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MENSSTYLE.COM.AU

MEN OF INFLUENCE

2016

NICO ROSBERG THE TASTES OF A CHAMPION

CHANNING TATUM HOLLYWOOD’S SURPRISING STAR

COOL COATS YOUR FULL WINTER GUIDE

BEST OF BASEL WATCHES FOR THE WISHLIST INSIDE ISIS DEFECTORS TELL ALL

WINTER 2016 Issue #68 AUST $II.95 NZ $I2.15

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CONTENTS Winter ~ issue 68

PRIORITY MALE 48 SOUL MATES

The almost accidental careers of the Bondi Hipsters 52 POP ART BENTLEY

Page 48 18 SCHMOOZING

Website launch; Outerknown; The Barber Shop; Burberry

Sir Peter Blake and Bentley combine for one colourful car 54 TRAVEL

A bourbon tour of Kentucky; Sydney’s new 5-star Primus Hotel

26 WOMEN

New Wonder Woman Gal Ga Gadot has lassoed us in 28 NICO ROSBERG

A chat about suits and watches w frontrunner with the F1 frontrun 32 STREET SEEN

Wintry chaps from Paris and Milan

68

40 OBJECT OF DESIRE

58

Superocean Heritage from Breitling’s Chronoworks ‘lab’

MOTORING

42 MUSIC & BOOKS

Garbage b never went outt

ON TREND

P g 32 Page

Jez Spinks drives the brilliant new BMW M2 Coupe and the Peugeot 308 GTi

GET THE LOOK

A/W looks from Dom Bagnato, Lacoste and Jeanswest 72 FRAGRANCES

FOOD + DRINK

Some kind of blue colours the latest batch of men’s scents

Sake opens in Flinders Lane; the rise of nebbiolo

MODERN GENT

60

64 WELLBEING

Are heart-rate monitors all A they’re ey’re cracked up to be?

74

78

BRANDS

An interview with Diesel founder Renzo Rosso 78

Key products for urban man

SWING TAGS

76

Burberry, Academy, Converse, Calibre, Marcs and more.

GROOMING

Tackling hair loss at any age

men’s style

11


CONTENTS Big Black Book from

FEATURES 98 FAME BECOMES HIM

Channing Tatum is proving he’s much more than eye candy 132 INSIDE ISIS

Stories from defectors of the world’s worst terrorist group 150 AFGHANISTAN

Mark Dapin speaks with Australian soldiers on what really happened in Afghanistan

Page 98

WATCHES 91 Our selection of the most eye-catching releases from this year’s Baselworld 2016

FASHION 120 WARM BODIES

MEN OF

INFLUENCE

12

Get your Winter coat game right with our edit

2016

PERFECT CONDITIONS

Page 107

Casual looks this season are all about polished luxury

men’s style

138

~ turn to p82


Geophysic Universal Time watch Philippe Jordan, Chief Conductor and Music Director in Paris and Vienna

Open a whole new world


E D I TO R ’ S N OT E O

our Men Of Influence is in its 9th edition this year. I have now compiled five of them and so feel qualified to say this year’s list represents our most diverse collection of influential men to date.

h coat, $880, Paul Smith shirt, $270, and pant, $340; BOSS OSS shoes, $899.

From an architect to an optometrist, property developer, climate change specialist,

chef and journalist, the range of different disciplines covered by our list is what – in our humble opinion – keeps it genuine and interesting from year to year. Like, we could probably make the list more PR-able and social media-friendly, but Men’s Style readers are of the more savvy variety and see through such cynical manipulation. As

Kestin Hare coat, $699, and jacket, $239; Nautica shirt, $99.95; Waven jeans, $149.

men’s style

one of this year’s Men, Winston McCall, says, “in a world quickly becoming about

Page 120

manufactured personas, the starting point for everything is presenting an honest and true self to the public”. Monday, May 9 - when this Winter issue goes on sale – is also the beginning of Wool Week Australia, a week of fashion, art and style which celebrates one of the world’s most

