRL.

OCCUPATION: Actress. RESIDENCE: Beijing. FAVORITE DESIGNERS: “I’m in love

with Ralph & Russo. Elie Saab is one of my favorites, too. Last but not least, my endearing friend Christopher Bu—we’ve known each other and worked together for so long.” FASHION PURCHASE OF THE YEAR: “I fancy collecting all kinds of hats all round the world.” ST YLE IDOLS: “Julia Roberts and Monica Bellucci.” www.vanityfair.com

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WEARING ERDEM AT THE LONDON PREMIERE OF PRIDE AND PREJUDICE AND ZOMBIES.

Lily JAMES OCCUPATION: Actress. RESIDENCE: London. FAVORITE DESIGNERS: “Burberry, Chloé, Erdem, Alexander McQueen.” FAVORITE SCENT: “My Burberry Black.” FAVORITE SHOES: “Converse or Jimmy Choo strappy heels, the only truly comfortable heels!” FASHION PURCHASE OF THE YEAR:

“My boyfriend got me the small black-and-silver Yves Saint Laurent handbag. It goes with everything.” ST YLE IDOL: “My agent [Angharad Wood]! She always looks very chic and has great hair.”

IN AN OZWALD BOATENG SUIT AT THE LONDON PREMIERE OF PACIFIC RIM. TOP, AT THE LONDON STAR TREK BEYOND PREMIERE, IN BURBERRY.

Helen MIRREN

Idris ELBA OCCUPATION: “Actor, D.J., musician, producer.” RESIDENCE: “U.K.” FAVORITE ITEMS OF CLOTHING: “All

my clothing from my Idris Elba + Superdry line.” FAVORITE DESIGNERS: “Zegna, Gucci, Burberry, Ozwald Boateng.” FAVORITE PLACE TO SHOP: “Fred Segal.” FAVORITE SHOES: “Louboutin.” ST YLE IDOL: “My father.”

IN DOLCE & GABBANA FOR A SCREENING OF WOMAN IN GOLD AT THE 2015 BERLIN INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL.

OCCUPATION: “Pretender.” RESIDENCES: “Wapping, in East London, and Seat 3A on any airline, mostly British Air.” FAVORITE ITEM OF CLOTHING: “A McQueen leopard-print suit.” FAVORITE DESIGNERS: “Dolce & Gabbana, Jacques Azagury, Armani, Ossie Clark, Christian Lacroix.” FAVORITE SHOES: “A pair of boots from Rene Caovilla.” ST YLE IDOLS: “Helena Bonham Carter and people on the streets of St. Marks Place, N.Y., and Spitalfields, London.”

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Nicky HASLAM OCCUPATION: “Interior designer, amateur

architect, lecturer, writer, and singer.” RESIDENCES: “A Chelsea apartment and a

folly in the Hampshire countryside.” FAVORITE ITEMS OF CLOTHING: “Chinos, corduroys, and classic suits made by Bespoke Attire, a tailor of pure genius. Anything 40s American, Austrian Tracht, jodhpurs.” ST YLE IDOLS: “Baron Nicolas de Gunzburg and Robert (R.J.) Wagner.”

IN A TRAUNSEE TRACHTEN JACKET, TOPMAN PANTS, AND A LANZ WAISTCOAT AT A PRE-BAFTA DINNER IN LONDON.

Lady GAGA OCCUPATION: Singer. RESIDENCE: New York City. FAVORITE DESIGNERS:

Alexander McQueen, Haus of Gaga, Brandon Maxwell, Azzedine Alaïa, Donatella Versace, Hedi Slimane. MOST NOTABLE ENSEMBLE OF THE YEAR:

A white strapless Brandon Maxwell dress, worn on the Oscars red carpet.

FROM TOP: IN A PRINTED CHRISTOPHER KANE COAT AND HOUSE OF HOLLAND SUNGLASSES; IN A PINK JACKET FROM THPSHOP AND BRIAN ATWOOD SHOES; IN BALENCIAGA AT THE 2015 MET GALA.


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Andra DAY

IN A JULIEN DAVID JACKET, IN NEW YORK CITY.

OCCUPATION: “Artist, songwriter.” RESIDENCE: “Los Angeles.” FAVORITE ITEM OF CLOTHING: “Pajamas.” FAVORITE DESIGNERS: “Marc Jacobs,

Sonia Rykiel, Brian Atwood, Roberto Capucci, Helen Lee.” FAVORITE PLACE TO SHOP: “The Way We Wore vintage.” FAVORITE SCENT: “Issey Miyake L’Eau d’Issey.” ST YLE IDOL: “Lucille Ball.”

RIGHT, PERFORMING AT THE DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL CONVENTION IN A HELLESSY TOP AND PANTS AND A CJW SCARF. TOP, WEARING A VINTAGE BILL BLASS COAT ON THE RED CARPET.

Daveed DIGGS OCCUPATION: Rapper, actor. RESIDENCE: “Sort of New York?” FAVORITE DESIGNERS: “Comme des

PURCHASE OF THE YEAR:

ORIGINALS

“This crazy dope denim zipper jacket by Sohung Designs.” ST YLE IDOL: “George Clinton. I think the P-Funk aesthetic really proved to me that it’s not so much about what you wear but how you wear it. That man made a muumuu look cool.”

Pat CLEVELAND IN A STEPHEN BURROWS ENSEMBLE, IN NEW YORK CITY.

OCCUPATION: “Model, writer, singer, painter, lyricist, dancer.” RESIDENCE: “My heart. [New Jersey.]” FAVORITE DESIGNERS: “Stephen Burrows, Zac Posen, Marc Jacobs, Tom Ford.” FAVORITE SCENTS: “Jo Malone’s White Jasmine & Mint, Valentino, Mugler, Chloé.” FAVORITE SHOES: “My

golden Chloés, Christian Louboutin, Manolo Blahnik.” ST YLE IDOL: “Nature.” 112

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Garçons, Issey Miyake, Oaklandish.” FASHION


H.R.H. Crown Princess Mary OF DENMARK RESIDENCES: Frederik VIII’s Palace,

at Amalienborg; Chancellery House, at Fredensborg Palace. NOTABLE DESIGNERS: Jesper Høvring, Malene Birger, Hugo Boss, Prada, Louis Vuitton, Chanel, Gaultier. MOST NOTABLE ENSEMBLE OF THE YEAR: A Jesper Høvring blue velvet gown with sequin embellishment and a Knight of the Order of the Elephant collar, worn to the New Year’s banquet at Amalienborg Palace, in Copenhagen.

ARRIVING AT COPENHAGEN’S AMALIENBORG PALACE IN A JESPER HØVRING GOWN.

Moses BERKSON Tilda SWINTON

OCCUPATION: Photographer. RESIDENCE: Los Angeles. FAVORITE ITEM OF CLOTHING:

“A 70s-era blue windowpane suit by Donaldson, Williams & G. Ward—one of a collection of custom Savile Row suits handed down to me from Kenny Jay Lane.”

OCCUPATION: “Showgirl.” RESIDENCE: “Scottish Highlands.” FAVORITE ITEM OF CLOTHING: “My kilt.” FAVORITE DESIGNERS: “Haider Ackermann, Alber Elbaz, Chanel.” FAVORITE SCENT:

FAVORITE DESIGNERS:

“Stephan Schneider, Frank Leder, Margaret Howell, Junya Watanabe, and Levi Strauss.” ST YLE IDOLS: “Bill Doig and my father, Bill Berkson.”

LEFT, WEARING CHANEL SUNGLASSES AND A PURDEY MACKINTOSH, IN NEW YORK CITY. ABOVE, IN HAIDER ACKERMANN AT THE CANNES FILM FESTIVAL.

“Like This, by Etat Libre d’Orange.” WEARING A MAISON MARGIELA TUXEDO, IN NEW YORK CITY.

FAVORITE SHOES: “Manolo’s BB in all colors.” FAVORITE PIECE OF JEWELRY:

“My Charles Edward Stuart cameo brooch.” ST YLE IDOL: “Juman Malouf.”

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H.M. QUEEN ELIZABETH II PRIMARY RESIDENCE: Buckingham Palace, in London. N OTA B L E D ES I G N E R S : Sir Norman Hartnell, Sir Hardy Amies, Angela Kelly, Stewart Parvin. MOST NOTABLE E N S E M B L E O F T H E Y E A R : A Stewart Parvin coat and

dress in lime green with a Brigade of Guards brooch, worn to Trooping the Colour, in London.

FROM LEFT: LEAVING THE BELGIAN EMBASSY IN LONDON, 1963; RESPLENDENT IN THE MANTLE AND ROBES OF THE ORDER OF ST. MICHAEL AND ST. GEORGE AT A SERVICE AT ST. PAUL’S CATHEDRAL, 1961; WEARING THE STATE DIADEM, AN EMBROIDERED CREAM SATIN DRESS, AND A FUR-TRIMMED CLOAK TO THE STATE OPENING OF PARLIAMENT, 2002; ATTENDING A STATE BANQUET IN CANADA IN YELLOW, 1977.

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Special Citation


Presents

T V, F I L M, AWA R D S, and I N DUST RY C OV E RAG E by and fr O B S E S S I V E S

Celebrating the best of what’s on-screen, illuminating the action behind the scenes. Coming this fall

V F H W D . C OM

L AU N C H SPONSORS:


JAMES WOLCOTT

THE YEAR IN PICTURES

P HOTOG RA PH S: CL O CKW IS E F RO M TOP L E F T, BY HA IDA R HA M DA NI /A F P / GE TT Y I MAGE S , CHA RL I E NE I BE RGALL/ A .P. I MAGE S, BE RT RA N D G UAY / A F P/ GE TT Y I M AGE S, SP EN CE R P L ATT /G ET T Y I MAGE S , F ROM RO L LS PR E SS/PO PPE RFOTO / GE T T Y I MAGE S, BY E RI K DE CA ST RO /R EU TE R S, GA STON D E CA R DE NA S / T H E M IAM I H E R AL D / TN S/ GE T T Y I MAGE S, PATR ICK AVE NTU RI E R/ GE TT Y I M AGE S , I A N DI CKS O N/R E DF E RN S/ GE TT Y IM AG ES , OZ A N KOS E /A F P/ GE TT Y I MAGE S

Images conveying the horrors of 2016: loss, terror, disaster, and the Trump presidential campaign.

OH! WHAT A DREADFUL YEAR

The Grim Reaper has been working overtime in 2016, plucking beloved icons (Bowie, Prince, Ali) while gobbling victims of guns and terrorism. With “garbage fire” both a dominant meme and a reality, is this merely a preview?

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f it weren’t for this pesky election coming up in November that could determine the fate of the earth (blue orb or blighted cinder— your choice), Americans would feel entitled to blow of the rest of the year and cool it until 2017. How many sucker punches can we be expected to take? Here and abroad it has been a rotten year, one of the rottenest on record (within the last half-century, only 1968 is within hailing distance), a real Philip K. Dick acid-rain dystopian production. The Olympics and their medal glory have supplied one restorative. The year started of bad, then kept throwing beanballs as if test-

ing how much bad news we could take before we cradled our heads and moaned, “No más.” David Bowie’s death in early January, a grievous shock that thumped all the harder because his cancer had been such a tenderly guarded secret (Bowie seemed so ageless and diaphanous a presence as to appear immortal), was the irst augury that all would not be well—the webbing was torn. As one wildly popular tweet put it, “I’m not saying that David Bowie was holding the fabric of the universe together, but *gestures broadly at everything* … ” Not a week later, Alan Rickman, the actor whose coaxing voice www.vanityfair.com

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WOLCOTT and wincing smile made him ideally moving in Sense and Sensibility, died, another sorrowful surprise. Glenn Frey, the guitarist, singer, and co-founder of the Eagles, permanently checked out of the Hotel California that same January. One by one the mighty went. Prince, the purple Peter Pan of ambisexual delight, dead at the unjust age of 57; Merle Haggard (no country singer could have been more aptly named); Beatles producer and studio Merlin George Martin; the magniicent Muhammad Ali, the heavyweight champion, civil-rights hero, and trickster demi-god for whom the acronym GOAT—Greatest of All Time—was an understatement; former First Lady Nancy Reagan; Garry Marshall, the producer, director, and actor (his big scene, as a casino manager, in Albert Brooks’s Lost in America is a stand-alone classic) who gave middlebrow entertainment a slap of extra mustard; a gallery of famed, beloved authors, including Harper Lee, Jim Harrison, Pat Conroy, and, a personal favorite, the discreet, deceptively cashmere-soft novelist Anita Brookner; and nearly all of these illustrious igures gone before the year was half done, the Grim Reaper working overtime.

T

errible and unexpected though they may be, individual deaths of prominent people are swiftly converted into occasions of collective mourning that conform to journalistic rituals and protocols functioning as shock absorbers. The meaning of their lives acquires greater height in their passing as the homages are paid. It is the sporadic barrage of anonymous deaths in droves that becomes more than the mind can withstand—a cluster-bomb attack on the psyche. All those innocent lives cut viciously short—and for what?—defy the platitudes laid like Easter lilies in the eulogies to the famous. Try making sense of the truck attack in Nice, France, that killed 85 people, 10 of them children attending what was likely their irst Bastille Day celebration. It requires a spreadsheet to keep track of all the ISIS or ISIS-inspired attacks in 2016, from the attack on the airport in Istanbul (45 dead, more than 200 injured) to the car bombing of a shopping district in Baghdad (more than 300 dead) to the suicide bombing in Kabul (80 dead, hundreds injured) to the stabbing sprees in London and Germany. And on top of the terrorism abroad, the auto-terrorism practiced in the United States to a numbing, unconscionable, disgracing degree—the gun slaughters erupting so fast and furious that the daily news becomes a daisy chain of psychotic outbreaks, hate crimes, and ISIS-copycat spasms with mounting casualty tolls as assault riles rake the land. “Mass shootings are already far ahead of last year’s pace,” ran the headline on the PBS site, and this was in February, our homegrown mass murderers just getting warmed up for the year

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ahead. “So far in 2016,” wrote Laura Santhanam and Megan Crigger, “49 mass shootings in the United States have left 73 people dead and 178 wounded, according to data collected from a Reddit thread that chronicles gun violence through crowdsourcing news reports. The subreddit’s criteria counts a shooting if a minimum of four people are wounded by gunire.” In June, a one-man mass-murder binge at a gay nightclub in Orlando, Florida, more than qualiied. It left 49 dead, 53 wounded, and the killer himself a bullet-torn corpse. In July, an ambusher opened fire on Dallas police, killing ive and wounding seven others, plus two civilians; the shooter, killed in the subsequent standof, was an Afghan-war army-reserve veteran retaliating in his mind for the murders of black civilians by law enforcement, of which there have been too intolerably many. An unarmed black behavior therapist, trying to calm down a patient, got shot even though he had his arms raised in surrender—“Sir, why did you shoot me?” he asked, to which the police oicer responded, “I don’t know.” That’s where we are now in the shooting gallery of the streets. One of the greatest intellectual frauds ever perpetrated and parroted—one of the primary articles of faith among libertarians and alt-right absolutists— was Robert A. Heinlein’s maxim that “an armed society is a polite society.” Which makes all of these massacres, what, breaches of etiquette? Part of the country’s eroding morale can be traced to the fact that no matter how high the casualty toll, how young the victims (a recent murder-suicide of a family made national headlines because one of the victims was a two-year-old heart-transplant recipient), the carnage continues because the N.R.A. holds veto power over even the smallest worm-inch toward gun safety. The political leadership seems to be determined to Second Amendment ourselves mad.

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t is not a sign of a flourishing culture when “garbage ire” (or “dumpster ire,” if that’s your preference) becomes the dominant meme, metaphor, and GIF. “Garbage fire” isn’t a colorful new addition to the vernacular—it has been sourced back to 2009—but the shambling spectacle of Donald Trump making a travesty of a mockery of a sham of himself, politics, and the dying beast of the Republican Party has had a pyromaniac efect. “Donald Trump’s Campaign Is Already an Absolute Garbage Fire,” declared a June headline on the Huington Post, countered two weeks later by a story on Slate that argued, au contraire, “Trump’s Campaign Wishes It Were a Garbage Fire. Garbage Fires Get the Job Done.” Meanwhile, New York magazine posts an irregular series of political updates titled “Donald Trump’s Campaign Is a Garbage Fire, ” which has a certain Sesame Street swing to it. “Garbage ire” is a

descriptive of wide application. I heard the New York Giants offensive line justly maligned as a garbage ire—and this was even before pre-season games had started—and Wired magazine touted its review of the DC Comics nihilistic grunge-fest Suicide Squad on Twitter with the rueful warning “Suicide Squad is the movie this garbage ire of a year deserves.” Considering how big a hit Suicide Squad was, it would appear to be the movie its garbage audience deserves, too—Comic-Con’s answer to Trash Humpers. But perhaps the most symbolic garbage ire of 2016 was the actual garbage ire in Mumbai at the city’s oldest garbage dump, Deonar, a conlagration that sent @vf.com To visit James up plumes of smoke that Wolcott’s B L O G , could be seen from space, go to VF.COM/ as CNN reported. “The WOLCOTT. cause of the ires remains under investigation,” reported Euan McKirdy and Mallika Kapur, “though authorities say the blazes could have been triggered by combustible gases from disintegrating garbage.” It isn’t too much of a strain to speculate that combustible gases from disintegrating garbage may account for so much that alicts us today, by which I intend no disrespect to Hoda and Kathie Lee. A garbage ire viewable from any lying saucer making the rounds is symptomatic of an overheated, overcrowded, overwhelmed home planet whose hospitality has been mistreated, its resources plundered, fouled, and depleted, and, at the risk of anthropomorphizing, a planet that is exhausted and sick of having us around. It’s been a good run these thousands of years, but, to quote Peter Fonda’s gnomic biker in Easy Rider, “we blew it.” The arrival of the Zika virus and the widespread revival of malaria in Venezuela are ravaging signs of myopia and mismanagement. Global warming is no longer a futuristic scenario but is unfolding right outside the front door, so inarguably evident that in a dozen years or so even a Republican might be candid enough to admit it. “Hottest ever June marks 14th month of record-breaking temperatures,” proclaimed a headline in The Guardian, not the sort of consecutive streak conducive to a comfortable, kick-back leisure lifestyle, much less human survival. Habitat loss, species extinction, rising oceans, sunken cities, droughts, wildires, melting ice caps—we’re in the early preliminaries, and no Instagram ilter is going to kissy up the realities ahead. Perhaps the reason 2016 feels so depressing is that it doesn’t seem like an anomalous one-of but a preview of coming attractions. No wonder some billionaires want to establish a colony on Mars and leave us teeming masses to teem for ourselves. But if they’re going to vacate the premises, could they at least take Trump Family Robinson with them? They owe us that much.  OC TOB ER

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ACCE SS P HOTOG RA PH S: CL O CKW I SE F RO M TO P L E F T, BY J U STI N B I SH OP, DE WE Y N I CKS, KATHRYN M A C LE O D, BE N PARK

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MICHAEL KINSLEY

MESSAGE: I CARE Ronald Reagan, for all his rhetoric, wanted to show he had a gentler side. Three decades later …

THE FOG OF PEACE Ronald Reagan created the U.S. Institute of Peace in 1984, as a sop to the anti-nuclear movement. Before long, Congress gave it a new, $111 million building just off the Mall, making it untouchable. So how’s the mission going?

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ave you noticed how much more peaceful the world has become since 1984? I certainly haven’t. The news seems as blood-drenched as ever, if not more so. Yet 1984 was the year President Ronald Reagan signed into law the bill creating the United States Institute of Peace. Then, in 1996, in recognition of the Institute’s “contributions to international conlict management”—and presumably instead of a Medal of Honor or a glass stele engraved with inspirational words from Gandhi or Albert Schweitzer—Congress gave the Peace

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Institute a gorgeous (in my view) new building designed by the Canadian-Israeli architect Moshe Safdie. The Safdie building, just of the Mall, competes for attention with the Smithsonian’s about-to-open National Museum of African American History & Culture, just down the street. If you’re simply stamping millions of Social Security checks all day, linoleum and wallboard are good enough for you. When your remit is the end of war, you deserve something grander. Truth be told, the Institute of Peace was OC TOB ER

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KINSLEY not really Reagan’s thing. He was more of a “peace through strength” kind of guy. But in the early 1980s—primarily because of Reagan’s election—the country and the world were in one of their regular lathers about the danger of nuclear war. Not that the danger wasn’t—and isn’t—real, but was it any greater or smaller than it had been six months previously? Recurrent eruptions of nuclear alarm seem to have little to do with any increase or decrease in the actual risk. As Reagan took oice, a stunningly foolish book called The Fate of the Earth— think Thomas Piketty and multiply by 50— became a worldwide best-seller, raising the specter of little things such as civil liberties having to be abolished in order to focus on ending the threat of nuclear war. Antinuclear hysteria was outgrowing its home in what we now would call the Bernie Sanders left, swallowing conventional liberalism whole, and even starting to make inroads among the corporate-establishment elite. The Institute of Peace was a sop. It was meant to show that Reagan did, too, care about avoiding nuclear war. So there. The Institute of Peace also turned into a highly convenient place to stash underemployed and—as they thought—underappreciated Reaganite thinkers. The original board of directors (15 of them!) included once familiar names such as Father Richard John Neuhaus, W. Scott Thompson, Evron Kirkpatrick (husband of Jeane), and so on. The names may mean nothing to you, but anyone around during the 80s will recognize something immediately: these were neoconservatives. And that was an odd development. The characteristic that distinguished neoconservatives from plain old conservatives back then was a greater willingness—if not eagerness—to solve the world’s problems by force. The

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“organized the irst ever Northern Nigeria Governors Forum, which addressed important peace and stability issues.” Tell me you can’t read that and smell the any organizations adopt a mis- bullshit. It’s just “jobs for the boys,” as sion statement or a creed of union leaders once said, back when there some kind. The U.S.I.P. has a were union leaders. The notion of the United States as a Vision, a Mission, and no fewer than six Core Principles. The Vision is “a world bringer of peace through tiny projects in without violent conlict.” One of the Core distant parts of the world will strike many Principles is that “conflicts can be re- people as unintentionally hilarious. No solved without violence.” And? Well, it’s country has brought more war to more never been done before and would seem places on the planet in recent years than to require a major change in human na- the United States has. Even if every one ture, so maybe the experiment deserves a of these interventions had been morally bit longer than 32 years to play itself out. sound and, in practice, fantastically sucAnd to be fair to the Institute, it does have cessful, we’d still be underwater in terms a fairly rigorous standard for what it will of lives lost and general all-around misery. and will not do. As part of its Mission, the No matter how many lives are saved by Institute has wandered far from nuclear persuading both sides to take up knitting war and is developing expertise in how to and together make a machine-gun cozy, negotiate with vicious local troublemakers. that number will be fewer than the numIt believes in small-scale interventions of ber who have died because of military opthe Peace Corps variety, working closely erations or the shortages of medicine and with local elements that will help to stop food that go with them. “So true, darling, so true,” yawned Arithe killing. So what is so terrible about spending $35 million a year and support- anna, a bit groggy from too much sleep. ing a staf of 173 people in a $111 million “We must encourage everyone to do yoga, building just to see if this kind of thinking eat holistically, and … and I can’t rememcan work? Answer: nothing is wrong with ber the third thing.” Especially now that it has a new buildit, except that all of human history suggests ing, the Institute of Peace will never be that it cannot work. No doubt the Institute of Peace has abolished, or even seriously re-examined. done some good in the world. But the heart Although logically it should be the reverse, sinks to read, on the Institute’s home page, a new building almost always leads to the in a short list of the organization’s proud- establishment of a fellowship program. est accomplishments, that the U.S.I.P. Fellows and former fellows soon form an “implements Generation Change, a pro- alumni organization, along with trustees, gram dedicated to empowering and build- directors, award winners, and anyone else ing the capacity of emerging youth leaders who happens to be around. One day you look up and the Institute of Peace in their communities.” Or that has become untouchable. People the U.S.I.P. are wandering Capitol Hill saying things like “You know, the whole shebang costs less than running an aircraft carrier for 43 seconds” (or whatever farcically small number seems appropriate). The comparison can be with anything, but it’s usually an aircraft carrier, since the size of one is the most notable thing about it. That said, it is equally true that for the cost of only 73 (caution: another made-up number) years of the Institute for Peace you could buy yourself an aircraft carrier. And it’s a nice question which of them will do more for peace. I’m not among those who believe that Reagan’s PEACE-MONGERING defense buildup won Who can the Cold War. But object to waging I’m not sure the irstpeace? The only ever Northern Nigepotential obstacle appears to be ria Governors Forum human nature. could have pulled it of, either.  Institute of Peace, if it stands for anything, must stand for the notion that international disputes can be settled without war.

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iring a social-media manager is like handing your car keys over to someone you’ve had cofee with once, maybe twice. Sure, he seems nice; his shirt is tucked in; he appears to have a handle on the basic workings of Twitter and Facebook and Instagram—have at it! And just like that, he has your Twitter password and he’s going to take your account out for the day. He may make a few wrong turns, run a few red lights—you see where we’re going with this—but he’ll have it back for you in the garage by nightfall. Sometimes, though, the car gets totaled and you have to take the keys back. In May, New York City mayor Bill de Blasio hired Scott Kleinberg, who had been running social media at the Chicago Tribune, as his social-media director, one of the more high-proile digitalmanagement positions, at least in the STORM WATCH political realm. After just eight Kanye West runs weeks, Kleinberg quit, writing some—though clearly not all—of his on Facebook that his “dream tweetstorms by job” had turned out to be just co-manager the opposite. “I tried to stick it Scooter Braun. out, but it was impossible,” Kleinberg wrote, explaining he had to leave for “the sake of my health and my sanity.” He vented that he was working “13 hour” days (plus weekends) in the role and also said the mayor’s oice had mandated that he get approval on anything he posted, even on his personal social-media accounts. Kleinberg declined to discuss his shortterm gig working for the mayor and sounded uncomfortable when the conversation veered close to politics. But he was conident, and Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook calm, when I asked him to share the most may be essential to modern fame, but many important piece of social-media advice he gives to people he works with: “My key thing stars and politicians can’t (or won’t) that I tell people is just to be yourself. Don’t pretend like you have to put on this ridicuhandle them. It’s the social-media manager who lous persona.” His speech sped up when exkeeps a celeb on message, out of plaining the occasional phoniness of celebrity social-media output. “Of course, there trouble, and—above all—“authentic” are celebrities out there who hire ghostwriters, and it isn’t actually them, and you don’t know—they try to pass it of,” he said. “It’s By JOSH DUBOFF

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not necessarily as authentic an experience as you think, although some fans don’t know the diference, [and] some fans don’t care.” He concluded, with the slightest hint of despair, “You just, you don’t, you don’t know.” A City Hall spokeswoman gave a statement regarding Kleinberg’s departure: “New York City government is a tough, fastpaced job that is not for everyone.” Kleinberg deleted his Facebook post about his illfated City Hall tenure, though nothing can ever be completely erased when it comes to social media. The screenshots linger.

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n the current cultural climate, having a social-media presence is essentially mandatory for any up-and-coming singer or actor or model (or politician); a 20-year-old industry newcomer without a single digital account would be like someone showing up to a black-tie wedding in a ripped T-shirt—or, more precisely, like someone not showing up to the wedding at all. Though it can be easy to forget now, there was a time before Facebook (founded in 2004), Twitter (which debuted in 2006), or Instagram (released in 2010), an age prior to Donald Trump tweets, Kim Kardashian selies, all-caps Kanye West Twitter monologues, and glistening Taylor Swift Fourth of July Instagrams. Nowadays, we don’t read about celebrity engagements or pregnancies in newspapers, or even on blogs; we find out from the celebrities themselves, on their Twitter and Instagram accounts. The numbers are staggering, across all ields: actor Vin Diesel surpassed 100 million Facebook likes this summer; pop star Katy Perry has accumulated more than 92 million Twitter followers; soccer player Cristiano Ronaldo’s Instagrams are seen by more than 74 million people. And we, those millions, watch, enraptured. We see photos of celebrities’ babies for the irst time on social media; we learn what movies stars will be appearing in and when those movies will be released; and—in the case of the Kardashians and their seemingly all-access Snapchat accounts—hell, we basically take showers and eat all their meals with them, too. Casting decisions are sometimes made based on which actor has the largest socialmedia following. (“If it came down to two professional actors … we’d go with the one who could get the [social-media] numbers,” a casting director told the Wrap in 2015.) Brands hire Instagram-popular stars to appear in their campaigns, such as Calvin Klein’s recent omnipresent ads starring Kendall Jenner and Justin Bieber. In the case of DJ Khaled and his popular Snapchat account (which led to a self-help book, to be released in November), or Anna Kendrick and her pithy Twitter account (which led to her book of essays, also due in November), projects and deals are regularly set into motion OC TO BE R

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based on celebrities’ social-media prowess. Long gone are the days of being able to admire your favorite celebrity only as she stared at you from a poster on your bedroom wall, or as he grinned at you from the cover of a magazine: now they live inside your phone. And they always have a lot to say (mostly about themselves), and a whole bunch of pictures to show you. While some celebrities out there are handling this output mostly on their own—especially ones who grew up with technology and are very comfortable expressing themselves

theAudience, such as Charlize Theron and Emma Watson, would ofer general guidelines for the company about what their social feeds should look like, and then let theAudience more or less take it from there (in Theron’s case, she was primarily interested in promoting her charitable efforts; Watson wanted to keep the focus on her acting work), there were others, such as Tyra Banks, who, per a former theAudience employee, would want to “see and review, and copyedit herself,” any copy that was posted on her pages. There were about 10 people

CASTING DECISIONS ARE SOMETIMES MADE BASED ON SOCIAL-MEDIA FOLLOWING. digitally—the social-media age also means a new kind of professional has arisen, in the semi-shadows, around the famous people themselves. They can go by any one of a number of names: digital strategist, socialmedia manager, brand consultant. In certain cases, the job is taken on by a publicist or an assistant or “someone at the label.” It could be one person, or a team of 10. But every celebrity, to some extent, has a force behind the scenes, aiding or guiding him or her in tweeting, Instagramming, and Facebooking. Tweet Beginnings

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ven as recently as 2012, high-proile actors and musicians were not, for the most part, spending a whole lot of time worrying about their social-media accounts. Ashton Kutcher had reached a million followers on Twitter several years earlier, in 2009, and Facebook had become a unifying cultural juggernaut. But there was still a wide swath of celebrities not on social media, and one could imagine a publicist hypothesizing that, as MySpace or Napster had, Twitter and Facebook might soon dissolve in the digital rearview mirror. Patrick Mulford, chief creative officer of theAudience, a company founded in 2011 to help celebrities build and maintain their social-media accounts, told me that when he joined the organization, in 2013, many of the celebrities they would meet with were not at all enthused about the platforms. “When we irst started publishing for celebrities, not only did they not really think about social media to any great extent, they were very cynical about it,” Mulford said. In spite of this apathy, many celebrities still signed on, encouraged by their management, perhaps influenced by theAudience’s two high-proile co-founders, Ari Emanuel and Sean Parker. While some actors who partnered with

working for the company initially, but the operation quickly grew to about 150 people; theAudience’s copywriters—who worked on accounts for celebrities ranging from Hugh Jackman to rapper Azealia Banks—would typically draw up a plan for a given month of Facebook content, based on many conversations with either the celebrity or his or her team, and, once they had approval, they would schedule the posts, timed to the actor’s or artist’s upcoming release dates and appearances. If you’ve ever matched with someone on a dating app, and then handed your phone over to a good friend and pleaded, “Can you just talk to them for me?,” and let your friend take the reins, well, theAudience was basically the celebrity social-media version of that. As theAudience’s third co-founder, Oliver Luckett, explained it to me, a major part of the job, at that point in time, was simply working with the celebrity to determine what it was he or she had to say. “We had to create the architecture. We had to sit down with someone and say, ‘What are your ive buckets of content?,’ ” Luckett told me on the phone from the Copenhagen airport a few days after he had attended Lindsay Lohan’s 30th-birthday celebration in Mykonos. “ ‘Are you a humanitarian? Are you interested in short ilms? Do you like movies? Do you like music? What clothes do you like?’ You just kind of had to break [it] apart and say, ‘Here are going to be the story lines this month.’ ” After a few years, a shift occurred, though, as theAudience saw an opportunity to align itself with brands, as opposed to the celebrities themselves. (McDonald’s, American Express, Ford, and Universal are among its current clients.) “The main reason [for the switch] was that the celebrities wanted more money, and they weren’t necessarily interested in creating content,” Mulford told me. “You look at how www.vanityfair.com

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SOCIETY anybody to know that someone is publishing on their behalf.” Yes, that “someone”: for artists who are touring, or working on location, or otherwise uninterested or occupied, the social-media manager often serves as translator, interpreter, gatekeeper, and JudyGreer-supportive-best-friend character all in one.

much money is being made with celebrities, it was hardly close to the same amount as there was working with brands.” The Quest for Authenticity

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ablee, which helps businesses process and parse social-media content, echoed Cooper’s take. “The whole challenge of celebrity in bygone eras was what you can manage to conceal from the public,” she told me. “It’s so interesting that now the challenge of celebrity is how to really open the loodgate and reveal as much as possible about how you’re living in the world.” But just because it seems organic and authentic—just because it would be nice to believe that Chris Hemsworth wants you to see his biceps curls because he has access to your dream journal and is willing to share that experience with you, or that Ariana Grande wants to live-stream a dance party with her backup dancers and friends because she wishes you were there bopping with them—doesn’t mean it’s really that simple. “No matter how organic it looks and feels, it’s no longer simply a person who happens to be famous generating content on a daily basis that they feel is interesting,” Cooper said. “That may be one part of it, but underneath it all there’s deinitely the notion that this is a way to market their products. This is a way to build their ‘brand,’ a way to shore up their fan base.” And there are often many others involved. “These stars [now] have a lot of help from diferent people to publish this stuf,” Mulford said. “But they certainly don’t want

he summer of 2016 has been dominated by—in addition to the inexplicable resurgence of both chokers and Pokémon—Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump’s Twitter skirmishes, which have seemed to receive as much attention as, if not more than, what the candidates say on the actual campaign trail. Even if the candidate is authoring the tweet, though, he or she is not usually doing the posting him- or herself. Trump is not crafting hashtags as he gets a pedicure in a bronze bathtub from a posse of four European supermodels (actually, he may be), nor is Clinton uploading memes to the Twitter app as she sits upright in a hotel room, picking at a Cobb salad, while Bill lounges in an armchair across the room, also silent, lipping through a newspaper (actually, she might be). The man who runs Trump’s social accounts, Dan Scavino Jr., was—this is not a joke—a 16-year-old caddie at a country club in Briarclif Manor, New York, when he met The Donald, in 1990. After accompanying Trump on the course, he rose up the ranks in the organization, eventually becoming the general manager of Trump National Golf Club, Westchester. Now in his 40s, Scavino is the man in charge of the Trump social-media operation. While Trump’s tweets are characterized by a particular punchy vernacular (“Sad!” “Loser!” “I told you!”), the authorship of each tweet is left purposefully vague. When Trump received widespread criticism for a July tweet criticizing Clinton that included what was widely perceived to be a Star of David (pictured with the words “Most Corrupt Candidate Ever” over a pile of bills), the blame was—conveniently, for Trump—placed on Scavino. (“The sherif’s badge—which is available under Microsoft’s ‘shapes’—it with the theme of corrupt Hillary and that is why I selected it,” Scavino said in a statement, explaining he had found the image on an anti-Clinton Twitter account.) As for Trump’s follow-up tweet, featuring a Frozen coloring book adorned with a so-called sherif’s star, The Washington Post reported that Trump chum Newt Gingrich and Trump himself had “kicked around” ideas for a response, which led to the crafting of the tweet—though this detail, OC TOB ER

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he word “authenticity” came up about once every three minutes in all the discussions I had with social-media managers, experts, and the celebrities themselves—and, almost every time, my thoughts would turn to Rihanna. (To be fair, my thoughts turn to Rihanna immediately in almost all contexts.) In 2012, around the same time as the release of her seventh album, aptly titled Unapologetic, Rihanna’s socialmedia presence seemed to shift. Previously, the posts on her accounts had been bland and oriented around TEAM EFFORT promoting her Hillary Clinton’s music, seemcampaign says ingly posted they make it “pretty by her label. clear that not But, at about everything comes ... this point, as from Hillary herself.” if the “real” Rihanna had been unlocked by some kind of video-game cheat code, the singer began posting content that felt, wholly, like “the real her.” She would share photos of silly and strange ofthe-cuf moments with longtime friends; she would “clap back” to haters on Twitter; she would post video clips from raucous parties (and chill parties, too). She went from coming across as a cipher to … well, coming across like one of your friends from college who was always up to something wild, of to a warehouse party at two A.M. when you were ready to call it a night. Rihanna was not the irst celebrity to embrace his or her “true” persona on social media, but her shift was one of the most pronounced, and indicative of an overall trend as celebrities moved away from working with consultancies, such as theAudience, and decided to take more control. Yes, they (in most cases) still had help, but it was handled less overtly. “Most of the celebrities that actually have been efective on [social media] deinitely are willing to allow a pretty high level of transparency,” mused Frank Cooper, chief marketing officer at BuzzFeed (and formerly C.M.O. of global consumer engagement at PepsiCo), citing Rihanna and also Taylor Swift as celebrities who have managed to perfect the “authenticity” smoothie recipe, making their fan bases feel as if they know them intimately. “They don’t have to produce everything, but they need to be at the center of the interaction with their audience and with their followers.” Tania Yuki, founder and C.E.O. of Share-


notably, emerged after Scavino’s statement. For Clinton’s accounts, there is more transparency in terms of who is doing the actual tweeting. “I think we’re pretty clear that not everything on Twitter comes from Hillary herself,” Clinton’s digital director, Jenna Lowenstein, told me. “Certainly, ‘Do you want to build a strawman?’ [Clinton’s retort to Trump’s Frozen tweet], I think it’s safe to say, was not direct from her mouth, but the signed tweets are messages that are from her. The unsigned ones are from campaign staf.” Lowenstein would not reveal the number of people on her social-media squad (the entire digital team has been estimated at 100 people) but said the number of employees brainstorming Twitter responses is “probably fewer people than you’d expect.” She continued: “It’s not a laborious process. If there’s a great idea, it gets out into the world.” (Clinton herself is “actively involved on Twitter, as you can tell from her volume of signed tweets,” Lowenstein said.) Lowenstein said that the primary objective of the Clinton social-media efort is to use their platforms (and they use them all, including Snapchat and Pinterest) to “give people time with [Clinton].” Lowenstein explained, “Hillary Clinton is one of the most known women in the world, but people don’t actually necessarily know things about her.” She said that responding rapidly to tweets from Clinton’s foes, especially Trump, is essential. “[Trump] has a unique ability, I think, to create conversation on Twitter, and so we know it’s really important for us to be there,” she said. “He’s good at Twitter insofar as he gets a lot of re-tweets sometimes, but his message, we believe, is going to be abhorrent to a lot of the American people, and so we at social media have to make sure people are seeing what he is saying.” But Lowenstein seems to welcome the challenge, responding, when asked how she feels about Trump’s social-media presence this summer, “I’d say Twitter is a lot more fun in the general election.” “White-Glove Services”

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candal star Kerry Washington—perhaps appropriately, given the D.C. operator she plays on television—also, like the politicians, outsources her social-media upkeep. (Washington has more than four million Twitter followers and three million Instagram followers.) All her accounts are run by her longtime friend Allison Peters, whom she has known since seventh grade. Peters calls what she provides for Washington (and other clients, such as actress Connie Britton) “whiteglove personalized services”; Peters is focused on big-picture, strategic decisions and also the minutiae. She reads every single comment on all of Washington’s Instagram and Facebook posts (and does her best to comb through all tweets directed at Washington). She also writes and edits copy for posts Washington puts up on behalf of her projects and brands, OC TO BE R

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always “making it sound like Kerry,” a job perhaps made easier by the fact that the two are real-life friends and have now been working together for ive years. (As the Kleinberg– de Blasio iasco makes clear, it is not always easy for a high-proile igure to ind someone he or she can trust and who is the right it.) Washington is involved in the proceedings, and sometimes, Peters told me, she’ll contact Washington speciically to ask if she wants to weigh in on a particular matter or news item. And when there are dicier topics in the mix— say, when Washington decided earlier this year to comment on an Adweek cover on which she felt she looked excessively Photoshopped— “a whole other layer,” including Washington’s publicist, gets involved in the discussion. “Our smaller things, when we’re just posting her look on the red carpet or whatever, I can do that,” Peters said. Tweets that are posted without any Washington involvement are signed of “KW’s crew.” Lara Cohen, Twitter’s head of entertainment talent and lifestyle partnerships, who works with many celebrities and their teams on building their Twitter presences and promoting their projects, said she’s noticed an evolution in the sophistication of the socialmedia managers themselves and what they can provide. “I think they’ve evolved, and I think there are much better ones out there who are advising their talent to be more authentic,” she said. “And I think a lot of people are using them in a way where it’s less obvious than those super-pluggy ones from days of yore.” Peters said she has noticed a greater need for digital consultants like herself, given the increasing demands for content. “It’s hard for [celebrities] to stay on top of everything,”

This consultant said she is “on call” 24 hours a day, including holidays and weekends, and her primary responsibilities involve scheduling content in advance, always to be approved by the client (“I post at diferent times for each [celebrity], depending on their time zone and analytics”); looking for archival “throwback” photos and attending appearances and photo shoots in person to collect images; and texting and e-mailing with clients continually about upcoming events and strategy. She summed up her job this way: “I make sure people have something to post, don’t spell anything wrong, and look like they did it all by themselves. That’s the real trick—making sure that fans think the celebrity posted themselves.” Sometimes, she said, that could mean checking the weather before she puts up a post to make certain that she doesn’t “post an archived photo of a sunny beach in Florida when your client might be in foggy London on holiday.” Oliver Luckett put the role of a socialmedia manager in more cynical terms: if you’re a celebrity on social media, “you better have something interesting and connective to say to people. If not, work with a professional and make up something, you know?” Let It Bieber

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cooter Braun—the 35-year-old manager of Justin Bieber and Kanye West (among others), and the man credited with discovering Bieber—has a managerial philosophy as it relates to social media, and also more generally, that is grounded in letting the stars in his stable roam free. He told me that when people ask him to reveal the “secret” to the viral social-media success

“THESE STARS HAVE A LOT OF HELP … BUT THEY CERTAINLY DON’T WANT

ANYBODY TO KNOW.” she said. “We know one of the keys to social media is being consistent. The fans don’t like [inconsistency].” One 27-year-old consultant—who prefers to remain anonymous to protect the identity of her clients—told me that, after starting with one celebrity client about a year ago, she now has more than 10 full-time clients and has had to turn down 4 to 5 others. “Clients usually hire me because they hate or don’t have time for social media,” she wrote me. “But as their followings grow, and as I educate them on how and why [social media] is important, I notice they start to get excited by seeing their numbers grow. They become more involved, more cooperative, asking what kind of pictures I need from them.”

of his clients and projects, he explains to them that he encourages “intimate interactions.” Braun also used that “authenticity” buzzword, noting the success of supermodel Karlie Kloss (with her more than ive million Instagram followers), whom he recently added to his roster of clients. “Especially with social media, people can see through it when it’s an act,” he said. “People are reacting to Karlie because it’s incredibly authentic.” Braun said that “at the end of the day [his] job is to manage” and it’s the job of the artist “to make the decision” about what to be posting, but he admitted he is “very hands-on.” He summarized judiciously: “My job is to educate, teach, help build the strategy, and then, you know, trust www.vanityfair.com

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that they can make the right decisions.” But those “right decisions” are often made with Braun’s guiding hand on their shoulder. Hard as it may be to imagine West—whose tweets can be controversial, if not moronic (“BILL COSBY INNOCENT!!!!!!!!!!” he tweeted in February)—calling up Braun (or anyone, for that matter) to see if he thinks a tweet is kosher, that apparently does happen. “When you’re an artist and you’re managing your social media, that’s where you ask the team and everyone else to check stuf. Ariana [Grande, a former client of his] used to, all the time, send me a message, ‘Hey, what do you think of this?’ Or, you know, Justin and Kanye … they all do. Like ‘Hey, what do you think?’ ” As for the more risqué posts from West and Bieber—who has a penchant for posting semi-nude selies and rambling notes about fame—Braun said he will always encourage his artists to be themselves. “When you’re doing [social media] for yourself, you’re gonna make mistakes along the way because you get passionate, and you want to say something, and sometimes, that judgment of the whole world, they’re not understanding the context of what you’re saying within the moment of your own life.” He paused, relecting for a second. “You know, I look at Justin and I think, There’s a lot of stuff he put on social media [in the past] that I was not happy with… But then there was stuf that he put that was great. And I think, at the end of the day, he’s now having the biggest moment of his career because people saw the human in that.” West is known to cause spikes in Internet traic (and decreases in oice productivity) when he begins one of his notorious tweetstorms in the middle of the day. And Braun said that anyone who is ofended by West’s thoughts may be missing the Kanye forest for the Kanye trees. “It’s like [looking at] a great painting, right? If you’re standing too close to it, and you only see one brushstroke, you might say, ‘What’s so great about this?’ But when you take a step back, you realize that all the strokes combined together make a masterpiece. I think sometimes people focus on just the music with Kanye and they wonder, ‘Oh, the rest of that, why is he doing that?’ But if you actually take a step back, it’s truly great performance art.” He added, “You don’t know what he’s gonna [tweet]; you might not agree with him, but you can respect the fact that it’s coming from a real place.” On Their Own

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f there were a textbook titled Our SocialMedia Age, Kim Kardashian West would almost certainly be on the cover. Kardashian has more than 47 million Twitter followers and 80 million Instagram followers, and yet, despite those daunting totals—millions of people eager for content on a daily basis—she told me, in an e-mail, that she is able to handle all of her social-media posts on her own.

Kardashian said it’s important to her that she write all her own posts, and, yes, she is dedicated to authenticity—that hallowed ideal!— too. “I have felt overwhelmed at times, especially when I’m with the kids,” she said of her social-media responsibilities. “I like to give [North and Saint] my full attention and not be on my phone, so I do feel like I want to post and get busy sometimes. I do take the time to take a second for myself to post and see what other people are posting. I could never see me hiring someone. For me, it wouldn’t seem authentic. Because it’s all about me, I couldn’t imagine trying to ind someone to do that for me.” But that does not mean Kim doesn’t have her version of a social-media consultant. I always assumed there was someone in Kim’s life—Kanye? Kris Jenner? an inlatable swan in her swimming pool?—ofering advice on posts (“Yes, your arms look amazing from that angle … Not as much in this one … Next”). It turned out I was not too far of. “I will ask friends what they think of a certain picture, but I am so picky when it comes to my image. I want to be in full control,” Kim said. She explained she gets input and advice from others “all the time,” though. “I will send two pictures to my friends or assistant and ask which they like better. Just tonight, I posted a pic of my friend Larsa [Pippen] for her birthday and sent three pictures to my assistant and asked which she liked best because I couldn’t decide. I love asking caption advice too—sometimes I draw a blank.”