F E AT U R E

Matthew Hall speaks with two researchers who have interviewed numerous ISIS defectors and discovered what really goes on inside the world’s most infamous terrorist organization.

luxurious natural fibres and which we here in Australia just happen to produce shedloads

THEY CALLED THE KID OMAR*. He was 14 years old and had a story that no 14-year-old should ever have to tell.

of. Highlights include the Isabella Blow: A Fashionable Life exhibition at Sydney’s

“They wanted to make me a button,” he says. He was not being cute. His teachers, who he trusted, had made a compelling case for a mission no child should ever have to consider. They would give him drugs. They would tell him to drive a truck toward a building. He would follow instructions: “You push the button, you won’t feel a thing, and then you’ll be straight in paradise.” The teachers had trained Omar to be a suicide bomber. Boom. Welcome to life inside the Islamic State. Omar’s experience is one story told by a group of Syrians who last year defected from IS – the most-feared terrorist organisation in the world today. IS is a death cult that has waged a brutal war to carve out chunks of territory in Syria and Iraq, terrorized communities across the Muslim world, and made high-profile attacks on restaurants, cafes, rock concerts, workplaces, train stations, and airports in the West. The defectors who told their stories now live in Turkey and were interviewed by academics working on behalf of the Washington DC-based International Center for the Study of Violent Extremism. The research will be published as a book in mid-2016. Their experience of the defectors reveals the reality of life inside IScontrolled sections of Syria as a daily diet of violence, drugs, fear, and conflicting morals – all at odds with what they actually believed to be the true interpretation of Islam. According to the defectors, all IS fighters have volunteered for military service but for many Syrians, years of civil war has left limited civil infrastructure, a crippled economy, and the breakdown of social structure. A big chunk of the population is desperate and vulnerable to exploitation.

Powerhouse Musem and the hosting of a different Australian designer each day at Westfield Sydney’s Styling Suite on Level 6. See www.merino.com for more details. The organisation behind Wool Week, The Woolmark Company, also helped us

INSIDE ISIS

achieve our fashion story on coats beginning on page 120 – an essential pitstop in this issue if you want to stay toasty this Winter. Thanks for reading.

men’s style

133

Page 132 MICHAEL PICKERING

Editor

FEEDBACK

HAIL ALY

Mark Gillespie, is approachable

What makes Waleed Aly [Autumn,

and has a genuine love for this fine

2016] so refreshing is taking a

spirit. This podcast compliments

complex issue like I.S.I.S and

Shayne Bugden’s Scotland Distillery

making it digestible for the masses

story perfectly.

to understand in a thoughtful manner. Your article failed to address the

Show with good friend Jimmy

G.L.B.T.I community as well. (My

Kimmel, along with Crank Anchors,

He’s Generation Y’s own Obama, smart, funky and cool. I wish him continued success and a very bright future.

James Smith, Melbourne, Vic

Loveline and the voice of Death on Family Guy.

WINNER

A. Graham, Nth Rothbury, NSW

Thanks to our friends at Coach,

VIP

James Smith receives this beautiful “Manhattan” backpack

So Waleed Aly is the most import-

in smooth calf leather, valued at

ant man on TV? Maybe, maybe not.

$1,170. Coach’s range of men’s

Maybe such an idea is just stupid

accessories – bags, wallets,

A couple more podcasts to be con-

anyway. Either way, nice line – you

shoes, document holders, as

sidered for gents [Autumn 2016]

certainly got social media chitter

well as ready-to-wear, is famed

would be WhiskyCast, an informa-

chattering about his value to our

for its quality and craftsmanship.

tive and well presented podcast on

media landscape.

See more at

everything whisky. The presenter

D. Clark, Adelaide Hills, SA

coachaustralia.com

LISTEN UP

men’s style

is known as one half of The Man

popularity he has with people in the lawyer partner finds him adorable!)