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mily Ratajkowski—a 25-year-old actress and model with more than seven and a half million Instagram followers, whom you may know from Gone Girl (she played Ben Affleck’s mistress) or the “Blurred Lines” music video—said she appreciates the “authorship” social media provides her with. “Mostly my feeling now is just I am so lucky to be a part of this generation of people who get to have access to social media in the public eye. Because it just allows you so much of your own authorship of who you are, which I cannot imagine being without at this point.” After Kardashian caused a public outcry in March when she posted a nude selie on Instagram, Ratajkowski came to her defense, and the two later posted a joint topless selie on both of their accounts. In a way, Ratajkowski—with whom I discussed Game of Thrones and the Met Gala briely before we moved on to Instagram, as if playing a conversational game of millennial bingo—serves as her own social-media manager. “There is a diference in what I would send to my family or post on Facebook on my private account, versus what I’ll post on Instagram,” she told me. Occasionally, like Kardashian, she will seek counsel. “Sometimes I will run it by my boyfriend, or whoever I’m with, and be like, ‘Is this right?’ BeOC TOB ER

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cause it’s hard to have perspective on it.” In fact, Ratajkowski’s social-media success has become a lucrative side job for her. The income she has made through sponsorships and brand deals, related to her social-media accounts, has allowed her to be choosier about ilm roles, she said. “Honestly, I’ve been really lucky—because of my social media I haven’t had to compromise on roles,” she explained. “Because I’m making money via social. That’s a huge part of my income, and if that wasn’t there, then I would be taking every movie that was ofered to me. My career would be in a much diferent place.” The amount of money a celebrity is paid by a company to post about their clothing line or makeup product difers greatly based on the inluence and reach of the individual, but Women’s Wear Daily recently estimated that a big-name celebrity with a large social following, such as Kylie Jenner or Taylor Swift, can earn up to $300,000 for a single sponsored Instagram post. (And one post from Selena Gomez, who currently has the most followers on Instagram, is “worth” about $550,000, per a recent analysis.) Ratajkowski tries to make sure the sponsored posts on her Instagram are consistent with the overall feel of the account. “I have an aesthetic that sometimes probably drives people who work on the ad side a little insane because I do want it to feel natural,” she said. “I don’t want it to feel like someone just dropped, you know, a Toyota ad in the middle of my thing.” (This commitment to posting only sponsored content that “feels right,” or—say it with me now—authentic, was something I heard again and again. Mike Heller, C.E.O. of the agency Talent Resources, told me that Beyoncé once turned down a “million-dollar deal” it had set up for her with a hair brand, after “three months of going back and forth,” because the singer “just didn’t connect with the brand.”) Generally, when you scroll upon a celebrity featuring a product or promoting a brand on his or her account, it’s the result of the brand’s having approached an agency, like Talent Resources or WhoSay, with its proposition (“We want someone young and cool, preferably with more than 1.5 million followers, who can post about our new soda lavor,” for example.) The agency might respond with a list of names— celebrities who it the given speciications—and, from there, lists of names are ranked, and then reranked, and, eventually, ofers are made. (In some cases, considering the asking rate of certain celebrities, a YouTube star or Disney Channel actor might have to suice where a Kylie Jenner was desired.) OC TO BE R

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For other celebrities, social media—and communicating that pivotal sense of authenticity—is a strict professional necessity. Andy Cohen, Bravo talk-show host and producer, told me he has a “complicated relationship” with social media, joking that he feels like “we’re all one tweet away from getting ired.” Cohen monitors social media for feedback on his shows (it’s a “real-time focus group,” he said), including the one he hosts, and feels the need to participate in the conversation. He said he could potentially see the cultural pendulum swinging back, though. “I think it could boomerang. Let’s say we have another ive years of Kardashian dominance. Then maybe everything might go quiet. Who knows! And then it’ll be simpler times when we’re all kind of experiencing things for ourselves.”

photographers shooting some of her socialmedia content, it made sense (the production values on many of her Instagram posts are of a higher quality than those of most summer blockbuster movies), but it was also a bit of a letdown (even if she is not necessarily alone in this practice). Celebrities, much as we may wish to believe otherwise, are not our friends. They have professional photographers at their parties. They have other people helping them write tweets. They are very clued in, however up-front they may be about it in interviews, as to what reaction any given post will receive from their audience. They are, on some level, always selling something. Perhaps that is part of the appeal of Snapchat, where celebrities broadcast everyday moments—car rides, meals, concerts—from their daily life, their posts disappearing after here’s something a bit dishearten- 24 hours. There is still likely some strategy ing about hearing, again and again, behind what celebrities decide to share on about the “strategy” that goes into Snapchat, but there is a very tangible layer— celebrity social-media accounts. It’s more fun that social-media-manager touch, however to believe, when we scroll past a party photo light it may be—which is removed on Snapposted by Selena Gomez, that she, like any chat. We can see the celebrity is holding his of our friends might have on a Sunday morn- or her phone and speaking to us directly, in ing, semi-impulsively decided over brunch to the exact same way we or one of our friends put up one of her pictures from the previous would Snap. But there is still a distance night—that she looked through her iPhone there, too; much as a celebrity chooses to Camera Roll for a few minutes before ind- share with us, there is always going to be ing one she liked, then tried out a few ilters, something they’re not sharing—not tweeting, shaking her head, squinting, until she found not Instagramming, not Snapchatting. We are the right one. When I was told by two people seeing what they want us to see. that Gomez “deinitely” has professional Social media may not have changed the notion of CeCANDID CAMERA? lebrity Smiling Down at That Selena Gomez Us from a Poster on Our Instagram post you just “liked”? It may Bedroom Wall as much have been snapped by as one might think. The a professional poster has just taken a photographer. diferent form. The room I interviewed Ratajkowski in was somewhat cramped; as we were sitting down, she joked that it felt like an “interrogation room.” At one point during the conversation, I asked her if she felt as if Instagram, and other social networks, had made for a stronger connection between celebrities and their fan bases. She did not, at this moment, start gushing about how close she feels with her fans, or the intense bond she feels with her social-media followers. “There is a separation between your private life and social media,” she said. “And that’s true for everyone.” She continued: “You don’t post your whole life. You’re editing, and you’re curating the image you’re putting out there.” I nodded, and she looked right at me. “I think that ultimately people don’t … they’re not actually as connected as they maybe feel.” 

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THE BOOK “Born to Run” isn’t just Bruce Springsteen’s signature anthem—it’s also the title of his 500-page autobiography, out this month, and shorthand for a lifelong restlessness. As Springsteen finishes one of the year’s top-selling international tours, he opens up to DAVID KAMP about the depression that has dogged him, the songs that age has deepened, and the key relationship he’s still unpacking

MAKE IT REAL Bruce Springsteen, photographed in Clichy, France, during his River Tour. 128

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I. That Signature Song

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bout an hour before every concert, Bruce Springsteen draws up a set list of 31 songs, written in big, scrawly letters in marker ink and soon thereafter distributed to his musicians and crew in typed-up, printed-out form. But this list is really just a loose framework. Over the course of an evening, Springsteen might shake up the order, drop a song, call a few audibles to his seasoned, ready-for-anything E Street Band, or take a request or two from fans holding handwritten signs in the pit near the front of the stage. Or he might do all of the above and then some—as he did on the irst of the two nights that I saw him perform in Gothenburg, Sweden, this summer. That night, at the last minute, Springsteen jettisoned his plan to open with a full-band version of “Prove It All Night,” from his 1978 album, Darkness on the Edge of Town, and instead began the show solo at the piano with “The Promise,” a fan-beloved Darkness outtake. Eight songs in, he again went of-list, playing a stretched-out, gospelized version of “Spirit in the Night,” from his first album, 1973’s Greetings from Asbury Park, N.J., which he followed with “Save My Love,” a sign request. Onward he went with tweaks and spontaneous additions, to the point where, by the time the show was over, it was past midnight and Springsteen, a man approaching his 67th birthday, had played for nearly four hours—his second-longest concert ever. “Yikes!” said Springsteen with mock alarm when I relayed this fact to him the next day, at his hotel in the Swedish port city. “I’m always in search of something, in search of losing myself to the music. I think we hit a spot last night where I was trying some songs we hadn’t played in a while, where maybe you’re struggling more. And then suddenly”—he snapped his fingers—

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“you catch it, and then, once you do, you may not want to stop.” “You have to create the show anew, and find it anew, on a nightly basis,” Springsteen said. “And sometimes,” he concluded, laughing, “it takes me longer than I thought it would.” There is one song, though, whose place and inclusion are never in doubt: “Born to Run.” Springsteen always slots it in near the start of his encore set, the clutch of seven or eight songs that see out the night. “It’s still at the center of my work, that song,” he said. “When it comes up every night, within the show, it’s monumental.” By design, every concert, no matter what its shape, builds up to “Born to Run” as the climax, with the songs that follow serving as a decompression from its operatic intensity. It is not uncommon for an artist to grow wary of a signature song—Robert Plant has referred to “Stairway to Heaven” as “that wedding song,” and Frank Sinatra called “Strangers in the Night” a “piece of shit”— but Springsteen has never tired of “Born to Run,” which he wrote at age 24 in a small rental cottage in West Long Branch, New Jersey. Expressly conceived as an important work, it took him six months to piece together all of its elements, from the twangy, Duane Eddy–inspired guitar figure with which it announces itself, to its “tramps like us” refrain, to its appropriations of imagery from the B movies that Springsteen adored as a kid, pulpy road pictures like Gun Crazy, with John Dall and Peggy Cummins. “A good song gathers the years in,” Springsteen said. “It’s why you can sing it with such conviction 40 years after it’s been written. A good song takes on more meaning as the years pass by.”

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hat has made “Born to Run” endure, Springsteen believes, are the words with which his nameless narrator implores his girl, Wendy, to join him on the road: “Will you walk with me out on the wire? / ’Cause baby, I’m just a scared and lonely rider / But I gotta know how it feels / I want to know if love is wild / Babe, I want to know if love is real.” “That question gets asked every single night, between me and all those people that are out there,” Springsteen said. “Every night, I watch the crowd sing it. Sing it word for word. It’s just something that connected.” It’s true. In Gothenburg, over two nights, I watched 120,000 Swedes surrender, fullthroatedly and with ists pumping, to “I want to know if love is real”—notwithstanding the song’s otherwise acutely New Jersey–speciic references to Highway 9 and the Palace, a now demolished Asbury Park amusement hall.

Springsteen’s new autobiography, to be published this month by Simon & Schuster, is also called Born to Run. Naming your book after your most famous song and the breakthrough album to which it lent its title could be seen as a sign of cash-grab expediency or outright laziness—plus, there is already a well-known Springsteen book called Born to Run, a biography by the rock critic Dave Marsh from 1979. But to Springsteen there was no other choice. Those three words have an emotional resonance for him beyond the song itself. They’re a sort of thumbnail memoir—a shorthand for a lifelong sense of unrest. To be sure, the latter-day Springsteen projects health and contentment. Onstage, he’s as limber and high-energy as ever: leaping and sliding in his concert uniform of black jeans, brown boots, black muscle T, gray vest, and gray neckerchief, and pulling in close to share a microphone with his wife, the singer Patti Scialfa, or his oldest friend in the band, the guitarist Steven Van Zandt. Offstage, across a table, he looks just as fantastic as he does from a distance, favoring formfitting snap-button western shirts that few other men his age could get away with; in one of our meetings, he even rocked the red-bandanna headband of his Born in the U.S.A. years. But, inherently, Springsteen is a brooder: a serious, unglib man given to puzzling out the mixed-up thoughts in his head. In other words, a born memoirist. When I asked him, for example, about the genesis of that pumped-up Born in the U.S.A. look, I was surprised by how considered a response I received. I was posing the question from a supericial, stagecraft angle: Was his evolution from the scrawny chancer on the cover of Darkness on the Edge of Town to the musclebound W.P.A.-poster hero of the mid-80s a sort of less extreme version of David Bowie– style shape-shifting? Was it a conscious image reboot? Springsteen’s initial reply was that, irst and foremost, he was trying to get healthy as his metabolism slowed, so he took to lifting weights, and “I had a body that just kind of popped in six months.” “But if you want to get into it deeper,” he continued, “my father was built big, so there was some element of ‘O.K., I’m 34. I’m a man now.’ I remember my father at that age. There was the idea of creating a man’s body to a certain degree. I suppose I was measuring that after my dad. And also, perhaps, in some way, trying to please him.” Then Springsteen went deeper still. “I also found that I simply enjoyed the exercise,” he said. “It was perfectly Sisyphean for my personality—lifting something heavy up and putting it down in the same spot for no particularly good reason. I’ve always felt OC TOB ER

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a lot in common with Sisyphus. I’m always rolling that rock, man. One way or another, I’m always rolling that rock.” II. Born to Write

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he germ of Born to Run, the book, lies in a short, diaristic piece Springsteen wrote for his Web site in 2009, after he and the E Street Band played the halftime show of Super Bowl XLIII. The logistics and pressure of doing the 12-minute show threw even as battletested a performer as Springsteen for a loop, and he thought the experience would make for a good yarn to share. “Fifteen minutes … oh, by the way, I’m somewhat terriied,” he wrote in one passage. “It’s not the usual preshow jitters, not ‘butterflies,’ not wardrobe malfunction nervousness, I’m talking about ive minutes to beach landing, ‘Right Stuf,’ ‘Lord Don’t Let Me Screw the Pooch in Front of 100 Million People,’ ‘One of the biggest television audiences since dinosaurs irst screwed on earth’ kind of terror.” Doing the Super Bowl show, Springsteen said, led him to discover a “pretty good voice to write in.” With time on his hands after the big game, he kept at it, writing down vignettes from his life in longhand while he and Scialfa were staying in Florida, where their daughter, Jessica, a competitive equestrian, was participating in show-jumping events. He was pleased with the results. In its and starts, back at home in New Jersey and on tour over the next seven years, a fullblown, 500-page autobiography eventually took shape, with no ghost or collaborator. Every word in the book is his own. There’s no shortage of levity in Born to Run. We learn that young Bruce, for all his romantic association with cars and the road, was a terrible driver who didn’t manage to get his license until he was in his 20s, and that current Bruce, like many a passionate babyboomer in the vicinity of a computer keyboard, is a fan of caps lock. On the seismic impact of Elvis Presley’s initial appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show: “Somewhere in between the mundane variety acts on a routine

Sunday night in the year of our Lord 1956 … THE REVOLUTION HAS BEEN TELEVISED!! Right underneath the nose of the guardians of all that ‘IS,’ who, if they were aware of the powers they were about to unleash, would call out the national gestapo to SHUT THIS SHIT DOWN!! … or … SIGN IT UP QUICK!!” But it’s the less jocular stuf in Springsteen’s life, the material germane to his autobiography’s title, that gives Born to Run its depth—and Springsteen knows this. “I knew I was gonna ‘go there’ in the book,” he told me. “I had to find the roots of my own troubles and issues—and the joyful things that have allowed me to put on the kind of shows that we put on.” Van Zandt remembers the Springsteen he befriended in their teens as “shut down and closed in.” This was on the central–New Jersey garage-band circuit of the mid-1960s, when Springsteen was playing guitar in a combo called the Castiles and Van Zandt fronted a group called the Shadows. “You remember the grunge guys, with the long hair, staring down at their shoes? That was him,” Van Zandt said. “People were always wondering ‘Why are you hanging out with him? He’s such a weirdo.’ Some people thought he was mental.” What Van Zandt quickly came to realize was that Springsteen was preternaturally focused, regarding rock music as his only way forward. “What inspired me about him, which nobody could really understand, was that he was completely dedicated,” Van Zandt said. “He’s the only guy I know who never had another job. I had to do some other jobs and ight to do it full-time, where he was always full-time. I got strength from that.” What made Springsteen so determined? What was Bruce running from? For one thing, the dead-end, near-feudal circumstances into which he was born, living with his parents and paternal grandparents in a tumbledown house in Freehold, New Jersey. It sat on the same block as their church, St. Rose of Lima, and its ailiated convent, rectory, and school, as well as four other small houses, occupied by members of his father’s family. His father’s side was pretty much Irish-American, people named McNicholas, O’Hagan, and Farrell.

His mother’s side, which lived just across the street, was Italian-American, people named Zerilli and Sorrentino. His father’s father’s father was called Dutch Springsteen, and Bruce has a handful of early childhood memories of the man (“His main thing was, he always had gum”), but, ethnographically speaking, the strain that gave Bruce his distinctive surname does not igure in his makeup—“The Dutch thing evaporated,” he told me. The point is, he was a classic central– New Jersey Roman Catholic combo platter, his family’s life dominated by the Church. “We collected the rice that people threw at weddings into bags and brought it home, and then we threw the rice at the next wedding, on complete strangers,” he said. “That was part of the show of our little street, you know?” One of the pleasures of reading Born to Run is seeing how naturally Springsteen’s singular, familiar songwriting voice translates to a new medium, prose. Recalling, in present tense, the circumscribed little life his family led, he writes, “The bride and her hero are whisked away in their long black limousine, the one that drops you of at the beginning of your life. The other one is just around the corner waiting for another day to bring the tears and take you on that short drive straight out Throckmorton Street to the St. Rose graveyard on the edge of town.” Should the rock-god thing no longer work out, this guy might have a future illing the late Elmore Leonard’s shoes. III. This Depression

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pringsteen may today be a man who splits his time between a horse farm in his native Monmouth County, a second home in New Jersey, and luxury properties in Florida and L.A., but Born to Run is an emphatic refutation of the notion that, as a songwriter, he can no longer connect to the troubled and downtrodden. Especially in its early chapters, the book demonstrates how honestly Springsteen has come by his material. Cars, girls, the Shore, the workingman’s struggles, broken dreams, disillusioned vets—it’s all right there in his upbringing. “One of the points I’m making in the

“I’VE ALWAYS FELT A LOT IN COMMON WITH SISYPHUS. I’M ALWAYS ROLLING THAT ROCK, MAN.” OC TOB E R

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A SPRINGSTEEN SHOW OFFERS ALMOST COMIC ABUNDANCE— IN LENGTH, BUT ALSO IN

EMOTIONAL DYNAMICS.

SPIRIT IN THE NIGHT Performing in July at the AccorHotels Arena, in Paris.


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oug Spring steen came from a socially immobile family rife with undiagnosed or undiscussed mental illness—agoraphobia, hair-pulling disorders, aunts who emitted inappropriate howling noises. (“As a child, it was simply mysterious, embarrassing and ordinary,” Bruce writes of life with these relatives.) Doug was a high-school dropout who drifted from one blue-collar job to the next—as a loor boy at a local rug mill, on the line at the Ford Motor plant in Edison. He was short-fused, a loner, and a drinker—“a bit of a Bukowski character,” as his son put it to me. And he didn’t get along with Bruce, treating the boy, depending on his own mood, with icy distance or tongue-lashing fury. Springsteen’s mother, on the other hand, the former Adele Zerilli, was all kindness and vivacity, and gainfully employed as a legal secretary. (Now 91, she maintains her upbeat disposition, Bruce says, despite having been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease four years ago.) Adele and Doug stayed together to the end, to his death in 1998 at the age of 73. Most extraordinarily, Adele went along with Doug’s plan to pull up stakes and move, in 1969, with Bruce’s sevenyear-old sister, Pam, from their native Freehold to the promised land of California, with all of their belongings packed atop an AMC Rambler. By this point, the mental illness that ran in his family had befallen Doug, leading to bouts of paranoia and tears, and he was eager to start his life anew—even if it meant leaving behind Bruce (who was not yet 20) and his other daughter, Virginia, who was not only a mere 17 but also a new wife and mother, having married the young man, Mickey

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Shave, who had gotten her pregnant in her senior year of high school. (Forty-seven years later, the Shaves remain happily married.) His parents’ enduring bond remains a mystery to Bruce. Adele had come from a family of relative wealth; her father, Anthony Zerilli, was a charismatic, self-made lawyer. On the other hand, he had divorced Adele’s mother and spent three years in Sing Sing prison for embezzlement (taking the rap, per family lore, for another relative). “What penance was she doing? What did she get out of it?,” Springsteen writes of his mother’s devotion to his father. He then proposes that “maybe knowing she had the security of a man who would not, could not, leave her was enough. The price, however, was steep.” I underlined that passage, and remarked to Springsteen that his thoughts sounded like something that had been worked out in talk therapy. He acknowledged this to be the case—“A lot of these ideas were things that I’ve parsed over quite a bit over the years”— and, in the book, he credits his longtime manager, Jon Landau, with connecting him to his irst psychotherapist, in the early 1980s. Over the years, Springsteen has been forthcoming about the fact that he is prone to depression, for which he has sought relief through both therapy and antidepressants. In the book, he delves more deeply still into the subject. There is his clinical depression itself, he explained to me, and then a compounding fear that he is doomed to sufer as his father did. “You don’t know the illness’s parameters,” he said. “Can I get sick enough to where I become a lot more like my father than I thought I might?” He acknowledges in Born to Run that his struggles are ongoing, and shares stories from the not-so-distant past. “I was crushed between sixty and sixty-two, good for a year and out again from sixty-three to sixty-four,” he writes. “Not a good record.” Springsteen remained professionally productive during these periods, however, and he says that he recorded his ine 2012 album, Wrecking Ball, at one of his lowest ebbs, with his bandmates none the wiser. (Though, he grants, the song “This Depression” might have been a tip-of.) But in the privacy of home, he writes, when the blues descend, “Patti will observe a freight train bearing down, loaded with nitroglycerin and running quickly out of track.” Whereupon “she gets me to the doctors and says, ‘This man needs a pill.’ ” “If I’m being honest, I’m not completely comfortable with that part of the book, but that’s O.K.,” Scialfa told me. “That’s Bruce. He approached the book the way he would approach writing a song, and a lot of times, you solve something that you’re trying to igure out through the process of writing—you bring something home to yourself. So in that

regard, I think it’s great for him to write about depression. A lot of his work comes from him trying to overcome that part of himself.” To some degree, Springsteen said, he has overcome the issues he had with his father. One of the book’s most moving passages occurs a few days before the 1990 birth of Springsteen and Scialfa’s first child, their son Evan. As was his impulsive wont, Doug embarked on an impromptu road trip, driving 400 miles south to Bruce’s house in Los Angeles from San Mateo, where he and Adele had made their home. Over beers at 11 A.M., Doug, uncharacteristically, made a small peace ofering to his son. “Bruce, you’ve been very good to us,” he said. And then, after a pause: “And I wasn’t very good to you.” “That was it,” Springsteen writes. “It was all that I needed, all that was necessary.” I asked him if he ever heard the words “I love you” from his father. “No,” he said, a little pained. “The best you could get was ‘Love you, Pops.’ [Switching to his father’s gruf voice.] ‘Eh, me, too.’ Even after he had a stroke and he’d be crying, he’d still go, ‘Me, too.’ You’d hear his voice breaking up, but he couldn’t get out the words.” IV. Five Guitars Deep

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nly half in jest, Springsteen describes touring as his “trustiest form of selfmedication,” and you can see why. He was always an exuberant rock performer, but with time, age, and fatherhood (he and Scialfa have a third grown child, Sam, a irefighter, in addition to Evan, who works for SiriusXM, and Jessica), he has evolved into an all-around entertainer, allowing more humor and goofiness into his shows. He gambols along the catwalks that line the stage with a puckered smile and arched eyebrows that recall Robert De Niro in comedy mode (his mom’s sunny Italian side coming out), slapping hands with fans and edging his famous mug into their smartphone frames for mid-song selies. He pulls small children from the crowds to join him in singing “Waitin’ on a Sunny Day,” a simple pop song from The Rising, his 2002 album. The song didn’t register as a hit in the U.S. but has been embraced by Europeans as a Pete Seeger–style folk sing-along. A Springsteen show, even a non-four-hour one, ofers almost comic abundance—not just in length, but in emotional dynamics, musical variety, and visual richness. Sometimes, there are no fewer than ive guitars being strummed on the band’s front line—by Springsteen, Van Zandt, Scialfa, Nils Lofgren, and the iddler and multi-instrumentalist Soozie Tyrell—with the towering, Afro’d Jake Clemons, nephew and heir of the late, great Clarence Clemons, picking his spots to weave through them all OC TOB ER

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book is that, whoever you’ve been and wherever you’ve been, it never leaves you,” he said, expanding upon this thought with the most Springsteen-esque metaphor possible: “I always picture it as a car. All your selves are in it. And a new self can get in, but the old selves can’t ever get out. The important thing is, who’s got their hands on the wheel at any given moment?” In Born to Run, the Bruce in the driver’s seat is often the kid or the conlicted young man who cowered or sulked in the presence of his father, Doug. The Springsteen catalogue abounds with songs about diicult father-son relationships, such as the recriminatory “Adam Raised a Cain,” the rueful “My Father’s House,” and the valedictory leaving-home ballad “Independence Day” (“The darkness of this house has got the best of us”), the last of which Springsteen introduced to the Gothenburg crowd as a song about “two people that love each other but struggle to understand one another.”


SOUND CHECK In Paris, Springsteen with his wife, the singer-guitarist Patti Scialfa.

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HOMESTEAD Springsteen at his horse farm in Colts Neck, New Jersey.

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Crowd-surfing in the middle of “Hungry Heart” in Paris.

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with his tenor saxophone. The three longestserving E Streeters, bassist Garry Tallent, pianist Roy Bittan, and drummer Max Weinberg, hang back and dress nattily; compared with the lamboyant Van Zandt and Lofgren—the former in his trademark headscarf, the latter in his Artful Dodger stovepipe hat—they look like private-equity guys playing in a weekend hobby band. (Completing the lineup is the organist Charlie Giordano, who stepped in after the death of founding E Streeter Danny Federici, in 2008.) Springsteen and the E Street Band remain an enormous live draw. The River Tour ’16, nominally pegged to last year’s release of The Ties That Bind, a boxed set of the sprawling sessions for his 1980 double album, The River, was originally to encompass a mere 20 dates, but between popular demand and Springsteen’s ardor to perform more, it has expanded to a total of 75 concerts in the U.S. and Europe. As it draws to a close (with a inal concert at Gillette Stadium, in Foxborough, Massachusetts, on September 14), it is on pace to be this year’s top-earning international tour; over its irst six months, it grossed more than $170 million. Landau, who has been with Springsteen since 1974, told me that when he is recognized by fans “the most common thing I hear is ‘Hundred-and-third show,’ or ‘This is our 45th show.’ ” In terms of loyalty and repeat attendance, he reckons, the only rock act that has topped Springsteen and the E Street Band historically is the Grateful Dead, “and I think we’re in a very respectable second place.” Plus, they’re still going strong. “We’ve never talked, not one sentence that I can recall, about ‘When does this stop?,’ ” Landau said. But Springsteen himself told me that there is no taboo surrounding the issues of age and aging. After all, in recent years, he has amended his nightly carnival barker’s call-out of his band so that it now goes, “You’ve just seen the heart-stopping, pantsdropping, house-rocking, earth-quaking, booty-shaking, Viagra-taking, love-making, legendary E—Street—Band!” “Playing a show brings a tremendous amount of euphoria,” Springsteen said, “and the danger of it is, there’s always that moment, comes every night, where you think, Hey, man, I’m gonna live forever! You’re feeling all your power. And then you come ofstage, and the main thing you realize is ‘Well, that’s over.’ Mortality sets back in.” Three years ago, Springsteen underwent a surgical procedure to address the chronic numbness he was experiencing on his left side, which was inhibiting his ability to work the fretboard of his guitar and turned out to be attributable to damaged disks in his neck. The procedure entailed getting his throat cut open and his vocal cords temporarily tied OC TOB E R

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of to the side to make way for the insertion of replacement disks—which meant that, for three months, he was unable to sing. “A little nerve-racking,” he said. “But it’s been very successful for me.” Springsteen recognizes that he has “a inite amount of time in which I’m going to continue to do what I’m doing,” he says. But absent any further medical crises, he has no imminent plans to dial back his no-holdsbarred approach. Tour dates are already carefully scheduled so that there is always at least a day of between shows for the musicians to recuperate, and everyone has his or her routine for remaining show-ready. “You gotta be in really good shape, baby!” said the 65-year-old Van Zandt, before ruefully commenting, over his pre-show beer, “I should be in better shape than I am.” Weinberg, who is also 65, has had eight operations on his hands and two on his back, and has had both shoulders reconstructed. Pre-concert, he said, he spends ive minutes pedaling on a recumbent bike, “generating some sweat and getting the blood lowing.” For their boss, the Boss, the River Tour ’16 will be swiftly followed by a series of promotional dates for Born to Run, the book. A publisher’s dream, Springsteen has committed to a multitude of promotional and instore appearances, and has even compiled an 18-song, retrospective companion album, titled Chapter and Verse, which covers his career from the Castiles and his choogling, hairy pre–E Street outits Steel Mill and the Bruce Springsteen Band all the way up to the title track of Wrecking Ball.

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asked Springsteen if he has any plans to get involved in this year’s presidential election, having actively campaigned in 2008 and 2012 for Barack Obama. He has been silent in this cycle, though at a June concert at Munich’s Olympic Stadium he held up a fan’s handmade sign that read, FUCK TRUMP, WE WANNA DANCE WITH THE BOSS. Springsteen demurred, noting that an artist has only so many “bullets,” credibility-wise, to shoot. But, he said, “when the times have felt very drastic, I feel like, ‘Well, I gotta put my two cents in.’ So we’ll see what happens.” What might better serve the good of the Republic is the planned release, sometime next year, of Springsteen’s irst album of entirely new songs since Wrecking Ball. (His last studio album, 2014’s High Hopes, consisted of covers, new recordings of older songs, and orphaned songs from sessions for his preceding albums.) The new album, as yet untitled, has been inished for more than a year but has sat on the shelf while Springsteen has busied himself with the tour and the book. “It’s a solo record, more of a singer-

songwriter kind of record,” he said. Intriguingly, though, it does not follow in the spare, acoustic tradition of such previous solo albums as Nebraska, The Ghost of Tom Joad, and Devils & Dust. Rather, it’s inspired by a recent immersion in the 60s collaborations of the songwriter Jimmy Webb and the singer Glen Campbell, “pop records with a lot of strings and instrumentation,” he said. “So the record is somewhat in that vein.” That’s as much as he’ll reveal at the moment. V. The Pact

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final word on “Born to Run,” the song that anchors Springsteen’s musical oeuvre and autobiography. Since so much of the book concerns his relationship with his troubled, enigmatic father, and since we had been speaking freely of Springsteen’s time in therapy, I asked him if I could ofer my own amateur-psychoanalytic theory of why “Born to Run” has so resonated with its author. “Go ahead,” he said with a chuckle. I told him that the pact the song’s narrator makes with Wendy—“We can live with the sadness / I’ll love you with all the madness in my soul”—jumped out at me, now that I’d read the book, as the pact that Doug Springsteen made with Adele. Springsteen smiled. “That was their pact,” he said. “And ‘We’re gonna get to that place / Where we really want to go / And we’ll walk in the sun’—I’m thinking of two people who had moved, relatively recently at the time you wrote the song, from New Jersey to California.” “Yeah, my folks. I think that was the place I envisioned, was West. Where do people run? They run West. That’s kind of where I imagined the characters going.” “So,” I asked, “is ‘Born to Run’ the internal monologue of Doug Springsteen?” “I wouldn’t go that far,” Springsteen said. “I never connected this song particularly with my father. I mean, I think it pertains as far as feeling trapped internally. He did. Which is why they ended up leaving for California when their kids were so young. We were 19, 17, and at a very critical moment in our lives. In my sister’s life, particularly. She just had a baby! So they had to go.” Springsteen seemed to be warming, ever so slightly, to my premise. “In a funny way,” he said, “my parents actually lived this song at that particular time.” “That’s what I’m saying,” I responded. “I’m wondering if—” “—later on, it clicked in my head?” he said, inishing my thought. “I don’t know where things come from. At the end of the day, you don’t know where everything comes from. It’s very possible.”  PORT FOLIO CON T I N U E S OV ER LEA F

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Haley Bennett, photographed at Greenwood Gardens, in Short Hills, New Jersey. BENNETT WEARS A GOWN BY ARMANI PRIVÉ.

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Spotlight

HALEY’S COMET ith five films coming out in the next several months, Haley Bennett, 28, the girl from Stow, Ohio, who says she “wanted to act like I wanted to breathe or eat or sleep,” is having quite a moment. First up is director Antoine Fuqua’s remake of the 1960 Western classic The Magnificent Seven, out September 23. In a reworking of the narrative—and a breakthrough for a notoriously chauvinist genre—Bennett stars as Emma, a young widow, opposite Denzel Washington and Chris Pratt. “It’s an adventure film, and Emma is at the center of it, plotting and taking her revenge,” Bennett says. “I learned a lot of new things: riding, weaponry, and what it was like to be a frontier woman. I was excited about the aspects of bringing a woman to the forefront and to the front line.” Next, there’s The Girl on the Train, the film version of the No. 1 New York Times bestseller, directed by Tate Taylor (The Help) and starring Emily Blunt and Justin Theroux. Bennett plays Megan, the seemingly perfect wife

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at the heart of this psychological thriller. (“She needs love more than anything; she needs love to stay alive.”) Also out this fall is Warren Beatty’s long-awaited Rules Don’t Apply, about the adventures of Howard Hughes (Beatty) during the golden age of Hollywood. Bennett, showing her range, plays Mamie—“You’ll get to hear me sing.” We’ll also see her opposite Miles Teller in Thank You for Your Service (based on David Finkel’s book about American soldiers returning from Iraq and Afghanistan), and she’s finished filming for Terrence Malick’s as-yet untitled ode to the Austin, Texas, music scene, in which she shares screen time with Christian Bale and Michael Fassbender. This impressive run reminds Bennett that, after almost a decade working, there is one particular director always at the top of her wish list: “I don’t know that I’ll ever get to make my ideal film, because Frank Capra is dead.” Nonetheless, the wish persists. “Eventually, I would like to remake one of his films—but that might be dangerous.” Don’t bet against her. — KRISTA SMITH

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Bennett, photographed at Greenwood Gardens. BENNETT WEARS GOWNS AND EARRINGS BY ARMANI PRIVÉ.

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Spotlight

VUITTON’S MASTER CLASS 1

W hen Russian and French representatives attended the United Nations General Assembly in September 2014, they had plenty of urgent topics on their agenda. Among them was the fate of one of the world’s most important, but relatively unknown, collections

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of modern art. Between 1897 and 1914, Moscow textile magnate Sergei Shchukin amassed 275 masterpieces, including 8 Cézannes, 13 Monets, 16 Gauguins, 41 Matisses, and 50 Picassos, which he displayed at his home, the Trubetskoy Palace. Nationalized in 1918 after the Bolshevik Revolution, the collection was eventually dispersed between the Pushkin Museum, in Moscow, and the Hermitage, in St. Petersburg. In 1948, Stalin decreed that the pictures were decadent, and they

were hidden until his death (1953), when some of them began popping up on the walls of the two museums. Only then did the importance of the collection come to light. In recent years, Shchukin’s 74-yearold grandson, André-Marc DelocqueFourcaud, a French citizen, has been lobbying to re-unite the collection in a major exhibition that would finally establish its eminence. No museum in Russia or France, however, had the hefty funds or the political clout to make it happen. OC TOB ER

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(1) Woman with a Fan, by Pablo Picasso (1908); (2) Portrait of Dr. Félix Rey, by Vincent van Gogh (1889); (3) Woman with Rake, by Kazimir Malevich (circa 1932); (4) Nude, Black and Gold, by Henri Matisse (1908).

But one modern Medici did. Bernard Arnault, the chairman and C.E.O. of LVMH, an empire of 70 luxury brands, from Christian Dior to Dom Pérignon, “jumped,” according to one of his advisers, when he learned about the collection. From October 22 of this year through February 20, 2017, the Fondation Louis Vuitton—a spectacular Frank Gehry–designed center that Arnault opened in Paris two years ago— will host a landmark exhibition, “Icons of Modern Art: The Shchukin Collection.” OC TO BE R

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“For me, it’s a big event,” Arnault said recently, during a rare interview in his sleek office suite at LVMH headquarters, on the Avenue Montaigne, in Paris. “The collection is one of the most beautiful that has ever been put together. It is a complete vision of the beginning of contemporary art.” And, he continues, “we got the approval of both governments, which, at the present time, is … something.” The show is not only the epitome of globalization—

“a Russian national treasure, which is primarily French art, installed in a building designed by a U.S. architect”—but also a testament to the power of brands, and art, to transcend politics. “In a way, my group and myself are ambassadors around the world,” says Arnault. “The average Chinese person, for example, knows the name of Christian Dior or Louis Vuitton more than he knows the name of any French head of state—maybe with the exception of Napoleon.” — JAMES REGINATO www.vanityfair.com

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COST UME S BY S A RA H TA PSCOTT; H AI R A ND MA KE U P BY HENR IK TOR P; WIG S FROM THE WIG STOR E ; S E T D E SIG N BY N ATA SH A CHE E K , DANIEL A R AY TCHEV, A ND ROB IN ME R Z; PRODU C E D O N LO CAT ION BY E L IZ ABET H J. CAR MODY

The torch will be passed, and a new leader must be capable of gripping it securely. Will he prove equal to the challenge?

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The Art of

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A presidential campaign unfolds in public—rallies, debates, tweetstorms. But there are private moments that can be far more revealing. Here, in what may or may not be the most intimate pictures ever taken of a potential president, photographer ALISON JACKSON offers a uniquely penetrating look at a uniquely confounding candidacy. The results? Truly unbelievable! But mysteries remain

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TAKING HIS MEASURE When the candidate looks in the mirror, a president should stare back. With newfound confidence, he is now ready to fill Lincoln’s mittens.

FIRST IN WAR As commander in chief, would the candidate use military force responsibly— and tastefully?

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KEEPING HIS HEAD? America needs a leader who won’t flinch under fire, whether literal, metaphoric, or tonsorial.

WHAT IT TAKES Above all, success in the Oval Office requires an ability to sit still for long hours of exacting prep work.

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ONE NATION, INCANDESCENT There is not a black America or a white America or a Creamsiclehued America (waterproof and evenly applied). There is only a United States of America.

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P HOTOG R A PH BY E THA N P IN E S/ T HE F OR BE S COL L E CT IO N

From the moment Elizabeth Holmes arrived on the tech scene, around 2003, as a 19-year-old Stanford dropout with a world-changing idea, an epic ambition, and a Steve Jobs–ian aura, her rise was meteoric. By last October, her revolutionary blood-testing start-up, Theranos, was valued at some $9 billion, and she had been anointed the world’s youngest self-made female billionaire. Then a Wall Street Journal reporter began looking at the science. In the wake of Theranos’s stunning collapse, amid civil and criminal investigations and class-action lawsuits, NICK BILTON explains why Silicon Valley saw only what Holmes wanted it to see

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Theranos founder, chairwoman, and C.E.O. Elizabeth Holmes, in Palo Alto, California, September 2014.


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t was late morning on Friday, October 18, when Elizabeth Holmes realized that she had no other choice. She inally had to address her employees at Theranos, the blood-testing start-up that she had founded as a 19-year-old Stanford dropout, which was now valued at some $9 billion. Two days earlier, a damning report published in The Wall Street Journal had alleged that the company was, in efect, a sham—that its vaunted core technology was actually faulty and that Theranos administered almost all of its blood tests using competitors’ equipment. The article created tremors throughout Silicon Valley, where Holmes, the world’s youngest self-made female billionaire, had become a near universally praised igure. Curiosity about the veracity of the Journal story was also bubbling throughout the company’s mustard-and-green Palo Alto headquarters, which was nearing the end of a $6.7 million renovation. Everyone at Theranos, from its scientists to its marketers, wondered what to make of it all. For two days, according to insiders, Holmes, who is now 32, had refused to address these concerns. Instead, she remained largely holed up in a conference room, surrounded by her inner circle. Half-empty food containers and cups of stale cofee and green juice were strewn on the table as she strategized with a phalanx of trusted advisers, including Ramesh “Sunny” Balwani, then Theranos’s president and C.O.O.; Heather King, the company’s general counsel; lawyers from Boies, Schiller & Flexner, the intrepid law irm; and crisis-management consultants. Most of the people in the war room had been there for two days and nights straight, according to an insider, leaving mainly to shower or make a feeble attempt at a couple of hours of shut-eye. There was also an uncomfortable chill in the room. At Theranos, Holmes preferred that the temperature be maintained in the mid-60s, which facilitated her preferred daily uniform of a black turtleneck with a pufy black vest—a homogeneity that she had borrowed from her idol, the late Steve Jobs. Holmes had learned a lot from Jobs. Like Apple, Theranos was secretive, even internally. Just as Jobs had famously insisted at 1 Ininite Loop, 10 minutes away, that departments were generally siloed, Holmes largely forbade her employees from communicating with one another about what they were working on—a culture that resulted in a rare form of executive omniscience. At Theranos,

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Holmes was founder, C.E.O., and chairwoman. There wasn’t a decision—from the number of American lags framed in the company’s hallway (they are ubiquitous) to the compensation of each new hire— that didn’t cross her desk. And like Jobs, crucially, Holmes also paid indefatigable attention to her company’s story, its “narrative.” Theranos was not simply endeavoring to make a product that sold of the shelves and lined investors’ pockets; rather, it was attempting something far more poignant. In interviews, Holmes reiterated that Theranos’s proprietary technology could take a pinprick’s worth of blood, extracted from the tip of a finger, instead of intravenously, and test for hundreds of diseases—a remarkable innovation that was going to save millions of lives and, in a phrase she often repeated, “change the world.” In a technology sector populated by innumerable fooddelivery apps, her quixotic ambition was applauded. Holmes adorned the covers of Fortune, Forbes, and Inc., among other publications. She was proiled in The New Yorker and featured on a segment of Charlie Rose. In the process, she amassed a net worth of around $4 billion.

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ne of the only journalists who seemed unimpressed by this narrative was John Carreyrou, a recalcitrant health-care reporter from The Wall Street Journal. Carreyrou came away from The New Yorker story surprised by Theranos’s secrecy—such behavior was to be expected at a tech company but not a medical operation. Moreover, he was also struck by Holmes’s limited ability to explain how it all worked. When The New Yorker reporter asked about Theranos’s technology, she responded, somewhat cryptically, “a chemistry is performed so that a chemical reaction occurs and generates a signal from the chemical interaction with the sample, which is translated into a result, which is then reviewed by certiied laboratory personnel.” Shortly after reading the article, Carreyrou started investigating Theranos’s medical practices. As it turned out, there was an underside to Theranos’s story that had not been told—one that involved questionable lab procedures and results, among other things. Soon after Carreyrou began his reporting, David Boies, the superstar lawyer—and Theranos board member—who had taken on Bill Gates in the 1990s and represented Al Gore during the 2000 Florida recount case, visited the Journal newsroom for a ive-hour meeting. Boies subsequently returned to the Journal to meet with the paper’s editor in chief, Gerard Baker. Eventually, on October 16, 2015, the Journal published the article: HOT STARTUP THERANOS HAS STRUGGLED WITH ITS BLOOD-TEST TECHNOLOGY. During the two days in the war room, according to numerous insiders, Holmes heard various response strategies. The most cogent suggestion advocated enlisting members of the scientific community to publicly defend Theranos—its name an amalgam of “therapy” and “diagnosis.” But no scientist could credibly vouch for Theranos. Under Holmes’s direction, the secretive company had barred other scientists from writing peerreview papers on its technology. 7 Absent a plan, Holmes embarked on OC TOB ER

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a familiar course—she doubled down on her narrative. She left the war room for her car—she is often surrounded by her security detail, which sometimes numbers as many as four men, who (for safety reasons) refer to the young C.E.O. as “Eagle 1”—and headed to the airport. (She has been known to ly alone on a $6.5 million Gulfstream G150.) Holmes subsequently took of for Boston to attend a luncheon for a previously scheduled appearance at the Harvard Medical School Board of Fellows, where she would be honored as an inductee. During the trip, Holmes ielded calls from her advisers in the war room. She and her team decided on an interview with Jim Cramer, the host of CNBC’s Mad Money, with whom she had a friendship that dated from a previous interview. It was quickly arranged. Cramer generously began the interview by asking Holmes what had happened. Holmes, who talks slowly and deliberately, and blinks with alarming irregularity, replied with a variation of a line from Jobs. “This is what happens when you work to change things,” she said, her long blond hair tousled, her smile ampliied by red lipstick. “First they think you’re crazy, then they ight you, and then, all of a sudden, you change the world.” When Cramer asked Holmes for a terse true-or-false answer about an accusation in the article, she replied with a meandering 198-word retort. By the time she returned to Palo Alto, the consensus was that it was time, at last, for Holmes to address her hundreds of employees. A company-wide e-mail instructed technicians in lab coats, programmers in T-shirts and jeans, and a slew of support staf to meet in the cafeteria. There, Holmes, with Balwani at her side, began an eloquent speech in her typical baritone, explaining to her loyal colleagues that they were changing the world. As she continued, Holmes grew more impassioned. The Journal, she said, had gotten the story wrong. Carreyrou, she insisted, with a tinge of fury, was simply picking a ight. She handed the stage to Balwani, who echoed her sentiments. After he wrapped up, the leaders of Theranos stood before their employees and surveyed the room. Then a chant erupted. “Fuck you … ,” employees began yelling in unison, “Carreyrou.” It began to grow louder still. “Fuck you, Carreyrou!” Soon men and women in lab coats, and programmers in T-shirts and jeans, joined in. They were chanting with fervor: “Fuck you, Carreyrou!,” they cried out. “Fuck you, Carreyrou! Fuck. You. Carrey-rou!” The Game

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n Silicon Valley, every company has an origin story— a fable, often slightly embellished, that humanizes its mission for the purpose of winning over investors, the press, and, if it ever gets to that point, customers, too. These origin stories can provide a unique, and uniquely powerful, lubricant in the Valley. After all, while Silicon Valley is responsible for some truly astounding companies, its business dealings can also replicate one big conidence game in

which entrepreneurs, venture capitalists, and the tech media pretend to vet one another while, in reality, functioning as cogs in a machine that is designed to not question anything—and buoy one another all along the way. It generally works like this: the venture capitalists (who are mostly white men) don’t really know what they’re doing with any certainty—it’s impossible, after all, to truly predict the next big thing—so they bet a little bit on every company that they can with the hope that one of them hits it big. The entrepreneurs (also mostly white men) often work on a lot of meaningless stuf, like using code to deliver frozen yogurt more expeditiously or apps that let you say “Yo!” (and only “Yo!”) to your friends. The entrepreneurs generally glorify their eforts by saying that their innovation could change the world, which tends to appease the venture capitalists, because they can also pretend they’re not there only to make money. And this also helps seduce the tech press (also largely comprised of white men), which is often ready to play a game of access in exchange for a few more page views of their story about the company that is trying to change the world by getting frozen yogurt to customers more expeditiously. The inancial rewards speak for themselves. Silicon Valley, which is 50 square miles, has created more wealth than any place in human history. In the end, it isn’t in anyone’s interest to call bullshit. When Elizabeth Holmes emerged on the tech scene, around 2003, she had a preternaturally good story. She was a woman. She was building a company that really aimed to change the world. And, as a then dark-haired 19-year-old irst-year at Stanford University’s School of Chemical Engineering, she already comported herself in a distinctly Jobsian fashion. She adopted black turtlenecks, would boast of never taking a vacation, and would come to practice veganism. She quoted Jane Austen by heart and referred to a letter that she had written to her father when she was nine years old insisting, “What I really want out of life is to discover something new, something that mankind didn’t know was possible to do.” And it was this instinct, she said, coupled with a childhood fear of needles, that led her to come up with her revolutionary company. Holmes had indeed mastered the Silicon Valley game. Revered venture capitalists, such as Tim Draper and Steve Jurvetson, invested in her; Marc Andreessen called her the next Steve Jobs. She was plastered on the covers of magazines, featured on TV shows, and ofered keynote-speaker slots at tech conferences. (Holmes spoke at Vanity Fair’s 2015 New Establishment Summit less than two weeks before Carreyrou’s irst story appeared in the Journal.) In some ways, the near-universal adoration of Holmes relected her extraordinary comportment. In others, however, it relected the Valley’s own narcissism. Finally, it seemed, there was a female innovator who was indeed able to personify the Valley’s vision of itself—someone who was endeavoring to make the world a better place.