14

The Adam Carolla Show is a constant on my playlist. Adam

SEND FEEDBACK TO OUR EMAIL ADDRESS: mensstyle@bauermedia.com.au Please include your contact details,including phone number and address. Letters to Feedback may be edited due to space restrictions.

131


MENSSTYLE.COM.AU

MEN OF INFLUENCE

2016

Issue 68 – Winter 2016

CHANNING TATUM

NICO ROSBERG THE TASTES OF A CHAMPION

HOLLYWOOD’S SURPRISING STAR

COOL COATS

Editor Michael Pickering mpickering@bauer-media.com.au

YOUR FULL WINTER GUIDE

BEST OF BASEL WATCHES FOR THE WISHLIST

Art Director Chris Andrew

INSIDE ISIS DEFECTORS TELL ALL

Fashion Director Kim Payne

WINTER 2016 Issue #68 AUST $II.95 NZ $I2.15

Grooming Editor Elisabeth King

Outerwear special from

CHANNING TATUM Contributing Writers Michael Adams, Mark Dapin, Matthew Hall,

PHOTOGRAPHY

Jez Spinks, john von Arnim, Rod Yates

BRIAN BOWEN SMITH/AUGUST/RAVEN & SNOW

Contributing Photographers/Illustrators Steven Chee, Lee Oliveira, Ben Simpson

Editorial co-ordinator Harry Roberts

FOLLOW US

Production Controller Giovanna Javelosa Production Manager Ian McHutchinson General Manager Prepress James Hawkes

ON THE WEB MENSST YLE.COM. AU

Director of Sales Fiorella Di Santo Head of Commercial Categories Mark Driscoll Group Commercial Category Manager Pete Harrison (02) 9288 9122 Commercial Category Manager Carolyne Gowen (02) 9282 8416

ON FACEBOOK FA C E B O O K . C O M / M E N S S T Y L E M A G

Implementation Executive Emily Whelan (02) 8268 6293 Head of Direct Sales Lisa Wells (02) 9282 8111

ON INSTAGRAM @MENSST YLEMAG

NSW Agency Sales Director Jo Clasby (02) 9282 8726 Sales director, Victoria Jacyln Clements Head of Brand Sales, Victoria Christine Lester (03) 9823 6382 South Australian Group Sales Manager Nabula El Mourid (08) 8267 5032

ON TWITTER @MENSST YLEMAG

Queensland, Head of Sales & Solutions Nikkola Hogan (07) 3000 8500 West Australian Sales Manager Vikki Stacy (08) 9207 1500 Syndication Inquiries London – John Slater (jslater@acpuk.com), (44207) 812 6527

DOWNLOAD

Sydney – Greg Allen-Waters (gallen-waters@acpmagazines.com.au), (612) 9282 8808

Audience Management Director Sarla Fernando General Manager, Marketing Natalie Bettini Marketing Manager Kimberley Omodei Research Director Justin Stone

YOUR STYLE BIBLE WITH OUR IPAD EDITION:

Business Analyst Mike Gray

For IOS users

Publisher Cornelia Schulze

Go to magshop.com.au/ipad Then go to the Appstore link on that page.

Men’s Style Australia is published by Bauer Media Pty Ltd, ABN 18 053 273 546, 54 Park Street, Sydney, NSW 2000. © 2016. All rights reserved. Phone (02) 9282 8000. Fax (02) 9263 9703. Melbourne: Level 7, 717 Bourke St, Docklands Vic 3008. Phone (03) 9823 6333. Fax (03) 9823 6300. Printed by PMP Print, 31 Heathcote Rd, Moorebank, NSW 2170. Men’s Style Australia accepts no responsibility for loss of or damage to unsolicited contributions. For subscription inquiries visit www.magshop.com.au, email magshop@magshop.com.au or telephone 136 116 between 8am and 6pm (EST) Monday to Friday. Alternatively, post requests to Magshop, GPO Box 5252, Sydney, NSW 2000.