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olmes’s real story, however, was a little more complicated. When she first came up with the precursor to the idea of Theranos, which eventually aimed to reap vast amounts of data from a few droplets of blood derived from the tip of a inger, she approached several of her professors at Stanford, according to someone who knew Holmes back then. But most explained to the chemical-engineering major that it was virtually impossible to do so with any real eicacy. “I told her, I don’t think your idea is going to work,” Phyllis Gardner, a professor of medicine at Stanford, said to me, about Holmes’s seminal pitch for Theranos. As Gardner explained, it is impossible to get a precise result from the tip of a inger for most of the tests that Theranos would claim to conduct accurately. When a inger is pricked, the probe breaks up cells, allowing debris, among other things, to escape into the interstitial luid. While it is feasible to test for pathogens this way, a pinprick is too unreliable for obtaining more nuanced readings. Furthermore, there isn’t that much reliable data that you can reap from such a small amount of blood. But Holmes was nothing if not determined. Rather than drop her idea, she tried to persuade Channing Robertson, her adviser at Stanford, to back her in her quest. He did. (“It would not be unusual for inger-stick testing to be met with skepticism,” says a spokesman for Theranos. “Patents from that period explain Elizabeth’s ideas and were foundational for the company’s current technologies.”) Holmes subsequently raised $6 million in funding, the irst of almost $700 million that would follow. Money often comes with strings attached in Silicon Valley, but even by its byzantine terms, Holmes’s were unusual. She took the money on the condition that she would not divulge to investors how her technology actually worked, and that she had inal say and control over every aspect of her company. This surreptitiousness scared of some investors. When Google Ventures, which focuses more than 40 percent of its investments on medical technology, tried to perform due diligence on Theranos to weigh an investment, Theranos never responded. Eventually, Google Ventures sent a venture capitalist to a Theranos Walgreens Wellness Center to take the revolutionary pinprick blood test. As the V.C. sat in a chair and had several large vials of blood drawn from his arm, far more than a pinprick, it became apparent that something was amiss with Theranos’s promise. Google Ventures wasn’t the only group with knowledge of blood testing which felt that way. One of Holmes’s irst major hires, thanks to an introduction by Channing Robertson, was Ian Gibbons, an accomplished British scientist who had a slew of degrees from Cambridge University and had spent 30 years working on diagnostic and therapeutic products. Gibbons was tall and handsome, with straight reddish-brown hair and blue eyes. He had never owned a pair of jeans and spoke with a British accent that was a combination of colloquial and posh. In 2005, Holmes named him chief scientist. Gibbons, who was diagnosed with cancer shortly after joining the company, encountered a host of issues with the science at Theranos, but the most glaring was simple: the results were of. This conclusion soon led Gibbons to realize that Holmes’s invention was more of an idea than a reality. Still, bound by the scientiic method, Gibbons wanted to try every possible direction and exhaust every option. So, for years, while Holmes put her fund-raising talents to use—hiring hundreds of marketers, salespeople, communications specialists, and even the Oscar-winning ilmmaker Errol Morris, who was commissioned to make short industrial documentaries—Gibbons would wake early, walk his dogs along a trail near his home, and then set of for the oice before seven A.M. In his downtime, he would read I, Claudius, a novel about a man who plays C O N T I N U E D O N P A G E 1 9 6

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Carole Bayer Sager, photographed at her Bel Air home, in Los Angeles.

hy write a memoir if I wasn’t going to be completely honest?” Carole Bayer Sager says about They’re Playing Our Song (due out October 18 from Simon & Schuster), which reads like a candid conversation over a bottle of Meursault on a breezy Bel Air night. Yes, her phobias—flying, weight gain—are there. Her initial intimidation at meeting Burt Bacharach, the man who’d become her second husband—that’s in it, too. But don’t let the self-deprecation fool you. A look-alike for her dear friend Elizabeth Taylor, Sager entranced Bacharach (“Burt needed a muse… I got the job”) and her other great musical-and-romantic partner, Marvin Hamlisch (“We were like two Jewish jumping beans”). (Since 1996, she has been married to former Warner Bros. co-chairman Bob Daly.) In doing so, she helped dot the 70s-through-90s pop-scape with an update of the Great American Songbook: lyrics for “Nobody Does It Better,” the Oscar-winning “Arthur’s Theme,” the Grammy-winning “That’s What Friends Are For” (on which Dionne Warwick, Gladys Knight, Stevie Wonder, and Elton John all sang, raising millions for AIDS research). She’s collaborated with Peter Allen, Carole King, Bette Midler (who, she writes, bellowed, “ ‘Iconic.’ ‘Misfit.’ ‘Drunk.’ Where are these words in your songs? Everything’s ‘home,’ and ‘rain,’ and ‘light.’“), and even Bob Dylan, who made her, in her tight jeans and studded leather jacket, feel tackily “faux rock ’n’ roll.” At 69, she’s still in the game. “Stronger Together,” a song that she, Kenny “Babyface” Edmonds, and Bruce Roberts wrote together, rang out in the closing minutes of the Democratic National Convention, sung by newcomer Jessica Sanchez. Sager was thrilled. Her excitement revealed that decades of glamour and achievement have not co-opted the earnest heart that created many wistful songs, and, now, this frank, delicious book. — SHEILA WELLER

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Fox’s Empire). They star on groundbreaking, Peabody-winning programs unafraid to explore social issues (Yara Shahidi on ABC’s Black-ish) and give voice to demographics previously unrepresented on TV (Emily Robinson on Amazon’s Transparent). They provide young audiences with inspiring examples (Rowan Blanchard’s empowered protagonist on Disney’s Girl Meets World and Adria Arjona’s fearless Dorothy Gale on NBC’s upcoming Emerald City). They offer a whimsical escape from real-world horrors via shape-shifting high-school students (Tyler Posey on MTV’s Teen Wolf), a zombie apocalypse (Alycia Debnam-Carey on

AMC’s Fear the Walking Dead), medieval battle (Isaac Hempstead-Wright on HBO’s Game of Thrones), and demon destruction (Katherine McNamara on Freeform’s Shadowhunters). And they find beauty in innercity chaos and crime (Jeremy Allen White in Showtime’s Shameless and Shameik Moore on Netflix’s The Get Down). No matter their background or role, these ambitious up-and-comers (whose portrait will appear on Vanity Fair’s Snapchat Discover pop-up channel on September 13) all exhibit gravitas beyond their years—and talent we look forward to watching in the — JULIE MILLER decades to come.

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oung actors on television today belong to a generation—and a medium—of unprecedented opportunity. An expanding number of channels and streaming services means more space for original storytelling and complex characters. And television’s impressive new class of stars— a refreshingly diverse wave of talent that reflects America’s multicultural audience—shines especially bright in this era of “peak TV.” They come from disparate backgrounds (Kyle Allen, the former acrobat and ballet dancer co-starring on Hulu’s The Path, and Bryshere Y. Gray, the Philadelphia street performer who made his acting debut on


Spotlight

HIPPER BY THE DOZEN Twelve rising stars from the Snapchat Generation—cool, diverse, ambitious, fearless—light up a new era of television

Rowan Blanchard, Kyle Allen, Isaac Hempstead-Wright, Adria Arjona, Yara Shahidi, Jeremy Allen White, Emily Robinson, Bryshere Y. Gray, Tyler Posey, Katherine McNamara, Shameik Moore, and Alycia Debnam-Carey. OCTOB E R 2016

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Sir Philip Green on his speedboat Lion Cub in 2012. He also owns three yachts, including the 295-foot-long Lionheart.

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Britain’s answer to Donald Trump (without, as yet, the reality show or political campaign), Sir Philip Green has been front-page news alongside Brexit and the Queen’s birthday. Did the brash Topshop tycoon underfund the pension plan of a once beloved retail chain, BHS—or was this summer’s parliamentary inquiry inspired by envy of his success? As Green adds the latest Gulfstream to his epic toy chest, WILLIAM D. COHAN reports

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hree big stories captured the attention of the British this past summer: the shocking vote in favor of Brexit, the country’s departure from the European Union; the Queen’s 90th-birthday celebration; and the senseless assassination of Jo Cox, a 41-year-old member of Parliament from West Yorkshire, by a deranged 52-year-old constituent. But, of the radar screen of most Americans, a fourth story also galvanized the country: the case of Sir Philip Green, a self-made retail multi-billionaire. With lowing white curly locks, a permatan, and unshakable brashness, the 64-year-old Green is the British Donald Trump (without the political aspirations). For months he has been front-page news, thanks to an irresistible combination of lamboyance and arrogance. At issue was Green’s March 2015 decision to sell for £1—that’s not a typo—the retailer British Home Stores, known as BHS, to an investor group led by Dominic Chappell, a 49-year-old former racecar driver with a history of bankruptcy, little money, and virtually no retailing experience. The demise of BHS, which was something of a national institution, struck a raw nerve with the British people. Modeled after Woolworths, the BHS chain was founded in 1928, and it sold at discount prices everything from electronics and furniture to perfume and groceries. Samantha Brick, a writer from Birmingham, recalls she used to go to BHS with her grandmother for tea. They’d sit together at the Formica-topped tables in the cafeteria. “It was really comforting and very reassuring,” she says. The £1 purchase price not only smacked of farce but was also suspicious. According to a July parliamentary report about the deal, Chappell and Retail Acquisition Ltd., Chappell’s company, “were manifestly unsuitable owners of BHS. It is inconceivable that someone with Sir Philip Green’s experience seriously considered otherwise.” Green said that the chain’s problems were becoming too much for his company to keep it. BHS was an increasingly small part of his overall inancial empire—the privately held Taveta Investments Ltd., of which his retail business Arcadia Group is a subsidiary. Arcadia includes such well-known British retail names as Topshop and Topman; Miss Selfridge; Burton; Evans; Wallis; and Dorothy Perkins. Topshop, in particular, with its focus on fashionable young women, had become Green’s flagship (and has a large store on New York’s Fifth Avenue). But the plot thickened considerably in April 2016 when BHS iled for “administration,” the U.K. equivalent of Chapter 11, throwing many of its 11,000 employees out of work and threatening the

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pensions of 20,000 current and former employees. Suddenly it seemed clear to the British people why Green might have been so eager to get rid of BHS: the gaping inancial shortfall in the pension plan—said to be £571 million and growing. Where once the British press referred to Green as the “King of the High Street [the British term for mid-level fashion retail],” suddenly he was known, in the pages of the Daily Mail, as “Sir Shifty.” Last spring Parliament held a series of extraordinary public hearings to investigate how the collapse of BHS afected the company’s pension fund. The committee’s irst report, released on July 25, was ruthless in its criticism of Green. What happened to BHS is “the unacceptable face of capitalism,” it concluded. According to the committee, Green “systematically extracted hundreds of millions of pounds from BHS, paying very little tax and fantastically enriching himself and his family, leaving the company and its pension fund weakened to the point of the inevitable collapse of both.” Furthermore, the report stated, “BHS declined to make the employer contributions necessary to maintain the sustainability of the pension schemes over the duration of Sir Philip Green’s period in charge.” Now the plan’s 20,000 pensioners are facing reductions of up to 77 percent of their expected payouts. Responding to the report’s conclusions, a spokesperson for Theresa May, Britain’s new prime minister, said that May intended to “prevent irresponsible and reckless behavior.” Frank Field, the chairman of the parliamentary inquiry, characterized Green as “much worse” than the disgraced former newspaper baron Robert Maxwell—who left a £440 million “black hole” in his company’s pension plan before he fell of his yacht to his death in November 1991—a remark that prompted Green to threaten Field with a libel suit. What made appearances even worse for Green is that the companies he runs had sent billions in dividends from BHS and his other U.K. companies to his wife, Tina. Now the principal beneicial owner of her husband’s businesses, she oicially resides in Monaco, and so she legally did not pay taxes on the dividends received. The precise amount of the dividends remains unclear. Field said on Sky News that, if you added up the dividends, the incurment of debt, and the repayment of loans, the Greens had extracted £1.6 billion from BHS and Taveta. When I asked Green to explain the sum, he declined to do so. My question was “too personal,” he said. The parliamentary report clarified that the “Green family” had received £307 million in dividends from BHS between 2002 and 2004 and, in 2005, £1.2 billion in dividends from Taveta. In this era of austerity the British people seem to have had quite enough of the retailing tycoon, with his legal tax dodges, his complicated corporate structure, and his hyperinlated lifestyle, replete with a helicopter, a Gulfstream G550 jet, and three yachts—including one, Lionheart, which is 295 feet long and reportedly has a swimming pool, a helipad, and a beauty salon. Green socializes with


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WHILE LONDON BURNS (1) Green and wife Tina at the wedding of Monaco’s Prince Albert II and Princess Charlene, 2011. (2) M.P. Frank Field questions witnesses in June. (3) Green in Barbados, 2008. (4) The Lionheart off the coast of Malta in August. (5) Green and Kate Moss during London’s fall 2013 Fashion Week. (6) Elizabeth Hurley, Green, Jackie Caring, and President Bill Clinton at a party in St. Petersburg, Russia, 2005. (7) The BHS store on London’s Oxford Street, in 2013. 5

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Kate Moss and Beyoncé, the latter of whom sang at his son Brandon’s Bar Mitzvah, in 2005, which took place in the gardens of Len Blavatnik’s Grand-Hôtel du Cap-Ferrat, on the Riviera, at an estimated cost of £4 million. For Green’s 50th birthday, in 2002, he held a toga party on Cyprus, which cost a reported £5 million and featured Tom Jones and Rod Stewart. His 60th-birthday party, held over four days at the Rosewood Mayakoba resort, south of Cancun, reportedly cost £6.5 million. The guests included Naomi Campbell, Leonardo DiCaprio, Gwyneth Paltrow, and Kate Hudson. Robbie Williams, Stevie Wonder, and CeeLo Green performed, and the Beach Boys sang at an outdoor barbecue. For a while, Green’s gallivanting amused British tabloid readers. “He’s the only person I know who has both Tony Blair and Kate Moss on speed dial,” gushed Michael Gove, the former British secretary of state for education, in 2014. Samantha Brick says, “We didn’t mind reading about him in the gossip pages and about how his wife would organize these six-igure-, seven-igure-sum parties for his birthday, where Kate Moss and Gwyneth Paltrow would show up.” But, she continues, since the pension issue, “there’s no return for him.” Green chalks up all the criticisms to the insecurities of others, and he is not shy about berating those he regards as his persecutors. Last year, Ian Grabiner, chief executive of Arcadia, told the Financial Times that “the volcanoes erupt frequently. He’s very sensitive but I think that for all people like Philip, insecurity is a factor, because in their minds they have got to continue to be successful… There’s a very childish side to Philip that looks for afection.” The June 15 parliamentary hearing, which lasted for nearly six hours, showed Green in all his volatility. At irst, he threatened not to appear, because, he claimed, Field, who demanded that he write a check to ill the pension hole, was biased against him. Field asked me, in an interview, to convey to Green that a £325 million payment over time to the BHS pensioners would do the trick. But in the end, amid calls from members of Parliament and other public igures to have him stripped of his knighthood, Green relented. Trial and Errors

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e arrived at the cramped hearing in a feisty mood. A few days earlier, doctors had placed a ninth stent into his coronary arteries. He was bombastic. He was disrespectful. He was charming. He contradicted himself. At one point, seemingly out of the blue, he turned to Richard Fuller, a Conservative Party M.P. from Bedford, and blurted out, “Sir, do you mind not looking at me like that all the time? It’s really disturbing… You just want to stare at me?” As for the gap in the pension plan, Green said, “It’s my fault. The answer is: it wasn’t dealt with. We’re here, and we have to ind a solution. It’s not my style to blame anybody else.” He then proceeded to blame all sorts of people for not letting him know the extent of

the problem and suggested that somehow a micro-manager such as himself—when he took over BHS, he claims, he saved £400,000 by ordering new clothes hangers—had not been informed. Green also blamed Goldman Sachs, for not warning him of Chappell as the buyer for BHS. “We one-million percent would not have done business with him,” Green told the M.P.’s. “If [Goldman Sachs] had said, ‘Don’t deal with this guy,’ that would have been the end of it.”

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his bit of inger-pointing seemed odd, since Green never actually hired Goldman Sachs to represent him in the sale of BHS. Instead, he said at the hearing, he had asked Michael Sherwood, his longtime friend and a London-based Goldman Sachs vice chairman, if Anthony Gutman, the irm’s co-head of European investment banking, could “do a favor” and “look over a few of the people” interested in buying BHS. Gutman testiied that the bank had turned down the BHS-sale assignment because it was “too small.” Gutman did, at Green’s insistence, “provide informal assistance” on the initial BHS-purchase proposals “related to funding and intentions.” The M.P.’s report found that Goldman Sachs had “provided free advice to Sir Philip on the transaction, having turned down the opportunity to be formally engaged. In doing so, they hoped to maintain a longstanding and lucrative relationship with a wealthy client.” (Goldman’s relationship with Green is now “under review,” according to a Goldman spokesperson.) Although Green did not commit to ixing the pension problem at the hearing, he did allow, “It’s going to get my best shot to ind a solution as quickly as we can.” But weeks after the June 15 hearing, there remained no proposal from him. Field, for one, has had enough of Green. “That family could sort the pension out now if it wished to,” he said at a June 29 hearing. “It just has to come up with some money, money it has already taken out ivefold, this sum, from these companies… We are fed up with hearing, ‘I am about to ix it.’ He does not ix it. What is required is a very large check from the Green family, who have done so well out of the whole of this.” In a July 30 letter to Field, Green wrote, “I have tried to stay silent in the face of your regular outbursts and to focus on the important task of working towards a solution for the Bhs pensioners. But I am not prepared to continue to allow your abuse to go unanswered… We are working towards a voluntary solution for the Bhs pension schemes because we want to help the Bhs pensioners. I will not be bullied by your press campaign and political grandstanding into supporting the Bhs pension schemes.” On July 31, the London Sunday Times reported that Green had inally put forth a plan featuring a new pension fund “rejuvenated with a cash injection from Arcadia”—instead of from Green or his family. By this point, however, the British pensions regulator was looking into a £189.6 million shortfall in Arcadia’s pension fund,

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so, as the Times noted, it was possibly “unsuitable to shoulder the burden” of bailing out the BHS pension fund. Field told me in June that “the story has turned out to be a tragedy for Green, when he could have actually at the very beginning shaped events. His greed has allowed events to shape him… I can’t understand the man, who needs to pay up, and each day witnesses his reputation [getting] further shredded, but does nothing but moan. It’s an Icarus story, isn’t it? Of seeing a way to make riches and then thinking you are immune from the power of the sun.” Adds one prominent businessman, “It’s really the character of Philip Green that makes it so completely interesting. And he is the Stephen Karam, most vain man ever, and pugnabackstage at the cious, and it’s just terribly interestRoundabout Theatre Company’s American ing to ind him sort of on the ropes Airlines Theatre, for a bit… If you’re consistently in New York City. lashy, consistently rude, and very rich, you can’t then be surprised if KARAM WEARS A COAT BY BARBOUR; nobody likes you.” SHIRT BY CALVIN Here’s the Deals

ST Y LE D BY J O SHUA LI E BM A N; HA I R A ND GRO OM I NG PRO DUC TS BY J ACK BL ACK; GROO M I NG BY ME GA N L A N OU X; F OR D ETA IL S , G O TO VF.CO M/ CR E DITS

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KLEIN COLLECTION; BOOTS BY ALLSAINTS; WATCH BY M&CO.

efore I had a single conversation about him, Green called my cell phone—“No Caller ID” showed up—and told me that he was worried that Graydon Carter, this magazine’s editor, was out to get him. He claimed that I had already started making calls seeking dirt on him. I told him I hadn’t spoken to anybody. “You’re on trial,” he told me. “Let’s see how well behaved you are.” He also threatened to sue. Green’s résumé makes clear that he very well may be the most successful leveraged-buyout aicionado to ever take on the retail industry, at least if accumulating vast wealth is the sole criterion. He grew up prosperous in Croydon, in South London. His father, a small-businessman, died of a heart attack when Green was 12. Green attended Carmel College, an expensive, now defunct boarding school west of London known as the “Jewish Eton,” until he was 16, when he left without graduating. He told the Financial Times in a 2015 interview that he “wasn’t a good school pupil” and preferred business, the tenets of which he had picked up by watching his mother, who had taken over the family business, which came to include auto shops, gasoline stations, and car showrooms. According to a 1992 article by Chris Blackhurst in The Independent, Green remained close to his mother and set up “a string of companies with her—none of which was especially successful.” In fact four of them—Cupcraft; Tarbrook, a clothing importer; Buzzville, a women’s-clothing maker; and Joan Collins Jeans, intended to be the British answer to Gloria Vanderbilt jeans—went bust. What Green excelled at, he soon found out, was risky, scrappy deal-making. In 1985, he bought a bankrupt clothing company, Bonanza Jeans. One of its customers, Jean Jeanie, owed Bonanza £250,000, he says. So the owner of Jean Jeanie offered to sell Green the company for £4 million. Green’s accountants took a look at Jean Jeanie’s books, only to discover that it was bankrupt, too, owing Barclays bank C O N T I N U E D O N P A G E 1 9 8 OC TOB E R

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magine you just won the Tony Award for best play (The Humans) and the show is such a hit it moved into a Broadway theater nearly twice the size of its previous home. Wouldn’t you be tempted to spend long afternoons at Orso drinking grappa and re-reading your reviews? Not Stephen Karam, 36, who is instead putting the finishing touches on his adaptation of The Cherry Orchard, produced by the Roundabout Theatre Company and opening this fall on Broadway starring Diane Lane. (Orso regulars, of course, know that Lane made her Broadway debut at age 12 in a 1977 version of the play alongside Meryl Streep.) What does a play about a clan from Pennsylvania celebrating Thanksgiving in a dismal New York apartment overlooking an air shaft have in common with Anton Chekhov’s final play, about an aristocratic Russian family facing the sale of its wooded estate? “Fear of poverty” is one thread, Karam says. Both families struggle with change, and Karam admires Chekhov for how “timeless and resonant” his plays remain. “The Cherry Orchard is a masterpiece, and there can never be too many adaptations,” Karam says. “All of them will fall short, and that is freeing when you are doing your own.” Karam need not be so modest, since he also wrote the upcoming film adaptation of Chekhov’s The Seagull, with Saoirse Ronan, Annette Bening, and Corey Stoll. “Chekhov would have been an excellent screenwriter,” Karam observes. “He is singularly good at dipping in and out of a group of people’s lives, like Robert Altman did.” — JIM KELLY

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The Front Page co-stars John Slattery, Robert Morse, Nathan Lane, John Goodman, Sherie Rene Scott, Jefferson Mays, and Holland Taylor, photographed at Skylight at Moynihan Station, New York City. 168

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Spotlight

BROADWAY’S BIG SCOOP hen The Front Page opened in 1928, the New Republic exclaimed, “My God, it’s vulgar!” Nearly nine decades later, on the eve of its latest Broadway revival, The Front Page is vulgar still, but that is the least of its virtues. Set in the pressroom of the Chicago criminal courts, The Front Page has dialogue so fast it breaks the sound barrier for wit and a plot as timely as today’s tweets. Playwrights Ben Hecht and Charles MacArthur, former Chicago newspapermen themselves, created a caricature (or is it?) that lives to this day: the reporter as a cynical, lying lout

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who subsists on a diet of whiskey, poker, and scoops and whose dying words surely would be “Get me re-write!” Hildy Johnson and his boss, Walter Burns, were the bromance of the 1920s, long before Howard Hawks reconceived the pair for the 1940 film His Girl Friday, in which Rosalind Russell played Hildy to Cary Grant’s Burns, her former husband as well as boss. This time around Burns is played by Nathan Lane, who won Tony Awards for best actor in A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum and The Producers. “Let’s put it this way: I’ve played men before who are conscience-free,” Lane says. Lane helped P H OTO G R APH

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director Jack O’Brien and producer Scott Rudin with casting and, while looking for someone to star as Hildy, ran into John Slattery (Roger Sterling of Mad Men fame) at a New Year’s Eve party and told him he was playing Walter Burns. “I said, ‘I should play that other guy,’” Slattery recalls. “And he thought about it for a minute and said, ‘You should play that other guy.’” The plot revolves around Burns’s desperation to keep Johnson, who wants to leave the paper for advertising, providing Slattery a laughline that the play’s writers and original director, George S. Kaufman, could — JIM KELLY never have anticipated. VA NI T Y

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Internet

After the defenses of an Internet giant were breached last December, alien software was discovered deep in the company’s networks: the cyber-war equivalent of an undetonated nuclear weapon. Through the eyes of a master hacker turned security expert, WILLIAM LANGEWIESCHE chronicles the rise of the Dark Net and learns how high the stakes have become in a lawless digital wilderness VAN IT Y

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I. The Back Door

is name is not Opsec, but I will call him that to guard his privacy. In webspace he is known as a grand master of the dark art of hacking. He is one of a small elite—maybe a hundred, maybe fewer—all of whom are secretive and obsessed with security. They do not talk about their work with their families. They generally do not talk to the press. Nonetheless, through friends of friends, Opsec agreed to speak and to introduce me to his perspectives. In “meatspace,” as he and others like him call the real world, Opsec lives in a metropolitan area in a little wooden house by a railroad track. He is in his mid-30s, physically imposing, and not a geek. He hangs out in a local bar, where the regulars know vaguely that he works with computers. He is a fast talker when he’s onto a subject. His mind seems to race most of the time. Currently he is designing an autonomous system for detecting network attacks and taking action in response. The system is based on machine learning and artiicial intelligence. In a typical burst of words, he said, “But the automation itself might be hacked. Is the A.I. being gamed? Are you teaching the computer, or is it learning on its own? If it’s learning on its own, it can be gamed. If you are teaching it, then how clean is your data set? Are you pulling it of a network that has already been compromised? Because if I’m an attacker and I’m coming in against an A.I.-defended system, if I can get into the baseline and insert attacker traic into the learning phase, then the computer begins to think that those things are normal and accepted. I’m teaching a robot that ‘It’s O.K.! I’m not really an attacker, even though I’m carrying an AK-47 and iring on the troops.’ And what happens when a machine becomes so smart it decides to betray you and switch sides?” Opsec lives in a hall of mirrors. He understands that webspace and meatspace, though connected, remain largely distinct. Given suicient motivation and time, Opsec can break into almost any secure network 172

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without setting of alarms. Breaking in used to thrill him, because once inside he could roam as he liked, but success comes too easily now: with such an attack, he has to ind only a single way in. By contrast, defense presents the challenge of out-thinking every aggressor. This appeals to him, and he works now on the defending side. Usually this means protecting company networks from criminal attacks, or reacting to attacks after damage has been done. Opsec does not do the routine stuf. He is the man for the serious cases. He has seen some big ones. But even he was taken aback when, late last year, he stumbled upon a hack—a sliver of alien software on American shores—which suggested that preparations were being made for a cyber-attack of unprecedented scale. I will call his client the Company. It is an Internet behemoth. It streams entertainment online and makes direct regular connections to more than 70 million personal computers worldwide. The Company does not charge for the connections but rather for the services it provides. It is very proitable. And it is under frequent attack from many parts of the world. Most of the attacks are drive-by shootings—spray-and-prays that succumb harmlessly to the defenses that Opsec has helped design. But some are carefully aimed and have threatened the Company’s existence. He first intervened six years ago, after a data center had been hacked (as Opsec puts it) in a fucking major way. The intruders had gone after key systems, including the central payment processor and the C.E.O.’s computer, and had stolen credit-card and financial data as well as the Company’s proprietary source code—the secret formula upon which the business is built. Opsec worked for nearly six months to clean up the mess. By backtracking he discovered that the hackers were a group associated with the Chinese army. They operated out of a speciic building near Shanghai, which he was able to locate, and specialized in targeting entertainment companies. Eventually he was able to identify some of the individuals involved, and even to obtain pictures of them. Nominally, that was the end of it. Opsec told me that because a government was involved, and legal recourse in China was unrealistic, no further action was taken. What do you do when there is no law? Counter-hacking is a temptation, but can be dangerous. The Russian mob, for instance, has a poor sense of humor, and Colombian drug cartels are not much fun, either. Also, among independent hackers there is no small number of psychopaths. Over the years the Company has endured death threats, rape threats, and bomb scares. It gets personal. In a world without privacy, home addresses as well as the names of spouses and children

are easily found. As the Democratic National Committee recently discovered, it is better not to get hacked in the irst place. After the original breach by the Chinese, Opsec had urged the company’s management to establish a vigorous informationsecurity program, which it did by building three NASA-like control rooms scattered in data centers around the world. Collectively, they are stafed around the clock. The sole purpose is to catch intruders, and to catch them as quickly as possible. The average industry delay in detecting a malicious hack is 188 days. For the Company, Opsec was hoping to reduce the delay to minutes or even seconds. But late last year, when the operations manager called him at home and urgently requested his presence at the Company’s high-tech campus, about 20 miles away, he knew that those defenses had failed. Almost as disturbing, the alarm had been raised not by the security team but by an ordinary technician, a system administrator doing the drudgery of a routine review. When Opsec got to the campus, the details illed in. The system administrator—a friend of his—had been going through event logs of the previous week. Event logs are lines on a screen showing summaries of each new task given to a computer network, with a time stamp and a green or red dot indicating success or failure. Seeing a red dot, the administrator had zoomed in for more information. The failed task turned out to be an attempt from within the Company to deploy a piece of software companywide. Deployment of software throughout the entire network did sometimes occur—for instance, to install updates—but it was rare, and sufficiently important that the sender did not often make a mistake. In this case, the sender had omitted a single letter in the domain name to which the job was addressed—hence the failure. The associated software package was unlike anything the system administrator had seen before. He alerted the operations manager. Opsec knew immediately that the package was suspicious. In lieu of a coherent naming scheme—for instance, a numbered update—there were random characters, followed by “.exe,” for an executable program. He ran the content through a piece of reverseengineering software, called a disassembler, and quickly confirmed that his client had been hit with a malicious hack. Within an hour he understood that the purpose had been to permeate the Company’s networks, steal and encrypt all of its data, and demand payment for the data’s return. The numbers for an overseas bank account were included in the program. Opsec would not tell me where that bank account was, or how much had been demanded. He said only that it was OC TOB ER

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an aggressive piece of ransomware, and that often in such cases the data is never returned. Ransom attacks have become an epidemic on the Internet. Most are widely dispersed. They lock down a victim’s computers and ask for relatively small amounts, payable in hard-totrace Bitcoins, in exchange for returning the victim’s life to normal. The biggest attacks— against corporations—have netted millions of dollars. Little is known about them because the victims are tight-mouthed. The massive hack of Sony Pictures in 2014 was a ransom attack, though by whom is still in question. Presumably Sony did not pay, because its internal e-mails and other information were released onto the Internet. Last February, hackers seized medical records from the Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center, in Los Angeles. The hospital paid to get the records back. Now, through sheer luck—a missing letter—the attempt to extort Opsec’s client had failed. But big concerns remained: the Company’s network was clearly compromised. Here was the situation Opsec faced. The package no longer mattered, but the hack most certainly did. Someone had emerged from the Internet, slithered into the Company’s heart, and then disappeared. The speciic vulnerability the attacker had exploited was still unknown, and was likely to be used again: he had established a back door, a way in. Some back doors are permanent, but most are short-lived. Possibly this one was already for sale on the black markets that exist for such information in obscure recesses of the Internet. Until Opsec could ind and lock it, the back door constituted a serious threat. Opsec reviewed the basics with the Company’s managers. He said, Look, we’re in the Internet business. We know we’re going to get hacked. We have to assume, always, that our network is already owned. It is important to go slowly and stay calm. We will soon know how and when to lock the door. We will have to decide later if we should do more. To me he said, “Also, relax. In the long run, the chance of survival always drops

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to zero anyway.” He did not say this to his client. It was not an insight the Company would have valued at the time. Even in the short run, as it turned out, the news would be alarming enough. II. Anarchist at Heart

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einitions. A vulnerability is a weakness in a network’s defenses. An exploit is a piece of software that takes advantage of a vulnerability. A zero-day exploit is a piece of software that takes advantage of a vulnerability that is known to a small group of aggressors and generally not to the defenders. “Back door” is another name for much the same. There are variations. Infinite invention is at play. Welcome to the Dark Net, a wilderness where wars are fought and hackers roam. More deinitions. The Dark Net exists within the deep web, which lies beneath the surface net, which is familiar to everyone. The surface net can be roughly deined as “anything you can ind through Google” or that is otherwise publicly indexed for all to see. The deep web is deep because it cannot be accessed through ordinary search engines. Its size is uncertain, but it is believed to be larger than the surface net above it. And it is mostly legitimate. It includes everything from I.R.S. and Social Security data to the internal communications of Sony and the content management system at The New York Times. It includes Hillary Clinton’s e-mails and text messages, along with everyone else’s. Almost all of it is utterly mundane. The Dark Net occupies the basement. Its users employ anonymizing software and encryption to hide themselves as they move around. Such tools ofer a measure of privacy. Whistle-blowers and political dissidents have good reason to resort to them. Criminals do, too. White fades quickly through gray and then to black in the Dark Net. Furtive sites there ofer all manner of

contraband for sale—narcotics, automatic weapons, contract killings, child pornography. The most famous of these sites was Silk Road—the brainchild of Ross Ulbricht, a libertarian entrepreneur who was arrested by the F.B.I. in San Francisco in 2013 and sentenced last year to life in prison without parole. New and even larger marketplaces have opened, including the current leader, AlphaBay, which is owned by a man who has been quoted as saying he resides in an “of-shore country where I am safe,” gives interviews to the press, and openly deies attempts by the authorities to shut him down. There are twists: illegal narcotics sold over the Dark Net tend to be purer, and therefore safer, than those sold on the street—this because of the importance to the sellers of online customer ratings. By comparison, it is hard to see the bright side of missile launchers or child pornography. However noxious the illicit Web sites may be, they are merely the e-commerce versions of conventional black markets that exist in meatspace. The real action on the Dark Net is in the trade of information. Stolen credit cards and identities, industrial secrets, military secrets, and especially the fuel of the hacking trade: the zero days and back doors that give access to closed networks. A shortlived back door to the iPhone operating system may sell for a million dollars. In 2015 a black-market site called TheRealDeal, the irst one to specialize exclusively in cyberweaponry, opened for business. Several others have followed. There is something strangely circular about all this—the Dark Net chasing its tail through the Dark Net— but the stakes have turned out to be high. And the trade is new. So new that when Opsec looks back on recent history he can sound like an old man remembering the onset of World War II. He was born to a middle-class family in the orbit of Washington, D.C., and by the time he was in kindergarten it was obvious that he was a bright if stubborn child. This was toward the end of

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the 1980s, in the pre-dawn before the Internet as we know it. His mother owned an early personal computer—a big box with a keyboard, a black screen, and white letters. It had a dial-up modem for point-to-point connections to other computers. When Opsec was six, he discovered that he could play games on it. The irst was a Japanese action game called Thexder, in which he could transform a robot into an airplane and bomb things on the ground. This was so gratifying that on weekends he would wake up his mother at ive A.M. and get her to go through the necessary keyboard commands to access it. She grew so weary of this that she wrote out the commands for him to use. He then igured out how to write a simple program to automate the log-in. That was the start of the path he remains on today. By the age of seven he had become a regular on electronic bulletin boards where gamers exchanged information and posted downloadable games. The bulletin boards were precursors of the Dark Net: you could not search for them on a computer; you had to have a specific phone number and reach it point-to-point with a dial-up modem. After you found the first one, you were in and could ind others. The users had pseudonyms and remained largely anonymous. Age and location did not matter. Social awkwardness did not matter. Some of the information the bulletin boards contained included pirated property and advice on how to break the law. Opsec was just a kid, and at irst he was only after the games. His problem was that they were often locked and required payment. With hints from the bulletin boards, he began to reverse-engineer the games, identify the lines of code associated with security, and modify the programs to bypass the payment requirements. He then posted his solutions on bulletin boards so that others could do the same. Though he did not know it at the time, he was creating zero-day exploits. By the sixth grade, Opsec had started hacking into universities and phone companies. His parents saw him sitting hour after hour at the keyboard, but were so unaware of his activities that they bought him a laptop for schoolwork because his handwriting was bad. The efect was to pour fuel on the ire. His grades plummeted from A’s to D’s. I asked him what the attraction of hacking was. He said, “The whole idea of being able to exert your will on systems that were designed to exert the will of others—the designers. It was a powerful and addictive feeling.” When he was 12, Opsec began to attend the local chapter meetings of a notorious hackers’ group, named 2600 for the 2600-hertz tone that gave access to the analog phone systems of the time. The meetings 174

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were held in the food court of the Pentagon City shopping mall. He had a friend, a like-minded Persian kid who attended the meetings with him and was extraordinarily capable but a bit malicious: he later published papers on how to destroy hard disks remotely and how to cause computers to catch on ire by shutting down their fans. Although also an anarchist at heart, Opsec was more interested in expanding his skills than in wreaking havoc. But the two friends had technical goals in common. They became regulars at the foodcourt gatherings and eventually met a man there who worked for an unnamed government agency but was willing to explain certain concepts clearly. Such exchanges are characteristic of the larger hacker gatherings that have followed, with natural adversaries such as F.B.I. agents and Eastern European cyber-criminals temporarily setting aside their diferences to share information. III. Chinese Networks

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psec took what he learned and acted on it. In most cases, success was defined as access to the administrative console of an operating system. That position is sometimes known as a root shell. For Opsec it was the holy grail, because from within the root shell, as an illicit administrator, he could do as he pleased, including using one computer to attack another, and from there yet another, in daisy chains that spanned the globe. This was tricky stuf, and also risky, because much of Opsec’s hacking was in violation of increasingly vigorous federal law, and the F.B.I. was cracking down. The most famous case at the time was that of Kevin Mitnick, a young Californian who had been repeatedly jailed for hacking. After violating the terms of a supervised release, Mitnick went on the run for several years, earning a place on the F.B.I.’s most-wanted list before being caught in 1995 and hauled of to prison for ive years. With several of his friends in detention, Opsec grew nervous about being identiied. It was 1996. The commercial Internet had barely arrived. Opsec was a scrawny adolescent. He was still using dial-up modems to break point-to-point directly into mainframes, particularly those that were part of the global telecommunications infrastructure. From an illicit bulletin board he obtained a master list of the default passwords used for many of the manufacturers, then went on a spray-and-pray hunt through the phone system, looking for vulnerable computers. To do this he wrote a program that would call every 1-800 number possible, for a total of roughly 7.9 million combinations. He chose 1-800 numbers because the

calls were free. If computers answered, the program would distinguish between them, respond with factory-default passwords, and register the successful penetrations. Once the program had mapped the vulnerabilities, and Opsec had taken possession of some computers, he intended to use them to go after other computers, in order to hide his traces as he approached the inal targets. The problem was how to make millions of automated phone calls, because even a 14-year-old has limits on his time. Late one night, working alone, he threw a rubber mat over a barbed-wire fence protecting a phone-company yard, and climbed up and over. Once inside he broke into two vans and stole everything he could: technical manuals, linemen’s handsets, utility belts, uniforms, helmets, pay-phone keys, and, most important, a master key to neighborhood trunk boxes—the junctions through which hundreds of phone lines run. With parts from a RadioShack he built a small device that allowed him to seize every one of those lines simultaneously. He connected the device to a small laptop that he had stolen from a Staples, and set to work. Dressed in an oversize lineman’s uniform and hard hat, with a utility belt dangling equipment from his waist, he slipped away from his house and every night for several weeks probed the 1-800 network with thousands of computerized calls. On the inal night of the endeavor, at two A.M., he had opened a trunk box situated on the front lawn of a church, when an old woman—a member of the congregation—spotted him from her window and, noticing that his uniform did not seem to it him, called the police. Opsec still wonders what she was doing up so late. When he was arrested, the police had so little idea of what he was doing that they returned the laptop computer to his father without having it examined. The local prosecutors charged him with illicit wiretapping, as if he had been eavesdropping. His parents hired an expensive lawyer. Opsec copped a plea to a misdemeanor to avoid having to explain himself, and was sentenced to several weeks in a juvenile-detention center, to be followed by years of probation. Then came the Internet, which for hackers was a dream come true. Suddenly they had access to millions of computers that until then they had needed to address one by one. Opsec invested in a high-speed DSL modem and set up a business in his Persian friend’s basement, renting out the connection to other hackers, who sent their computers to him because of the access he ofered for relatively rapid downloads, often of stolen content, and the fast execution of complex attacks. He learned a lot by servicing those clients. As he gained experience he graduated from OC TOB ER

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indiscriminate hunts for low-hanging fruit to more focused attacks, known as deep dives, against well-defended networks. The dives required careful planning. Opsec said, “You start with recon, studying the target network, but also doing research on employees, building psychological proiles, trying to assess the culture of security, and looking for the ‘social engineering’ possibilities—can you trick someone into divulging a password? You create a map of all the possible avenues you can use to get in.” Opsec got into the Colombian government’s networks without setting off alarms, and spent six months there, undetected, moving around. Then he dived into Chinesegovernment sites and military networks, and into the domain of speciic Chinese hacking teams. He was 16 now. In yet another lapse of understanding his parents allowed him to take a job in an electronics store, where his main purpose was to steal more “burner” laptops to discard after use, to avoid detection. A regular customer there learned of his unusual knowledge of Chinese networks and offered him some work on the side: the man handed him a list of about 20 Chinese servers and asked Opsec to look into them. This turned into a regular thing. The man sent a bank transfer to him every month. Opsec guessed that he worked for the N.S.A. or the C.I.A. Opsec’s parents, meanwhile, kept shipping their son from one school to another, in the vain hope of getting him to return to conventional studies. They sent him of to a military school with the idea that boot camp might bring him to heel. He hacked into the school’s network, encrypted the data on a classmate’s personal computer, and taunted him with the loss. The school found out and gave Opsec the choice of helping to shore up its defenses or being expelled. He chose to be expelled. When he called his mother to give her the good news, she was livid. She said, “How did you manage to get kicked out of a bad-kid school?” She exiled him to live with his uncle in a faraway place. He kept hacking. OC TOB E R

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IV. “Mafiaboy”

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psec describes the public’s awareness of the Dark Net as a slow awakening. It started at the dawn of the new millennium, around the year 2000. With Internet connections proliferating, e-commerce expanding, and the dot-com boom fully under way, the surface Web looked much as it looks today except for this: attacks were not pervasive and computer security was not a big concern. The problem with security is that it slows operations down, and the new and ambitious Internet entrepreneurs were locked into competitive races that allowed no room for interference. The interference came anyway. In February 2000 a 15-yearold French Canadian who went by the name Mafiaboy launched a series of denial-ofservice attacks that took down a progression of important Web sites, starting with the then dominant search engine, Yahoo, and moving on to Amazon, eBay, Dell, and CNN, among others. Such denial-of-service attacks, which overwhelm Web sites by hitting them with massive traic, are the most primitive form of hack. They require only the hijacking of undefended computers, not the penetration of the target networks, and they do not result in the loss of data. In Opsec’s view, Mafiaboy was a talentless “script kiddie” who used of-the-shelf components written by others, and needed little knowledge to pull of his stunt. He was so naïve that he bragged about his exploits in Internet chat rooms. He was arrested, and sentenced as a juvenile to eight months of house arrest and a year of probation. But Maiaboy’s attacks surprised the industry, caused losses estimated at more than a billion dollars, and made international news. Internet companies realized that they were going to have to improve their resiliency. The magnitude of the cited losses also got the attention of the underground. Anarchists were attracted by the opportunities to cause disruption. Others were attracted by the opportunities to make money. Organized crime

soon got involved. Identity theft, credit-card fraud, and electronic extortion expanded rapidly. The public remained largely unaware, but with monetization the evolution of the Dark Net suddenly accelerated. In the United States alone, nearly every company larger than small is getting hit on a regular basis, usually from abroad. The Pentagon has said it fends of several million attempts at cyberintrusion every day. Opsec had just turned 18 when Maiaboy struck. Nominally he was a senior in high school. As an adult now, he arranged to have authority over his probation transferred from where he lived with his uncle back to the Washington area, and he returned from his exile soon afterward. That spring he fell in love with a beautiful Asian girl who was all about drugs and sex, and he moved in with her. During his next visit to his new probation oicer, he reported the change of address, and she busted him for it because he was supposed to have informed her in advance. He was sent to jail for several months to contemplate the error. In prison he found a mentor who was a doctor convicted of selling the identities of dead babies on the Dark Net for use in providing criminals with new identities. Opsec was released in 2000, becoming a free man without restrictions for the irst time in four years. He swore of hacking, and went to work at an espresso bar on the ground loor of an oice building. Through a chance encounter with a customer there, he found himself with a computer job upstairs. The company was in the data-transmission business, largely through iber-optic cables laid long-distance along 19th-century railroad rights-of-way. Opsec was assigned to the company’s control center to give general assistance to customers, who were mainly Internet-service providers. Given his talents, he soon gravitated to the security side. To his surprise, Opsec found himself back in the underground from which he had just emerged. Opsec moved on to a series of small jobs, then landed a position C O N T I N U E D O N P A G E 1 9 4 www.vanityfair.com

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Mary Astor’s “purple” diary pushed Hitler and Franco off her ex-husband for custody of their daughter. In an adaptation from his book steamy revelations about Astor’s affair with (married) Broadway

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I LLUST R AT I ON S

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the tabloid front pages in 1936 as the Hollywood star battled about the scandal, EDWARD SOREL revisits the courtroom drama, the diary’s legend George S. Kaufman, and its mysterious disappearance

& the Agony

Mary Astor becomes Hollywood’s unwitting sex bomb.

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guess you could say that Mary Astor and I “met cute,” the way romantic leads always do. It happened in 1965. I was 36, a freelance illustrator who, thanks to Vietnam, had begun doing political satire in a left-wing magazine called Ramparts. Mary, as I would come to call her, had retired from the screen a year earlier, after a career often playing soigné, exquisitely coifed upper-class women. She was 59. My wife, Nancy, and I were lucky enough to ind a railroad lat in one of the remaining

el. They were issues of the New York Daily News and Daily Mirror from 1936. The papers were smelly and yellow with age, but otherwise readable. The giant black headlines concerned a child-custody trial in Los Angeles. The News banner for July 31 screamed, MARY ASTOR SOBS ON STAND. Next came ASTOR’S SENSATIONS SCARE FILM MOGULS. And by August 8 it was ASTOR DIARY “ECSTASY,” with the subhead G. S. KAUFMAN TRYST BARED. I began putting the pages in order. In 1936, Mary Astor was only a featured player in movies, but enough of a star to make headlines when it came out that George S. Kaufman, then the most successful playwright on Broadway and married, had been her lover. Once his name emerged in Mary’s custody battle, the story pushed Hitler and Franco of tabloid front pages. The scandal revolved around Mary’s diary, which her ex-husband—Franklyn Thorpe, a Hollywood doctor—had found when they were still married. Its incriminating contents had forced Mary to give up custody of their daughter, Marylyn, in order to obtain a divorce. But by 1936 she had resolved to renegotiate the arrangement. Thorpe planned to use the diary to prove she was an unit mother. Mary, he claimed, had kept a graded tally of all her extramarital afairs. He threatened to put the document into evidence, and had already shown a page of it to

But before I gave my heart away, I needed to learn everything about her. If a new life of Kaufman came out, I read it. If the Museum of Modern Art was showing a Mary Astor ilm, I saw it. As a latchkey kid growing up in the Bronx who could do whatever he wanted after school, I would draw pictures and go to the movies. All theaters in the Bronx ofered double features, and I often took in four movies on a weekend. The irst time I saw Mary was in The Prisoner of Zenda, when I was 10, and I remember puzzling over why someone so stunning was desperate to marry Raymond Massey, who was scheming and homely. The husbands Mary chose in real life seemed equally unfathomable. Granted, her irst love was a tough act to follow. In 1923, John Barrymore was 41 and at the peak of his celebrity as the greatest Hamlet ever seen on an American stage. On the basis of a photograph he had seen in a movie magazine, he chose the 17-yearold Mary as his co-star in Beau Brummel. The Great Proile, smitten in earnest after he met her, introduced her to tenderness and gaiety, and gave her a sense of worth as an actress. He even labored honorably to coax her away from her exploitative parents—“They’ll just make a meal ticket out of you”—before giving up. The break was a cruel one, but Mary’s rebound had its own miseries. Her mar-

“I did meet a man, rather well-to-do,” Astor wrote, “only his first initial is G. and I fell like a ton of bricks.” tenements on Manhattan’s Upper East Side. It was listed as a “professional apartment,” meaning the renter had to run a business from home. In a rent-controlled building that meant the landlord could charge more. Still, I was delighted to pay the legal limit of $97.14 a month. The place was a wreck, and Nancy insisted that the irst thing we had to do was tear up the rotting linoleum in the kitchen. One layer yielded to another, until inally I came to a bunch of newspapers that had been laid over the warped wooden loor to make it levAdapted from Mary Astor’s Purple Diary: The Great American Sex Scandal of 1936, by Edward Sorel, to be published next month by Liveright, an imprint of W. W. Norton & Company; © 2016 by the author. 178

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the press. Although Mary had in fact used brown ink in her fountain pen, the tabloids couldn’t resist making it jibe with the prose so they could call it “the Purple Diary.” My small collection of papers ran out before I learned the outcome of the trial, or whether Kaufman, then in Hollywood, had been forced to testify. Men of Her Dreams

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ortunately, Mary had written a memoir in 1959—smart, witty, and self-denigrating. After reading her story I began to feel a real affection for her. And I thought she looked exactly like those beautiful women drawn by Charles Dana Gibson in the early 1900s.

riage to sweet-natured Ken Hawks (brother of Howard) ended abruptly when Ken died ilming a World War I dogight from a biplane. That left Mary a widow at 23. Alone and anxious, she soon succumbed to the bedside manner of Dr. Franklyn Thorpe— good-looking and gallantly appreciative of her income, which enabled him to set up his own gynecological practice. After their marriage, in 1931, it became clear that Thorpe also had a trigger temper and a talent for enumerating Mary’s faults. Within two years, she wanted out. But Thorpe had grown fond of the lifestyle to which she had accustomed him. He knew she had had adulterous assignations with men, and if Mary took legal steps toward a divorce, he would accuse her of being an unit mother. OC TOB ER

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Mary went to see an attorney, who advised patience: a custody trial could ruin her career. A woman friend suggested a holiday in New York—why, she’d write her good friends Bennett Cerf and George S. Kaufman at once. Surely they’d be happy to squire her around.

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n 1933, Kaufman was not only the toast of Broadway but a consummate seducer, well known to be in a devoted but open marriage. Mary quickly became his latest conquest, inding him handsome without his glasses, genuinely solicitous about her career, and absolutely sensational in the sack. A diary entry written after her return home conveys her gobsmacked state: “I did meet a man, professional, somewhat older and rather well-to-do, only his irst initial is G. and I fell like a ton of bricks—as only I can fall … that was six months ago and it’s still good—we write to each other often, about every two weeks— flowers and telegram for Christmas and New Years; once when Franklyn was away he called me long distance and we talked for half an hour—his last letter finished with ‘Think of me my darling, because I certainly think of you.’ ” A subsequent entry suggests a second trip in 1933. “I am still in a haze… It is beautiful, glorious—and I hope it’s my last love—can’t top it with anything in my experience—nor do I want to.” It was another G-whiz idyll. She saw rehearsals of his plays, heard Gershwin play the score for Porgy and Bess, scoffed at Prohibition, and necked like there was no tomorrow. “Only ten days, but enough to remember the rest of my life—We went to ‘21’ … we drove through the park … we dined at the Colony; we saw Life Begins at 8:40 … we went to Reuben’s; we talked and laughed and spent lovely nights at the Essex House.” Mary’s happiness in New York—“We shared our fourth climax at dawn”—contrasted sharply with her wretchedness in Hollywood, chained to second-rate scripts. It was also unbearable to live with a foul-tempered despot after teddy bear George. When Thorpe refused to give Mary a divorce, she and four-year-old Marylyn moved out. Thorpe had anticipated just such a maneuver. Months earlier he had searched for and found the diary he knew Mary kept. In it he read that his sexual performance was lame, his name-dropping and social climbing ofensive, and his proligacy with her hard-earned money infuriating. She even ridiculed him for growing a mustache identical to Clark Gable’s. More important, he read that “G,” in New York, was her ideal match. It wasn’t hard to figure out who “G” was—she’d OC TOB E R

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George S. Kaufman and Astor shared an enviable amount of sack time. “I am still in a haze,” she confided to her diary.

The ladylike Astor glides into court on July 28, 1936, to face the prurient curiosity of the gallery. www.vanityfair.com

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It Boy

SURFBOARDS TO BILLBOARDS hen Jordan Barrett was a 13-year-old student in his native Byron Bay, a surfers’ paradise on Australia’s eastern coast, he was caught stealing matches at a convenience store on a break between—we’re not making this up—his marine-aquatics class and his scuba-diving lesson. Luckily, it was a model scout who stopped him, not store security. “He was asking me all these questions about my mom and stuff I didn’t understand. I thought he was security, and I sort of scampered away,” he coos, scrunching up his face, which makes him resemble the love child of a pouty Leonardo DiCaprio and a ferocious lioness. Before Barrett ducked back into school, the scout gave him a business card, which his mom found in his jeans pocket; a few weeks later, she e-mailed the scout some pics. In 2011, Jordan moved to Sydney, and at 17 was booked on his first modeling job, in Tokyo. He still had to wait a year before he could sign with IMG because the agency insisted on waiting until he was 18 to launch him into the fashion sphere. “My agent teases me they didn’t want to take care of a 15-year-old thief,” he says. Today, at 19, Barrett has traveled around the world for brands such as Tom Ford, Tommy Hilfiger, Balmain, Versace, and Moschino. This summer, he put Hollywood on alert by spending the month of August in acting classes: “I find that really challenging; it makes me use my mind in a new way. It’s like therapy almost.” But, for now, it’s the fashion world that’s responsible for his ubiquity. His rapid ascent in the male-modeling business is atypical; perhaps that’s why he is sometimes referred to as “Baby Kate,” as in La Moss. Barrett reckons the comparison is @vf.com beyond skin-deep. “We have the same To watch Jordan lust for life,” he says, smiling while lightBarrett play “Face Time” with Derek ing his cigarette—with, presumably, a Blasberg, go to lighter he paid for. — DEREK BLASBERG VF.COM/OC T2016.

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Jordan Barrett, photographed in New York City. BARRETT WEARS CLOTHING AND SHOES BY PRADA. OCTOBE R 2 016

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MADE IN THE SHADES Lapo Elkann in his Ferrari 458 in Milan. ELKANN WEARS A TUXEDO BY RUBINACCI; SUNGLASSES AND WATCH BY ITALIA INDEPENDENT.

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LAPO LUXURY

After living in the orbit of his iconic grandfather, Fiat chairman Gianni Agnelli, and a near-fatal drug overdose in 2005, Lapo Elkann quit the family business to re-invent himself as a global entrepreneur. From the $1,400 sunglasses that proved his marketing skill to his latest venture—a bespoke car (and plane and boat and bike) business—Elkann, MARK SEAL discovers, is doing what comes naturally: blending Italian passion, American ambition, and Agnelli style OCTOB E R 2 016

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apo Elkann is named for the 12th-century Italian poet Lapo Gianni, who was immortalized in a verse by Dante as one who could “talk about love forever.” Lapo Elkann, in fact, is all about love. Soon after we meet, he pulls me in close for a kiss on both cheeks, and I can feel the stubble on his face and smell the Marlboros on his breath. “Lapo loves to be loved,” says Countess Marina Cicogna, who has known him since he was ive. “He loves to be recognized. He would drive around in his cars with their Prince of Wales prints and wave to the people on Via Monte Napoleone.” After all, he is the youngest grandson of Gianni Agnelli—the iconic industrialist who once ruled Italy with his myriad businesses and la dolce vita lifestyle. I am relieved that Lapo is kissing, and not cursing, me. Because in the February 2006 issue of this magazine, I wrote a story about his spectacular, near-death drug overdose in 2005, which left him in a threeday coma, and which Lapo asked me not to dwell upon here. Two years later, I wrote a V.F. story about his mother, Margherita Agnelli de Pahlen, and her dogged fight against her father’s longtime advisers, and her own family, to receive what she believed was

“My mind-set today and in those days was ‘Think like a self-made man,’ ” Lapo Elkann says. 186

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her rightful inheritance from her father’s estate. HEIRS ’N’ PARENTS But Lapo has learned not to focus on the past. Below, Elkann “I try to think about the constructive path,” he with his grandfather says. And it is itting that his path has led him to create automobile, eyewear, and lifestyle businesses Gianni Agnelli in Venice, 2001. that are all about transformation and rebirth. Opposite, Elkann One afternoon in Milan, Lapo takes me (in pink shirt) for a spin in a Ferrari California T V-8, every with Agnelli and family near inch of which Lapo has customized, from its Turin, Italy, seats of leather and baby-soft Japanese denim 1986. to its screaming Scottish-blue exterior. He has just left the headquarters of his company, Garage Italia Customs, where he and his team transform Ferraris and other cars into kaleidoscopes of color, detail, and design, inspired by anything from the pinstripes of a customer’s favorite bespoke suit to the lacquer hues of a woman’s nail polish. Now he wants to show me how the car (base price: $202,000) performs, which it does admirably, commanding attention from bystanders. “Ciao, Lapo, come va? ” all of Milan seems to be asking as we streak down its streets. A riot of pure Italian passion and all-American ambition packed into a muscular frame with heavily tattooed arms, Lapo says, “There is nothing I like more than driving cars, working on cars, creating cars.” He’s dressed in a double-breasted blue Luca Rubinacci suit, velvety tailor-made slippers, and custom shirt, its cufs personalized with his nickname: LAPS. Turning onto a side street, he hits the gas in a car that can accelerate from zero to 60 in less than four seconds. My head jolts back against the headrest as he begins to recount his extraordinary story: how he, Lapo Edovard Elkann, 38, re-invented himself as a global entrepreneur. He didn’t have to go back to work after his overdose. Because for most of his life Lapo had been a prince forever looking up to, and emulating, his grandfather. At one point worth an estimated $3.1 billion, Gianni Agnelli’s empire included a controlling interest in Fiat (which then controlled Ferrari, Maserati, Lancia, and Alfa Romeo), Juventus (the Turin-based soccer team), the Château Margaux vineyards, Italian department stores, and La Stampa, Turin’s daily newspaper. Linked romantically to Jackie Kennedy and Rita Hayworth, Agnelli was the paradigm of the playboy tycoon. Lapo lived in Agnelli’s Park Avenue apartment in New York in 2001, when he worked as personal assistant to Henry


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Kissinger. “New York was good for him,” says the designer Diane von Furstenberg, who has known Top, Elkann with Lapo since he was seven, when she lived with his a customized Bombardier father, the dashing French-Italian novelist and TV Learjet 31, personality Alain Elkann, in the 1980s. “Like a lot in Milan, and, of creative people, it was diicult for Lapo to ind bottom, the way he would use his creativity and, to a cerphotographed by Bruce Weber tain degree, his madness. And he found his way.” off the coast of This November, he will unveil the headquarCannes in 2009. ters for his latest company: the iconic Agip mega TOP, ELKANN gas-station-and-garage in Milan. A masterpiece of WEARS A JACKET midcentury design when constructed in the early BY RUBINACCI. 50s, the building languished as a mechanics’ shop in the mid-1980s and then stood decaying for years. Now Lapo and his team are radically refurbishing it, complete with customization workshops, a restaurant, showrooms for Garage Italia’s cars, offices, and more. To tell me that story, Lapo takes me to his residence atop a building in the center of Milan. Like everything else in his life, his home has been transformed. He guides me through his apartment, a swirling cornucopia of art and design and, everywhere, clothes. Only one thing seems to be missing: his current girlfriend, the gorgeous Shermine Shahrivar, Miss Europe 2005. Lapo’s clothes, including some 400 suits, many of which are available in a made-to-measure collaboration between Gucci and Lapo called Lapo’s Wardrobe, have earned him a spot in Vanity Fair’s BestDressed List Hall of Fame. But the clothes are not merely the plumage of a playboy; they’re the armor of a Renaissance businessman, whose companies include an international fashion brand, Italia Independent, with an advertising arm, Independent Ideas; a ilm-distribution-andproduction irm, Good Films, which Lapo has a major stake in with his sister, Ginevra Elkann Gaetani, 36; and Garage Italia Customs, which customizes “cars, planes, boats, bikes, and toys for boats.” We have lunch in his dining room beneath a huge Warhol-andBasquiat painting titled Eat Your Vegetables. Lapo eats, and smokes, and inhales a stream of espresso, while he talks, in a guttural, staccato voice tarred by nicotine. After his overdose, he was sent of to rehab in Arizona and then moved back to New York, where he battled his addiction, which he calls “the biggest challenge I’ve had in my life,” but he emerged creatively more alive. BLAZER TRAILS

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e would go to Canal Street, and he would grab things—cheap watches, a dollar hat, sunglasses—and he would change it into something his own,” recalls the photographer Wayne Maser. “He has a talent that’s hard to articulate, even at that time when he had no idea what he would eventually do.” At 28, working as the director of worldwide brand promotion of Fiat, he became the lamboyant public face of the otherwise private Agnelli family. Determined to make Fiat hip for his generation, he aggressively promoted the Grande Punto, the second iteration of the company’s irst supermini car, which contributed to his 2005 collapse. He enlisted a Manhattan advertising agency to help him on the 2007 relaunch of another car, the Fiat 500, or the Cinquecento— the afordable snub-nosed coupe that became the rage of Italy in 1957. When only Lapo, and not his team, was invited to an event to be recognized for the car’s success, he resigned from “my family business” (though he remained a major shareholder of the Agnelli family investment company, which owns a controlling stake in Fiat Chrysler Automobiles), and tattooed a one-word mantra along the length of his left forearm: INDEPENDENT. OC TOB E R

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“People would laugh if I say I started from ground zero, but the reality is I started my companies from scratch,” he says. “My mindset today and in those days was ‘Think like a self-made man. Even though you come from a family who has a humongous heritage, has everything, you need to think like someone who is poor. Because if you think like someone who is rich, you’re fucked.’ ” Public Spectacles

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e eventually settled on sunglasses as his first product, his debut model inspired by a photograph he had of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis wearing her signature sunglasses in a Fiat 500 belonging to his grandfather. “Frankly, I didn’t think there was so much to talk about with sunglasses,” remembers the stylist Sciascia Gambaccini, who watched Lapo sift through several ideas for his irst product. “I thought there were enough sunglasses in the world.” And Lapo knew that sunglasses-crazy Italy was eager to watch him fall on his face. “In the U.S., success is cherished and respected,” he says. “In Europe, success is envied.” Lapo called his new company Italia Independent. He founded it with two longtime friends and associates, the attorney Andrea Tessitore and Lapo’s former Fiat colleague Giovanni Accongiagioco, and helped inance it with 50,000 euros of his own money. “I wanted to see what I was capable of doing without my family, without my family business, without my family money,” he says. For Lapo, entering the eyewear industry was like a lamb staring into the jaws of a lion. The industry leader is the Milan-based Luxottica Group, one of the world’s largest producers of eyewear. The company’s founder and chairman, Leonardo Del Vecchio, 81, is worth $16 billion, according to Forbes, and is known as the secondrichest man in Italy. His company owns Ray-Ban, Oakley, Persol, Sunglass Hut, and LensCrafters. How to stand out? Lapo thought back to his grandfather’s all-black racing yacht, Stealth. “Carbon iber,” he says, citing the advantages of the material, which include lightness and incredible strength. “Nobody had ever done carbon-iber eyewear,” says Lapo, whose sunglass frames would be constructed of 47 layers of carbon-iber ilament, making them as sturdy and sleek as his grandfather’s sailboat. But what initially set the sunglasses apart was the price: 1,007 euros (approximately $1,400). In early 2007, Lapo dramatically returned home. Wearing his grandfather’s cream-colored cashmere double-breasted blazer with Brazilian camoulage trousers, he celebrated the launching of his new company at a dinner for 150 during the Pitti Uomo fashion fair, in Florence. “To the eyes of the world [the price] was a joke, but in reality it is probably the best thing I’ve ever done,” Lapo says. “Because if I wanted to position my brand high, and I had to invest in advertising, I would’ve had to have paid millions. By doing these glasses and positioning them at that price, advertising was free of charge … We sold them all.” Now Italia Independent is an international entity, listed on Milan’s secondary stock exchange. With 180 employees worldwide, the company reported 2015 revenues of $44.4 million, up 20.4 percent from the previous year. It has 15 lagship stores worldwide, selling more than 1,000 diferent styles of sunglasses and other items, and ofers products in partnership with companies including Adidas Originals and Hublot. Among a host of celebrity endorsers, fashion designer Karl Lagerfeld has made Lapo’s Italia Independent sunglasses part of his distinctive wardrobe and has also designed a sunglasses collection for the company. Early the next morning, Lapo sends me to the Milan Design and Style Center of Garage Italia Customs, to meet his company’s artistic www.vanityfair.com

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MIAMI BLUES Elkann, off Miami’s South Beach on his digitally camouflaged speedboat. ELKANN WEARS A SUIT BY RUBINACCI.

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apo is currently franchising the Garage Italia Customs concept in Miami, Dubai, and Asia. Garage Italia Customs has c u s tom i z e d 165 cars and five private planes, including a Gulfstream G650, a Gulfstream IV, a Bombardier Learjet 31, and a Learjet 45. The company has done collaborations with Mazda, Ducati, Smart cars, and BMW, customizing one of its new models to celebrate BMW’s 50 years in Italy. Private-equity billionaire Ron Burkle paid $1.12 million for one of Lapo’s camoulage Fer-

raris at last summer’s AmFAR auction in Cannes, and two Fiat 500 electric cars, customized by Lapo’s company, were auctioned of at this year’s Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation charity event in St. Tropez. Garage Sale

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lmost as challenging as creating the product was inding a headquarters, a symbol, that would relect Lapo’s enormous pride in his country and his vision for the future. The answer, it turned out, was something that Lapo had literally driven past for the last 20 years of his life. “The Temple of the Automobile,” designed by the great modern Italian architect Mario Bacciocchi, relected the hopes and dreams of an Italy on the move, an exuberant country being rebuilt after the war with American money from the Marshall Plan. Although the building was primarily meant to be a gas station, it became an automobile club, a futuristic, curvaceous, boomerang-shaped beacon for drivers in Milan. But by the mid-1980s it was a mechanics’ shop, and then for more than 10 years it sat empty, a victim of Italy’s economic stagnation, a once shining symbol of the country’s hopes that stood vacant and vandalized. “I always asked myself, ‘Why is it kept so poorly?’ ” Lapo says of the building. “And it pissed me of, actually. I always said, ‘One day, I need to do something … to restore dignity, pride, and honor to this building, which is a landmark in Milan. ” He got his chance in early 2015, when the building was put up for sale in a public auction run by the city of Milan. Lapo and his team bid against companies from Italy and abroad. Naturally, Lapo won, and, naturally, he is pushing the renovation to the limit. The building, which will be restored under the direction of noted Italian architect Michele de Lucchi, will become the global headquarters of Garage Italia Customs when it reopens this November. It will also once again become the Temple of the Automobile, featuring workshops and showrooms of Lapo’s company’s customized vehicles, and a restaurant run by renowned chef Carlo Cracco. One afternoon, Lapo takes me on a tour of the building, which was then still a wreck, its majestic windows broken, its futuristic walls covered in grafiti, its garage bays grimy with dirt and dust, the air reeking of neglect. “Another shell,” I say. “That’s the beauty,” he says. “Why?” “Because it’s beautiful to see things that you bring back.” 

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director, Carlo Ludovico Borromeo, the 32-year-old scion of the Borromeo dynasty, which dates back to the 14th century. So rich and powerful are the Borromeos that they once governed their own state within Northern Italy and still have their own islands, one in Lago Maggiori and another of Taormina. Lapo came to know Carlo when his brother, John, head of Fiat Chrysler Automobiles, married Carlo’s sister Lavinia, in what was called the wedding of the decade in 2004. But Carlo didn’t realize the force of his brother-in-law’s personality until Lapo invited him to a business meeting in his home near Turin one day in 2010. “I was dressed properly,” says Carlo of his arrival at Villar Perosa, the grand Agnelli family estate. He was greeted by Lapo’s housekeeper, Armando, and led downstairs, where he heard Lapo, in his guttural roar, shout, “Hey, I’m in the sauna! Come in!” “So I got undressed,” Carlo recalls, and headed naked into the heat. “I don’t really like saunas, and he kept me in that sauna for 45 minutes, talking about projects, smoking cigarettes, talking on the phone. Everything in the sauna. I could die; my [blood] pressure! I was about to have a heart attack. But that’s where we started, and the next day I was at Ferrari with him.” Lapo was leading Ferrari’s Tailor-Made program, which is still in operation and allows buyers to customize their Ferraris “down to the tiniest detail,” according to Ferrari promotional materials. From there, he began working on a new accessory, a refrigerator commissioned by the German-based appliance giant Smeg. Smeg sought a fridge reimagined, and Lapo turned to one of his favorite fabrics: he covered the little fridge completely in denim. A year later, he launched the Smeg 500, a refrigerator hidden inside the hood of a partial Fiat 500 shell, which dazzled shoppers as they gaped at it in shops like Colette, on Paris’s Rue Saint-Honoré. From there, it was a natural leap into customizing the commodity closest to Lapo’s heart: cars.


VOLCANIC AMBITION Elkann in his bedroom in Milan. Opposite, a rendering of Elkann’s new headquarters, in Milan. ELKANN WEARS PANTS BY RUBINACCI.

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and you’ve condoned it. Now you bring it up in order to threaten me and obtain custody of my baby.” Then came the most startling development: Knight declared an adjournment of the trial for one week, to allow Mary to complete her work on Dodsworth. She had begun to look haggard on the set, and a lawyer for Goldwyn told the court that 500 people would be out of work if production had to stop. The trial was postponed. Monday, August 10, it resumed. As soon as Mary was seated in the witness-box, she underwent ierce grilling about her “friendship” with the men named in her diary: John Barrymore, the screenwriter George Oppenheimer, Bennett Cerf, Daniel Silberberg (a New York stockbroker), and Kaufman. Mary handled it splendidly, with far more composure than she had a week before. The secret of her newfound self-assurance was her decision to go on pretending she was Edith Cortright, her character in Dodsworth. “She was a lot of things I wasn’t, she was a lot of things I would like to have been,” she said in her second memoir. “She walked tall; she made no unnecessary gestures, or movements. She was cool.” And from all reports, that’s just how Mary was in the witness-box.

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The Dark Net

at a networksecurity company. That company was a surface relection of the Dark Net. One division was straightforward: it mined the Dark Net for known vulnerabilities and compiled them into an encyclopedia for its clients. Another division was grayer in character. It ofered bespoke

She sat a little straighter, kept her white-gloved hands quiet, and took a long time before answering questions, which unsettled Thorpe’s lawyer. She was never “smart” or “clever,” but thanks to playing Edith, she was “rattleproof.” Mary testified that upon returning from a visit to see Kaufman in Palm Springs she had found several bruises the size of Thorpe’s hand on her daughter’s body. And prior to the divorce, she said, he had “allowed Marylyn to be present while we were quarrelling, while he was threatening me, shaking his ist at me and pushing me into the chairs.” When I read this part of the trial transcript, I was appalled at Mary’s inability to protect her daughter from that hate-filled scene. How could she sit silently while her terriied daughter was forced to witness the hatred her parents now had for each other? Why was Mary powerless everywhere except on a movie soundstage?

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wo days later, Mary was set to return to the witness-box when Knight unexpectedly called a halt to the proceedings, bawling out the attorneys for their malicious attacks and waste of taxpayer money. They were there to determine which parent should have custody of a four-year-old—not reopen the divorce. He told them to prepare the case so the matter could be cleaned up in three days, max. And lo, it came to pass. The settlement was submitted to superior-court judge Knight at 10 A.M. on August 13, and since he had all but dictated the terms, he approved them. Marylyn was awarded to her mother during the school months, and to her father for vacation periods and weekends. The child’s teachers, governesses, and nurses would be selected by mutual consent and the costs shared. As for the diary, its inal disposition rested with the court. “It is part of the agreement,” said Thorpe’s attorney, “that no one, save

intelligence gathering, often under cover of the Dark Net. Opsec once stumbled across one of its products—behind a door that should have been locked, in a large room, on a circular table 20 feet across on which al-Qaeda’s electronic connections were physically mapped out. And then there was the third division, a part of the company that was rarely mentioned. It was the moneymaker, an exploit broker for the U.S. government—much like those that exist for criminals on the black market— that did original zero-day research and sold the hacking opportunities to NATO allies.

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e are now approaching the mid-2000s. Most of the attackers were not skilled hackers; they were incapable of examining software or a secured network and discovering vulnerabilities. They knew only how to acquire

the litigants, their counsel and the court, will ever know what became of that diary. It will remain a mystery.” The Daily Mirror ran the banner ASTOR DIARY BATTLE ENDS; JUDGE LOCKS UP LOVE-BOOK. Forever After

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n her two memoirs, Mary became circumspect when writing about her affair with Kaufman, never divulging more than what the public already knew. Kaufman, no surprise, never saw her again after the trial and was touchy about any mention of her name. On September 25, 1987, in the autumn of Ronald Reagan’s presidency, Mary died. The obituary heading in The New York Times read, MARY ASTOR, 81, IS DEAD; STAR OF “MALTESE FALCON.” The obit opened by describing her as having had “a delicate beauty, extraordinary grace and a compelling acting style.” It pointed out that in her 45-year career she had acted in more than 100 movies, and midway down the page it described the scandal I had irst read about in newspapers under my kitchen linoleum. Little did I imagine half a century ago that Mary Astor would one day take over a good portion of my life. Mary wasn’t a reigning Hollywood sex goddess, like Hayworth or Monroe. Her beauty, in all truth, was too aristocratic to be pinned up in a man’s locker. She wasn’t even a huge star, and that in itself made me want to shine a light on her. Then, too, the luky way in which I found out about the scandal led me to believe that I was somehow fated to be the keeper of her lame. She was a great actress, and, dammit, I want to see her on a goddamn postage stamp!! Postscript: In 1952, Mary’s diary and its copy were removed by court order from the bank vault where they had sat for 16 years, and, with a judge standing by, the pages were set alame and turned to ashes. 

tools on the Dark Net and put them to use. Opsec was diferent, one of the few who could have made a living as a researcher whether by selling zero days to the target companies (who after years of reluctance had wised up and begun paying bounties for them), by peddling them to brokers, or by ofering them for sale on the black market. But he did none of that. He went to work for a computer-security company as a “penetration tester,” and for the next ive years traveled extensively, performing security audits and hacking into corporate networks to explore their weaknesses. Some of Opsec’s clients were serious about security. But many were just going through the motions. All too often Opsec would hack into a network, submit a report recommending ixes, and come back the next year only to ind that nothing had been done. He said, “Mostly it was just check-box security. And a lot of the OC TOB ER

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penetration testers are really bad. They don’t have the background or mind-set. They don’t have the skills. They have a scanner with a database of all the diferent vulnerabilities, and it checks the network for those things. There’s no creative process there. They’re not looking for things that are not in the knowledge base. They push some button, then come back and say, ‘You’re clean!’ ” In 2007 he quit the job and set himself up as a hired gun, determined to be selective about which clients to accept. The irst requirement was that they had to be serious about network security. The second requirement was that they had to be on the side of “right.” This turned out to be tricky, because the expertise he ofers and the systems he puts in place are classic dual-use weapons that can be used to rob and oppress just as easily as to defend people’s lives and property. Furthermore, Opsec was politically naïve: he assumed that U.S. agencies and foreign allies were inherently on the side of right. He no longer suffers from the illusion. To me he said, “If you kick over enough rocks, you’re going to ind shit, and if you piss of the military-industrial complex … ” He hesitated. He said, “There are certain things they just don’t want you to know. And they kill people. They’ll kill you.” I asked him if paranoia is a professional hazard. He said it is, but if only for peace of mind he steers clear of those sorts of clients today. As a gun for hire he made some mistakes early on. He would not describe them to me. He did say that he spent a month in Pakistan with U.S.-government approval, consulting with the Pakistanis on how to establish cyber-war capabilities. Clearly that was not his proudest moment. Several years later he made a similar mistake by subcontracting to an American team in an oppressive Gulf kingdom and ally of the United States. He assumed that the project was known to the U.S. government and only later discovered that it was not. Opsec moved to the kingdom for nine months. The job was to set up a national network-security operations center, an emergency-response group, and a hacking school to teach ofensive and defensive cyber-warfare techniques. The school was equipped with cyber-warfare “iring ranges”— rooms of computers where simulated attacks could be run—and had a curriculum that included intelligence gathering and the writing of malware. Additionally the team ran penetration tests and discovered vulnerabilities in the country’s radar and missile-defense systems as well as in its international telecommunications. But Opsec discovered that under the table the team was selling cell-phone interception and tracking equipment to the authorities for all the wrong reasons. The capabilities he was providing for national defense would in practice be turned against the citizenry. He left the project and returned to the United States. He settled down with a few good clients, the best of which was the Company, 20 miles from home. OC TOB E R

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he ransomware attack on the Company late last year was not just an incident. It was a serious breach. Opsec urged stealth in response. The attacker would have known that he had failed to steal the Company’s data; there could have been various reasons for that. It was important to keep him wondering whether the hack itself had been discovered. The ransomware was a generic of-the-shelf module of no great interest or complexity. It had arrived only two or three days before being identiied. The question was how it had arrived. To his shock, Opsec soon determined that it had come in by piggybacking on a major intrusion, until now unknown, that had occurred fully a year before. This was the hack that really mattered. The extent of it was still unclear, but the Company’s network had been secretly “owned” ever since. There was more. Embedded in the system was strong evidence that the attackers were the same Chinesegovernment team that had hit the Company four years earlier. And the Chinese team’s capabilities had vastly improved. Here is what occurred. The Chinese irst went into a subcontractor, a global offshore payment processor that handled credit-card transactions, and then, having gained possession of that network, quietly entered the Company through a legitimate back door that had been installed on the Company’s network to administer consumer accounts. The initial breach was a work of art. The Chinese wrote a piece of customized software purely for that job. It was a one-of-a-kind “callback dropper,” a Trojan horse that could be loaded with any of many malware modules, but otherwise stood empty, and regularly checked in with its masters to ask for instructions. Once inside the network, the Chinese were able to move laterally because the Company, for the sake of operational eiciency, had not compartmentalized its network, despite Opsec’s advice to do so. They knew exactly where they were going. First, using “bounce points” within the network to further obscure their presence, they went after the central domain controller, where they acquired their own administrative account, efectively compromising 100 million user names and passwords and gaining the ability to push software packages throughout the network. Second, and more important, the Chinese headed into the network’s “build” system, a part of the network where software changes are compiled and then uploaded to a content-distribution network for the downloading of updates to customers. In that position they acquired the ability to bundle their own software packages and insert them into the regular flow, potentially reaching 70 million personal computers or more. But, for the moment, they did none of that. Instead they installed three empty callback Trojans on three separate network computers and left them standing there to await future instructions.

Opsec and his team concluded that the purpose was to lay the groundwork for the rapid construction of a giant botnet. The “bot” in “botnet” is derived from “robot.” Botnets are illicit networks of infected computers, known as zombies or nodes, that appear to function normally but are secretly controlled by hackers and can be used in combination to produce enormous computing power. The largest of them have consisted of several million computers. They have been around for a long time. No one knows how many are active, but the numbers are large. A few are self-propagating, but most require active (if unintentional) downloading. Either way, they are the force multipliers of the Dark Net. Some of them are commercial, and ofer services on the black market. Others are privately held. On the most simple level, hackers use them to mount denial-of-service attacks, overwhelming Web sites with the sheer volume of traffic. Beyond that, their purposes are almost limitless—identity theft, credit-card fraud, bank fraud, intelligence gathering, highspeed code cracking, corporate espionage, commercial sabotage, and attacks on national infrastructure, including industrial control networks, phone systems, and the Internet itself. Cyber-attacks that cause physical damage are extremely rare—Iranian centrifuges destroyed by Stuxnet in 2010; a steel mill hit in Germany in 2014; blackouts caused by a hack of the power grid in Ukraine in 2015—but whatever damage a single computer can do, a botnet can do it better. Botnets are so valuable—and potentially so short-lived—that their creators normally rush to use them as soon as they are built. That was the odd part about the attack on the Company. The Chinese had gone to all the efort to insert their Trojan, yet had stopped without taking further action. Why? The botnet it could have created would have been huge. If the Chinese had breached other large Internet companies via the same paymentcenter route—and it seemed likely they had—the combined efect would have been the creation of by far the largest botnet ever seen, an Internet robot consisting of perhaps 200 million computers, all controlled by one small Chinese hacking team. Opsec had stumbled onto a very big thing. And its lack of use was the key. The only possible purpose, Opsec concluded, was that of a sleeper cell, lying in wait as a pre-positioned asset to be used as a last resort, like a nuclear weapon, in the event of an all-out cyber-war. The world certainly seems to be moving in that direction. Already cyber-attacks constitute an active component of nearly every conventional military battle. They are used by the U.S. in conjunction with the air and ground war against ISIS. Some say that a global cyber-war is already under way, because everyone is getting hacked. But many states—China, Russia, Germany, France, Pakistan, Israel, and the United States—are actively preparing for something much larger to come. The sleeper cell would never have been diswww.vanityfair.com

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The Dark Net covered had it not been for the ransomware that failed to deploy. According to Opsec, a member of the Chinese government team had apparently decided to freelance and make a little money for himself, sending his extortion demand along the pathway secretly blazed by the government team a year before and inadvertently exposing the entire operation. When identiied, if he has not been already, the renegade team member in China will face a very unhappy future. As for the future of the sleeper cell itself, Opsec could only speculate. The U.S. government had of course been informed. “Yeah, and they

Elizabeth Holmes

dumb to unwittingly become the most powerful person on earth. While Gibbons grew ever more desperate to come up with a solution to the inaccuracies of the blood-testing technology, Holmes presented her company to more investors, and even potential partners, as if it had a working, fully realized product. Holmes adorned her headquarters and Web site with slogans claiming, “One tiny drop changes everything,” and “All the same tests. One tiny sample,” and went into media overdrive. She also proved an efective crisis manager. In 2012, for instance, Holmes began talking to the Department of Defense about using Theranos’s technology on the battleield in Afghanistan. But specialists at the D.O.D. soon uncovered that the technology wasn’t entirely accurate, and that it had not been vetted by the Food and Drug Administration. When the department notiied the F.D.A. that something was amiss, according to The Washington Post, Holmes contacted Marine general James Mattis, who had initiated the pilot program. He immediately e-mailed his colleagues about moving the project forward. Mattis was later added to the company board when he retired from the service. (Mattis says he never tried to interfere with the F.D.A. but rather was “interested in rapidly having the company’s technologies tested legally and ethically.”) At around the same time, Theranos also decided to sue Richard Fuisz, an old friend

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wouldn’t take it down. They’d surveil it, do reconnaissance and monitoring, just so they could keep tabs, and they would probably spend some time developing the capability to disrupt or hijack the botnet if they needed to. Right?,” he said. “Let the Chinese build their cyber-weapon and think they’ve got it, and when we need it, we’ll just block it or take it over.” I said, “What branch?” “Meade. The Fort.” How Opsec himself responds is another matter. He is not the U.S. government. He once told me he is his own mini-N.S.A. Referring to a friend of equal reputation, he said, “We write highly invasive software.” As a product of the Dark Net, he has the power to invade China, and has done so before. I

asked him what an invasion would look like. He said, “We’d find their command-andcontrol structure, the control brain for the malware they use. Ultimately, what you’d like to do is ind a way to hack into their C2 servers and (a) igure out what information they acquired from you, and (b) insert a command into their infrastructure that tells all the malware out there to delete itself. A botnet takedown, that’s what I’d like to see. We’re at least crippling their network.” And maybe, he went on, as a present, you could give them the identity of the guy whose ransomware brought the hack down. So is that what you’re doing?, I asked. Of course not, he said. It would be against Company policy. 

and neighbor of Holmes’s family, alleging that he had stolen secrets that belonged to Theranos. As the suit progressed—it was eventually settled—Fuisz’s lawyers issued subpoenas to Theranos executives involved with the “proprietary” aspects of the technology. This included Ian Gibbons. But Gibbons didn’t want to testify. If he told the court that the technology did not work, he would harm the people he worked with; if he wasn’t honest about the technology’s problems, however, consumers could potentially harm their health, maybe even fatally. Holmes, meanwhile, did not seem willing to tolerate his resistance, according to his wife, Rochelle Gibbons. Even though Gibbons had warned that the technology wasn’t ready for the public, Holmes was preparing to open “Theranos Wellness Centers” in dozens of Walgreens across Arizona. “Ian felt like he would lose his job if he told the truth,” Rochelle told me as she wept one summer morning in Palo Alto. “Ian was a real obstacle for Elizabeth. He started to be very vocal. They kept him around to keep him quiet.” Channing Robertson, who had brought Gibbons to Theranos, recalls a diferent conversation, noting, “He suggested to me on numerous occasions that what we had accomplished at that time was suicient to commercialize.” A few months later, on May 16, 2013, Gibbons was sitting in the family room with Rochelle, the afternoon light draping the couple, when the telephone rang. He answered. It was one of Holmes’s assistants. When Gibbons hung up, he was beside himself. “Elizabeth wants to meet with me tomorrow in her oice,” he told his wife in a quivering voice. “Do you think she’s going to ire me?” Rochelle Gibbons, who had spent a lot of time with Holmes, knew that she wanted control. “Yes,” she said to her husband, reluctantly. She told him she thought he was going to be ired. Later that evening, gripped and overwhelmed with worry, Ian Gibbons tried to commit suicide. He was rushed to the hospital. A week later, with his wife by his side, Ian Gibbons died.

When Rochelle called Holmes’s oice to explain what had happened, the secretary was devastated and ofered her sincere condolences. She told Rochelle Gibbons that she would let Holmes know immediately. But a few hours later, rather than a condolence message from Holmes, Rochelle instead received a phone call from someone at Theranos demanding that she immediately return any and all conidential Theranos property. The Enforcer

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n hundreds of interviews with the media and on panels, Holmes honed her story to near perfection. She talked about how she didn’t play with Barbies as a child, and how her father, Christian Holmes IV, who worked in environmental technology for Enron before going on to work in a number of senior government jobs in Washington, was one of her idols. But her reverence for Steve Jobs was perhaps most glaring. Besides the turtlenecks, Holmes’s proprietary blood-analysis device, which she named “Edison” after Thomas Edison, resembled Jobs’s NeXT computer. She designed her Theranos oice with Le Corbusier black leather chairs, a Jobs favorite. She also adhered to a strange diet of only green juices (cucumber, parsley, kale, spinach, romaine lettuce, and celery), to be drunk only at speciic times of the day. Like Jobs, too, her company was her life. She rarely ever left the oice, only going home to sleep. To celebrate her birthday, Holmes held a party at Theranos headquarters with her employees. (Her brother, Christian, also works at Theranos.) But the most staggering characteristic that she borrowed from the late C.E.O. was his obsession with secrecy. And while Jobs had a fearsome security force who ensured that conidential information rarely, if ever, left Apple’s headquarters, Holmes had a single enforcer: Sunny Balwani, the company’s president and chief operating oicer, until he stepped down in May. Balwani, who had previously worked at Lotus and Microsoft, had no experience in medicine. He was OC TOB ER

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hired in 2009 to focus on e-commerce. Nevertheless, he was soon put in charge of the company’s most secret medical technology. According to a number of people with knowledge of the situation, the two had met years before he began at the company, when Holmes took a trip to China after she graduated from high school. The two eventually started dating, numerous people told me, and remained very loyal even after their relationship ended. Among Holmes’s security detail, Balwani was known as “Eagle 2.” When employees questioned the accuracy of the company’s blood-testing technology, it was Balwani who would chastise them in e-mails (or in person), sternly telling stafers, “This must stop,” as The Wall Street Journal reported. He ensured that scientists and engineers at Theranos did not talk to one another about their work. Applicants who came for job interviews were told that they wouldn’t know what the actual job was unless they were hired. Employees who spoke publicly about the company were met with legal threats. On LinkedIn, one former employee noted next to his job description, “I worked here, but every time I say what I did I get a letter from a lawyer. I probably will get a letter from a lawyer for writing this.” If people visited any of Theranos’s oices and refused to sign the company’s lengthy non-disclosure agreement, they were not allowed inside. Balwani’s lack of medical experience might have seemed unusual at such a company. But few at Theranos were in a position to point fingers. As Holmes started to assemble her OC TOB E R

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board of directors, she chose a dozen older white men, almost none of whom had a background in anything related to health care. This included former secretary of state Henry Kissinger, former secretary of state George Shultz, former Georgia senator and chairman of the Armed Services Committee Sam Nunn, and William J. Perry, the former defense secretary. (Bill Frist, the former Senate majority leader, and former cardiovascular doctor, was an exception.) “This was a board that was better suited to decide if America should invade Iraq than vet a blood-testing company,” one person said to me. Gibbons told his wife that Holmes commanded their attention masterfully.

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heranos’s board may not have been equipped to ask what exactly the company was building, or how, but others were. While Holmes was bounding around the world on a private plane, speaking on panels with Bill Clinton, and giving passionate TED talks, two government organizations started quietly inspecting the company. On August 25, 2015, months before the Journal story broke, three investigators from the F.D.A. arrived, unannounced, at Theranos’s headquarters, on Page Mill Road, with two more investigators sent to the company’s blood-testing lab in Newark, California, demanding to inspect the facilities. According to someone close to the company, Holmes was sent into a panic, calling advisers to try to resolve the issue. At around the same time, regulators from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, which regulates labo-

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ratories, visited the labs and found major inaccuracies in the testing being done on patients. (The Newark lab was run by an employee who was criticized for insuicient laboratory experience.) C.M.S. also soon discovered that some of the tests Theranos was performing were so inaccurate that they could leave patients at risk of internal bleeding, or of stroke among those prone to blood clots. The agency found that Theranos appeared to ignore erratic results from its own quality-control checks during a sixmonth period last year and supplied 81 patients with questionable test results. While the government was scouring through Theranos’s inaccurate iles and data, Carreyrou was approaching the story not as a fawning tech blogger, but rather as a diligent investigative reporter. Carreyrou, who had worked at the Journal since 1999, had covered topics ranging from terrorism to European politics and financial misdeeds before returning to the New York newsroom and taking over the health-and-sciences bureau. As a reporter of obscure and often faceless subjects, he was not enticed by access, nor was he afraid of lawyers. In fact, he had won two Pulitzer Prizes for taking on nemeses as signiicant as Vivendi and the U.S. government. After a team of seasoned lawyers arrived at the Journal newsroom, Carreyrou was simply emboldened. “It’s O.K. if you’ve got a smartphone app or a social network, and you go live with it before it’s ready; people aren’t going to die,” he told me. “But with medicine, it’s diferent.” Meanwhile, Theranos had its lawyers send www.vanityfair.com

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Elizabeth Holmes a letter to Rochelle Gibbons’s attorney, threatening legal action for talking to a reporter. “It has been the Company’s desire not to pursue legal action against Mrs. Gibbons,” a lawyer for Boies, Schiller & Flexner wrote. “Unless she immediately ceases these actions, she will leave the Company no other option but to pursue litigation to deinitively put an end [to] these actions once and for all.” Others who spoke to the Journal were met with similar threats. The End

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ack in March 2009, Holmes returned to the Stanford campus, where her story had begun, to talk to a group of students at the Stanford Technology Ventures Program. Her hair wasn’t yet bleached blond, but she had started to wear her uniform of a black turtleneck, and she was just beginning to morph into the idol she would soon become in Silicon Valley. For 57 minutes, Holmes paced in front of a chalkboard and answered questions about her vision. “It became clear to me,” she said with conviction, “that if I needed to, I’d re-start this company as much as possible to make this thing happen.” This is exactly what Holmes seems to be doing now. Executives from Theranos, including Holmes and Balwani, declined to sit for interviews. But on a recent July afternoon, I traveled to the company’s headquarters anyway. From the outside, Theranos seems to be in a sad state. The parking lot was devoid of cars, with more than half the spaces empty (or half full, depending on your outlook). The giant American lag that hangs in front of the building was laccid at half-staf. On the edge of the parking lot, a couple of employees were smoking cigarettes as a single security guard stood nearby, taking a selie. On the Friday morning that they gathered in the war room, Holmes and her team of advisers had believed that there would be one

Sir Philip Green

£3.5 million and another £3.5 million to its suppliers. Green persuaded Barclays to hold off for six months on calling in its Jean Jeanie loan. Then he went back to the owner and told C ON T I N U ED F ROM PAGE 167

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negative story from the Journal, and that Holmes would be able to squash the controversy. Then it would be back to business as usual, telling her flawlessly curated story to investors, to the media, and now to patients who used her technology. Holmes and her advisers couldn’t have been more wrong. Carreyrou subsequently wrote more than two dozen articles about the problems at Theranos. Walgreens severed its relationship with Holmes, shuttering all of its Wellness Centers. The F.D.A. banned the company from using its Edison device. In July, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services banned Holmes from owning or running a medical laboratory for two years. (This decision is currently under appeal.) Then came the civil and criminal investigations by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and the U.S. Attorney’s Oice for the Northern District of California and two class-action fraud lawsuits. Theranos’s board has subsequently been cleaved in two, with Kissinger, Shultz, and Frist now merely “Counselors.” Holmes, meanwhile, isn’t going anywhere. As the C.E.O. and chairwoman of Theranos, only she can elect to replace herself. Forbes, clearly embarrassed by its cover story, removed Holmes from its list of “America’s Richest Self-Made Women.” A year earlier, it had estimated her wealth at $4.5 billion. “Today, Forbes is lowering our estimate of her net worth to nothing,” the editors wrote. Fortune had its mea culpa, with the author stating boldly that “Theranos misled me.” Director Adam McKay, fresh of his Oscar for The Big Short, has even signed on to make a movie based on Holmes, tentatively titled Bad Blood. (On the bright side for Holmes, Jennifer Lawrence is attached as the lead.) Silicon Valley, once so taken by Holmes, has turned its back, too. Countless investors have been quick to point out that they did not invest in the company—that much of its money came from the relatively somnolent worlds

of mutual funds, which often accrue the savings of pensioners and retirees; private equity; and smaller venture-capital operations on the East Coast. In the end, one of the only Valley V.C. shops that actually invested in Theranos was Draper Fisher Jurvetson. Many may have liked what Holmes represented about their industry, but they didn’t seem to trust her with their money. Meanwhile, Holmes has somehow compartmentalized it all. In August, she lew to Philadelphia to speak at the American Association for Clinical Chemistry’s annual conference. Before she stepped out onstage, the conference organizers played the song “Sympathy for the Devil” for the ballroom, packed with more than 2,500 doctors and scientists. Holmes was wearing a blue button-up shirt and black blazer (she has recently abandoned the black turtleneck), and she spoke for an hour while rapidly licking through her presentation. The audience was hoping that Holmes would answer questions about her Edison technology and explain whether or not she knew it was a sham. But instead Holmes showed of a new blood-testing technology that a lot of people in the room insisted was not new or groundbreaking. Later that day she was featured on Sanjay Gupta’s CNN show and a few weeks later appeared in San Francisco at a splashy dinner celebrating women in technology. “Elizabeth Holmes won’t stop,” Phyllis Gardner, the Stanford professor, told me. “She’s holding on to her story like a barnacle on the side of a ship.” Holmes may not be prepared to compartmentalize what comes next. When I arrived in Palo Alto in July, I wasn’t the only person setting out to interview anyone associated with Theranos and Holmes. The Federal Bureau of Investigation was, too. When I knocked on a door, I was only a day or two behind F.B.I. agents who were trying to put together a time line of what Holmes knew and when she knew it—adding the most unpredictable twist to a story she could no longer control. 

him there was good news and bad news. The man was bankrupt, but Green would still be happy to do a deal with him. He offered £65,000 for the option to buy the owner’s 65 shops, and he promised an additional £435,000 in six months. After the owner agreed, Green flew to Paris and Hong Kong, where he convinced wholesalers to give him new inventory on a “pay on sale” basis. Three days before his deal with Barclays was set to expire, Green says, he sold his Jean Jeanie option to Lee Cooper, a British jeans brand—for £3 million, he told The Independent in 1992, a igure which over the years has increased to £7 million in the telling. He was of to the races. A few months earlier, he had met his future wife, Christina Palos, who is known by

her nickname, Tina. Brought up in the Far East by wine merchant parents, she had her own Sloane Street boutique, Harabels. At the time she was married to businessman Robert Palos, with whom she had two children. The irst time she met Green, she thought he was “dreadful” and “an arrogant pig,” she told a Daily Mail reporter in 2005. The second time she met him she fell in love with him. They were married in 1990, after she proposed, according to Top Man, a 2005 biography of Green by Stewart Lansley and Andy Forrester.

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struggling publicly traded retail group, of which he became C.E.O. According to Top Man, Green bought a house in St. John’s Wood and a vacation house in Marbella, and he started throwing lavish parties for his friends. Under his leadership, Amber Day bought Woodhouse, an upmarket men’s-wear retailer, and What Everyone Wants, a Scottish chain, and ratcheted up the company’s profits from £3 million to £10 million. The stock price more than doubled. But in September 1992, with a missed earnings forecast and the stock plummeting, Amber Day’s board of directors ired him. “Green’s ousting was all about the kind of person he is and the company he keeps,” one observer claimed in The Sunday Times. “In the past he walked on the wild side, and his enemies would not let him forget it.” Top Man explains that the traditionalists in the City disapproved of Green’s brashness and his unorthodox way of running his business, and regarded him as “an untamed polecat who needed reining in. The anti-Green camp found they had plenty of ammunition in what was to become an increasingly dirty war.” The satirical magazine Private Eye ran several unlattering stories that focused on “Green’s close friendship with men associated with the very public inancial scandals of the time,” Top Man observes. According to the biography, the Amber Day experience was “shattering” for Green, who pledged never to run a public company again. But Green now claims the opposite: that Amber Day was the best thing that ever happened to him, opening up the way for bigger conquests. But irst he had to focus on his health. In 1995 he had a series of heart problems that ultimately resulted in the nine stents being implanted in his chest. In 1998, he says, he was threatened by a mugger with a sword, near his London home. Tina insisted they take a time-out. The family moved to Monaco. Green now says that he chose the principality because someone told him it was a nice place to live. When pressed, he also mentions its lack of taxes on income, capital gains, and dividends. While Tina continues to live in Monaco, Green flies back and forth to London.

n 2000, Green turned his attention to BHS, acquiring the chain for £200 million. It soon became clear that he had made a fabulous deal. Two years after the purchase, BHS was valued at £1.2 billion and had already paid its new owners £166.5 million in dividends. Green now says he should have sold the company at that point but he had fallen into a romance with BHS. He held on to it. In 2002, Green bought Arcadia Group, a collection of retail brands that now forms the basis of his fortune, for £840 million. To do so he put in £10 million of his own money and borrowed the rest. In 2005, a group of banks reinanced the Arcadia debt, permitting Tina to take out the £1.2 billion dividend. Green’s retail empire continued to thrive in the years after the inancial crisis— with the exception of BHS, which started to face steep challenges from Internet retailers and other competitors. In 2006, Green was knighted for his “services to the retail industry.” In August 2010, Prime Minister David Cameron asked Sir Philip to undertake “an efficiency review” of government spending. His report, though light on details and heavy on bullet points, found much waste across departments and spending categories. I asked Green to allow his British friends, including Simon Cowell, businessman Richard Caring, and fashion entrepreneur Sir David Tang, to speak with me, but I never heard from them. Instead, he suggested I speak with the American retailers Mickey Drexler, chairman and C.E.O. of the J. Crew Group; Pete Nordstrom, co-president of Nordstrom, Inc.; and Richard Baker, the governor and executive chairman of the Hudson’s Bay Company (which owns Saks). Drexler tells me that Green “is an out-there brash guy,” who has become “a juicy target” for the British press and Parliament because he’s an “enormously successful, wealthy guy.” Richard Baker says, “We call him a triple threat. He’s a merchant, an operator, and he has enough design savvy to be dangerous.” Like Baker, Nordstrom says Green is a man of his word: “He’s not always an easy guy to sit across the table from if you’re trying to negotiate something … but what we ind refreshing and constructive is that he’s very transparent and honest.”

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ith Green’s extraordinary inancial success came extraordinary hubris. He thinks nothing of picking up the phone and lambasting journalists. For instance, in 2008, the writer Alice B-B (a Vanity Fair contributor) questioned in a Daily Mail column whether Topshop was still a relevant shopping experience for women after they moved beyond young adulthood. Green called her out of the blue. They had never met before. She was at home. “He basically said, ‘Who the fuck are you? I don’t even know who the fuck you are. Are you fat? Are you thin? I don’t even know what you look like. I could get you banned from Topshop,’ ” she recalls. (Green declined to comment.) Near the very end of the June 15 hearing, Green wrote something on his notepad, he said, because he was afraid he might forget it. He wasn’t sure he should say it out loud to the M.P.’s, but then he blurted it out anyway: “Envy and jealousy, my doctor told me, are two incurable diseases.” The audience in the hearing room gasped audibly. He told the M.P.’s he could have structured his companies “much, much more aggressively” for his own gain than he did. He claimed he has paid every bit of the taxes—hundreds of millions of pounds—he owed to the U.K. government. He was done apologizing. “I have a very clear conscience,” he said. “We have run these companies properly. We have paid everything that was due.” As if to prove his point, a few days after the June 15 hearing, the press reported that he had taken delivery of a new, £46 million, topof-the-line Gulfstream G650. Described as the “holy grail of private jets,” the G650 seats up to 19 passengers and sleeps 10. Lady Tina reportedly planned to spend £300,000 re-decorating the interior. One observer told The Sun, “It’s the most luxurious private jet on the planet, the fastest of its kind.” Green likes to point out that he is not the only businessman in the world with a boat and a plane, and he blames his country for what he considers unfair—and anti-Semitic—persecution. “Listen, all I can tell you is this,” Green said to me in May. “You can phone as many people as you like that know me, and they’ll tell you I don’t tell lies. I say it how it is. I’m reliable. If I say 9:00, it’s 9:00. If I say I’m going to do something, I do it. You’re going to ind England, unfortunately, is a place where you get a lot of jealous, envious, you know, negative people. That’s how it is.” 

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VANITY FAIR IS A REGISTERED TRADEMARK OF ADVANCE MAGAZINE PUBLISHERS INC. IN BOTH THE U.S. AND THE U.K. THE U.K. EDITION IS PUBLISHED BY THE CONDÉ NAST PUBLICATIONS LTD. UNDER LICENSE. COPYRIGHT © 2016 BY THE CONDÉ NAST PUBLICATIONS LTD., VOGUE HOUSE, HANOVER SQUARE, LONDON W1S IJU. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. REPRODUCTION IN WHOLE OR IN PART WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION IS STRICTLY PROHIBITED. Vanity Fair No. 674 The magazine is published monthly by The Condé Nast Publications Ltd., Vogue House, Hanover Square, London W1S 1JU (telephone: 020 7499 9080; fax: 020 7493 1345). The full subscription rate to Vanity Fair is £57.60 for one year (12 issues) in the UK. Overseas Airmail per year: €99 to the EU, £90 to the rest of Europe, $99 to the US and £99 to the rest of the World. Enquiries, changes of address and orders payable to Vanity Fair, Subscriptions Department, Lathkill Street, Market Harborough, Leics LE16 9EF. To subscribe on the Internet, visit www.magazineboutique.co.uk/vanityfair or e-mail vanityfair@subscription.co.uk, quoting code 7223. Subscription hotline +44 (0)844-848-5202 open Monday to Friday 8 A.M. to 9:30 P.M. Saturday 8 A.M. to 4 P.M. Manage your subscription online 24 hours a day by logging on to www.magazineboutique.co.uk/youraccount. VANITY FAIR is not responsible for loss, damage, or any other injury to unsolicited manuscripts, unsolicited artwork (including, but not limited to, drawings, photographs, or transparencies), or any other unsolicited materials. Those submitting manuscripts, photographs, artwork, or other materials for consideration should not send originals, unless speciically requested to do so by Vanity Fair in writing. Manuscripts, photographs, and other materials submitted must be accompanied by a self-addressed overnight-delivery return envelope, postage prepaid. The paper used for this publication is based on renewable wood ibre. The wood these ibres are derived from is sourced from sustainably managed forests and controlled sources. The producing mills are EMAS registered and operate according to highest environmental and health and safety standards. This magazine is fully recyclable—please log on to www.recyclenow.com for your local recycling options for paper and board. TO FIND CONDÉ NAST MAGAZINES ONLINE, VISIT www.condenet.co.uk ; TO FIND VANITY FAIR, VISIT www.vanityfair.co.uk.

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PROUST QUESTIONNAIRE

Ina

GARTEN On the publication of her 10th cookbook, Cooking for Jeffrey, the Barefoot Contessa hostess enthuses about the book’s namesake: the greatest love of her life, her husband

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hat is your idea of perfect happiness? Sundays

Jefrey. Which talent would you most like to have? Singing. I can’t even bear to listen to myself hum. What is your current state of mind? It simply doesn’t get any better than this! What do you consider

in Paris with Jefrey. We go to the Sunday market, make a nice lunch, drink a big bottle of Burgundy, and then take a long delicious nap. Heaven. What is your greatest fear? Pain. I told Jefrey that if I have a really bad headache just pull the plug. Which historical figure

your greatest achievement?

I can’t believe that I was able to write one cookbook, let alone 10, and that so many people say I taught them how to cook.

do you most identify with?

What is your most treasured possession? The Mini convert-

Julia Child—she created her cookbooks and television show on her own, with no precedents. She loved French cooking and wanted everyone to share her passion. What is the trait you most deplore in yourself? I worry that if I don’t challenge myself professionally I’ll lie on the sofa and watch old episodes of Law & Order all day.

ible Jefrey bought me—the top goes down and it’s summer. What do you regard as the lowest depth of misery?

An evening home alone with nothing to do. Where would you like to live? Right here in East Hampton. What is your favorite occupation? Mine. What is your most marked characteristic? I have really

What is the trait you most deplore in others? Lying on

good parking-space karma.

the sofa watching old episodes of Law & Order all day. What is your greatest extravagance? Never having to set an alarm clock. What do you consider the most overrated virtue? Being young. I’m having much more fun now, and the toys are better. On what occasion do you lie? When Jefrey asks how much we’re spending on the garden. What do you dislike most about your appearance? Someone said, “Inside every old person is a young person saying, ‘What the hell happened here?!’ ” What is your greatest regret? Not marrying Jefrey sooner. What or who is the greatest love of your life? That’s easy— 200

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I L L U STRAT IO N

What is the quality you most like in a man? Generosity and a great sense of humor. What is the quality you most like in a woman? Running toward you when you’re in trouble. Happily, that describes my best friend perfectly. What do you most value in your friends? That they want to be with me. What is it that you most dislike? Passive-aggressive people and cilantro. How would you like to die? I don’t care as long as Jefrey and

I go together and we end up in a big suite with a view of the ocean. What is your motto? “Most of life’s problems can be solved with a good cookie.” BY

RISKO

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Your essential watch brieing: Auction Report; Hero Watch; News; Modern Classic. The best way to ind out what’s making the watch world tick

FEATURES C A S E S T U DY: R E N A I S S A N C E R E VA M P

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How Jaeger-LeCoultre supported one of Venice’s exquisite scuole or guilds— the Scuola Grande di San Rocco—and made a very ine wrist of it. By NICK FOULKES SPIRIT OF ENTERPRISE

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Rolex’s Awards for Enterprise give worthy winners a welcome inancial boost—and a rather nice watch, too. By NICK FOULKES PITCH PERFECT

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With Laureus, the sports charity he founded, Richemont's Johann Rupert has transformed the sports ield from battleground into a place of inspiration and harmony. By NICK FOULKES

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PORTFOLIO

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C A S E S T U DY: PL AY ON

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Raymond Weil’s association with music-therapy charity Nordof Robbins is just one of the ways it’s striking the right note. By JAMES GURNEY T H E ON E A N D ON LY

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Only Watch is great news for watch connoisseurs. This Monégasque muscular-dystrophy charity’s biennial auctions raise millions—and send the feelgood factor through the roof, too. By SIMON DE BURTON CALL TO ALMS

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Charitable contributions? Tick. The special-edition charity watch is reeling in the high rollers, writes JOE THOMPSON

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C U LT U R E C LU B

The upper echelons of watchmaking are falling over themselves to marry horology to high art. CAROLINE ROUX surveys the patronage scene T H E VA N I T Y FA I R O N T I M E 2 0 16 P O R T F O L I O

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The great, the good, their amazing achievements for charity, and their watches. In this year’s Portfolio, you’ll ind some very inspiring company WAT C H R E P O R T

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The most gorgeous timepieces of the moment: diamond butterlies by Graf, gold and ceramic serpents by Bulgari, and much more. Time to indulge WA T C H T H I S S PA C E

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A sophisticated manufacture has been de rigueur for a top watch company for years. Now, these buildings are becoming increasingly environmentally sophisticated, too. CLIVE ASLET takes a tour

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ON THE COVER: Natalia Vodianova photographed by Hugues Laurent at the Fondation Louis Vuitton, Paris

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P H O T O G R A P H S : F. P. J O U R N E ( WAT C H ) ; J O H N B A L S O M ( C L A P T O N ) ; S A M H O F M A N ( WAT C H S T I L L L I F E )

O N LY WAT C H


E d i to r ’s

L e tte r

The PHILANTHROPY issue am not, by nature, one of your glass-half-full types, but then nor am I a glass-half-empty man. Instead, rather too often I perceive the glass lying smashed on the loor, its contents spilled. I make Eeyore, the gloomy donkey of A.A. Milne’s Winnie the Pooh books, look like Dr. Pangloss in Voltaire’s Candide. Pangloss, you will recall, was the insanely optimistic Leibniz-style philosopher who taught his pupils that “all is for the best” in the “best of all possible worlds”. Pangloss was a fool, but at least he lived before the age of the internet; our time is one in which bad news is pushed directly to our telephones by news organizations competing with each other to be the irst to bring us the details of the latest terror atrocity, natural disaster, industrial accident, plane crash, epidemic, pandemic, environmental hazard, economic collapse, clash of arms or ominous political development wherever it may be in the world. These are not the most stable of times, and we witness plenty of man’s capacity for inhumanity towards others of his species. But there is good in the world too, and in the philanthropy issue of Vanity Fair On Time we bring you as much of it as we could lay our hands on. Watchmaking is a fairly blameless sort of activity—you would have to be pretty curmudgeonly to take ofence at a load of talented and dexterous people working in calm, pleasant, light-illed buildings, making non-polluting, repairable, recyclable mechanical devices—but watch companies also put down their loupes, roll up the sleeves of their white watchmaker’s coats, and help make the world a better place. In this issue, we trace the Laureus Sport For Good foundation back to its roots in apartheid-era South Africa, when a young campus hothead and rather handy cricketer by the name of Johann Rupert spoke out about the iniquitous political system deiling his homeland. Years later, as the helmsman of Richemont, which owns many of our favourite watch brands, he decided, with

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a little help from Nelson Mandela and almost every famous athlete and sports star you have ever heard of, to establish an organization that is now changing thousands of lives. We enter the workshops to see just what goes into making the watches that raise money for charity and why it can be dangerous work (Jaeger-LeCoultre’s tribute to the Scuola Grande di San Rocco in Venice exploded… twice). Simon de Burton, On Time’s saleroom correspondent, examines the biennial phenomenon that is Only Watch, the giant of the horological charity auctions, which raises millions for research into Duchenne muscular dystrophy and has been responsible for some truly remarkable one-of watches. And given that charity often begins at home, noted architectural historian Clive Aslet went on a tour of Switzerland to assess the current and future crop of new watch factories and oices and how they enhance the life of their local communities, all while treading so lightly on the environment as to barely leave a trace—beyond their beauty and functionality. Elsewhere, veteran industry commentator Joe Thompson examines the rise of the charity watch; while Caroline Roux reveals the signiicant involvement of watch companies in what the French call mécénat: the laudable tradition of giving money to support cultural activities and the arts. And in our Portfolio, you will see men who save sharks and who man lying operating theatres; meet the chief of Switzerland’s most famous charity, the International Committee of the Red Cross; be introduced to the rock star behind Live Aid, the charity event that deined a generation; and hear from Eric Clapton, a man with exquisite taste in timepieces who parted with one of the rarest and most desirable ones ever made to raise funds for his drug and alcohol treatment centre in the Caribbean. Having just re-read the above paragraphs, I have surprised myself by thinking that Dr. Pangloss might have been on to –NICK FOULKES something after all.

PHOTOGRAPH:CHRISTOPHER HUNT

VANITY FAIR ON TIME Editor NICK FOULKES Creative Director JAMES SLOCUM Managing Editor HOLLY ROSS Chief Sub-Editor ANNA BLOMEFIELD Art Director SCOTT MOORE Designer RUSSELL PROWSE Picture Editor ZOE GAHAN Acting Picture Editor TANJYA HOLLAND PARKIN Sub-Editor THOMAS BARRIE Fashion Director EMMA MARSH Advertising Director KATHERINE PITCHER Account Executive JAMIE WEEDEN Corporate Business Director CLAIRE SINGER Senior Promotions Manager LAURA PATERSON Senior Production Controller HELEN CROUCH Production Co-ordinator SAPPHO BARKLA Associate Publisher TIA GRAHAM Publishing Director ANNIE HOLCROFT

COPYRIGHT © 2016 THE CONDÉ NAST PUBLICATIONS LTD, VOGUE HOUSE, HANOVER SQUARE, LONDON W1S 1JU. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. REPRODUCTION IN WHOLE OR IN PART WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION IS STRICTLY PROHIBITED. NOT TO BE SOLD SEPARATELY. THE PUBLISHER HAS ENDEAVOURED TO ENSURE THAT ALL INFORMATION IS CORRECT AT THE TIME OF GOING TO PRESS, BUT DOES NOT ACCEPT ANY RESPONSIBILITY FOR ERRORS AND OMISSIONS.

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CAROLINE ROUX Caroline Roux lives in London, but covers contemporary art and architecture events all over the world. This year she wrote about subjects as varied as the grand reopening of San Francisco MOMA; the Venice Biennale; Art Basel; and an exhibition of the incomparable Robert Rauschenberg in Beijing (and that was just April to June). But the highlight of 2016 so far was being caught in the New York snowstorm in January and seeing a city transformed. She contributes to the FT, The Economist, Telegraph Luxury and magazines including British Vogue and W. For Vanity Fair On Time, Caroline charts the artistic patronage of watch companies, where watchmakers’ inancial muscle combines with avantgarde contemporary art. She herself hasn’t worn a watch since 1991.

NAZANIN LANK AR ANI An independent journalist specializing in art, jewellery, watches and luxury, Nazanin Lankarani began her professional career as a litigator practising in the United States. A few years later, she settled in Paris and went on to earn a degree in art history. Since then, Nazanin has been a regular contributor to the International New York Times, digital watchmaking daily World Tempus, and Artology, a magazine for art, travel and creativity. She has also contributed to Vanity Fair On Art, Louise Blouin’s Lifestyle magazine and various Artinfo publications. Having twice served on the jury of the Grand Prix d’Horlogerie de Genève, she serves as Vanity Fair On Time’s expert guide to all things novel and exciting taking place in the world of luxury watches.

HUGUES LAURENT Hugues Laurent lives and works in Paris. After studying art history at the University of Paris, his knowledge of fashion led him to become a regular portraitist for W, Vogue, WSJ Magazine, Numéro and Vanity Fair, among others, aiming to bring “a frontal and raw approach” to his portraits. Hugues’ sitters have included Natalie Dormer, Léa Seydoux and Lupita Nyong’o; he also likes to work on long-term projects, following individuals in their day-to-day lives to create story-based photographic portfolios, or instead focusing his lens on a particular place or city to capture their mood or ambience. Hugues turned his attention to Russian model and philanthropist Natalia Vodianova for this issue’s Vanity Fair On Time Portfolio, photographing her at the Fondation Louis Vuitton.

Clive Aslet has a passion for all the best things in life, particularly architecture and ine craftsmanship— which come together in his contribution to this issue, on manufacture buildings. He admits to having always had a preoccupation with time, although largely because he inds it so diicult to keep appointments. But mechanical watches, he says, are not purely about eiciency: “They are one of the wonders of the universe and a miracle of the watchmakers’ skill.” Clive spent 13 years as editor of Country Life, before becoming editor-at-large. He is now pursuing his new love: iction. His irst novel The Birdcage, set in Salonika during the First World War, was published to critical acclaim in 2014. David Dimbleby describes Clive’s writing as “charming, erudite, amusing…His energy, enthusiasm and learning, always lightly worn, are prodigious”.

DYLAN THOMAS

CLIVE ASLET

SIDNEY TEO

TR ACEY LLEWELLYN

VAN I T Y FA I R ON

After receiving her MSc in transport engineering, Tracey Llewellyn made a sharp turn in career direction by becoming a journalist. Since those early days she has covered a wide range of topics, from architecture and building to fashion and travel. For the past 10 years, Tracey has been writing about wristwatches, allowing her to return to her engineering roots—albeit on a slightly diferent scale. Today, Tracey is editor-in-chief of Revolution UK, the British edition of the world’s biggest watch lifestyle magazine. For Vanity Fair On Time, she explores how watchmakers have been at the fore of eco-friendly production values, from the heights of Jaeger-LeCoultre’s solar-panelled roof to the depths of Rolex’s underground water-saving reservoir. T IME

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HEUER MONZA www.tagheuer.com


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STOPWATCH Æ AUCTION REPORT p . 2 2 HERO WATCH p . 2 4 BUY, SELL, HOLD p . 2 6 NEWS REPORT p . 3 3 MODERN CLASSIC p . 3 4

BRIDGEMAN IMAGES

THE GENEALOGY OF GIVING Tracing their origins all the way back to the 11th century, these venerable fellows—the Knights of St John, also known as the Knights Hospitaller—are the blueprint for the modern charity. Established to care for sick pilgrims during the Crusades, they still go about their good works in today’s more secular climate, including running a maternity hospital in Palestine and a field hospital for refugees on the Turkey-Syria border. This painting, The Chapter of the Order of St John of Jerusalem Held in Rhodes in 1524, by Claude Jacquand, depicts the moment when the Knights were driven from their base on Rhodes. Six years on, though, the Holy Roman Emperor, Charles V, granted them the island of Malta, in return for the annual payment of a falcon (and therein lies another tale…). It is philanthropic acts such as theirs—albeit played out, mostly, on a less historic stage—that we salute in this issue of Vanity Fair On Time. —A.B.

AU T UM N 2 016

www.vanityfair.com

VAN IT Y

FAIR ON

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STO PWATCH

AN ABSOLUTE PEACH

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Magnum Opus

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Plane beautiful viator Charles Lindbergh’s mother must have been mighty proud when her 25-year-old son completed the first nonstop flight from New York to Paris in May 1927—and delighted when the Milos & Diel watch-case company presented her with this unique, white-gold “plane watch” to mark the occasion. The 20in model of Lindbergh’s “Spirit of St Louis” features flip-up wings which conceal an art-deco watch dial beneath a barrel-shaped crystal. Engraved with a dedication to Evangeline Lindbergh (above, with her son), it fetched a doubleestimate $35,000 when it sold at Christie’s in June—complete with a first edition of Lindbergh’s book We, signed by the aviator.

arry Winston’s Opus project began in 2001 in a bid to push the watchmaking envelope by inviting avant-garde makers to design far-out concept pieces, with one of the “farthest out” being the Opus 3, made in conjunction with Vianney Halter. Unveiled in 2003, the watch featured a digital display showing the time and date through six “portholes” set in a gold block case. But, while it wowed the crowds at that year’s Basel watch show, the mechanism proved erratic and required a further seven years of development before the first model could be delivered. Just 25 were made– and two have appeared at auction recently: number 20, which fetched $118,750 on 8 June at Sotheby’s New York, and number 25, which made $238,317 at by Christie’s Hong Kong DE BURTON on 3 June.

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ON AUCTI RT R EPO SIMON

PATEK COMES OUT ON TOP

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t’s often the little diferences that make one watch more collectable than another: a fact demonstrated by the sale of a 1971 Patek Philippe Reference 3448 perpetual calendar model (inset) that realized an estimatebusting $281,000 at Christie’s New York. The price was partly attributable to the fact that the maker’s name was printed above the date window rather than in the usual place below—leading to the watch being dubbed

VAN I T Y FA I R O N

T IME

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“Topsider” by Patek-o-philes. The vendor, Dr Norman Stone (inset, left), a US psychotherapist, philanthropist and art collector, had owned the watch since new and donated the auction proceeds to the Pristine Mind Foundation, a Buddhist charity. The watch, itted with a transparent case back, was sold with an additional gold one that had remained in appropriately pristine condition, having never been itted.

AUTUMN 2016

B E T T M A N N / G E T T Y I M A G E S ( L I N D B E R G H ) ; P I C T O R I A L P R E S S LT D / A L A M Y ( N E W S PA P E R ) ; © C H R I S T I E ’ S I M A G E S LT D , 2 016 ( P L A N E WAT C H , W I N S T O N , PAT E K ) ; T H E N AT U R A L H I S T O RY M U S E U M / A L A M Y ( P E A C H P I C T U R E ) ; J A C K F / S H U T T E R S T O C K . C O M ( F R A M E ) ; C O U R T E S Y O F D R . C R O T T A U C T I O N E E R S , G E R M A N Y ( P E AC H WATC H ) ; S H I G E M I TS U TA K A H A S H I / A L A M Y ( B U D D H A ) ; J E RO D H A R R I S / G E T T Y I M AG E S ( STO N E )

gold, enamel and pearlstudded pocket watch designed to resemble a peach—complete with enamelled leaves and a pendant loop in the shape of a stem—realized a sweet €186,600 when it crossed the block at German auction house Dr Crott in May. Created for the Chinese market in around 1810 by London maker Ilbery, the watch is thought to be one of just eight in existence. It was originally owned by Hendrik van Gilse van der Pals, a Rotterdam rubber merchant who was also the Dutch consul in St Petersburg, where he organized musical soirées and mingled with composers such as Gustav Mahler. He was said to have been a lovely old fruit.


BAR REFAELI by Chen Man

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Big Bang Broderie Sugar Skull. Case in ceramic set with 48 red spinels. Unique dial made of carbon fiber with fine Saint-Gall embroidery in the form of floral arabesque. Strap embroidered in silk stitched on rubber. Limited edition of 200 pieces.

BOUTIQUE LONDON 31 New Bond Street / Harrods Knightsbridge Tel. 020 3214 9970 • 020 7730 1234

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MARVELLOUS MARVIN

Box clever

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group of 20 19thce ntu r y clock wor k items raised $4million at Sotheby’s New York in a collection entitled “Swiss Mechanical Marvels”. The highlight was a “magician box” once owned by King Farouk of Egypt (right). The box, decorated with a scene made from four colours of gold and depicting a sorcerer, was made by automata specialist Piguet & Meylan in around 1820. When one of 10 gold drawers containing different questions is pushed into a slot, the wizened character raises a book towards his eyes, nods his head and points his wand towards the branch of a tree–which dutifully moves aside to reveal a window in which the answer is displayed. The piece fetched a spellbinding $1.2million.

rivers’ watches are all the rage these days, but few can match the wonderful Marvin Motorist produced during the 1950s. Designed to be worn on the side of the wrist for easy reading at the wheel, the Marvin featured a snug-itting convex case and an ultra-thick crystal to protect it from knocks. Once favoured by the likes of Che Guevara and F1 world champion Juan Manuel Fangio, Marvins are rarely seen these days, making it all the more remarkable that German house Dr Crott found a “new old stock” example for a recent sale.

GOOD SPOT

onhams became the latest auction house to join the internet bidding revolution when it staged its first online-only watch sale, which ended on June 9 with a 100 per cent sale rate. The firm claimed to have received bids from 30 countries for the 118 lots, which were part of the ongoing dispersal of 2,000 watches collected by the late Jan Willem Frederik, Baron van Wassenaer (see the Spring 2016 issue of On Time). The success of the initial sale will see further online auctions of affordable watches during the coming months. More at bonhams.com

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ne of the most talkedabout launches at Baselworld in 2004 was a take on the Rolex Cosmograph Daytona called “The Leopard”. The normally sober sports watch was given a wild makeover with a leopard-print dial and strap and a bezel set with yellow sapphires. Rarely available pre-owned, one recently sold at Christie’s Hong Kong for $38,815.

HERO WATCH PAT E K

P H I L I P P E

J UM B O

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creation of the late, great watch designer Gérald Genta that sits alongside his Audemars Piguet Royal Oak in the sports-watch hall of fame, Patek Philippe’s Nautilus was introduced in 1976. Named after the marine mollusc, in reference to the fact that it was suiciently waterproof to withstand a dunking in the sea or the swimming pool, its shape is said to have been inspired by a ship’s porthole. At 42mm across, the Nautilus was a large watch for the era, leading to the original Reference 3700/1 models being given the nickname of “Jumbo”. They were produced

N AU T I L U S

ANTIQUORUM GENEVA, MAY 2007

VAN I T Y FA I R O N

ANTIQUORUM

£14,045

T IME

SOTHEBY’S

ANTIQUORUM BONHAMS NEW YORK, MAY 2010

£24,000

3 7 0 0 / 1

for less than a decade and are now highly collectable due to their clean and simple lines and the fact that the case size is now considered average rather than big, meaning the watch looks entirely in keeping with today’s styles. Surprisingly, however, prices for standard models (without, for example, specially signed dials) remain relatively stable. Although the Jumbo was available in gold and bimetal, the stainless-steel versions— preferably with a blue dial—are regarded as being quintessential, and it is to these that our graph (below) relates. When buying, try to ind an example that retains its original cork box.

CHRISTIE’S NEW YORK, MAY 2008

£19,980

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www.vanityfair.com

LONDON, JUNE 2011

£16,800

ANTIQUORUM GENEVA, MARCH 2013

£16,620

GENEVA, NOVEMBER 2015

NEW YORK, APRIL 2014

£16,990

BONHAMS

£29,330

LONDON, JUNE 2015

£23,750

AUTUMN 2016

C O U RT E SY O F D R . C R OT T A U C T I O N E E R S , G E R M A N Y ( M A R V I N WATCH ) ; B R U N O S CH O L Z / U L L ST E I N B I L D V I A G E T T Y I M A G E S ( FA N G I O ) ; C O U RT E SY S OT H E BY ’ S ( G O L D B OX ) ; C O U R T E S Y O F ‘ L E M O N D E D E S A U T O M AT E S , A L F R E D C H A P U I S A N D E D O U A R D G É L I S © F O N D AT I O N E D O U A R D E T M A U R I C E S A N D O Z ( P U L L Y, S W I T Z E R L A N D ) ( D R AW I N G S ) ; P I C T U R E P O S T / H U LT O N A R C H I V E / G E T T Y I M A G E S ( FA R O U K ) ; J A C K F / S H U T T E R S T O C K . C O M ( F R A M E ) ; © C H R I S T I E ’ S I M A G E S LT D , 2 016 ( R O L E X ) ; I S T O C K . C O M / E R I C I S S E L É E ( L E O PA R D ) ; I S T O C K . C O M / S B AY R A M ( G L O B E ) ; I S T O C K . C O M / M A L E R A PA S O ( M O U S E ) ; B O N H A M S ( PAT E K ) ; I S T O C K . C O M / S E A R S I E ( WAT E R ) ; I S T O C K . C O M / B L U E X H A N D ( N A U T I L U S )

ON I T C U A RT O P E R

Net profits

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LEGENDS ARE FOREVER

www.zenith-watches.com

HERITAGE I PILOT Ton-Up


STO P WATCH

AU C T I O NE E R S ’

BU Y

JONATHAN DARRACOTT Bonhams, London

Perfect condition vintage watches by any good maker, preferably unused or very little worn

Military and 1940s and 1950s chronographs by makers such as Omega, Longines and Jaeger-LeCoultre, Patek Philippe and Rolex

Patek Philippe dress watches

Modern watches with complications by the best makers

Modern Patek Philippe tourbillon wristwatches. They have dropped considerably over the past year and now offer great value for money

Vintage steel Rolex Daytona Chronographs could not be much hotter right now. But the trend towards higher prices for Daytonas can’t go on forever

If the laws of supply and demand hold true, well-preserved vintage Cartier Tank wristwatches, with original dials, will go up in value in the short and long term

Excellent vintage pieces, especially chronographs from names such as Longines, Heuer, Minerva

All vintage watches with badly restored dials and overpolished cases

JOHN REARDON Christie’s, New York

STEFAN MUSER Dr Crott, Mannheim

Modern complicated wristwatches by Audemars Piguet and Vacheron Constantin Vintage chronographs with Valjoux or Lemania movements. Valjoux 72 especially. Original dials are a must

SIMON SUTTON Watches of Knightsbridge, London

Bosom buddy

Vintage chronographs or complicated watches, in very good condition, by Rolex, and makers such as Longines, Heuer, Omega and Audemars Piguet “Fashion” watches from 1970 to 2000 by brands such as Cartier, Chopard, Corum and Bulgari

ON I T C U A RT R EPO

a e g e r - L e C o u l t r e ’s Reve r s o à E c l i p s e watches have shutters that open to reveal enamelled images on the dial. Bonhams recently sold one showing the pertinent portion of a portrait of Gabrielle d’Estrées and her sister, the Duchess of Villars. It fetched £27,500.

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THE FUTURE’S BREITLING

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n the feverish market for vintage watches with bluechip dial names, some collectors say old Breitlings have a way to go, so those who snapped up the eight “new old stock” examples sold by Antiquorum in Geneva probably spent their money wisely. The octet made CHF36,750 (40 per cent more than anticipated), with the top sellers being a 1970 Bullhead Pupitre Chrono-Matic at CHF8,750, and a 1969 ChronoMatic Superocean at CHF8,500.

T IME

Universal, Heuer and watches less than 36mm diameter

Contemporary high-end watches; oversupply from the grey market has softened prices at the moment but this may change

Tool watches in good original condition from brands other than Rolex, Omega and Heuer

VA NI T Y FA I R O N

H OLD

Restored vintage watches from the likes of Rolex and Patek, before the market polarizes further

ADRIAN HAILWOOD Fellows, Birmingham

DARYN SCHNIPPER Sotheby’s, New York

T I P S

SELL

Diver watches from the 1960s and 1970s and steel chronographs with Valjoux 72 movements

JULIEN SCHAERER Antiquorum, New York

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www.vanityfair.com

Modern watches with black cases. They are still sexy

High-grade time-only pocket watches

Rolex sports watches

START ME UP

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t’s well known that steel sports chronographs are bestsellers, which prompted Aurel Bacs at Phillips to hold a sale dedicated to the genre. “Start, Stop, Reset” resulted in all 88 chronographs selling for a combined total of CHF13.3million. A 1942 Rolex split-seconds model set a record at auction when it realized CHF2.4million.

Old Master gold Breguet from the 18th century became the second-most valuable watch by the maker to sell at auction when it fetched CHF3.2million at Christie’s in Geneva. The self-winding quarter-repeater, with calendar, equation of time and power reserve indications, is regarded as one of Breguet’s masterpieces and was first sold to the French general Jean Moreau for Fr3,600 before being bought for Fr4,800 in 1817 by Charles-Louis Havas (above), founder of the AFP news agency.

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AUTUMN 2016

A N T I Q U O R U M A U C T I O N E E R S ( S CH A E R E R , B R E I T L I N G WATCH ) ; B O N H A M S ( DA R R ACOT T, J AG E G E R - L E CO U LT R E ) ; © C H R I ST I E ’ S I M A G E S LT D , 2 016 ( R E A R D O N , B OX A N D P O C K E T WATCH ) ; C O U RT E SY O F D R . C ROT T A U C T I O N E E R S , G E R M A N Y ( M U S E R ) ; F E L L O W S ( H A I LW O O D ) ; C O U R T E S Y S O T H E BY ’ S ( S C H N I P P E R ) ; WAT C H E S O F K N I G H T S B R I D G E ( S U T T O N ) ; C O U R T E S Y O F P H I L L I P S / P H I L L I P S . C O M ( O L D R O L E X ) ; L O U V R E PA R I S , F R A N C E / B R I D G E M A N I M AG E S ( E ST R E E S ) ; I STO C K . CO M / F LY F L O O R ( F R A M E ) ; A F P / G E T T Y I M A G E S ( H AVA S ) ; A N G U S M CC O M I S K E Y / A L A M Y ( B R E I T L I N G P L A N E )

B U Y, S E L L , H O L D :


STO PWATCH

Place your bets

ON I T C U A RT O P E R

GROOVY, BABY ew horological creations speak more loudly of the groovy 1970s than Piaget’s fabulous Manchette cuff watches, several of which turned up at Phillips in Geneva. They included a 1971 example made from textured gold and with a tiger’s-eye dial (CHF32,500); another with a lapis lazuli dial and a cuff set with diamonds and sapphires (CHF70,000) and a third with a jade dial and a “bark” effect bracelet incorporating jade and lapis lazuli links (CHF35,000). The sale also featured a 1971 Rolex cuff watch by Georges L’Enfant, who was famous for the 1970s jewellery designs he created for Hermès, Van Cleef & Arpels and Cartier.

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Urban-e style collection of watches made by the 18th-century Danish horologist Urban Jürgensen fetched CHF5.73m when it was dispersed by auction house Antiquorum in Geneva—with the lion’s share attributable to an exquisite gold pocket watch known as the Krusenstern Chronometer, a piece commissioned by King Frederick VI of Denmark in 1812 and presented to Commander Adam von Krusenstern (left) for becoming the irst person from Russia to sail around the world. Predicted to fetch around CHF50,000, it sold for a remarkable CHF620,000 after a protracted bidding battle between four wouldbe buyers.

AUCTION CALENDAR SEPTEMBER __13 __ Bonhams, London __17 __ Watches of Knightsbridge, London __27 __ Fellows, Birmingham OCTOBER __8 __ Antiquorum, New York __15 __ Antiquorum, Hong Kong __19 __ Christie’s, Dubai __25 __ Fellows, Birmingham

VAN I T Y FA I R ON

T IME

www.vanityfair.com

NOVEMBER __12 __ Dr Crott, Frankfurt __12 __ Phillips, Geneva __13 __ Antiquorum, Geneva __14 __ Christie’s, Geneva __15 __ Sotheby’s, Geneva __22 __ Bonhams, London __28 __ Christie’s, Hong Kong __29 __ Fellows, Birmingham __29 __ Phillips, Hong Kong __19 __ Watches of Knightsbridge, London

DECEMBER __6 __ Christie’s, New York __7 __ Antiquorum, New York __7 __ Sotheby’s, New York __8 __ Bonhams, New York __12 __ Bonhams, Los Angeles __14 __ Bonhams, London __15 __ Sotheby’s, London

AUTUMN 2016

E V E R E T T C O L L E C T I O N / S H U T T E R S T O C K . C O M ( R O U L E T T E ) ; I S T O C K . C O M / D A N I E L R . B U R C H ( P L AY I N G C A R D S ) ; I S S T O C K . C O M / R I C H L E G G ( D I C E ) ; © C H R I S T I E ’ S I M A G E S L T D , 2 016 ( J A C K P O T T O U R B I L L O N , C H R I ST I E ’ S D U B A I ) ; CO U RT E SY O F P H I L L I P S / P H I L L I P S . C O M ( P I AG E T WATC H ) ; P I AG E T ( B & W P I A G E T A D ) ; CO U RT E SY O F T H E A DV E RT I S I N G A R CH I V E S ( P U R P L E P I A G E T A D ) ; A N T I Q U O R U M A U C T I O N E E R S ( P O CK E T WATCH ) ; F I N E A RT I M A G E S / H E R I TAG E I M AG E S / G E T T Y ( K R U S E N ST E R N ) ; I STO C K . CO M / F LY F L O O R ( F R A M E ) ; I STO CK . C O M / D N Y 5 9 ( G AV E L ) ; D E AG O ST I N I / G E T T Y ( C A R R I AG E C L O CK ) ; CO U RT E SY

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orolophiles who like a lutter had the chance to take a punt on two unusual watches that crossed the block in late May’s major Hong Kong sales. Christie’s ofered a Girard-Perregaux Jackpot Tourbillon featuring a miniature interpretation of a Liberty Bell slot machine with three spinning reels, while Phillips ielded a Christophe Claret Blackjack 21 piece on which blackjack, dice and roulette can be played. They sold for $175,960 and $93,490 respectively.


We assemble every single watch twice. Because perfection takes time.

For us, perfection is a matter of principle. This is why, on principle, we

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craft all timepieces with the same care and assemble each watch twice.

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George Pragnell 5 and 6, Wood Street, Stratford-upon-Avon, Tel. 178 92 67 072 · Harrods 87–135 Brompton Road, Knightsbridge, London, Tel. 2 07 73 01 234 · Watches of Switzerland 155, Regent Street, London, Tel. 0207 534 9810 Wempe 43 – 44, New Bond Street, London, Tel. 207 49 32 299


STO PWATCH

Coming right up

ENGLAND MADE ME

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he second of Sotheby’s Celebration of the English Watch sales in July raised £1.8million for 36 lots by important British makers. The star of the show was a silver-cased pocket chronometer made in 1781 by the Cornish horologist John Arnold (left). It fetched £557,000 against a pre-sale estimate of £150,000, while a “pair cased” pocket chronometer made in 1784 by Thomas Earnshaw in collaboration with Thomas Wright realised £305,000. Both were record prices for watches by the respective makers.

RACING GREAT

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notable Heuer Carrera chronograph shattered its pre-sale estimate more than 10 times over when it fetched CHF225,000 at Sotheby’s, making it the most expensive Heuer ever sold. The yellow gold chronograph was originally a gift to the Swedish Formula One star Ronnie Peterson (above, with Jack Heuer) in 1972 and was inscribed on the back, “Success. Ronnie Peterson from Jack W. Heuer”. Peterson died following an accident at the 1978 Monza Grand Prix; the watch remained with his family until the sale. At a UK classic car auction in June, a 1972 Lotus Elan Plus 2S once owned by the driver sold for £72,800.

VAN I T Y FA I R ON

T IME

www.vanityfair.com

CHRISTIE’S i s s t a g i n g s a l e s i n c e l e b r a t i o n o f t h e 4 0 t h a n n i v e r s a r y o f t h e Pa t e k P h i l i p p e Na u t i l u s . O n e w i l l i n c l u d e a rare 1978 Reference 3700/1 model (left) made for the Sultanate of Oman and bearing the “Khanjar” symbol on the dial. Due to be offered in Dubai on October 19, the yellow gold watch is described as being exceptional and beautifully p a t i n a t e d . It w i l l b e s o l d o n i t s original, matching bracelet and is estimated to fetch up to $300,000.

ON AUCTI RT R EPO

otheby’s’ once record-breaking Hong Kong watch department mysteriously disappeared during the first half of 2016. Head specialist Sharon Chan (below) resigned in February, and her departure was rapidly followed by that of the remaider of her team. On Time was unable to squeeze an official comment from the house about the situation, but we are assured it will resume watch sales in the region. Insiders say the Asian watch auction market has been adversely affected by a surfeit of discounted retail stock and a rise in the number of watch-collecting clubs whose members trade among themselves.

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PHILLIPS i s e x p e c t i n g b i d s i n e x c e s s o f $ 3 m i l l i o n f o r a n u l t r a - r a r e Pa t e k P h i l i p p e R e f e r e n c e 1518, made during the 1940s, at its Geneva s a l e o n No v e m b e r 1 2 / 1 3 . T h e m o d e l i s h i g h l y sought after by collectors because the 1518 was the first perpetual calendar chronograph to be made in series. Of the 281 made, most are cased in yellow gold and a very few in pink gold —but a mere four were made from stainless steel. This (right) is one of them, and it has never before been seen at auction.

DR CROTT h a s u n e a r t h e d a v e r y r a r e v e r s i o n of Omega’s celebrated Speedmaster c h r o n o g r a p h f o r i t s No v e m b e r 1 2 s a l e . The 1958 Reference 2915-3 (right) is the third version of the model, and features straight strap lugs, broad arrow hands and the famous 321 hand-wound movement— a l l o f w h i c h O m e g a m a n i a c s l u s t a f t e r. D r C r o t t ’ s carries an estimate of 30,000-40,000. BONHAMS i s e x p e c t i n g b i d s o f u p t o £35,000 for a rare rose-gold, handwound watch (left) from 2009 by i n d e p e n d e n t m a k e r Ka r i Vo u t i l a i n e n . Vo u t i l a i n e n ’ s b e a u t i f u l l y c r a f t e d p i e c e s a r e h i g h l y s o u g h t a f t e r. T h i s o n e c o m e s c o m p l e t e w i t h i t s l e a t h e r s t r a p, c l a s p, b o x a n d p a p e r s .

Biver birthday one-off Hublot made to mark the 60th birthday of LVMH watch division boss Jean-Claude Biver realised CHF62,500 when it was consigned to Phillips by a vendor who bought it at a charity sale. The well-worn titanium and ceramic-cased foudroyante chronograph, known as the “King Biver”, was presented to Biver in 2009 by the employees of Hublot, the brand he turned around after taking over as CEO in 2004.

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AUTUMN 2016

S S P L / G E T T Y ( A R N O L D ) ; I STO CK . CO M / J A CK F ( F R A M E ) ; C O U RT E SY S OT H E BY ’ S ( S I L E R P O CK E T WATCH , P E T E R S O N WATC H A N D B OX ) ; M A U R I C E H A A S ( B I V E R ) ; C O U RT E SY O F P H I L L I P S / P H I L L I P S . C O M ( H U B L OT ) ; C O U RT E SY TAG H E U E R ( P E T E R S O N ) ; I STO CK . CO M / L U X I Z E N G ( H K ) ; A N T H O N Y K WA N / G E T T Y ( CH A N )

Going, going, gone?

FORTHCOMING SALEROOM HIGHLIGHTS


STO PWATCH

NEWS R E PORT By Nazanin Lankarani

candidate, who, in turn, must have the desire to integrate, and commit to staying long-term and learning the language.

PUTTING A BRAVE FACE ON IT

I L L U ST R AT I O N S T H RO U G H O U T: ST U D I O N I P P O L DT

REACHING OUT TO REFUGEES A. Lange & Söhne has come up with a creatively charitable way to help migrants integrate into German society. For the past year, it has been implementing a programme to recruit young refugees for its manufacture in Glashütte. “We wanted to contribute to the German humanitarian effort by finding a way to give young refugees a chance to become watchmakers,” says Wilhelm Schmid, chief executive of A. Lange & Söhne. The company hopes to recruit five people, aged 18 to 26, into its one-year language programme, to be followed by an immersive placement in the manufacture. “We need people who are curious, eager to learn, and want to take a chance with us,” said Schmid. The programme comes at a cost to A. Lange & Söhne of €25,000 to €40,000 per AU T UM N 2 016

Since 2012, when Nomos Glashütte first launched its collaboration with Doctors Without Borders, the German brand has raised over $500,000 for the international humanitarian organization. Targeting an even $1million, the charitable work continues with new specially designed, limited-edition timepieces. Nomos and its retailers have, as before, pledged to donate $100 to the NGO for each of the watches sold. The project started in Germany with special collections based on two of its signature mechanical models, the Tangente (below) and the Tetra. Each watch bore the engraving “Doctors Without Borders” on

the dial below the six o’clock marker. Given the success of the original German series, now sold out, Nomos extended its programme to the UK and the US, where it is offering six differently sized models. The special-edition models retail between £1,240 and £1,460 in the UK, and $1,960 and $2,330 in the US.

Olly Hicks as its new ambassador. Having just embarked on the world’s first documented kayak crossing from Greenland to Scotland, a 1,200-mile journey called the Wake Of The Finnmen, next December, Hicks is planning to take on the Southern Ocean, where he will attempt to row around the globe solo.

Hublot Hublot welcomed Lang Lang (below), the international piano sensation, as its brand ambassador. Last May, the Chinese classical pianist gave an exclusive private performance to mark the opening of Hublot’s new boutique on Fifth Avenue in New York. Proceeds from the shopping event went to charity.

Chanel French actor Gaspard Ulliel, the face of perfume line Bleu de Chanel, is now the ambassador for Chanel’s men’s watch, Monsieur de Chanel. Piaget Piaget has picked the award-winning Canadian actor and producer Ryan Reynolds as international brand ambassador for Piaget watches. Mr Reynolds, 39, delighted television audiences as Michael Bergen on the hit ABC sitcom Two Guys and a Girl.

Richard Mille Richard Mille will welcome a new German partner, the tennis player Alexander Zverev. The record-setting and spectacular performances of the 19-year-old prodigy echo those of Rafael Nadal, a familiar figure to Richard Mille. The right-handed Mr Zverev will henceforth play wearing a Richard Mille RM 27-01, a timepiece developed with Mr Nadal that boasts a tourbillon calibre suspended by cables capable of resisting accelerations of up to 5,000Gs.

AMBASSADOR CLASS: WHO’S WHO Bell & Ross Bell & Ross has added a racing-car driver to its list of professional users and named Carmen Jordá, 28, who is also a model, as ambassador for its new ladies’ line. Though not yet a “serious” contender, Ms Jordá, who is Spanish and the daughter of racing driver José Miguel Jordá, is a racing-car and development driver for Renault’s F1 Team. Bremont The British brand Bremont has announced the British adventurer and rower

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ITALIAN HIGHLIGHTS Bulgari in Rome Last June, Bulgari’s chief executive, Jean-Christophe Babin, flanked by Francesco Prosperetti, superintendent of Rome’s Colosseum, jointly unveiled the newly restored mosaic floors of the western gymnasium of the Terme di Caracalla, now on view to the public thanks to a generous donation by Bulgari. The geometric shapes that decorate the Terme di Caracalla mosaics, specifically their ancient “fan” design, have been a central motif in Bulgari’s Divas’ Dream collections (above).

Chanel in Venice Chanel is hosting an exhibition entitled The Woman Who Reads at the Ca’ Pesaro International Gallery of Modern Art in Venice (until January 8). Part of a programme known as Culture Chanel, the new show will explore

Mademoiselle Chanel’s creative world from the perspective of her relationship to books and reading, including authors whose works left a mark on her life and shaped her personality, namely Plato and Virgil, Cervantes and Jean Cocteau.

NYC CARTIER REOPENS This September, following two years of renovation, the historic boutique at 653 Fifth Avenue (below), Cartier’s first in New York, will reopen. It will be the largest Cartier

store to date, spanning six floors, with an archive and workshop. The “New York mansion” is also known as “the house bought for a necklace”. It was reportedly acquired by Pierre Cartier in 1917 in exchange for $100 and a double-strand necklace of 128 natural pearls, which was coveted by “Lady” Maisie, who was married to Morton F. Plant, the previous owner of the building.

CHANEL’S HIGHCALIBRE MALE The big news for Chanel at Baselworld 2016 was the launch of Monsieur, the luxury house’s men’s watch. Five years in development, the house announced that the Calibre 1, which features instantaneous jumping hour and minute retrograde complications, was also the first movement “designed,

developed, reliabilitychecked and assembled by Chanel”. The manual-winding movement is made up of 170 components, with integrated complications. Managing to be both traditional and contemporary in appearance, the timepiece features two circular skeletonized bridges. Inside, alternating matte and glossy black surfaces decorate the movement in “amorphous diamond-like carbon”, a highperformance coating. A lion, a recurrent motif for Chanel (above), decorates the buckle and crown.

MODERN CL ASSIC GIR ARD-PERREGAUX L AURE ATO by NICK FOULK ES ith its bracelet of polished and brushed links seamlessly joined to a watch head characterized by an octagonal bezel, Girard-Perregaux’s Laureato is one of the great classic designs of the 1970s. It is sometimes compared to the Audemars Piguet Royal Oak and, like the Oak, it is given a refresh once in a while: a tweak here and a subtle change of proportion there, sometimes so discreet that you would need to have the old and the new side-by-side to see it. Depending on your view, it may even be the case that this year sees the 40th birthday of the model. The brand’s

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late owner Gino Macaluso once told me: “In the oicial history of Girard-Perregaux, 1975 is cited as the year in which the design of the Laureato was initially presented, but I do not think that the irst one was delivered until the following year.” When at last those irst customers received their watches, they were wearing the very latest horological technology: the Laureato was introduced as a quartz watch, as Girard-Perregaux was a pioneer of the technology in Switzerland. Laureato translates as “graduate”, and in Italy, this model became a favoured gift of parents to sons graduating from university.

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NEWS R E PORT PARIS BIENNALE This year’s Biennale des Antiquaires, the prestigious art and antiques fair taking place in September at the Grand Palais in Paris, is noticeably different from previous years’. Though in total a greater number of exhibitors is taking part, a multimilliondollar antiquesforgery scandal has angered some dealers, causing them to pull out. The fair will also feature a significantly reduced roster of high jewellery and watch

brands. Conspicuously absent names include Cartier, Graff Diamonds, Van Cleef & Arpels, Boucheron, Dior and Chaumet. The Geneva-based De Grisogono, not quite a newcomer given its last appearance in 2008, is participating, the company confirms. A spokesperson for the brand confirmed that De Grisogono had decided to return this year despite the pre-opening commotion, because its founder Fawaz Gruosi “does not follow the crowd”.

DIOR BOUTIQUES A new Dior boutique opened in June on New Bond Street in London: a milestone for the brand in the UK. To mark the occasion, Dior created two collections of watches, each drawing inspiration from the colours of the British flag. The smaller D de Dior Précieuse timepiece is subtly pavéd with diamonds, its case embellished with a bezel set in rubies for the red version, or sapphires for the blue. The Dior VIII Grand Bal Plissé Soleil timepieces are

T OOL TIME

designed to evoke a ballgown in the colours of the Union flag. They come in two editions, limited to eight timepieces each. Both editions are encased in polished pink gold, each embellished in either red rubies or blue sapphires and both equipped with the maison’s “Dior Inversé 11 1/2” calibre, which features the oscillating weight on the dial decorated with mother-of-pearl marquetry. In late September, Dior opens a new watch and jewellery boutique in Paris opposite the flagship store at the corner of Avenue Montaigne and Rue François 1er.

IWC BURSARY IWC Schaffhausen announced the launch of its annual Filmmakers’ Bursary

Award in March, in association with the British Film Institute. The award, which includes a £50,000 prize, will be handed out on 4 October at the IWC Gala Dinner to an outstanding British writer or director whose first or second feature-length fiction film premieres

at the 2016 London Film Festival. The award will help future development in filmmaking. IWC’s role as official time partner of the British Film Institute and the London Film Festival will continue until 2019.

by JUS TIN JAY KOULL APIS

he earliest watches had their wheel teeth cut individually by hand, each tooth being shaped to its bishop’s-mitre profile with a tiny file. The tedium was considerable. By the mid-1700s, watchmakers were, well, fed up to the teeth with it all. Besides, no matter how many thousands you might have cut, there was no guarantee that the next tooth was going to be the same shape as the last. What was wanted was something to make the process more predictable and less fiddly. Revolutionary—but not in a rotational sort of way—the machine à raboter is a stout frame whose job it is to perfectly

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guide little file-shaped cutters mounted on a flat plate. The operator glides the handle back and forth like a truffle on a grater, and with each pass, the pre-shaped cutter forms an exact image of itself in the edge of a previously plainnotched gear blank mounted nearby. Notch the next tooth along, and repeat. Many think that watchmaking is a pure process, devoid of irony. Not so. After all, how did watchmakers get those plain notches into the wheel in the first place? The answer: sometimes they used a wheel engine with a plain circular sawblade. Sometimes they just used a file…

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SPORTING GREATS Longines: racing Longines begins the horseracing season as official timekeeper of the Qatar Prix de L’Arc de Triomphe, a thoroughbred race at the Hippodrome de Chantilly on 2 October, ahead of the show-jumping event the Longines Masters of Paris, in Villepinte, in December. TAG Heuer: surfing TAG Heuer has partnered with the World Surf League to serve as official timekeeper of the Big Wave Tour. The surfing event began with the Puerto Escondido

Challenge in June with TAG’s brand ambassador, the American surfer Kai Lenny (below), sporting the Aquaracer 300M to promote the brand’s Don’t Crack Under Pressure campaign. The Tour will travel to Chile, Peru, Oregon, Punta Galea in Spain’s Basque country, and Hawaii, before reaching Todos Santos in Mexico. Tudor: motorsports This month, the Historic Grand Prix held in Zandvoort brings together race-ready classic cars for a spin around the Dutch circuit with Tudor as the official sponsor. Tudor’s love

affair with motorsport dates back to 1970’s Tudor Oysterdate, also referred to as “Homeplate,” a design it revisited in 2010. Zenith: motorcycling On 25 September, more than 38,000 smartly dressed gentlemen will straddle their café racers, bobbers, scramblers and other custom motorcycles in 470 cities to participate in The Distinguished Gentleman’s Ride and help fund research for prostate cancer, with Zenith as official timekeeper. To celebrate this partnership, Zenith has produced a timepiece called the Heritage Pilot Ton-Up. Bring a helmet.

CULTURAL CONCERNS Montblanc Montblanc’s Cultural Foundation has named the independent curatorial team of Sam Bardaouil and Till Fellrath (above right) as

co-heads. Bardaouil and Fellrath will be in charge of developing cultural initiatives for the Foundation, and overseeing the Montblanc Arts Patronage award that, this year, will honour Sir John and Lady Sorrell for their contribution to the Sorrell Foundation, which works to inspire creativity in children. Sir John, chairman of University of the Arts London, and Lady Sorrell, Chancellor of the University of Westminster, have, since 1999, developed a programme that connects schoolchildren with mentors.

Panerai at the V&A The Italian watchmaker Panerai is collaborating with design duo Glithero, founded by Tim Simpson and Sarah van Gameren, to bring to life a mesmerizing, time-based mechanical installation at the Victoria & Albert Museum, London, from September 17 to 25. The interactive installation, titled The Green Room, will occupy a stairwell of the museum, and will emulate the circular motion of the hands of a clock, using veils of colourful string to create an ever-changing optical effect suggestive of time itself.

BOOK CLUB C ARTIER: THE TANK WATCH, BY FR ANCO COLOGNI WHAT IS IT? Essential reading for next year. WHY? Have you been living under a rock? Next year is the centenary of

the Cartier Tank. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The biography of the world’s most famous straight-sided wristwatch. WHO HAS WORN A TANK? Who hasn’t? Jacqueline Bisset, Yves Montand, Jacques Fath, Elizabeth Taylor, Andrée Putman, Madonna, Muhammad Ali, Gary Cooper, Cary Grant, Yves Saint Laurent and Stewart Granger (who also had a pair of gold-backed Cartier hairbrushes). RANDOM FACT According to this book, Truman Capote never wound his Tank “because he didn’t wear it to tell the time”. MRS TRUMP TAKE NOTE In 2009 Michelle Obama wore a Tank Française for her official portrait, so don’t be surprised to see The Donald’s wife Melania wafting into her local Cartier boutique sometime soon.

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NEWS R E PORT famous profile of a Taíno chief—Cohiba’s distinctive emblem.

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CHIEF CONCERNS Cuban legend Zenith is celebrating the 50th anniversary of legendary Cuban cigar brand Cohiba with its El Primero Chronomaster 1969 Cohiba Edition (above), a limited edition of the iconic El Primero chronograph, with 50 watches in rose gold and 500 in stainless steel, presented in glossy chestnut reminiscent of the amber colour of Cohiba cigars. From 1966 to 1982, cigars made by

Cohiba were exclusively used for institutional gifts from the Cuban government to foreign statesmen and diplomats. The name comes from a term used by Taíno Indians to describe rolls of tobacco leaves—the ancestors of cigars. In a nod to the ultimate cigar, Zenith’s El Primero Chronomaster 1969 Cohiba Edition has a Havanabrown dial spanned with the distinctive yellow and black lines of the Cuban brand, including the

A woman’s vision The Grand Prix d’Horlogerie de Genève will take place this year on November 10. With the Grand Théâtre undergoing a two-year renovation, the ceremony will be held at the Théâtre du Léman (below) in Geneva’s Grand Hotel Kempinsky. The jury will be presided over again by watch-auction legend Aurel Bacs. Of note is the presence of six

women on a roster of 25 jurors, up from three, including French fashion designer Chantal Thomass, publisher and journalist Heekyung Jung, and Swiss entrepreneur Tina Zegg. “We thought it was essential to bring a feminine viewpoint to the GPHG,” said director Carine Maillard. “There are categories in which a woman’s perspective is very important.”

CORUM DJ style Corum has embarked on a collaboration with Steve Aoki (above), the

Grammy-nominated DJ and founder of the record label Dim Mak. Mr Aoki has designed a new version of Corum’s iconic Bubble wristwatch, expected to go on sale soon. It is, according to Davide Traxler, Corum’s chief executive, an “electrifying vision of the Bubble”. The venture comes hot on the heels of another musical collaboration with cymbal-makers Paiste, favourite of rock bands such as Deep Purple, Pink Floyd and AC/DC.

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onnected watches are the future, and the future is here,” declared Fawaz Gruosi, founder of De Grisogono, when he presented the world’s first high-jewellery smartwatch at a glamorous launch party last March, the result of a collaboration with Samsung. The Samsung Gear S2 hit the shops worldwide on 4 July. Limited to 100 units, the jewelled smartwatch is a true marriage of luxury and technology: set with diamonds on a galuchat strap, it boasts a hi-res display and wireless capabilities that support mobile payment function, among many others. With this timepiece, De Grisogono joins the growing circle of brands foraying into connected territory. Bulgari tested the waters with its then-concept watch, the Diagono Magnesium, at Baselworld 2015. In true Swiss tradition, it was designed to serve as an encrypted digital wallet using the Vault, a storage facility that keeps the wearer’s passwords, bank and VAN I T Y FA I R O N

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credit-card information safe. Delivery is estimated for 2017. But the most talked-about connected smartwatch launch remains TAG Heuer’s Carrera Wearable 01, unveiled in New York last November. Jean-Claude Biver’s added touch of marketing genius was to offer a guarantee allowing the buyer to exchange the by-then technologically obsolete smartwatch for a mechanical model two years after purchase. The race is on for imaginative new features, too. Early models like the IWC Connect and Montblanc’s TimeWalker Urban Speed e-Strap offered activity-tracking tools integrated in the strap of mechanical timepieces. Today, Breitling offers the Exospace B55, a connected watch for pilots that boasts smartwatch functionalities in an entirely Swissmade body. Tissot has developed the Smart-Touch (left), a water-resistant smart solution featuring weather data, navigation settings, air quality, humidity, and altimeter readings—N.L. AU T U MN

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Case Study

RENAISSANCE RE VA MP The 15th-century Scuola Grande di San Rocco was once among the proudest Venetian guilds. Jaeger-LeCoultre restored it to full splendour—and celebrated with a unique enamelled watch

BY NICK FOULKES

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P H OTO G R A P H S : S C U O L A G R A N D E D I S A N RO CC O ( STA I R S ) ; A R M A N D Y E R LY ( WATCH D E S I G N )

The scuola’s grand staircase. Inset: Jaeger-LeCoultre’s enamel version

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enice—one of man k i nd’s most startling ach ievements, and for centuries one of the world’s great powers. This glittering jewel of a city was once the crossroads of the world; master of the Adriatic and beyond; rich and powerful. Today, of course, it is a tourist attraction, a city-sized water-girt museum. The stones

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of Venice, about which the 19thcentury aesthete John Ruskin wrote so passionately, now echo to the slap of numberless flip flops, the babble of countless tongues and the occasional clash of selfie sticks as the towerblock-sized cruise ships add their human cargoes to the touristic tide that surges in from the mainland to remove the Rialto, the Duomo, the Doge’s Palace and the Bridge of Sighs from their TripAdvisor to-do list. And day-trippers aside, every other year the city becomes the capital of the art

world with the famous Biennale (see Caroline Roux’s piece on horological patronage of the arts on p. 76) and towards the end of the summer, the city ills with a slightly different crowd, as the itinerant global circus of the ilm festival pitches its metaphorical tent on the Lido—the sandbank at the mouth of the Lagoon where Dirk Bogarde expired in the ilm of Thomas Mann’s Death in Venice and where, from the end of August and in the irst days of September, you will find the Mostra Internazionale d’Arte Cinematografica— official watch Jaeger-LeCoultre. Film festivals are popular with watch companies: red carpets, beautiful people, f lash photography, glamour and high visibility. But across the lagoon, on the side of the Grand Canal opposite St Mark’s, it is a very diferent story, as Daniel Riedo, CEO of Jaeger-LeCoultre, explains. “If you are in Venice during the festival but are not involved in it, you have no idea that the festival is going on, because everything takes place at the Lido. While we were not obliged to do anything, we said as a sponsor it would be nice to invest a little bit in the city itself.” And so Riedo consulted Franco Cologni, author, historian, former boss of Cartier Italy, and the elder statesman of parent company Richemont Group, to find a suitable project in the heart of Venice. “He put us in contact with people from the Scuola Grande di San Rocco, and that’s how we first met them. They were very enthusiastic for a partnership; they really badly needed the money.” Charitable and religious organizations, the scuole grandi of Venice were funded by wealthy merchants and prominent citizens, and as well as doing good as clubs and associations, they came to wield considerable power in the city. San Rocco, built in the early 16th century, was one of the most splendid, with stunning paintings by Tintoretto. I remember my irst visit 25

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Case Study

years ago when, with a handheld mirror the size of an as-then-uninvented iPad to better appreciate the lavishly decorated ceiling, I walked this building in wonder. But it would appear that I am in a minority. “It is a bit far, quite of the tourist route, so it is not visited as much as the scuole located along the Grand Canal. They receive little money from the government, and when I say little, I mean almost nothing,” says Laurent Vinay, Jaeger’s Executive Director of Communications who became deeply involved in the project. “At the time, when we approached them, they told us they were receiving €4,500 a year from the ministry of culture.” Over three years, the Swiss watchmaker pledged €150,000, which, while a considerable sum, is not immense by the standards of modern marketing. But it is all about perspective, and for the Scuola Grande di San Rocco it meant its annual funding had increased by around 1,100 per cent. “All the electrical system was in decay; it had to be renovated and modernized, as well as the lighting, so this is what we did the first year,” says Vinay. “During the second year we really focused on the marble, because the marble had never been cleaned so it was really dark.” This year, the money will be spent on repairing the windows: “Almost all of them were

broken. They didn’t have enough money to replace the windows, so there were heavy drapes inside, just to keep the rain from coming in.” This work has now been celebrated in a one-of watch that showcases the enamel technique of Jaeger-LeCoultre. Although not as old as the Scuola di San Rocco, the thriving enamel studio at Le Sentier is celebrating something of an anniversary this year. Twenty years ago, in 1996, Miklos Merczel, chef d’atelier, presented his irst enamel watches, a quartet depicting the four seasons as imagined by Art Nouveau artist Alphonse Mucha. Given that subsequent enamel watches at Jaeger have been inspired by the works of Caspar David Friedrich and Van Gogh inter alia, broken windows and faulty wiring did not really present themselves as suitable sources of artistic inspiration for enamelling on the back of a yellow-gold Reverso GT. So by a process of elimination, the magnificent main marble staircase was chosen as the subject, which brought its own problems, not least the parallax efect, as Yoan Descollonges, the enameller who worked on the watch, explains. “The diiculty was to respect the straight lines of the staircase while working on the curved surface of the Reverso case and it was demanding to transcribe the marbled efect of the column and walls on to the enamel, as the efects are highly attenuated during

the iring. And given that the colours in the marble were very few, we needed to work on subtle contrasts, often using the same colour, and we tried a lot of mixes to develop the right colours based on variations of taupe, brown, white, pale pink and icelle [a creamy colour].” And those were just the anticipated diiculties. With 15 irings at 800 degrees centigrade and another 32 drying sessions at 230 degrees, the scope for accidents was considerable. “The irst explosion happened during the irst weekend, after ive days of work,” recalls Descollonges matter-offactly. After the second explosion cracked the enamel it was decided to discard the case and start from the beginning. But the craftsmen of Le Sentier do not give up easily, and by early summer—pale colours, attenuated marbling, explosions and the parallax efect notwithstanding—the watch left the workshops and went to the CEO’s oice for a inal inspection. The plan was to auction it and donate the proceeds to the Scuola, but when Daniel Riedo saw the finished work, he insisted that it go straight into the maison’s museum, and that a donation would be made to the Scuola instead. However, he did consent to the watch going on exhibition in the JaegerLeCoultre boutique in St Mark’s Square, a good reason to make the trip over from the Lido. As if the Tintorettos at the Scuola were not enough of an attraction. 

MINIATURE MARVEL

CLE AR VISION Below: the outline emerges. Right: foundation enamel is applied

FINE LINES Right: the subtle marbling of the scuola takes three weeks to recreate

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MUSEUM PIECE Above: the ornate portal adorns Jaeger-LeCoultre’s iconic Reverso case

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A L L P H OTO G R A P H S BY A R M A N D Y E R LY; WATCH FAC E © J A E G E R - L E CO U LT R E

The staircase of the Scuola Grande is painstakingly depicted by Jaeger-LeCoultre’s master craftsmen


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Philanthropy Focus

SPIRIT OF ENTERPRISE In 1976, Rolex decided to recognize those individuals striving for the greater good. Forty years later, the Awards for Enterprise have grown to encompass an astounding range of projects

P H O T O G R A P H S : © R O L E X ( R O L E X O Y S T E R P E R P E T U A L L A D Y- D AT E J U S T 3 1 M M , 1 9 7 6 S E L E C T I O N C O M M I T T E E , A D V E R T I S E M E N T )

BY NICK FOULKES

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inety years ago, watchmaking took a huge step forward. Or perhaps more accurately, it took the plunge, with the introduction, by Rolex, of a waterproof and dustproof watch called the Oyster. For centuries, the wristwatch had been a delicate mechanical object that nestled in the waistcoat pocket and needed to be protected from dust, moisture, shocks and sudden movement. Now, here was a watch that could be taken for a dip; indeed, that is what Mercedes Gleitze did the following year, when she swam solo across the English Channel. Thanks in large part to the Oyster, Rolex would become the world’s most famous luxury watch brand. Half a century passed, and in 1976 André Heiniger, who had taken over from the founder Hans Wilsdorf as CEO, wanted to celebrate this important anniversary. He established the Rolex Awards for Enterprise, and now the awards themselves are celebrating their 40th anniversary. But Rolex, being a stickler for precision, is at pains to point out that although the awards were announced in late 1976, they

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were not presented until two years later, as Rebecca Irvin, Rolex’s no-nonsense, crisply dressed head of philanthropy explains. “In the early years there was a big advertising campaign. In 1976, Rolex did so much promotion for the awards that over 3,000 applications came in and they didn’t know what to do with all of them—they had a jury, but it took a long time to go through them all. So the irst awards were only given out in 1978.”

For a brand that prides itself on the accuracy of its products, calling something an “enterprise award” is perhaps the least precise thing Rolex has ever done. “The idea from the beginning was to support individuals who were doing innovative work, had an exceptional spirit of enterprise and were carrying out concrete projects,” says Irvin. “In the very beginning it was about science, exploration and the environment; very quickly, by 1981, we were getting a lot of cultural heritage projects, so we expanded the deinition of the categories to include cultural preservation. But the basic concept of supporting exceptional individuals trying to make a diference in the world has not changed. And the idea of the spirit of enterprise—which means they are very entrepreneurial, overcoming obstacles and dedicating themselves to humanity—remains the same basic core concept as in 1976.” In practice this means honouring an agreeably heterogeneous group of projects. In addition to the obvious things such as setting up medical centres, preserving old buildings and establishing wildlife reserves, one can scoop an RAE for: saving a set of prehistoric footprints in Argentina; developing a way to predict volcanic eruptions using a remote-controlled

E XPERTS IN INVENTION The 1976 jury: Luis Marden, Olivier Reverdin, Derek Jackson, André Heiniger, Jacques Piccard. Above: The advert that launched the project. Inset: The winners’ watch (1976-2006)

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helicopter; teaching a gorilla to use sign for the Nanopatch, which, by the sound of you’re wearing all the time. The back is language; or even revitalizing and it, will revolutionize the way we are engraved, so it’s not just a generic watch; preserving “whistled and drummed vaccinated. Instead of an intramuscular it’s one that is very special to me and to my languages” via the internet (no, I am not jab with a sharp bit of metal and a syringe family. Of course, it’s telling you the time, making this up). full of whatever, Prof. Kendall has but you can also draw encouragement from Moreover, since its foundation it has devised a patch that uses just one percent it. We all have those days, tricky days, when spawned the Young Laureates awards for of the dose of a traditional vaccination it’s hard at work for whatever reason and those under 30, and the Rolex you can draw encouragement Mentor and Protégés Arts from diferent cues. Sometimes to Initiative, too. “It became do that I can just look down at extremely diverse, extremely the watch and think ‘Yeah’.” international, but the basic You do not have to be a watch concept—like a watch—has aicionado to ind the unalloyed remained incredibly up to pleasure the award winners date. And very relevant.” derive from their watches Ah yes. The watch. As refreshing. One of the most unwell as a cash grant for afected and charming responses their work, each laureate comes from a 1993 laureate, receives a watch. For 30 Nancy Abeiderrahmane, from years that meant a Mauritania, who was honoured yel low- gold O yster for the slightly of-piste project of Daydate for the men and making “cheese from camel’s a gold Oyster Datejust for milk supplied by semithe women. nomadic herders” into “a Then, in 2006, the watch stable and healthy supply of changed, becoming white locally produced dairy gold, and by 2012 the watch goods”. given was a steel and white“The main impact of gold Datejust. At first I the award on me was thought they had gone all self-confidence. It austerity. But given that Rolex boosted my morale, can hardly be described as hardand upheld my up, the answer was rather belief in dairy at a time diferent. Times and tastes have when I was still about changed, and while I might be the only one to believe in quite happy to swan about it, and it was tough going,” wearing a gold watch on a gold she says. “It is a very nice bracelet, thank you very much, feel i ng, a lbeit a bit others might feel a bit awkward surprising, to be in the company doing so. As Irvin explains of so many remarkable people delicately, it is a question of the doing unusual things around the “context” in which they will be world. I wonder whether I wearing the watch. After all, if deserved it. On a personal level your life’s work has been two things really chuffed me, combining loofah and plastic maybe childishly: the Rolex waste to make low-cost housing watch, which I would never have ALTERNATIVE ALTRUISM Clockwise from top: Francine Patterson taught Koko the gorilla in Paraguay, then you might feel had, even in my wackiest sign language; Nancy Abeiderrahmane at her African camel-milk a touch self-conscious wandering dreams, and the beautiful dairy; Mark Kendall and his needle-free vaccine; David Hockney around a favela with 200 awa rd s c eremony. Ma ny mentored artist Matthias Weischer. Insets: the later watch designs grammes of yellow-gold watch laureates live and toil in very dangling of your wrist. harsh environments, with few (cutting the cost by 99 per cent), and that luxuries, so Rolex perfection is all the his is not to say that the laureates does not need to be refrigerated—the more gratifying.” are not proud of their watches. implications for poor countries in warm It is not childish at all. I think even Quite the opposite. It is just that places are obvious. more highly of her for admitting that she “I had a nice watch before, but it wasn’t was excited by the watch on her wrist; not as selfless individuals with high (and rather brilliant) minds they have other a Rolex,” says Kendall. “I never really least, I find it reassuring that I have at things to consider than which watch they imagined I’d be a guy wearing a watch like least one thing in common with the quite will wear today. Take Professor Mark that. So it’s a huge honour, and it’s quite an remarkable group of people honoured by Kendall. He picked up an RAE in 2012 interesting award, because it’s something Rolex over the past 40 years. 

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Philanthropy Focus


HERMÈS BY NATURE


Philanthropy Focus

PI TC H PE R FEC T With his charity Laureus, Richemont’s Johann Rupert made the sports ground a place of harmony

P H O T O G R A P H S : T H E C A P E T I M E S , I N D E P E N D E N T M E D I A LT D / N L S A A R C H I V E S ( C A P E T I M E S H E A D L I N E ) ; PA S C A L L E S E G R E TA I N / G E T T Y I M A G E S F O R LAUREUS (RUPERT AND FEDERER); COURTESY OF LAUREUS (OTHER IMAGES)

BY NICK FOULKES

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ver the years as chairman of Richemont, the luxurygoods conglomerate that owns many of the world’s finest watch brands, Johann Rupert has seen plenty of newspaper clippings. The media has named him everything from Businessman of the Year (South African Sunday Times, thrice) to “Rupert the Bear” (FT) and much else besides. So perhaps he can be forgiven for not recalling every single article. However, there is one headline that he remembers with some pride. It appeared in the Cape Times on October 21 1970 and read “Anton Rupert’s Son Attacks Apartheid”. It seems extraordinary, especially in the light of events in Europe just a few years earlier, but in 1948, South Africa embarked

injustice of the system, a young Rupert took to the pages of the student magazine to ON THE BALL attack the government. Left: The Moving the “If the present Government Goalposts project, Kenya. has no solution,” he wrote, Below, from left: Rupert’s “and intends on leaving it to dissent in the Cape Times; Rupert with Roger Federer at our generation, let it please the Laureus World Sport not alienate the Coloured Awards; the Laureus/IWC [bear in mind this was written Schafhausen Portoino Automatic Moon Phase in 1970] to the extent that we 37 Edition won’t even have time to attempt anything. “How much longer are the Coloured going to accept that they will have no say in their own future? His tone was practically apocalyptic; the invidious situation would worsen, enduring for almost another quarter of a century. Rupert was a keen sportsman: a talented cricketer, who continued to break the law on an official policy of racial segregation, by playing mixed-race cricket. Now, clearing millions from their homes and looking back on the actions of his younger dividing areas according to skin colour and self, he sees this as the birth of an idea that race. By 1970, international condemnation would become the sports charity Laureus, of the policy of apartheid was rising. one of the highest-profile charitable Internal criticism was mounting too, and initiatives of the present century, among those South Africans protesting highlighting the power of sport as a force about their nation’s policy was a 20-year-old for positive social change. student. But as the headline suggests, this was not just another long-haired campus hothead. This student at Stellenbosch University was heir to one of South Africa’s most significant industrial dynasties, founded on cigarettes by his father Anton, who himself had been talked of as a potential moderate leader of the country. Inflamed with the passions of youth and the fundamental

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Good supports is audible in his voice. “It is about people who give back to their own communities,” he says, telling me how “a Kenyan gentleman arranged a whole township around football; before the children can play they have got to do their homework and clean the streets. They use sports to shape role models for the betterment of society.” Today both of Rupert’s fathers—the tobacco tycoon and the semi-parental freedom ighter—are no longer alive, and he is a paterfamilias with three children. I ask what it would feel like to read a similar headline to that one that greeted his father over breakfast on the morning of October 21, 1970. “Luckily, my kids… they don’t understand the whole concept,” he says of the dark days of apartheid, adding, with genuine feeling, “Thank God.” 

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PHOTOGRAPHS: JEAN-PIERRE MULLER/AFP/GETTY IMAGES (NELSON MANDELA AND FRANCOIS PIENAAR); GREY VILLET/THE LIFE IMAGES COLLECTION/GETTY IMAGES (CHILDREN); COURTESEY OF LAUREUS (OTHER IMAGES)

few years later, radical Rupert found himself working on Wall Street for Lazard Frères. “It was the height of apartheid,” he recalls. “I had a number of black friends and I carried on playing cricket in the US. The players were expats and West Indians. I got to know a famous sports star”—a Yankees baseball player who happened to be black. “I noticed how, in the back of his limo, he had posters and a pen. He took special care when signing posters for white kids. I said to him, ‘You seem to give more care to the posters for white kids.’ And he said, ‘Johann, if the white kid has a poster of me on his wall then he can’t hate the GOLDEN BOY Clockwise from top: South black kid in his class.’” Africa’s Rugby World Cup It was a response that victory; a ten-year caused Rupert to think. anniversary Laureus/IWC charity watch; the winning “In amidst all the child’s drawing chosen to trouble of race, religion adorn it; black and white and ethnicity, I thought children play on separate that if somebody really beaches admires a sports star of another culture and another ethnicity, it helps break barriers down.” Slowly, the idea coalesced that the immense inluence of sports stars could be harnessed and directed. The keen sportsman had grown into a highly astute businessman, and as a result of the success of what was first the Vendôme group and later Richemont, Rupert encountered many of the sporting heroes of his early years. most valuable thing they have— “I have met so many global superstars their time—to work on projects who were willing to give their time post- with the foundation, then that retirement, and who felt that sport could is incredible.” Since its inaugural Awards unite people.” As individuals they could sign posters and they could even set up their own ceremony event in 2000, at which foundations, but, typically, Rupert had a Mandela spoke, Laureus has gained grander vision, and given his family’s huge momentum. Perhaps inevitably, the commercial power and his own anti- Laureus World Sport Awards are talked of apartheid credentials, he decided to ask a as the Oscars of the sports world (having few of his inluential friends if they would attended neither event, I am not in a position to judge how true that is) but the noise mind helping make his vision a reality. Like many South Africans, Rupert had around it is more audible every year, aided in been struck by Nelson Mandela’s great part by the slick marketing of Rupert’s enthusiastic backing of the Springboks, even sports-watch brand IWC, which makes a wearing the captain’s shirt during the 1995 limited series of special watches each year Rugby World Cup, in a just-post-apartheid that are sold to beneit the organization. But, away from the magisterial ideals of South Africa: an event that inspired the ilm Invictus. “I went to President Mandela—he the grand vision and lash-photography-fest semi-adopted me as a son, that is how close of the Laureus Awards, it is the stories of we were—and he became our irst patron on the individuals helped by Laureus that touch Rupert most deeply. Although it the basis that sport can unite people. “It sounds crazy when you look at would be stretching a point to say that a football, and the hooliganism, but when note of tenderness softened the staccato you get to the level of a Tiger Woods, who vowels and angular consonants of his South has transcended colour, and a Lionel African accent, his genuine admiration for Messi, and they are willing to give the the work of those that Laureus Sport for


Case Study

catch the eyeballs of a particular demographic and that Premier League team Y is delivering that East Asian market. Adding a charitable element is just another way of “activating” the association, but that doesn’t necessarily mean charity activation is without value. Sometimes, however, the association is so far from the usual push-button norm that you have to sit up and take notice. Such is the case with Raymond Weil’s long-standing support for Nordoff Robbins, the musictherapy charity that grew out of the pioneering collaboration between the American pianist Paul Nordof and special-education teacher Clive SOUND EFFEC TS Robbins. Influenced by the Left: Paul Nordof, seated, Steiner movement and and Clive Robbins, whose developed over a 17-year music-therapy charity is supported by Raymond period starting in 1958, Weil. The brand’s musictheir creative music inspired timepieces, top to therapy, originally devised bottom: Othello, Parsifal, as a form of treatment for and maestro Beatles Limited Edition children with psychological, physical, or developmental disabilities, is grounded in the belief that everyone can respond to music, no matter how ill or disabled. Nordoff Robbins is not obscure. It’s quietly well known and pops up in the news pages regularly enough, but given the star power the two could draw on, the charity is almost retiring, which means the persistence of Raymond Weil’s involvement needs a little explanation. As it turns out, music is a theme that Raymond Weil has woven into the brand from the start. Raymond Weil’s association with music-therapy charity Somewhat against the grain of the times Nordoff Robbins is just one of the ways it strikes the right note and just ahead of the quartz and currency BY JAMES GURNEY crises that would decimate the Swiss watch industry, Raymond Weil, an industry insider, he days when creating a of flying. And, as brands become more set up his own brand in 1976. Weil was able watch brand was no more sophisticated in their gaming of these to see both the diiculties the industry was complicated than making associations, so we become more adept at facing and the opportunities that the slightly better watches reading their messaging. time was ofering. We accept Chopard’s Mille Miglia than the next manufacture He also had the industry nous up the valley are long connection because we know that and the contacts. But it was his gone, if ever they truly existed. Relexively, company co-president Karl-Friedrich son-in-law, Olivier Bernheim, we see that as a bad thing: a sign of our ever- Scheufele’s enthusiasm for vintage cars who had the marketing shallower times; another paving stone on the is absolute; but equally, we know that Hollywood star X is just there to general road to hell. I’m not so sure. Watches, like anything else worth having, are attractive for the associations they carry, and whether we admit it or not, we use our preferred associations as a much-needed ilter to navigate the tidal wave of options on ofer. That’s why you don’t need to be a pilot to like Breitling or Bremont—you simply have to share the mindset of a love

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hand the results of the great work that the charity does, and this is why we feel so passionately about the continued partnership.” ince 2000, the brand has been a partner of the charity, designing watches to be auctioned at the annual Silver Clef lunch with renowned artists ranging TOP SCORES Clockwise from far left: from Jamiroquai singer Jay the Amadeus ad, 1983; Kay to Nicola Benedetti. James Bay with Craig It’s an opportunity both to Leach at the Brit Awards; classical guitarist Miloš raise funds for Nordoff Karadaglić; the Freelancer Robbins and to reinforce Electro Music and, below, Raymond Weil’s assocNabucco watches iation with the music world. Over the years, the sums are significant—more than £600,000 has been raised through the special-edition auctions (the 2007 Jay Kay watch went for £75,000). Not bad for a brand that has an average price of around £1,750. More than the kudos of the money raised, artists. That’s partly a the sponsorship of the awards has allowed response to the growing the brand to go a little more of-piste with importance of marketing in the designs, dressing up special editions that the watch industry generally, normal brand-DNA rules wouldn’t allow. but a great deal to do with the Producer and singer Labrinth helped with next generation of the Bernheim the design of a Freelancer Electro Music family—cello-playing Elie has been Special Edition which was auctioned of at CEO since 2014 and his brother, the Silver Clef Awards in 2014, the inner dial showing Labrinth’s very own labyrinth logo Pierre, is a director. Much of that activity has been on a silver background, while the minute centred in the UK—a key market—and track mimicked equalizer bands. Last year has covered a surprisingly wide range of saw a collaboration with 2Cellos (Croatian activities, tastes and genres. Most obviously, duo Luka Šulić and Stjepan Hauser) that the brand has been the oicial watch and resulted in another Freelancer watch. Cased timing partner of the Brit Awards since this time in titanium, the watch is a 45mm 2008 and of the Royal Albert Hall since chronograph, decorated with cello strings 2013, but the association goes deeper and around the dial and a red bow-shaped wider than that: they’ve supported Wired’s chronograph hand. This year’s Beatles live music platform, the Classic Brit Awards special edition, shown at Baselworld in March, was auctioned at the Silver Clef and Glasgow venue the SSE Hydro. The partnership with Nordoff Robbins awards on July 1, where award winners grew out of earlier involvement in music present included Olly Murs, Lionel Richie sponsorships, as Bernheim explains. “The and André Rieu. The watch raised £5,000 relationship between Raymond Weil and and took the total raised by Raymond Weil Nordof Robbins came through the brand’s for Nordof Robbins to £750,000. The Bernheim family clearly work within the music industry and hold the association close to their through recognition of its being one hearts. They have helped the of only a few watch brands using Silver Clef Awards blossom from music to market its products. We the annual get-together for wanted to create a philanthmusic industry insiders ropic angle to our campthat it started as 40 years aigns and were introduced ago into an impactful to Nordoff Robbins. We and inspiring event on have witnessed its relentless behalf of Nordoff eforts to transform the lives Robbins and music lovers of individuals through music everywhere.  therapy. We have seen first-

insight that the family’s intense involvement in music ofered a point of difference that might resonate with consumers, and Raymond Weil agreed. As Olivier’s son Elie Bernheim says, “When he launched the company, my grandfather knew he would need to focus on something that would be an inspiration for the watches—you need that to make a watch diferent, not just a device for telling the time—and that it had to be something relevant. He loved music and could see that its diversity meant you could create diferent watches to appeal to diferent people.” Bernheim joined the irm in 1982 and the following year saw the launch of Raymond Weil’s irst collection to generate signiicant interest: Amadeus. Released in conjunction with Miloš Forman’s ilm of the same name, the watch placed the brand at the forefront of 1980s design, with its bimetal case and softened lines. More importantly, the brand’s link with music was established. Major collections over the intervening years have carried musical names (mostly from opera: Parsifal, Nabucco, Don Giovanni, Othello, Fidelio and Traviata included). With the brand and product identities in place, Raymond Weil grew steadily into the 1990s. Over the last decade or so, the brand has adopted a slightly more sophisticated and involved approach. Going beyond using music as generalized inspiration, it has developed partnerships with events, performing companies and individual

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SIMON OWEN, RED PHOTOGRAPHIC (KARADAGLIC)

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O V E R S EAS Bearing the prestigious Hallmark of Geneva, this timepiece is the ideal companion for an extraordinary voyage that reveals a unique perspective on the world. It is the only watch of its kind.

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ulgari. Think of the pre-eminent Roman jeweller, and the chances are that, along with the luscious cabochon jewels the house is renowned for, Serpenti will come to mind. The sinuous form of the snake has been threading its way through Bulgari’s jewels for decades, since the famous house created its first serpentiform watches using its interlockingstrip chain tubogas technique to evoke the snake’s graceful, dangerous allure. Now, ever the innovator, Bulgari has taken this dangerously enticing familiar and given it a dazzling abstract interpretation with its latest Serpenti collections, including the Serpenti Incantati and Serpenti Spiga watches, and Serpenti jewellery. The watches represent the ultimate fusion of haute horlogerie with haute joaillerie. And with Serpenti Incantati, the house has done something entirely new with its treasured symbol by stylizing it and sweeping it around the watch face, creating a jewel-set circular frame for the timepieces. It’s difficult to know whether to be more impressed with the craftsmanship of the horlogiers that make the tiny mechanical marvels inside the case, or the skills of the jewellers crafting and setting the exteriors. But it’s not a choice that really needs to be made when both are so abundantly present. Pick one of these watches up and study it up close, allowing Two new watches from your eye to be bewitched by its deBulgari’s Serpenti tailing. The movement is pure Incantati range. grace; the mainplate and bridges Left: pink gold with are painstakingly crafted in pink rubellites and or white gold. Choose a rubellitediamonds. Right: white set version with a pink-gold case gold and diamonds and a smooth satin strap, or nudge it that little bit further into the realm of joaillerie by switching said strap for a gem-set bracelet—not only visually enchanting, but surprisingly comfortable to wear (thanks to the skill that’s been handed down through generations of Bulgari artisans) and, of course, hardwearing. Or keep it monochrome with a diamond-set whitegold example: classic glamour. Then peer inside the case: something you’ll be able to do without the aid of a microscopic watchmaker’s screwdriver if you choose the Serpenti Incantati Skeleton Tourbillon. What you’ll see through the sapphire-crystal face is mesmerizing: perpetual move-

Lead us into

TEMPTATION For the new watches in its fabled Serpenti range, Bulgari has taken the snake—one of its heritage symbols—and given it a ravishing new twist


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ment, endlessly whirring. It’s hard to tear your eyes away. It is the technical mastery of Bulgari’s artisans that consistently delivers the luxury that has made it such a distinctive house; it is this mastery that is on display if you bring the watch closer to your face to admire the minutiae of the gem setting, the hairsprings and screws, the meticulous engraving. The finesse and quality of the gems and their assembly can only be achieved after years of experience, and with the weight of a half-century of Bulgari’s expertise brought to bear, it is as if anything superfluous to craft had been left by the wayside. And the serpent is still a potent symbol. The ancient Greeks had a way of depicting the eternal and cyclical nature of time: the ouroboros, depicting a snake consuming its own tail. The icon symbolized both reflexivity and introspection. Likewise the serpent, regularly shedding its outer skin and yet remaining the same beneath, is an appropriate symbol to which Bulgari consistently returns. Whether clad in bright, expressive pink and white gold in the Incantati iteration, with, say, a soft satin strap, or dark, seductive ceramic as a Spiga, with its articulated body, the twin incarnations of the Serpenti collection are two sides of the same powerfully enticing coin. The same timelessness that characterizes the craftsmanship of the two

watches, and the simultaneous, paradoxical change and constancy that they embody, mean that Serpenti has evolved into ever more fantastical creations that challenge the art of the jeweller even as they reinforce this powerful trope. The watch faces have changed shape over the years: octagonal or square, round or pear-shaped. Diamonds and other gems have illuminated the watches. The case has been re-positioned, sometimes in the middle of a coil, sometimes at the end. One thing that remains consistent, though, is the quality of the movements, with all watch components manufactured in-house in Bulgari’s vertically integrated manufactures in Switzerland. The Manufacture Bulgari is itself spread over four sites in the Jura mountains, which overlook the appropriately serpentine Lac Léman. Rare is the brand that can claim total mastery of the design, development, mechanical movements and—most importantly— bejewelling of a timepiece. Bulgari,

uniquely poised between horology and jewellery, has developed the streamlined Swiss finesse needed. In Bulgari’s watchmaking as in its jewellery, age-old skills are combined with state-of-the-art technologies. Of the four sites in the Manufacture, the creative process is spread between Le Sentier, where the grandes complications are born; the forge at Saigneliégier, where the gold and steel cases and bracelets are teased out of the metal; La Chaux-de-Fonds for the high-end dials; and finally, Neuchâtel, the nerve centre of the operation, where the entire process comes together and where assembly and final controls are handled. Bulgari has reinvented its own process of creation to rank it with the very greatest in watchmaking. Now, with the new Serpenti, the house is reinventing the snake, drawing on its potent symbolism of perpetual renewal. So are you tempted yet?  www.bulgari.com

IT’S HARD TO KNOW WHETHER TO BE MORE IMPRESSED WITH THE

CRAFTSMANSHIP

OF THE WATCHMAKERS OR JEWELLERS Left: a designer’s sketch for Serpenti Incantati. Below: the Serpenti Incantati Skeleton Tourbillon. Far right: the Serpenti Incantati with diamonds and satin strap


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THE ONE AND ONLY

With unique watches selling for millions of euros, the biennial Only Watch auction in aid of Duchenne muscular-dystrophy research has become an unmissable event for watch lovers. It’s also done untold good BY SIMON DE BURTON TOP BILLING

PIXELEYES PHOTOGRAPHY

Only Watch, the charity auction in watch connoisseurs’ calendars, has far transcended its original mission

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hoever invented the concept of the highend charity auction was surely some kind of genius. What better way to extract money for a good cause than to contain a large number of wealthy people in a room, ply them with good food and drink and then ask them to demonstrate how magnanimous and rich they are by inviting them to bid for expensive things they didn’t

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know they needed? More often than not, however, such events are one-off affairs designed to provide a fillip to charities that are struggling to raise money by other means—and persuading benefactors to part with suitably exciting lots can often be as difficult as finding a volunteer auctioneer with the necessary charisma

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and gavel-swinging style to set the room abuzz. But 11 years ago, Luc Pettavino hit on a winning formula when he inaugurated Only Watch, a biennial auction of high-end timepieces that has now raised in excess of $25million for charity.

ack in 2000 Pettavino, now 52, was the CEO of the Monaco Yacht Show when his five-year-old son Paul was diagnosed with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, a version of the illness that affects one boy in 3,500 and is characterized by progressive muscle weakening that leads to respiratory and heart problems, ultimately compromising the function of vital organs. Yet rather than simply accepting the cards that nature had dealt, Pettavino decided he would try to raise awareness of the illness and, if possible, improve the level of medical knowledge surrounding it in the hope that an effective treatment might eventually be found. And the best way to do that, he concluded, was to raise as much money as possible to fund research. “When I decided to do something, my irst idea was to THE ONLY WAY IS UP ask a group of artists to make This page: outside (above) thei r ow n and inside (below) the 2011 Only Watch auction, versions of the

Mona Lisa,” explains Pettavino. “It received a good response, and some major names such as Helmut Newton, and local artists Ben, Arman and Folon all created works which we auctioned, raising around €130,000. We followed that with a similar, Adam and Eve-themed project in

2003, and then I hit on the idea of an ‘Only One’ sale for 2004 which featured one-of objects made specially for the event by wellknown brands. So we had a unique tie by Lanvin, for example, a special Smart car, a custom-made humidor and so on.” As with the previous auctions, the sale

Monaco. Facing page: a unique Jaeger-LeCoultre Reverso Duetto that realized €110,000 at the 2005 event

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2005 SALE TOTAL €1.9MILLION

1. The inaugural event saw the extraordinarylooking Richard Mille by Starck 005-1A, below, designed by Philippe Starck, realize a double-estimate €285,000. 2. Second equal bestsellers were a Vacheron Constantin Malte Tourbillon, right, and a DeWitt Tourbillon Diférentiel, each at around €120,000.

A M M / M YS ( I N T E R I O R O F 2 011 AU C T I O N , A L B E RT S P E A K I N G ) ; A M M ( O N LY WATC H 2 0 0 7 )

Luc Pettavino, HSH Prince Albert II of Monaco and Osvaldo Patrizzi, 2005

was held at the Monaco Yacht Show—one of the official partners of which was the Swatch Group-owned watch brand Blancpain. “The fact that we were already raising €130,000-150,000 from our initial auctions meant we had generated a suicient amount to start funding some serious research,” recalls Pettavino. “But what that also meant was that we were now opening up many more paths to explore, all of which would need a great deal more money if they were going to prove efective—and that’s when my connection with Blancpain through the Yacht Show led me to meet with Nicolas Hayek [the late CEO and chairman of Swatch, who died in 2010] and propose to him the idea of the Swatch Group brands making and donating unique watches to sell at an inaugural Only Watch auction the following year.” ettavino’s suggestion (as well as, no doubt, his sincerity and enthusiasm) met with Hayek’s approval and several Swatch brands, including Blancpain, Breguet, Tissot and Swatch itself, set to work creating unique pieces for the auction, which was slated to take place in Monaco on September 22, 2005. Word of the sale soon spread around the watchmaking community, however, and the Swatch Group effort was quickly

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augmented by pieces from Richemont brands such as Jaeger-LeCoultre (inset) and Piaget as well as independents including Richard Mille, Svend Andersen and the Hong Kong maker Kiu Tai Yu—and, to add a spot of royal icing to an increasingly impressive-looking cake, His Serene Highness Prince Albert II of Monaco came on board as the event’s patron. As the weeks rolled on, Pettavino

2007 SALE TOTAL €2.7MILLION

thought carefully about how best to maximize what was quickly growing into a golden opportunity to raise some serious funds for the Association Monéga sque Contre L e s Myopathies (AMCLM), the oicial charity he had established as the foundation for the Duchenne research programme. “Selling watches was clearly a very particular ield, so I typed the words ‘watch auctioneers’ into Google. The first name that came up was that of Osvaldo Patrizzi and his company Antiquorum. I called him, explained what I was planning to do, and he happily came on board to help.” By the early summer of 2005, the pending irst edition of Only Watch had attracted no fewer than 34 brands, each of which had gone to considerable lengths either to create a unique piece for the sale or to supply the ‘number one’ from a small, limited edition. “While studying the 34 descriptions and illustrations of the watches to be ofered, I was struck by the diversity of the pieces,” Patrizzi told me at the time. “Each manufacturer had interpreted the mission in its own fashion, producing a watch that was characteristic of its image, style and flair. “I was also moved by the humanitarian spirit displayed by the brands as they wholeheartedly and enthusiastically took part for such a worthy cause—the end result being an astounding and magnificent selection of horological

1. Patek Philippe established the irst of its several Only Watch records with a unique version of its Nautilus featuring a titanium case, right, which went for €525,000. 2. A DeWitt and Jean-Michel Wilmotte Incognito 2008 tourbillon sold for €400,000.

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1. Patek Philippe stole the show with its goldcased Reference 5106 Celestial watch, left, that fetched €535,000. 2. As if the Cabestan Winch Tourbillon Vertical, right, wasn’t odd enough on its own, it was incongruously signed by rally star Sébastien Loeb. And fetched €220,000. Luc Pettavino, HSH Prince Albert II of Monaco and Osvaldo Patrizzi, 2009

masterpieces representing the finest of modern watchmaking,” he added. Key to the success of the sale, however, was exposing the forthcoming event—and the watches that were to be ofered—to as many people as possible: in addition to a core of VIP guests, anyone was permitted to participate live or from anywhere else in the world through Antiquorum’s thengroundbreaking online bidding system. To make the most of this potential, the 34 lots were taken on a global tour that started in Sardinia before moving on to Geneva, Bangkok, Hong Kong, Tokyo, New York and, inally, Monaco, immediately prior to the auction. The result was that many of the world’s top collectors got to see the watches in the metal; the sale received maximum publicity and many of the lots soared above expectations. The star of the show proved to

“LUC PETTAVINO HAS MOVED MOUNTAINS, BECAUSE IT COMES FROM THE HEART” be a one-of Richard Mille with a titanium case designed by Philippe Starck, which raised €285,000; while a Vacheron Constantin tourbillon sold for €120,000; a Jaeger-LeCoultre Reverso realized €110,000; and a unique Swatch made from steel, plastic and crystal drew a winning bid of €12,000. Every watch sold, raising a remarkable €1.9million.

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he sums involved were clearly large, and the commitment and investment required of the brands was signiicant,” explains Pettavino. “And it was mainly for these reasons we decided to make Only Watch biennial rather than annual—and I think that was a wise decision.” FIGHTING SPIRIT Despite the need for that This page: HSH Prince commitment, the number of Albert II of Monaco and brands participating in the event attendees with Duchenne had grown to 44 for last year’s suferers Philippe Ferreyrolles (left) and edition, up from a previous high Paul Pettavino (right), of 40 in 2011. at Only Watch 2011. Yet, insists Pettavino, it’s not Facing page: the Only so much a question of numbers One Swatch that sold for as a question of quality. €12,000 in 2009 “Participants have to be at a VAN I T Y

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certain level of watchmaking—but that doesn’t mean a major brand name that everyone recognizes. It’s more to do with the fact that they shouldn’t be too conservative, that they should be writing a new page in horological history. I go to the Baselworld show every year, discover new names and then ask people with knowledge what they think about them—if they believe they are suitable candidates for Only Watch, then we might ask them if they would like to take part.” nd that’s not as easy a decision as it sounds—because, after 10 years and six editions, the event has achieved such a high proile that it is now regarded as a key horological happening. And, if a watch that has been lovingly crafted and generously donated by a particular brand fails to sell well it can, at the very least, be embarrassing. “When we invite a watchmaker to take part, we’re very careful to explain that offering a piece to Only Watch is not a guarantee of success,” says Pettavino. “We emphasize that, first and foremost, they need to protect their brand and be aware that an auction is far from being an exact science—there can, for example, be an inexplicable inertia among the bidders which can cause a watch to sell for

A M M ( P R I N C E W I T H P H I L I P P E A N D PA U L ) ; T I M C L AY T O N / C O R B I S V I A G E T T Y I M A G E S (BLAKE); JULIAN FINNEY/GETTY IMAGES (NADAL)

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2011 SALE TOTAL €4.5MILLION

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2013 SALE TOTAL €5MILLION

1. Another Patek Philippe, this time a reference 5004 split-seconds chronograph in a unique titanium case, sold for €2.95million. 2. The Richard Mille tourbillon watch worn by sprinter Yohan Blake at the 2012 Olympics came an inappropriate second at €350,000.

below its true value. And that can be potentially damaging.” It is something that Max Büsser, founder of the high-end independent brand MB&F, has always been very aware of. He first became involved with Only Watch while CEO of Harry Winston Fine Watchmaking, supplying a piece for the inaugural event in 2005 shortly before setting up on his own. “I find it truly mind-boggling that Luc Pettavino has managed to get all the big guns from the watch industry to come to the table with a unique piece—essentially, he’s moved mountains, and the reason he’s been

1. You guessed it–another Patek Philippe took the laurels: this time a hand-wound, minute-repeating tourbillon in a unique steel case, selling for €1.4million. 2. The Richard Mille RM 27-02 worn by Spanish tennis star Rafael Nadal while winning the 2011 Monte Carlo championship took second spot, at an impressive €510,000.

able to do it is because it comes from the heart. He’s not simply some rich guy who’s trying to look good, he’s trying to save children’s lives and that really motivates people,” says Büsser. “But if you’re going to become involved as a brand, you really have to think about what you’re doing—it’s just not enough to make your watch, donate it and then sit back and wait for it to make a high price because it might not. It might even make a very small price, and that’s not good for anyone.

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n my opinion, you have to create something really special, and then you have to make it known to the people who might buy it. I usually spend around three weeks travelling the world with the piece we are donating in advance of an Only Watch sale, and I really believe it pays of. We’ve had great results with all three pieces that we’ve ofered, two of which have since changed hands and made a substantial proit for the people that originally bought them. Handled correctly, Only Watch can be a win-win situation: a big amount for charity, and a boost to the image of your brand.” Of all the brands that have taken part, however, Büsser reserves special praise for one in particular— and that is Patek Philippe, whose donations have consistently made skyhigh prices. Last year’s piece, for example, established a new world record for any watch sold at auction when it fetched a remarkable €6.8million,

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THE AUCTIONEER’S VIEW AUREL BACS, PHILLIPS, BACS AND RUSSO

contributing the lion’s share of the overall sale total of €10.4million. That, combined with the sums raised by the previous five editions of the event, has provided more than €26million towards research into Duchenne muscular dystrophy—and created momentum that now seems unstoppable. “If anyone steps in to the project, then they do so knowing that everything they give is given free of charge,” says Pettavino. “We

creating watches that they would not usually make even for VIP clients. “Combine that with the fact that the sale is biennial—meaning two years’ worth of anticipation and enthusiasm is downloaded in the space of a couple of hours—and you have a recipe for exceptional prices. In addition, the fact that all of the proceeds go to a good cause removes any guilt people might sometimes feel about spending such large sums on a wristwatch. “From an auctioneer’s perspective, it is also a hugely enjoyable sale to conduct. When you have a room illed with 400 people throwing bidding paddles in the air and you sell a Tudor for 100 times more than estimate, and a Patek Philippe becomes the most expensive watch on the planet—well, that can only be described as rock ’n’ roll on the rostrum.”

allow for maximum costs of 1–1.5 per cent of the sale proceeds in order to take care of unexpected eventualities but, other than that, everything goes to the charity—the auction house takes no commission and charges no premium. Even the two tons of paper required for the catalogues is donated. “But it has to be that way because the inances needed are now so great—we have moved on from the fundamental research of a few years ago to applied research, and that

2015

1. Not only did Patek Philippe’s unique, steel-cased reference 5016A minuterepeating, perpetual-calendar tourbillon make the highest price of the sale, it set a new auction record for any wristwatch at SALE TOTAL €10.4MILLION auction, selling for €6.7million. 2. FP Journe’s Luc, Monique and Paul Pettavino delectable tantalumcased Tourbillon Souverain Bleu, below, wasn’t held back by its “unlucky 13” lot number—it fetched €506,000. An honourable mention goes to Tudor’s one-of Black Bay, above. It was expected to fetch €3,5004,500, but eventually sold for €345,000.

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means more money is needed and we need to protect patents and establish companies. It is almost like a private-equity business for altruistic purposes.”

uch is the professionalism and success of the organization that it has now established Synthena, a notfor-proit biotech company based at Bern University and stafed by a dozen scientists and engineers, and SQY Therapeutics, the biological division of the charity, which works from the University of Versailles. It is already a legacy of which Pettavino deserves to be immensely proud, and it looks set to keep on growing. “Only Watch got it right from the very beginning,” says KarlFriedrich Scheufele, co-president of Chopard, which has donated a unique piece to the auction for every one of its six editions. “The sale has become known for providing collectors with just the sort of watches they are looking for, the result being that it has gained considerable momentum in recent years and has come to be seen both as an opportunity to raise a considerable amount of money for charity and for the brands to display their creativity—and for that, I think we all have to thank Luc Pettavino for having the initial idea and for being so convincing and so determined. Only Watch is, quite simply, the premier event of its type.”  AU T U MN

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uctioneer Aurel Bacs presided over the most successful Only Watch sale since its inception when he hammered down 44 lots in Geneva last November for a total of more than €10million—establishing a record price for any watch at auction by selling a Patek Philippe for €6.7million along the way. “The nine capital letters that spell out ONLY WATCH have now come to represent one of the most powerful logos in the watch industry—a logo that is as powerful as those of many of the most recognized brands. I think the event owes its success to the fact that it represents the very essence of what watch collecting is all about. It ofers rarity, exclusivity, aspiration. It’s a place where dreams can come true because it moves the CEOs of brands to make huge exceptions in


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Call to Alms Charitable contributions? Tick. The charity watch is pulling in the high rollers, says JOE THOMPSON

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n May 2015, at a charity auction in Geneva for Action Innocence, two watch collectors locked horns over a one-of-a-kind Tourbillon Souverain watch that the Geneva watchmaker FrançoisPaul Journe had donated to beneit the charity. Action Innocence is a Geneva organization that protects children from dangers on the internet. Its symbol is a purple safety pin. To make his auction watch unique, Journe created a new dial for the watch in the exact purple colour of Action Innocence. Bidding was ierce. But when well-known watch collector Claude Sfeir (he owns more than 2,400 pieces) bid CHF350,000, his opponent, Robert Manoukian, threw in the towel. However, Manoukian requested that his bid of CHF300,000 be added to the inal price of the watch—in the hope, he said, that Sfeir would occasionally lend him the watch for a few days. So it was that Journe’s watch raised CHF650,000—more than triple the price of a standard Tourbillon Souverain—for Action Innocence. It’s a stellar example of a relatively new genre of wristwatch—the charity watch. Charity watches have done a lot of good for countless causes. No one knows precisely how much money they’ve raised, but, based on the evidence available, it is easily in the scores of millions of pounds over the past 15 years. Charity watches—whether unique pieces donated to a charity auction, or limited editions linked to an organization that gets a percentage of the proceeds—offer a win-win-win situation. Charities gain visibility and get funds to pursue their humanitarian work. Watch aficionados often get a rare timepiece and the satisfaction of contributing to a good cause. “Watch companies get goodwill because they are supporting a charity,” says watch expert Paul Boutros, senior vice president and head of North American operations at Phillips Auctioneers. “They get the eyeballs of wealthy patrons who are potentially future clients. And they get to market their brand. The auction can create excitement for a unique ofering that can get them free publicity.” Yet, for all the good they do, charity watches can have drawbacks. Not all, or even most, watch companies develop them. Watch auctioneer Aurel Bacs, head of the watch department at Phillips in association with Bacs & Russo in Geneva, says he warns watch brands that there are risks involved if watches underperform at charity auctions. Critics of “p e r c e n t a ge - o f- p ro c e e d s” watches say the migration of the trend to the middle- and lowerpriced segments of the watch market has turned the charity watch into a marketing gimmick. Still, the category thrives. The 44 brands that contributed unique pieces for the Only Watch auction for

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Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy in Geneva last November include many of the Swiss watch industry’s great and good (Patek Philippe, Vacheron Constantin, Blancpain, Richard Mille, Ulysse Nardin, etc: see Simon de Burton’s in-depth report on p.63) The €10.37million raised at the auction testifies to the continuing vitality and power of the charity-watch concept.

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harity auctions, as a rule, have the most appeal for watch collectors because they present the most prized watches: unique pieces. They are the best expression of watchcompany philanthropy because the brands donate the watch, which usually gives a big boost to charity cofers. “At a charity auction, the goal is not to steal a watch at a very reasonable price,” Bacs says. “The goal is the opposite: to overpay and support a good cause.” Some auctions, like Only Watch and the (Red) Foundation auction, generate enormous media buzz. The (Red) Foundation, cofounded by the rock star Bono, held an auction with Sotheby’s in New York in 2013 to generate funds to ight AIDS. Jaeger-LeCoultre worked with designer Marc Newson and Apple design chief Jony Ive to create two unique pieces for sale. Ive collaborated on the “Memovox Tribute to Deep Sea, Europe”, which sold for $365,000. An Atmos 561 clock, designed by Newson, brought in $425,000. Most auctions, though, like the one for Action Innocence, generate little to no publicity. Patek Philippe, for example, supports a Swiss charity called Children Action. Every two or three years, with little fanfare, Patek creates a unique piece for an auction beneitting the charity, which provides aid to children with medical and psychological problems. The ive watches Patek has donated CHARITY DRIVE over the past 11 years have raised CHF3.2million. Below: Jony Ive, Bono and Marc Newson at Sotheby’s. Each year, watch companies Inset: The Jaegercontribute customized pieces for LeCoultre (Red) Atmos similar charity auctions around 561 clock, by Marc Newson

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SOLID FOUNDATIONS Above: the Audemars Piguet Jules Audemars Clinton Foundation Equation of Time. Above right: Bill Clinton. Below: Ben Stiller, Pascal Rafy, Paul Haggis and Jimmy Jean-Louis at The Academy for Peace and Justice, a school in Haiti supported by Bovet; the Blancpain Fifty Fathoms Ocean Commitment Bathyscaphe Flyback Chronograph

the globe. Last year, for example, Blancpain donated a Triple Date Moonphase in rose gold with a customized rotor to Auction Napa Valley, which supports a variety of hospitals and schools in California. Blancpain ofered to personalize the watch by engraving the rotor with whatever image the winning bidder wanted. Blancpain worked with Swiss Air Lines to create a Swiss-themed lot that included the watch, plus a trip to Switzerland with free air fare and lodging that brought in $140,000 for the charity. The other, more common kind of charity watch is a commercial piece, usually produced in limited numbers with design elements linked to a charity. Watch companies donate a percentage of the sales to the charity. The deals vary. Some irms give the charity a percentage of proceeds (usually defined as sales, sometimes as proits). The percentage can range from three per cent to as high as 30 per cent. The industry average is around 10 per cent, watch executives say.

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Other companies give a ixed sum for each watch sold. Hublot produces on average three limited-edition charity watches each year, according to CEO Ricardo Guadalupe. “In general, on every watch sold, we give a ixed amount that can be between $1,000 to $3,000 to the charity,” Guadalupe says. Blancpain, meanwhile, donates €1,000 to oceanic environmental causes for each limited-edition (250 pieces) Fifty Fathoms Ocean Commitment Bathyscaphe Flyback Chronograph watch it sells.

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eveloping a limited-edition charity watch can take from four months to two years, depending on the complexity of the piece. “The development process is a fairly big project,” says Yan Lefort, global head of sponsorships and partnerships at IWC. IWC develops four to ive charity watches every year, Lefort says. “It involves many people from different departments throughout our manufacture. It centres around the design and production of the watch. It involves the designers but also product managers, suppliers, manufacturing and logistics.” Patek Philippe says it spends an average of two years creating a unique piece for the two charities its supports, Only Watch and Children Action. For the 2012 Children Action auction in Geneva, Patek created a Ref. 5131 World Time watch with what it calls “an exclusive Geneva identity”. On the dial of the watch, called “View of the City of Geneva”, is a representation of the city in hand-made cloisonné enamel. Patek removed Paris from the list of cities on the time-zone ring and replaced it with Geneva. The changes made a diference. The watch sold for CHF1million, 20 times the price of the standard 5131 World Time, Patek said. A watch like the Hublot Classic Fusion House of Mandela, introduced last year, takes from nine months to a year, according to Guadalupe. It supports the House of Mandela, a foundation created by the family of Nelson Mandela to educate South African children. Customized touches include an engraving of Nelson Mandela’s signature on the gold bezel, the emblem of the Mandela family engraved on the gold dial, and a caseback featuring a cut-out of the map of the African continent framing an outstretched hand and the words “It’s in your hands,” a reference to Mandela’s quote, “It’s in your hands to make of our world a better one for all.” Hublot made 95 of the watches, one for each year of Mandela’s life. Other watches are simpler to customize. The simplest ones take four to ive months to produce, Guadalupe says. At Audemars Piguet, “The customization always depends on the taste of the person we partner with,” says CEO François-Henry Bennahmias. “Jay-Z, LeBron AU T U MN 2 016


James, Quincy Jones: they all had their say regarding the model, the colours, materials, stones, etc. All these limited editions have very diferent looks reflecting the personality of the godfather.” One of AP’s most complicated charity watches was the Jules Audemars Clinton Foundation Equation of Time, with the seal of President Bill Clinton on the back of the watch, in 2007. “We decided to customize the model with the sunrise and sunset times at the White House,” Bennahmias says. “There was a speciic display and box made for this timepiece and it involved many of our departments, from products to marketing, and, of course, legal.” Since Clinton was the 42nd president of the United States, AP created a collection with 42 pieces each in platinum, rose

marketing vice-president, who founded his firm in New York in 1995. He has worked on charity projects with numerous watch companies (Swatch, Hublot, Girard-Perregaux and more). The terrorist attack in New York on 11 September 2001 changed the climate, he says, both in Europe and the U.S. “After 9/11 there was a new desire to donate and help,” Ciampa says. One example: three months after the attack, Ciampa helped organize the Swatch “Wristory” auction in New York that raised more than $800,000 ($400,000 from the auction with a matching grant from Swatch) for charities helping families of 9/11 victims. “Charities went from being passive philanthropic ventures to becoming marketing

“JAY-Z, QUINCY JONES, ALL HAD LEBRON JAMES: THEIR SAY REGARDING THE WATCH DESIGNS”

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gold and white gold. Clinton himself attended an event in New York to announce the collaboration between AP and the Clinton Foundation. He watched with delight as AP auctioned of the Clinton Foundation No.1 watch for $200,000, and picked up a cheque from Audemars for an additional $3million for the Foundation. It is not unusual for brands to make additional donations to charities they support.

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he charity-watch trend took of at the beginning of the last decade, executives say. But there were a few pioneers in the 1990s. Audemars Piguet created a Royal Oak engraved with a tree to support the work of the Audemars Piguet Foundation in worldwide forest conservation. Chopard launched its irst José Carreras watch collection in 1996 to support the tenor’s Leukaemia Foundation. The casebacks bore engravings of the world’s great opera houses. In 2000, Bennahmias, then CEO of AP’s subsidiary in the United States, created a charity auction that watch collectors cite as a milestone. Held at Christie’s on the occasion of Audemars Piguet’s 125th anniversary, it was attended by 35 celebrities (Arnold Schwarzenegger and the late Muhammad Ali were co-chairmen) and raised $1.5million for charities. Using unique and limited-edition watches, Bennahmias developed a celebrity/charity formula that tapped into powerful new forces in the luxury market. One was a sophistication a mo n g c h a r i t y o r g a n i z a t i o n s themselves. Char ities changed dramatically in the last decade, says Venanzio Ciampa, founder and CEO of The Promotion Factory, a marketing and promotion consultancy in New York. Ciampa is an ex-Swatch Group AU T UM N 2 016

partners,” Ciampa says. “That led to more involvement between charities and watch brands. A lot of products emerged from that.”

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he first Only Watch auction, in 2005, marked another milestone in the development of the charity-watch category. So did the Great Recession of 2008-09. That had a profound efect on charity auctions, Aurel Bacs says. In the go-go Noughties, prior to the subprime crisis, “anything would go at auction,” Bacs says. “The money didn’t matter. At charity auctions, simply to feel good, people would raise their paddle in iveAFRICAN ICON or six-digit numbers for any Nelson Mandela, Cape kind of watch. It was easy.” Town, and the Hublot Classic Fusion House of Mandela. Top: The F.P. Journe Tourbillon Souverain that caused a sensation at a 2015 Geneva charity auction

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José Carreras and, right, the watch designed by Chopard to raise money for the famous singer’s Leukaemia Foundation

After 2008, the auction scene changed. Money got tighter, and watch collectors got smarter. “A lot of manufacturers thought that a logo of some football club or some race driver on the dial would be a great success,” Bacs says. “And it wasn’t. It was a lop. People who bid on watches said, ‘You have got to do something better for me.’” Paul Boutros recalls attending a charity auction for a friend raising money for medical research. A watch donated for the auction received no bids at all. “It was a regular production piece, brandnew,” Boutros says. “I had no interest in the watch. But I wanted to help my friend and his charity.” He bought the watch for well below its retail price. “When the watches ofered for charity sell at half of retail price, that’s a huge problem,” Bacs says. “You destroy so much value and goodwill.” By the same token, he says, “It’s very prestigious for a

HELPING HANDS Out of the spotlight of high-profile auctions, many brands quietly donate to their own causes In February, Luminox, maker of rugged, glow-in-the-dark Swiss-made quartz analogue watches, announced it will donate a percentage of the sales of two new $750 watches called Spec Ops Challenge to the U.S. Navy SEALs Foundation, for the support of families of fallen SEALs. In March, Bovet announced it would donate 10 per cent of its sales of its Lady Bovet Flower of Life watch to the Haiti charity Artists for Peace and Justice. Meanwhile, Germany’s Nomos Glashütte has formed an association with Doctors Without Borders (for more, see News, p.33). Last autumn, boutique brand Nixon ofered music fans the chance to get up close and personal with their heroes with the Rock LTD collection, VA N I T Y

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whose models sport straps made from rock stars’ leather jackets, guitar straps and the like. A percentage of proceeds goes to the MusiCares MAP addiction-recovery fund; the watches are priced from $1,000 to $4,000. Citizen donates a portion of the proceeds of online sales of Q&Q Smile Solar fashion watches ($29 to $45) to Table For Two, a charity that delivers school meals in Africa and Asia; whilst in March, Frédérique Constant introduced actress Gwyneth Paltrow as the firm’s new charity ambassador, and announced a donation of $50 to Donors Choose, another education organization, for every model sold in its ladies’ collection. AU T U MN

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watch manufacturer to see their unique piece trading for above retail.” Which is what happened to F.P. Journe’s purple Tourbillon Souverain. Bacs wielded the gavel that evening. The key to the success of that auction was planning, he says: the founder of Action Innocence, Valérie Wertheimer, Journe, and Bacs had lengthy brainstorming sessions. Bacs volunteers his time at four or five charity auctions a year. When companies contact him about the auctions, he always asks, “Are you sure you want to do this?” Often, he says, “I try to talk them out of it.” Some brands have pulled back from the charityauction scene in response to tougher times and disappointing hammer prices. The result is fewer, but better charity auctions. What has not slowed down is the number of watches with proceeds going to charities. There has been a surge of them up and down the price pyramid. Most of these watches, though, are not limited editions and not customized to link them to the charity. The proliferation of charity watches has led to criticism that the trend has hit saturation point. “If it is too commercial, a little too hokey, then it doesn’t really work,” says a European executive who asked not to be identiied. “There is so much of it. Nothing stands out any more.” Better, he argues, to support a charity by simply making a donation, as many watch companies do. Hublot’s Ricardo Guadalupe disagrees. “It is better if we involve our consumer in this activity by selling them a watch linked to the charity,” he says. “The concept is that the consumer knows about the donation we make and is participating in this donation. They see what Hublot is doing and they say, ‘Wow, that’s an incredible brand.’” 


Introducing neomatik from NOMOS Glashßtte: Watches with the automatic movement of the next generation. Incredibly slender, highly precise, outstandingly accurate—and now available with selected retailers. Find out more about the neomatik series and other NOMOS models at nomos-glashuette.com and nomos-store.com.


CIRCLE OF FRIENDS L’Opéra de Paris, with its ceiling by Marc Chagall. The ceiling was reproduced on a specialedition métiers d’art watch, far right, by Vacheron Constantin

The brands that occupy the upper echelons of horology are keener than ever to invest high profits in high art—from opera to ballet, painting to architecture. CAROLINE ROUX takes in the patronage scene VAN I T Y

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n the hallowed halls of Basel’s Messe every June, millions—maybe billions— of dollars’ worth of art changes hands. The occasion that ensures this heady state of transaction is Art Basel, the art fair that’s considered the best of the lot, where a $5.5million painting by the American artist Christopher Wool can be snapped up within 20 minutes of the gates flying open, and a $35million Warhol Fright Wig work will have no trouble inding a future home; where it’s no surprise to see Leonardo DiCaprio eyeing up an anime-influenced Takashi Murakami, or Princess Michael of Kent lounging on a booth run by her friends at the Galerie Gmurzynska. For the very rich— collectors such as the American money mogul Steve Cohen or Beirut’s Tony Salamé—this feels like home. The Swiss watch company Audemars Piguet its in comfortably, too. Like other longer-term but equally upmarket players—UBS, Ruinart champagne and Davidof cigars—Audemars Piguet decided, in 2013, to take a space in the inner sanctum that is the Collectors Lounge, luring the bearers of both wealth and taste with chilled drinks and tiny snacks, and an attractive arrangement

the company credibility,” says Jean-Claude Biver, the energetic 67-year-old CEO of all LVMH watch brands, including Hublot (in which he is a shareholder) and TAG Heuer, when we meet for tea at Brown’s Hotel in London to discuss Hublot’s new design prize. On his wrist is a TAG Heuer Connected. “I’m addicted to it!” he exclaims, flipping through its choice of possible faces from threehand to diving coniguration, and demonstrating its instant access to emails. “I’ve had it since November and I can’t leave it alone. It’s telling you something all the time!” (His Hublot Tourbillon, he confesses, is packed away in his bag and will be worn later.) Biver himself is a serious art collector: he owns stunning Swiss landscapes by Giacometti, and works by Matisse and Renoir. He bought his irst piece in 1967—a Boucher drawing of a peasant. “It hangs in the hall at home,” he says. “Art is eternal. Art is love!” But a design prize, irst announced in Paris in the spring of 2015 and bestowed upon the winner in Tokyo later that year, is, in his view, a better brand match. “Hublot is part of design and the disruption of design,” he declares, recalling the provocation caused by the irst Hublot when it was launched in 1980, combining gold and rubber in a market long dedicated to traditional materials. “People said it was a gimmick. But we’ve taken risks and been successful at it and now we want to give back. Sharing deines the early 21st century and I feel the prize is part of that.”

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AND I FEEL THE PRIZE IS PART OF THAT” of merchandise. After all, if you’ve just bought a large artwork, a €35,000 timepiece will hardly make you blush. The watch world has always been closely associated with sport and Hollywood, cherry-picking its ambassadors from the best of both. But more and more, it’s viewing the worlds of art and design, as well as opera and ballet, as enticing places for its patronage (mécénat, as the French call it). There are, of course, the early adopters. Montblanc has been honouring established talent since 1992: its Montblanc de la Culture Arts Patronage Award has gone to everyone from Prince Charles to Yoko Ono to Andrew Lloyd Webber. And Cartier set up its Fondation Cartier way back in 1984 as a cultural initiative to commission new works. In the early 1980s there had been talk of the socialist government in France nationalizing the country’s most prestigious watchmaker and, as an act of resistance, Cartier responded by demonstrating it was as fully committed to art as to bling. Housed in an all-glass building by Jean Nouvel since 1994, the foundation has worked with everyone from Hiroshi Sugimoto to Patti Smith, with a clear remit that the art and the product divisions will never meet. If high-end and avant-garde art confer one kind of credibility, then edgy young design delivers a diferent kind of dynamism. “It gives AUT UM N 2 016

At the 2015 Tokyo ceremony, two contenders—a trio called BigGame and a pony-tailed Norwegian, Daniel Rybakken—received the top prize of CHF100,000 (£70,000) between them. The young Icelandic designer Brynjar Sigurdarson received a “jury’s special award” of CHF10,000, and then Biver’s sharing gene took a truly spontaneous turn on the night. “He called me and Federico Santa Maria forward, though we knew we hadn’t won anything,” said Bethan Wood, a British designer who, with her incredible outits of swathed fabrics and fruit, looks like a work of art herself. “And awarded us each CHF10,000 on the spot.” Vacheron Constantin, meanwhile, has settled upon the craft world instead. “I’ve discovered there is such a thing as a glyptician,” Julien Marchenoir, the company’s director of strategy and heritage, tells me delightedly from his oice above the original Vacheron Constantin boutique in the heart of old Geneva. “They sculpt and engrave on stone; they make cameos. And I’ve met Michel Heurtault, the master of umbrella-making.” The company’s support has led, in France, Italy and Switzerland, to the establishment of the successful yearly Journées Européennes des Metiers d’Art, which showcase high-end craft, as well as London Craft Week, which rounds up the city’s practitioners www.vanityfair.com

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P I E R R E B O D O / P H OTO L U C B O E G LY ( B O R D O ) ; RO B I N M E I E R / P H OTO C O U RT E SY AU D E M A R S P I G U E T ( SY N CH R O N I C I T Y ) ; J U L I E N B O U R G E O I S / N Y T / R E D U X / E Y E V I N E ( U M B R E L L A ) ; S WATC H ( VA S C O N C E L O S ) ; TA G H E U E R ( A R N A U LT / B I V E R ) ; PAT T I S M I T H ( P O S T E R ) ; R O L E X / B E N O I T P E V E R E L L I ( K A U F M A N N ) ; “ L A VA L L E E D E J O U X ” © D A N H O L D S W O R T H , P H O T O C O U R T E S Y A U D E MPAHRO S TPOI G U E TP HASN: DX XSXCXHX E U B L E I N + B A K ( H O L D S W O R T H ) ; U N I T E D V I S U A L A R T I S T S / P H O T O L U C B O E G L Y ( G R E A T A N I M A L O R C H E S T R A ) ; H U B L O T ( W O O D / J E A N M O N O D ) RA

MECENAT ABOUT Clockwise from top left. Opposite: a view of the exhibition Beauté Congo (2015) at the Fondation Cartier, Paris, featuring Sapeur (2010) by Pierre Bodo; Robin Meier at Audemars Piguet’s Synchronicity, Art Basel 2015; Michel Heurtault making an umbrella (one of the many crafts explored by Vacheron Constantin) at traditional makers Parasolerie Heurtault, Paris; Keith Haring’s Modele Avec Personnages Swatch; Joana Vasconcelos’s Lookseasy Swatch; Vasconcelos herself; a poster for the Patti Smith Land 250 exhibition; Bernard Arnault and Jean-Claude Biver at the TAG Heuer Connected Watch event in New York, 2015. This page: German tenor and Rolex Testimonee Jonas Kaufmann; Dan Holdsworth’s photography at Audemars Piguet’s Art Basel booth, 2013; the Hublot Fusion Watch; The Great Animal Orchestra installation, now at the Fondation Cartier; 2015 Hublot Design Prize finalists Bethan Wood and Grégoire Jeanmonod

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of the craft’s more recherché end. That approach doesn’t exclude the great and the grand, however. Vacheron Constantin produced the Métiers d’Art: Chagall & l’Opéra de Paris—a watch designed and manufactured to celebrate the 30th anniversary of The Friends of the Paris Opéra and Ballet, and “support the creations and crafts of the Paris Opéra Ballet”. The timepiece boasted a reproduction in enamel of the Opéra’s remarkable ceiling, painted by Marc Chagall. It was a celebration of “the relation between our two great names of tradition—The Opéra de Paris & Vacheron Constantin”, says Marchenoir. Such spirited patronage is, of course, about creating brand awareness, and excitement and relevance, in a market that is awash with names, many of them Swiss. “We’ve had to think harder,” one CEO told me in private. “Using ambassadors—for example—is a great way to connect directly with consumers. We all like seeing faces with products. It’s about human contact and to that extent it works. But who, in all honesty, can remember which perfume is advertised by Cate Blanchett or who dropped Maria Sharapova after the doping scandal?” (It was TAG.) Rolex, one of the most far-reaching providers of patronage, whose Enterprise Awards go back to 1976 and who set up an impressive mentorship scheme in 2002 (mentors have included the British conductor Sir Colin Davis, the American ilm director Martin Scorsese and the Australian novelist Peter Carey, each of whom spent 30 days with a protégé over various cycles of the scheme), has found an answer. The Swiss foundation (by virtue of which status it doesn’t pay corporation tax) has ring-fenced a coterie of high-cultural names to represent its wares. Sure, it has the very best sports stars, from Pelé to Roger Federer, wearing its watches. But it’s the testimonials from exceptional talents from the world of music, including the opera singers Dame Kiri Te Kanawa and Jonas Kaufmann, that have brought the brand a particularly elusive blue-chip aura. It’s not an entirely cynical move, since Rolex also ofers Hublot Design Prize winner Daniel Rybakken’s Layers installation at the Institut Suédois, Paris, 2012

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signiicant support to any number of highend institutions from the Teatro alla Scala in Milan to the Metropolitan Opera in New York. In the UK, it has strong ties to the Royal Opera House. “Philanthropy and sponsorship are about one ifth of our income nowadays, which is about the same as the government’s contribution,” Alex Beard, CEO of the Royal Opera House, tells me, as we sit in his unostentatious oice, where the only decoration is a wall-mounted Rolex clock. “When I started working at the Tate in 1994, about 85 per cent of our funds came from the government and in those days, company donations to places like the ROH tended to stem from the chairman’s personal passion for something. It’s a rather more sophisticated conversation these days, and both partners have to have common values. At the ROH, we’re precise and intricate and use the latest technologies to give form to something that has very deep roots. The watch business shares that.” Rebecca Irvin is a brisk American who worked for the Red Cross before she joined Rolex 23 years ago. Now, as head of philanthropy, she’s in charge of what appears to be an ininite stream of largesse. No one knows what Rolex spends, though its mentorship scheme alone involves seven disciplines per two-year cycle, and tots up $1million in stipends (each mentor receives a $76,000 honorarium, and each protegé $25,000) even before taking into account all its elaborate administration and travel. I sit down with Irvin at the Venice Architecture Biennale in late May, where Rolex has taken on full sponsorship of an event that, caught up in Italy’s failing economy, was in dire need of funds. “We irst got involved in 2010, when Kazuyo Sejima was the director,” says Irvin, name-checking the superstar Japanese architect who co-designed the Rolex Learning Center in Lausanne that had opened earlier in 2010. “We have strong links to architecture—Kengo Kuma is currently building a stunning new tower for us in Dallas—and it’s a question of reinforcing our reputation for excellence in the most relevant areas.” At the Biennale’s opening dinner, hosted by the watchmaker in the 15th-century Ca’ Giustinian palazzo, the great and good of arts and architecture were dotted around the busy room. The outgoing director of Tate Modern, Chris Dercon, chatted to the Serpentine’s Hans-Ulrich Obrist, while Swiss architect Peter Zumthor and his British counterpart David Chipperield (the Biennale director of 2012, and Rolex architecture mentor of 2016) passed the time of day. “Architecture is interesting for Rolex because it’s a meeting of science and art, and architects contribute hugely to society,” said Irvin that night. “Visual arts may be more glamorous, but this is what we believe in.” Swatch, with its jaunty reputation and teen appeal, likes to play its awareness game against the Venetian backdrop, too. “There’s nothing more distant from Swatch, in a way,” says Carlo Giordanetti, who has been the brand’s creative director since 2012. “Venice is all about history, and we’re so new. But Swatch works with the juxtaposition of opposites.” He is looking out of the window of his oice in the Swiss Jura when we speak on a late spring day. “It’s crazy cold and pouring with rain,” he tells me.


“Biel is one of the most interesting places in the world for what happens here, but maybe not aesthetically.” In 2015, Swatch also took a big step into the heart of Venice’s Art Biennale. “We set up a temporary pavilion in the Giardini [the key exhibition area] and gave it over to the Portuguese artist Joana Vasconcelos,” he says. Inside a silver inflatable structure, Vasconcelos, who is known for working with traditional crafts such as crochet and ceramics, illed the space with a landscape of textile and ibre-optic flowers that turned slowly in the darkness. “Artists like working with us, because we bring a lot of visibility; they get good exposure,” says Giordanetti. It was also incumbent upon Vasconcelos to design a watch, but one that didn’t stray far from her art practice (here Swatch has form, working with everyone from Keith Haring to Mika,

the 1970s, the mechanical masters witnessed a downturn and two-thirds of the employees in the Swiss industry lost their jobs. “We should have died then,” says Audemars. “With the arrival of quartz, the usefulness of our product had already gone. We knew that our value was to make instruments that spoke to the heart. That was when we launched the Royal Oak.” With its stainless-steel case, sharp angles and visible screws, and coming in at the same price as a gold watch, the new design was a risk. It was also a huge success. Olivier, though, wasn’t going to launch a new model. Instead, it was decided in 2012 to launch an art initiative. Last year, the photographer Dan Holdsworth was commissioned to create a set of images around Le Brassus, the isolated spot in the Vallée de Joux where the company has been based since its birth in 1875.

L AU R E N T P H I L I P P E ( O N T H E OT H E R S I D E , CH O R E O G R A P H E D BY B E N J A M I N M I L L E P I E D A N D C O M M I S S I O N E D BY VA N C L E E F & A R P E L S )

“ARTISTS LIKE TO WE BRING A WORK WITH US. LOT OF VISIBILITY. THEY GET GOOD EXPOSURE” who chose an especially complicated colour palette and whose “He came back with images of snow and fog. We saw ourselves design was a great success). Vasconcelos crafted an exquisite through the eyes of others,” says Audemars. Next, with the curator gold iligree face to it inside the standard Swatch case, and the Marc-Olivier Wahler, a former director of the Palais de Tokyo, a 999 examples were hand-fabricated. “Joana loved that,” says Swiss artist called Robin Meier was commissioned to create a Giordanetti, “especially because however it’s made, it can never large-scale installation at the Volkshaus in Basel, to be shown at be sold for more than €200 and that means it’s accessible; it’s art the same time as the art fair. Meier recreated a jungle environment inside the building, and illed it with thousands of ireflies and you can wear in the street.” Swatch had already made a commitment to supporting artists crickets. “It was a study of how order emerges spontaneously in nature,” said the artist of the more broadly in 2011, turning the former mesmerizing scene where the ireflies’ Palace Hotel in Shanghai, which irst pulsating lights and the crickets’ opened in 1908, into the Art Peace Hotel, chirrups came to be synchronized—“the where emerging artists from across all opposite of entropy”. The next project, disciplines have stayed and showcased to be presented in December at Art new work, while workshops to feed the Basel Miami Beach, will be by the project have been run by Swatch in 18 Chinese artist Sun Xun. countries. “It was our vision to have a In fact, the more you look, the more space in a country like China where you ind. In London in late June, I artists could express themselves freely,” attended the premiere of a new ballet, Giordanetti says. Rest assured, it also On the Other Side, by choreographer provides a location for Swatch’s biggest Benjamin Millepied, danced by his Chinese retail outlet. company LA Dance Project against a Olivier Audemars, the great-grandson backdrop by the artist Mark Bradford. It of one of Audemars Piguet’s founding had been largely supported by Van Cleef fathers, is a charming 55-year-old who & Arpels, the company that originally joined the family irm in 1998 after funded the creation of Jewels, a dazzling studying engineering and running his ballet by George Balanchine for the Met own materials company. “I was rather in New York back in 1967. shocked by the way we were doing The jeweller, which also supports the things,” he says of his arrival at School of American Ballet, has a long Audemars. “Both in terms of production history with dance. “It’s all about and communication.” Ad campaigns movement and beauty,” Van Cleef’s were based on sports, and personalities CEO and creative director Nicolas Bos like Arnold Schwarzenegger. “By the BALANCE SPRING told me after the show. “If that’s not too early 2000s, it just didn’t feel right.” A dancer from LA Dance Project performs much of a irst-degree statement.” And Audemars Piguet had been left behind the ballet On the Other Side just a little bit of brand awareness, too.  before. When quartz was introduced in AUT UM N 2 016

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H A I R B Y T E R R I C A P O N AT S T E L L A C R E AT I V E A R T I S T S U S I N G L E O N O R G R E Y L . M A K E - U P : TA N I A R O D N E Y. D E N I M B Y I D A J E A N S AT D O N N A I D A . C O M . S H I R T S B Y P O L O R A L P H L A U R E N A N D R A L P H L AU R E N CO L L E C T I O N . WATCH E S , L - R : E M I LY H A M B RO : C A RT I E R S A N TO S G A L B E E S M ; TA M A R A B E CK W I T H V E RO N I : D E G R I S O G O N O N E W R E T R O W N 0 2 ; A ST R I D H A R B O R D : B U L G A R I L U C E A ; K AT E P E R C I VA L : C A R T I E R TA N K A N G L A I S E ; C H L O E D E L E V I N G N E G R A N T: C A R T I E R TA N K S O L O ; J E N N Y H A L P E R N P R I N C E : C H O PA R D I M P E R I A L E ; J O S E P H I N E D A N I E L : G R A F F B U T T E R F LY; C L A R E VA N D A M : PA N T H E R E D E C A R T I E R ( N O L O N G E R S O L D ) ; M I K A S I M M O N S : C H O PA R D H A P P Y S P O R T; B R I D G E T B A R K E R : C H O PA R D H A P P Y S P O R T


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L A DY G A R D E N E R S THE GYNAECOLOGICAL CANCER FUND The Gynaecological Cancer Fund is the 21st-century version of the ladies’ charity lunch, without the twinsets and pearls; instead, there is what founder Mika Simmons calls a “tongue-in-cheek” Lady Garden campaign, combined with social-media nous that maximizes the networks of the 10 founders. “Our goal is to make a significant difference to funding and awareness of women’s gynaecological cancers,” explains co-founder Chloe Delevingne Grant, who can rely on superstar sisters Cara and Poppy to spread the word. For many of the team, motivation came from personal loss. As Claire van Dam, wearing a “very special” Panthère de Cartier given to her by her mother, explains, “When I lost my mother I was determined to help other women suffering.” Such loss is also a bringer of perspective. “As one gets older, one realizes that time is precious and every moment should be savoured,” says Astrid Harbord, who alternates between a navy-blue Bulgari watch and a vintage Seiko that belonged to her father.–C.O. Emily Hambro, Tamara Beckwith Veroni, Astrid Harbord, Kate Percival, Chloe Delevingne Grant, Jenny Halpern Prince, Josephine Daniel, Clare van Dam, Mika Simmons and Bridget Barker, wearing Cartier, De Grisogono, Bulgari, Cartier, Cartier, Chopard, Graff, Cartier, Chopard and Chopard respectively. Photographed by Frederic Aranda at Clifton Nurseries on June 14, 2016 AU T UM N

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ST Y L I N G : G I A N L U C A L O N G O . G I L L I A N W E A R S D R E S S , BY H U G O B O S S . H A I R : P E T E R L U X AT F R A N K AG E N C Y U S I N G P H Y TO . M A K E - U P : M I CH E L L E C A M P B E L L AT F R A N K AG E N C Y U S I N G CH A N E L L E RO U G E CO L L E C I TO N N O . 1 A N D L E L I F T V- F L A S H . T H E FA L L W I L L R E T U R N T H I S AU T U M N O N B B C T WO

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TR IB A L -R IGH TS C A MPA IGNER GILLIAN ANDERSON Gillian Anderson seems at once delicate and strong—a paradox that has served her well. Not only is she a critically acclaimed Golden Globe- and Emmy-winning film, television and theatre actress, having landed roles as Agent Scully, Wallis Simpson, Miss Havisham and DSI Stella Gibson (in The Fall), but she is also an author, mother and campaigner. She has been an ambassador for Survival International, the global movement for tribal peoples’ rights, since 2011. “People in the world who live ‘uncontacted’ and in perfect harmony with nature are not part of the systematic destruction of our planet, and yet are persecuted and driven from their habitats by the very people who are responsible. This is so fundamentally wrong and heartbreaking that to help protect them and give them a face and a voice must be supported and celebrated as noble and vital work,” she says. She wears a “strong, delicate, bold, tough and feminine” Baume & Mercier Classima. How apt.–H.R. Photographed by Perry Ogden in London on July 6, 2016 wearing a Baume & Mercier rose-gold Classima 33mm VAN I T Y FA I R ON

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R EH A BILITATOR Among horolophiles, Eric Clapton enjoys—there is no other word for it—rock-star status. An informed, tasteful connoisseur, he recalls being given a Universal Tri-Compax by Brian Epstein. Its chronograph-calendar with moonphase led him to “further refinements” such as his famous platinum Patek Philippe 2499 (one of just two made in the metal). Indeed, what followed was a blizzard of horological serial numbers. But this was far preferable to the blizzard of drink and drugs that characterized his early years. “Maybe I am making amends by starting this thing in Antigua,” he says of his Crossroads treatment centre. “I tried to do a Robin Hood thing where we would keep a third of the beds for the local people.” Of course, Robin Hood never had to balance the books. To fund the centre, Clapton puts on festivals; he auctions guitars and sometimes watches, including the 2499. He misses it, but acknowledges, “All through the Caribbean there is now an awareness of recovery. They know addiction is a disease, and something you can recover from. I am very proud of that.”–N.F. Photographed by John Balsom in London on June 21, 2016 wearing a Rolex Day-Date 36mm AU T UM N 2 016

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V ISIONA RY DR DANIEL NEELY Over the years, Dr Daniel Neely’s wristwear has matured significantly. As a child he wore a Timex, which was soon replaced by a Swatch that lasted for over a decade. Today, he has transitioned to the Hour Vision Blue model of the classic Omega De Ville, designed in support of the NGO Orbis International, for whom he helps treat eye diseases in developing countries via his Flying Eye Hospital. “Daniel Craig was so impressed with my watch that he got one as well,” he says. “I wish he would stop copying me.” Jokes aside, Dr Neely takes his work very seriously. He has taken his airborne hospital to Vietnam, Cambodia, Peru, Zambia, Uganda, Mongolia and India, supporting the foundation because of its focus on education—Orbis has even developed an online consultation platform called Cybersight, which connects physicians in any corner of the world with specialists in their field. “I want to help create a system of local care that is self-sustaining and able not just to exist, but to thrive and grow—and to train others to do the same.”–I.T. Photographed by Lauren Dukoff at the Atlantic Aviation Hangar, LAX, on June 3, 2016 wearing an Omega De Ville Prestige VAN I T Y

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DEEP- SE A PIONEER L AURENT BALLESTA Legendary French diver Jacques Cousteau once remarked, “The sea, once it casts its spell, holds one in its net of wonder forever.” For marine biologist Laurent Ballesta, the “net of wonder” stretches a little further. Like Cousteau, he seeks uncharted territories— in Ballesta’s case, the unexplored Antarctic seabed. “I have always taken great pleasure in exploring seabeds,” Ballesta explains. His life’s purpose is research into, and preservation of, underwater life, and he takes spellbinding deep-sea photographs. While Cousteau relied on the groundbreaking Blancpain Fifty Fathoms to guide him on his dives, Ballesta has the use of its pimped-up big brother, the Blancpain X Fathoms. The watch, complete with mechanical depth gauge, is an essential companion, not least when he’s caught in a tricky spot: on a recent dive in Fakarava, French Polynesia, Ballestra was caught by the wrist by a grey reef shark, tearing the strap off the watch. “I have no idea what state my wrist would be in if not for the thick strap of the X Fathoms.”–C.O. Photographed by Yann Hubert in the Tetamanu Channel, French Polynesia on June 27, 2016 wearing a Blancpain X Fathoms

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HUM A NITA R I A N PETER MAURER “In the industrialized, market-driven world, time is a measure for efficiency, for value, for success,” explains Peter Maurer, president of the International Committee of the Red Cross. “In war zones, it is not really a measure of order: people count the seconds between bombs to know if the fighting is coming closer.” With the ICRC’s goals of emergency response, first aid and protecting victims of armed conflict in mind, Maurer’s choice of personal timepiece, the Mondaine Evo Big, speaks to the parallel worlds that he and his 15,000 staff inhabit. Since it’s the official Swiss Railways watch, with a design inspired by the huge clocks in Swiss train stations, “you have the feeling that you are carrying the notion of time as a service to the public with you”, says Maurer. An appropriate sentiment for someone dedicated to helping the vulnerable. “The times when one watch would accompany a person from adulthood to the grave are gone,” he remarks; but the Omega Seamaster he was given for his 16th birthday does still make an appearance “on special occasions”.–C.O. Photographed by Frederic Aranda outside the International Committee of the Red Cross, Geneva on July 5, 2016 wearing a Mondaine Evo Big AU T UM N 2 016

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MEDIC A L M A ESTRO

PHOTOGRAPHS: XXXXX

MARC KOSKA As is often the case with the most ingenious inventions, you don’t know you need something until someone else creates it. Then you can’t imagine how you lived without it. This is, quite literally, the case with Marc Koska’s invention, the K1 auto-disable syringe, which, by preventing the medical transmission of blood-borne diseases, has saved countless lives. “For long periods I was the only person carrying the flag for safe injections. I would never give up knowing that thousands of people were infected or killed every day without knowing any better.” The next challenge, once Koska had produced his invention, was to persuade people to use it. He founded his charity SafePoint to scale his device up globally. Spreading a worldwide message means he has a lot to pack into his days, but mastering time is just another challenge. His Bremont Alt1-P has a waterproof rubber strap, so he never has to take it off. “Time seems to go faster and faster,” he says simply. “I am planning bigger results in a smaller timeframe.”–I.T. Photographed by Adriaan Louw in Project Playground, Langa, Cape Town on June 10, 2016 wearing a Bremont Alt1-P Blue AU T UM N 2 016

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( SUPER ) MODEL OF A LT RUISM NATALIA VODIANOVA Supermodel, super mother, super-elegant consort of Antoine Arnault and, of course, super-generous, it is little wonder that she has earned the sobriquet Supernova. After Maxim Gorky, Natalia Vodianova is the most famous child of Nizhny Novgorod, the city on the Volga where she was born into a world very different to the one she inhabits today. Growing up in late-Soviet and early capitalist Russia in a one-parent family, with a sister, Oksana, who has cerebral palsy and autism whom she helped support, Natalia could have been forgiven for turning her back on the past and immersing herself in the world of sevenfigure modelling contracts, Vogue covers, and a scrapbook of pictures taken by Mario, Patrick, Bruce, Peter, Annie et al. Instead, the memory of that upbringing (one hesitates to call it a childhood) has guided her to a noble purpose. Aged just 22, she established the Naked Heart Foundation: building accessible children’s play parks, and providing support services for families raising children with conditions such as autism, Down’s syndrome, cerebral palsy and learning disabilities. The Foundation’s goal is to expiate what it calls the USSR’s “horrible legacy” of hiding disabled citizens “behind closed doors and high fences”. In the 12 years since its inauguration, the Foundation has built more than 160 play facilities in Russia alone, with three more parks in London, Liverpool and Glasgow open to children of all abilities and backgrounds. The charity also funds dozens of NGOs focused on children with special needs, a legacy that shows Natalia is not a woman to waste a single moment that ticks by on her Louis Vuitton Emprise watch. Vanity Fair On Time caught up with her at the Naked Heart Foundation Love Ball, the acme event of her fundraising years, at the Fondation Louis Vuitton on July 6, just 32 days after giving birth to her fifth child. We can only applaud her energy (not to mention marvel at her post-pregnancy figure).—N.F.

Photographed by Hugues Laurent at the Fondation Louis Vuitton, Paris, on July 6, 2016 wearing a Louis Vuitton Emprise in yellow gold and diamonds

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R ESCUER STRATIS VALIAMOS “I don’t think that anyone can look the other way when someone is drowning.” Stratis, a fisherman from Lesvos, is rumoured to be a Nobel Peace Prize nominee for helping refugees. “I live 20 metres away from the sea. Last year, from my window I could see 30 boats coming to Lesvos every day; that’s almost 2,000 people a day. I realized how colossal the refugee crisis was when I saw myself through the media’s eye. But actually the first time we saw refugees in Lesvos was back in 1996.” The sea plays a central role in Stratis’s life and livelihood; he also loves deep-sea diving. “It’s the only reason I wear a watch,” he says, glancing at his TAG Heuer Aquaracer. There are two words for time in Greek. Chronos refers to linear time, with a beginning and an end. Ceros is used to describe opportunity. “There is the right ceros for everyone,” Stratis continues. “The refugee who came to the island last year now has a more stable life, whereas for one who just came to Lesvos, it is just beginning.”–Nassia Matsa Photographed by Yannis Bournias in Skala Sikamineas, Lesvos, Greece, on June 15, 2016 wearing a TAG Heuer Aquaracer 300m Calibre 5 Automatic

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VOICE MIDGE URE Not content with raising £8million and scoring the Christmas number one with their Band Aid single “Do They Know It’s Christmas?”, Bob Geldof and Midge Ure decided to do more. They embarked on the global Live Aid concerts, simultaneously performed at Wembley Stadium and in Philadelphia on July 13 1985, with a global reach of 1.9 billion across 150 nations, raising around £150million. “It was a music event. It didn’t become a historical event until after the fact. We saw it in a very tunnel-vision way: we just had to get the concert to work.” Now, with hindsight, Midge has realized, “Band Aid changed a generation’s perceptions of charity because of how we did it. We used a colourless, ageless vehicle that doesn’t recognize borders: music. Young kids were all of a sudden seeing their music heroes doing something for somebody else, in an industry that is renowned for doing nothing for anybody else. We changed that.” He looks at the Cartier Tank that he wore during that era with a fond nostalgia.–H.R. Photographed by Jeremy Murch at Real World Studios, Wiltshire, on May 20, 2016 wearing a Cartier Tank Solo VAN I T Y FA I R ON

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SU RV I V OR PE TR A NEMCOVA ˇ For Czech supermodel Petra Nemcová, life is sweet. Appropriately, her first watch was made out of candy; today, though, she wears a Chopard Happy Sport, set with diamonds but durable enough to withstand any number of endorphin-inducing activities. Petra is so focused on enjoying her life because in 2004, she nearly lost it. Caught up in the Boxing Day tsunami, she survived only by clinging on to a palm tree for eight hours. Suffering a shattered pelvis, she returned to Thailand once she could walk again, and resolved to find a way to offer long-term support to families whose entire lives had been washed away by establishing the Happy Hearts Fund. Today, its mission is to rebuild schools in areas affected by natural disasters. “Our goal is to bring hope, empowerment and safety to children,” she says. She wants these children to enjoy living. “After the tsunami experience I was able to live in the present instead of the future, which has given me, personally, huge liberation from the time pressure in my life.”—I.T.

R I N G & P E N D A N T F R O M T H E C H O PA R D H A P P Y D R E A M S C O L L E C T I O N , B O T H I N W H I T E G O L D A N D D I A M O N D S ; M A K E - U P BY G R E G O R I S AT C A L L I ST E AG E N C Y; H A I R BY DAV I D D E L I CO U RT AT C A L L I ST E AG E N C Y; ST Y L E D BY J O A N N E B L ACK ; S U I T BY Z U H A I R

Photographed by Hugues Laurent on the rooftop of the Peninsula, Paris, on July 4, 2016 wearing a Chopard Happy Diamonds in 18ct white gold and diamonds

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PHILOSOPHER CR A FTSM A N BRUNELLO CUCINELLI He is a cashmere tycoon by profession, but his inclination is to philosophy: Brunello Cucinelli puts into practice the great values of mankind. Engaged in what he calls the Beauty Project, he’s currently clearing the valley below his workshop in Solomeo, Umbria, of ugly industrial sites to allow the beauty of an unmolested nature to reveal itself. He feels that all too often restoration projects focus on historic city centres; suburbs, outlying districts and those who inhabit them deserve dignity too. Cucinelli is big on the dignity of manual labour, a value crystallized in his Patek Philippe. Like the Stern family at the watchmakers, Cucinelli believes in the transmission of skills to future generations: “I have had the pleasure of taking the tour of the factory in Geneva and I met the son and the father who run the business. I could really appreciate the value of manual skills.” With this in mind, he has set up craft schools in Solomeo. His headquarters has long outgrown its hilltop home and spread to a campus at the foot of the hill that gives a taste of the Cucinelli world view: his workers wear his clothes (bought with a 75 per cent discount), and they eat his food, served in a refectory that would not be out of place in a monastery devoted to Cucinelli’s local hero, St Francis of Assisi. However, instead of the cult of poverty preached by St Francis, Cucinelli wants everyone to have the chance to enjoy the better things that life has to offer—provided we value and use them rather than merely consume them. It is, he says, about respecting nature. “Instead of having 25 peaches that don’t taste of anything, you just want one delicious peach.”—N.F. Photographed by Patricia von Ah in Solomeo, Italy on July 5, 2015 wearing a Patek Philippe Calatrava 5227J-001 in yellow gold VA NI T Y

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B . F. G . ( BIG FA ST G UA R DI A N ) YOHAN BL AKE In 2008, world champion sprinter Usain Bolt was asked if there was anyone he saw as a potential threat. “Watch out for Yohan Blake,” he warned. “He works like a beast.” The name stuck, and now The Bolt and The Beast are a formidable duo. Blake’s breakneck rise to the top was sparked by necessity. “I had a talent for running and I saw it as my way out of poverty,” he says. Now, he wants to nurture the talents of others, and has set up YB Afraid: The Yohan Blake Foundation, to support children who have been separated from their families. “These children need all the help they can get,” he says. “I want to do everything I can to help provide young people with an opportunity to fulfil their potential.” The charity has attracted a string of high-profile supporters, including watchmakers Richard Mille. During the London 2012 Olympics, Blake sported an early prototype of his eponymous Tourbillon in the black, yellow and green of the Jamaican flag (which he subsequently auctioned for the Only Watch charity, raising €350,000 for research into Duchenne muscular dystrophy). Time is at the very centre of Blake’s world—and it goes beyond world records. “The faster I can run,” he says, “the more sponsorships I can attract for the foundation.”–I.T.

Photographed by Marina Fitzgerald Selby at Mount Olivet Boys Home, Jamaica, on June 5, 2016 wearing an RM 59-01 Yohan Blake Tourbillon

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F O U N D I N G M E M B E R O F T H E Q U A L I T Y F L E U R I E R C E R T I F I CAT I O N A N D PA R T N E R O F T H E F O N DAT I O N D E L A H A U T E H O R L O G E R I E

RÉCITAL 18 SHOOTING STAR 2 TIMES PATENTED 5-DAY TOURBILLON, HEMISPHERIC UNIVERSAL WORLDWIDE TIME WITH SELECTABLE TIME ZONE AND ULTRA-COMPACT 24 CITIES INDICATOR, HEMISPHERIC PRECISION MOON PHASE, JUMPING HOURS, RETROGRADE MINUTES LIMITED EDITION


Watch Report By Nick Foulkes

P HOTO GR AP H S

BY

SAM HOFMAN •

S ET

D ES I GN

BY

CARRIE LOUISE


SURGICAL PRECISION Clockwise from far left: Double Tourbillon 30° Technique, by Greubel Forsey; El Primero Skeleton Tourbillon, by Zenith; EMC X-Ray, by Urwerk; Tonda Metrographe Abyss Blue, by Parmigiani Fleurier; Perpetual Calendar Chronograph 5270R-001, by Patek Philippe; Grand Prix de Monaco Historique, by Chopard; BR-XY Hyperstellar, by Bell & Ross; Royal Oak Double Balance Wheel Openworked, by Audemars Piguet; RM-011 All Gold, by Richard Mille; Capeland Shelby Cobra 1963, by Baume & Mercier; Formula 1 Special Edition James Hunt, by TAG Heuer VAN I T Y

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SCIENTIFIC FORMULA Clockwise from far left: Heritage 1918 41mm, by Longines; Saxonia Moon Phase in pink gold, by A Lange & Söhne; RL Automotive, by Ralph Lauren; Cape Cod TGM, by Hermès; Entheus R2 in rose gold, by Asprey; Classic Fusion Berluti King Gold, by Hublot; 1957, by Girard-Perregaux

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NEW GENERATION Clockwise from top left: Seamaster Planet Ocean 600M Co-Axial Master Chronometer, by Omega; Overseas World Time, by Vacheron Constantin; Visionnaire DTZ in white gold, by FabergĂŠ; Timezoner Chronograph, by IWC; Orbis Terrarum, by Montblanc

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ROCK STARS Clockwise from top left: Black Bay Bronze, by Tudor; New Retro W N03 in rose gold, by De Grisogono; Radiomir 1940 3 Days GMT Automatic Acciaio, by Panerai; Campaign Limited Edition Men’s Watch, by Mappin & Webb; Master Ultra Thin Perpetual, by Jaeger-LeCoultre; 19Thirty Dimier, by Bovet VAN I T Y FA I R ON

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JUNGLE FEVER Clockwise from top left: High Jewellery Secret Hour Watch with diamonds and sapphires, by Cartier; Black Tie Emperador Bracelet with diamonds, by Piaget; Lady Arpels Jour Nuit Fée with enamel, diamonds and sapphires, by Van Cleef & Arpels; Serpenti with diamonds, emeralds and malachites, by Bulgari; Soleil Watch with diamonds, by Chanel; Tambour Monogram with diamonds, by Louis Vuitton; Diamond Princess Butterfly, by Graf; Datejust Pearlmaster 39 with diamonds, by Rolex; Joséphine Rondes de Nuit with diamonds, by Chaumet; La D de Dior Précieuse with diamonds and rubies, by Dior

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Watch THIS SPACE A sophisticated manufacture has been a must for any respectable horologer for years. Now, watchmaking is at the forefront of eco-conscious architecture

A t the watchmaker Audemars Piguet, north of Geneva, Stefan Arnaud is a specialist in grandes complications. These are movements of bewildering complexity, each one using scores of tiny parts, perhaps with a tinkling chime to count the hours and minutes, a calendar that is always correct, leap years included, and the ability to record time in quarters of a second. Stefan is reassembling a watch: each one has to be made, taken apart, washed and put together again three times before it is inished. Yet on his bench is VA NI T Y

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a mushroom carved out of wood, to remind him of another passion: gathering ceps—he inds hundreds each weekend. We are in the beautiful Vallée de Joux, a place of forests, wild flowers and brown-and-white cows. It is on mountainsides like this that watchmaking—an activity for country people during the long winters—began. It is an old paradox: timepieces for busy, mostly urban lives are made in an environment that seems to have changed little over the past 100 years—which might, in fact, be called timeless. Now, some brands are expressing their innate rapport with the

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natural environment through architecture. This can be seen in a number of ultrasophisticated projects, either just built or in the oing, which celebrate the wonder both of watches and the world at large. They’re works of imagination—fantasy, even—that succeed in thrilling visitors while treading as lightly as possible on the planet. This is daring architecture—architecture that rejoices in self-imposed technical challenges, which only a spirit of adventure and much research can overcome. Just like a grande complication, in fact. These buildings are also conceived with AU T U MN 2 016

B J A R K E I N G E L S G RO U P ( L A M A I S O N D E S F O N DAT E U R S )

BY CLIVE ASLET


SWISS ROLL

the highest environmental standards in mind. Switzerland, proud of its sparkling air and Alpine purity, has been a pioneer of energy efficiency, having adopted the trademarked Minergie certification label that was developed in the 1990s. The object of the Minergie standards is to promote sealed buildings with little heat loss (important in such a mountainous country, large parts of which spend half the year under snow): air is circulated using energyefficient ventilation systems. While the national target for Minergie compliance across Switzerland is 20 per cent of all new AUT UM N 2 016

La Maison des Fondateurs museum at Audemars Piguet’s headquarters in the heart of the Vallée de Joux, Switzerland

construction and 10 per cent for refurbishment, it’s str i k i ng that watch brands —for example Chopard, Jaeger-LeCoultre, Patek Philippe and Panerai, among others—put such a high emphasis on the environment that they routinely make this grade. This owes something to their history and location: making watch movements began as a country craft—something that farmers could do when heavy winter snows stopped them from getting on to their ields. It also reflects the nature of watchmaking today, where the

atmosphere of work spaces must be tightly controlled as a defence against the great enemy of mechanical movements—dust. The high degree of concentration required of the craftsmen is made possible thanks to conditions of almost Buddhist calm. t’s to see one of these new architectural projects that I’ve come to Audemars Piguet. At AP, one of the older brands, the restoration workshop still occupies the very room where Jules Louis Audemars and

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reference, clearly, to the hairspring of a started with an international competition, watch.  (Remember that this in an area won by Bjarke Ingels of the Danish practice whose local planning regulations stipulate BIG, in 2012. “AP is one of the oldest and that all new buildings must have a traditional most traditional brands in the world, but we roof, pitched at 60 degrees, so to obtain the are independent; that means we can be necessary permits was itself no mean provocative, we can break rules. We occupy task.) Not only will it contain exhibits and the two poles; of heritage, on the one hand, explanatory displays, but set among the and extreme innovation on the other. You’ll historical watches will be workshops in feel this in the architecture of the museum.” which watchmakers go about their daily he AP project will include the work: a living demonstration of the craft. renovation of the existing Founders’ Natural light is an all-important House, which will return the wood requirement for watchmaking. In the new Maison des Fondateurs, as the museum is panelling that the rooms would have had called, this will be supplied by curving, when it was a home as well as a manufactory; uninterrupted glass walls. To achieve the and it will also improve links with the desired lightness of effect, the glass will manufactory building next door. One of the directly support the roof. This, you might new offices will be occupied by the have thought, would test the limits of the Audemars Piguet Foundation, established material wherever it were done—only, in the in 1992, the 20th anniversary of the Royal Swiss mountains, there’s an additional Oak line, whose mission is to promote factor. Although the roof itself is, naturally, environmental education among young very light, the structure requires glass that is people and the planting of trees. Although capable of bearing both that roof and a 7m not trumpeted from the rooftops, the fall of snow. Sebastian Vivas, AP’s 42-year- Foundation is, Sebastian says, at the heart of old Heritage and Museum Director, is the company. It reflects the history of the Vallée de Joux: in the excited. He has been 16 t h cent u r y, nurturing the project since it TOUCH OF GLASS glassmaking was banned Vacheron Constantin’s because the furnaces Plan-Les-Ouates HQ. consumed too much of Facing page, clockwise from top left: Rolex Learning the forest. (Small iron Center (RLC); an forges survived, though, installation at the RLC; using ore that was dug Manufacture Hublot 1 & 2; locally; the iron was inside the RLC turned into steel—and hence, in the 18th century, watchmaking could grow up.) So the Maison des Fondateurs must meet the highest environmental criteria. Building anything in the mountains has its difficulties: construction can only take place between June and October, when there is no snow on the ground—and building workers traditionally down tools for a long holiday in August (as do watchmakers, in memory of days past when it was necessary for country people to cut the hay meadows). But when you add the need, for example, to manage extreme diferences of temperature between outside and inside the building, without airconditioning (“It would be absurd to have air-con at a height of 1,000m above sea level,” insists Sebastian), the challenges dizzy the mind. Sebastian hopes for an opening date in 2018. “We’re doing all that human beings can,” he declares. “But we’re also in the hands of nature.” At Plan-les-Ouates, a light industrial park outside Geneva—Plan les Watches as it’s

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Y V E S A N D R E ( P L A N - L E S - O UAT E S )

Edward Auguste Piguet made their first watches in 1875. This reflects a commitment to its heritage at Le Brassus which is, for this family-run irm, deeply personal. “We have a family home in Le Brassus,” explains Olivier Audemars, the present family member heading the irm. “My grandfather built tree houses in two trees that were eventually blown down by high winds. I still miss those trees: I’d have liked to introduce my children to them.” One of AP’s recent environmental projects is also tree-related: a wood-burning power station, now under the control of the village, some of whose houses take electricity from it. There is also a boutique hotel: the losses that it makes are tolerated because of the contribution it makes to the community. Now the company has a new museum in the process of creation. This is not in itself astonishing: heritage is part of the mystique of many brands and, at AP, the details of every watch made are still entered by hand into the ledgers that have been kept since the very beginning. What will astound visitors is the boldness of the conception.  Set into a slope below the old Founders’ House, the museum will take the form of a spiral—a


© T H O M A S M AY E R / T H O M A S M AY E R A R C H I V E . D E ( R O L E X L E A R N I N G C E N T E R ) ; N I C K H I G H A M / A L A M Y ( M O D U L AT I O N E N T R E H A R M O N I E E T M AT H E M AT I Q U E BY RO G E R P F U N D ) ; J U L I E N L A N O O ( RO L E X L E A R N I N G C E N T E R , I N T E R I O R ) ; H U B L OT ( M A N U FAC T U R E H U B L OT 1 & 2 )

called locally —I meet Supachai Wattanakanoktham. He is the master craftsman at Vacheron Constantin responsible for the guillochage: the technique of decorating metal surfaces with patterns made from tiny incised dots, using a tool similar in appearance to a large oldfashioned sewing machine. The patterns, of swirling dragons or interlaced birds, are exquisite. Today, the machine at which Supa is working dates from the 1950s—a relative baby compared to his other pieces of kit, some of which were made in the 1880s. Vacheron Constantin is another brand to which heritage is all-important: it has the longest continuous history of any of the watchmakers, and the earliest known silver pocket watch by Jean-Marc Vacheron dates from 1755. And yet the building in

sophistication of whose movements is matched by the sumptuousness of the metiers d’art that are applied to the decoration of dials and cases. But Tschumi had also recently won the competition to build a museum for the Acropolis in Athens, which would open to acclaim. At Plan-lesOuates, he created a building of similarly impeccable finish. But the form? In a country whose default preference is for right

angles and concrete, Tschumi tormented the conventional aesthetic by providing curves. The Vacheron Constantin building flows sinuously over its seven-acre site as though it were a living creature—though one capable of lifting itself off the ground. For as a reviewer wrote when the building was opened in 2005, “The tautly crafted carapace of shiny, perforated steel seems to float.” The opulence, which, in the classic Vacheron Constantin manner, is not overstated, provides an architectural equivalent to the watches assembled and decorated inside it. Clearly the building

“WE’RE DOING ALL THAT HUMAN BEINGS CAN,

BUT WE’RE ALSO IN THE HANDS OF NATURE” which Supa works was opened a mere two years ago, having been designed by a leading member of the international avantgarde of architecture, Bernard Tschumi. Vacheron Constantin can claim to be one of the first marques to recognize the i mpor t a nc e of a rch itect u re i n communicating its values. When its owner Richemont International decided to consolidate management, marketing and production under one roof—and to locate that roof at Plan-les-Ouates—in 2001, they held an international competition. Tschumi, who won it, had claims to being a local boy, having been born down the road, at Lausanne—although he had long since based himself in Paris and New York. This deconstructivist, who made his name with the Parc de la Villette, built on the site of the old abattoirs in Paris, was not in all respects an obvious choice for a brand that is synonymous with the bespoke luxury of its watches, the immense technical AU T UM N

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hile Vacheron Constantin has added a masterpiece to the shores of Lake Léman, the Swatch Group is poised to reinvent its headquarters at Bienne, on Lake Biel, north-east of Lausanne. This showcase for brands such as Omega as well as Swatch will be doubly remarkable. Why this is so is evident from visiting the Omega Factory at Villeret, opened by Daniel Craig—a.k.a. James Bond—in 2015. Although the processes of watch assembly will never be fully automated and every stage must be regulated by the human eye, Omega has

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brought its production as far as possible into the 21st century, with a new range of computer- controlled, ultra-precise machines. This impressive investment is all the more remarkable for having been made among the forests of the Jura. Outside there are mountains, but inside, Omega’s head of production confided in me, it’s more like Nasa. The dichotomy is not as strange as it appears, however. Omega refers to Villeret as the “cradle of watchmaking”, and its passion for the environment, in its broadest sense, can be seen from the support it gives to the GoodPlanet Foundation. The Foundation was established by the French photographer Yann Arthus-Bertrand “to raise public awareness of ecology” and inspire “positive action” in 2005. Arthus-Bertrand’s film Terra, not so much a wildlife documentary

GREEN FINGERS Watchmaking has always been an eco-friendly industry; now brands such as Rolex and Chopard are turning every area of their production green, says TRACEY LLEWELLYN

echanical watches have MATERIAL DEMANDS always been among Current attitudes have forced brands to reassess the supply of resources such the “greenest” as precious metals, gemstones l u x u r y The Rolex and exotic skins for straps. products facility in Swatch Group was the irst on the planet. But now, Bienne to restrict its exotic Swiss watch brands are keen to express leathers to Alligator their green credentials mississippiensis from the in myriad ways, from USA, while also deciding small everyday to use only wood from commitments to sustainable species. All of the major luxury full-scale socialwatchmaking groups, plus many responsibility programmes. independents, including Chanel and Chopard, are members of the Responsible

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Jewellery Council (RJC), which aims to advance, promote and enforce responsible business practices in the diamond, gold and platinum supply chain. Chopard also signed a partnership agreement with the Alliance for Responsible Mining in order to support selected mining communities in Latin America and to enable them to obtain Fairmined certiication. LOCAL HEROES

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C H O PA R D ( C H O PA R D , F L E U R I E R ) ; A R T PA R T N E R - I M A G E S . C O M / A L A M Y ( S O L A R PA N E L S ) ; © C H R I S T O P H S T Ö H GRÜNIG (ROLEX, BIENNE); OLIVIER ZIEGLER © CARTIER (CARTIER); ROLEX/ROGER FREI (LIGHT WELL); C U LT U R A C R E AT I V E ( R F ) / A L A M Y ( B I K E ) ; R E G I S B I N A R D ( G I R L ) ; E R I C I S S E L É E / I STO CK ( C RO CO D I L E ) ; © J I R I

worked. By 2012, the company had outgrown its gleaming shell and returned to Tschumi for an extension. This is where the watchmakers and craftsmen such as Supachai are now based.

as “an essay… on the human species and its relationship with other living beings”, has recently been released. What relevance will this have to the yetunbuilt Swatch Group Headquarters in Bienne? One glance at Japanese architect Shigeru Ban’s design, which won the international competition in 2010, tells all: the frame will be made from the most ecological material of all, wood. Climbing through the full height of the 14-storey ediice, which houses the Swatch Group’s seven separate shops, as well as offices and an event space, are vertical gardens that allow shoppers—and browsers, since the ground floor of the building is open to the public—to enjoy the contact with nature that’s so much appreciated by the Japanese. In 2014, Mr Ban, at the relatively young age of 56, won the prestigious Pritzker Prize for a lifetime’s achievement in architecture, having impressed the judges with an oeuvre that includes a temporary cathedral made for Christchurch, New Zealand, after its earthquake. Ban has also designed earth and timber dwellings for a Sri Lankan ishing village destroyed by the tsunami of 2004. He has said that he wants “to make a balance of working for privileged people and working for the disaster. And the difference is becoming nothing for me. The only difference is whether I am paid or not, but otherwise there is none.”


LIGHT BOX

HERA/ALAMY STOCK PHOTO (PICKAXE); KICKERS/ISTOCK (NUGGETS); REGIS BINARD (BAUME AND MERCIER FRESH D R I N K I N G WAT E R P R O G R A M M E )

Cartier’s manufacture in La Chaux-de-Fonds, timber technologies—they The Swatch Group Switzerland. Facing page: have the most advanced Headquarters may be Chopard’s Minergietimber institution. Timber thought of, in these approved solar-powered is the only renewable terms, as serving the factory in Fleurier material for construction cause of privilege: a luxury timepiece that takes many hours in the world.” While the site for the Swatch Group to design and make will never be cheap. But as well as a museum and production Headquarters is being prepared, Rolex hall, the Headquarters will also create a has lent its name to another masterpiece new public space for Bienne: part by a Japanese practice: the Rolex campus, part plaza, part icon. “I wanted L ea r n i ng Center at the Ecole to design something very special and Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne particularly appropriate for this city,” (EPFL). This dazzling structure by the said Ban at the launch of the project. “I Japanese partnership SANAA resembles know that Bienne is very famous for its the Swatch Group Headquarters in that it

workshops in an old Versoix post of f ic e, Rolex’s production building in Bienne was designed with a “green roof” with tiered terraces, partially planted to ensure it blends into the surrounding countryside. Involving employees and communities in its environmental policies led Baume & Mercier to establish a “bike to work” programme, car-sharing incentives, free public transport passes and subsidized train passes, while Jaeger-LeCoultre has long had a public bus service and carsharing scheme in place. GLOBAL REACH

Working with Eco Age creative director Livia Firth, Chopard has this year created three items for the haute joaillerie Green Carpet

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Collection, which is committed to ethical sourcing and traceability of raw materials. Jaeger-LeCoultre has worked with UNESCO for the past eight years to provide financial support and raise public awareness of the 47 oceanic sites that appear on the World Heritage List. Since 2009, Baume & Mercier, in coordination w ith al l R ichemont maisons, has been CO2 neutral, last year ofsetting its emissions through a hydroplant project in Uganda, a forest conservation project in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and a wind farm project in China. Since 1992, Audemars Piguet has been committed to conserving forests around the world, IWC partners with the Charles Darwin Foundation to conserve the

eschews the straight line; the floors swell up and fall away like the contours of a landscape, covered by a great cloud of roof, supported on the thinnest (and fewest) of columns. To imagine the form of the building, think of a tablecloth that has been laid out on the ground and lifted at central points, so that the sides part company with the ground. Only there have been holes cut in the tablecloth to make it lighter—and even more diicult to build. Visitors can pass under the building and through it, and the cut-away parts form circular courtyards where people can meet, chat or study on sunny days.

delicate ecosystem of the Galapagos Islands, Omega and the GoodPlanet Foundation raise public awareness of ecology, Oris supports the Australian Marine Conservation Society and Rolex quietly assists projects that improve lives or protect the world’s natural and cultural heritage via its Awards for Enterprise. If it’s unlikely that the watch industry is “going green” for purely philanthropic reasons, there is no doubt that the brands are pioneers of environmental sustainability. Whether through corporate policy or financial commitment, the move towards deeper social responsibi l ity is happening now, and watch maisons are leading the way.

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Inside there are practically no internal divisions, just a giant, wave-like space, which includes a library, restaurant and forum (for lectures and events)—but is otherwise just that: space. Students (and the public, though it is primarily students who use it) can inhabit the building as they wish: bean bags are provided for those to whom that means sleep. “It’s a bit like a cathedral,” Cyril Veillon, a lecturer in the architecture faculty, tells me. “Not wholly practical but something to inspire.”

brand this is absolutely essential in today’s socio-political environment.” To FrançoisHenri Pinault, chairman and CEO of the Kering group, sustainability is a key concomitant of luxury. “Inherent to quality, sustainability stimulates us to create products that are more imaginative, longer lasting and more desirable,” he wrote in the company’s Panorama of 2014. “Fashion and sustainability will be one and the same.” This can be seen in the code that Kering has developed for ethical gold, used in its brands FULL TILT Girard-Perregaux and JeanRichard. Greubel Forsey’s Cartier’s dedication to manufacture, angled to around the world. In 2014, mirror the surrounding the twin goals of tradition Jura Mountains the company announced a a n d i n n ov a t i o n i s three-year sponsorship of expressed in two new the Venice Biennale, with a pavilion buildings: a converted barn that is the calm designed by Daniel Libeskind. and almost meditative home of its métiers For centuries, watchmakers assembled d’arts craftsmen, and a gleaming, their intricate mechanisms in intimate transparent and fully integrated Cartier workshops, but increasingly they are Manufacture for 1,000 people from 37 looking from the very small scale to the countries; both are in La Chaux-de-Fonds, large. The latest extension to Jaeger- in the Jura Mountains. Nearby, Greubel LeCoultre’s headquarters in the Vallée de Forsey, a relative baby among Joux is the largest that the company has watchmakers, having been founded in

THE CITY OF LAUSANNE SHOULD BE

PR AISED FOR ITS tructurally this is as daring a building as could be imagined, based around two giant arches of reinforced concrete. All the concrete, so smooth on the outside as to look polished, had to be poured at one time, which required the combined efforts of all the construction companies in the area. The undulating glass walls were similarly challenging—and expensive. Indeed, although the City of Lausanne is to be applauded for its imagination in commissioning such a remarkable building, it’s hardly a surprise that it went over budget. Indeed, it would not have been built at all if Rolex had not come to the rescue and sponsored it. Since the building has been hugely popular with the people of Lausanne, this is regarded locally as something of a marketing coup—though not a surprising one for a brand that has developed a reputation for glamorous architecture both in its Geneva home and

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undertaken to date, its environmental quality symbolized by the 10 beehives that provide visitors with JaegerLeCoultre honey. Hublot’s new unit of 8,000sqm at Nyon ofers charging points for electric scooters and cars, using electricity from solar panels. Chopard finished a five-year renovation of its building in Fleurier in 2013, who se energ y ef f ic iency demonstrates the brand’s commitment to “sustainable luxury”; electricity is again generated from solar panels. At Neuchâtel, Panerai’s new structure is not only carbon-neutral but harvests rainwater. Georges Kern, CEO of IWC, emphasizes IWC’s commitment to sustainability, “which we have been doing since before 2010”. The company’s new manufacturing at Schafhausen is “one of the most eicient industrial buildings in Switzerland. We always need to combine doing well with doing good. For a luxury

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1999, works from a building by Pierre Studer, the architect of the Piaget manufactory in Plan-les-Ouates. Next to a restored 19th-century farmhouse, it surges from the ground, at an angle to relect the fold of the Jura Mountains. Beneath a green or garden roof, a double skin allows self-cooling in summer and heat retention during winter. To lovers of watches, these buildings are all admirable developments, indicating that the long term for timepieces is positive. People who enjoy architecture, admire excellence and believe that successful companies ought to demonstrate the highest environmental standards, should also rejoice. In the modern world, space is as much of a luxury as time—and in Switzerland, they’ve joined hands.  Clive Aslet’s latest book is The Age of Empire: Britain’s Imperial Architecture from 1880-1930. His novel The Birdcage is about to be issued in paperback by Sandstone Press. AU T U MN

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PAT R I C E S C H R E Y E R ( G R E U B E L F O R S E Y )

REMARK ABLE, IMAGINATIVE COMMISSION


BR-X1 HYPERSTELLAR CHRONOGRAPH The BR-X1 HYPERSTELLAR is the perfect synthesis of Bell & Ross’s expertise in the world of aviation watches and master watchmaking: an instrument with an innovative design, conceived for an adventure in space and produced in a limited edition of only 250 pieces. Lightweight and resistant, the grade 5 titanium case of the BR-X1 is protected by a titanium and high-tech rubber “belt”, that serves as a defensive shield. Ergonomic and innovative, the push buttons allow the chronograph functions to be used easily and efficiently. Sophisticated and reliable, the skeleton chronograph movement of the BR-X1 is truly exceptional and combines haute horlogerie finishes with extreme lightness. Bell & Ross UK: +44(0) 2076 291 558 · Boutique: Units 48 - 49 Burlington Arcade - W1J 0QJ - London · e-boutique: www.bellross.com


Exploded Watch B U L GA R I

OCTO

FINISSIMO

The Octo Finissimo Minute Repeater caused a sensation at this year’s Basel fair. Building on the reputation of the recently launched Octo case as a standard bearer of size-zero watchmaking, the Octo Finissimo Minute Repeater manages to house the notoriously fiddly and demanding minute repeater movement in a case that is, staggeringly, a mere 6.85mm thick. I suppose it is just as well that you can hear the time on this watch as, when viewed from the side, it almost becomes invisible. – NICK FOULKES

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BEZEL DIAL GONGS HAMMERS CENTRIFUGE SPRING BARREL R E G U L ATO R B U T TO N CASE C RO W N C A S E B A CK

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I N S I D E S TO RY WAT E R R E S I S TA N C E : 3 B A R (3 0 M E T R E S) CASE DIMENSIONS: 40 MM

X

6.85 MM

MOVEM ENT COM PON ENTS: 362 POWER RESERVE: 42 HOURS

MOVEM ENT TH ICKN ESS: 3 . 12 M M

EDITION: 50 PIECES

NUMBER OF JEWELS: 36

F R E Q U E N C Y: 2 1 , 6 0 0 V P H

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D OUBLE BAL ANCIER Unique edition 33 Timepieces in white gold

170 New Bond Street, London W1. Tel: 0207 290 6500



Vanity Fair UK October 2016