ISSN 1449-6704

For Android Users

Got to magshop.com.au/android For Android users, Magshop is only available on the

Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1, on which it’s pre-installed.


SCHMOOZING

March 2016, Sydney

mensstyle.com.au An enthusiastic crowd of readers, clients and magazine associates turned up to help us officially launch mensstyle.com.au at This Must Be The Place in Sydney’s Darlinghurst in March. Maybe because it was a Friday night or maybe because there was plenty of product on offer from one of our online launch partners, Henkell – producers of fine sparkling wine since 1856 – or maybe both combined, everyone enjoyed the evening as they heard from Editor Michael Pickering and Henkell’s Mr Klaus Kuerten (above) on the launch of our much anticipated site. Men’s Style thanks everyone who came and congratulates Kam from MCMPR who walked away with a six-litre bottle of Henkell for listening to Klaus’ speech most closely!

18

men’s style


SCHMOOZING

Shannon Voss and Scott Tweedie.

Travis Lunardi and Simon Hancock.

April 2016, Sydney

The Barber shop Sydney guys are already familiar with The Barber Shop in York St, a winning combination of traditional (and award-winning) barber’s studio with a cocktail bar vibe. Now founder Mike Enright has opened his second location – at Sydney’s new go-to precinct, Barangaroo. The new shop was recently launched with an intimate launch event for select media and celebrities where guests were treated to bespoke grooming, curated cocktails, charcuterie and all things men’s luxury. The new location offers a tailored barber shop experience with the opportunity to enjoy a creative cocktail and browse through men’s luxury books and lifestyle products, all while basking in the vintage industrial feel of the innovative space.

Oliver Barry and Ryan Channing.

20

men’s style

The barbers.


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Kate and Barney Miller.

Ted O’Donnell and Vickie Lee.

Jodhi Mears and Nick Finn.

Nadia Fairfax and Jesinta Campbell.

April 2016, Sydney

OuterKnown

Tim Peds and Courtney Miller.

Derek Rielly and family.

22

men’s style

The desire for ‘sustainable’, ecologically conscious menswear is behind 11-times world-champion surfer Kelly Slater’s creation of the Outerknown brand. Available in Australia through David Jones, The Iconic, Incu and selected boutiques, Slater was joined in Sydney in early April by Creative Director John Moore to promote the brand’s new Spring/Summer 2016 collection, centered around wardrobe essentials for men. Outerknown was launched in the US in July 2015, blending function and style whilst establishing responsible manufacturing processes across the supply chain. “I created Outerknown to smash the formula,” says Slater. “To lift the lid on the traditional supply chain, and prove that you can actually produce great looking menswear in a sustainable way. I’m proud that we’re one of the few taking the lead.”

Torah Bright and Angus Thomson.

John Moore and Kelly Slater.

Danny Johnson, Vaughan Blakey and Doug Lees.


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SCHMOOZING

Guests in Burberry’s flagship Sydney store, 343 George St.

April 2016, Sydney

burberry

Michael Brown and Joshua Penn.

The new fragrance, Mr Burberry, was the pretext for Burberry and Men’s Style to host a private function in the brand’s beautiful George St, Sydney store during April. John Mutton, Managing Director of Burberry Australia, introduced the fragrance to guests and explained its design links to the Burberry Heritage Trench coat, as well as giving a brief history of Thomas Burberry’s most famous coat creation as well. Men’s Style editor Michael Pickering then spoke on the wider trend to personalisation and customisation in the fashion industry, a trend led by Burberry with its newly introduced monogramming service for the Heritage Trench Coat as well as engraving of initials on bottles of Mr Burberry. Monogramming has also been available on scarves available at the in-store Burberry Scarf Bar since late last year. A whiskey tasting followed, conducted by Chivas Regal brand ambassador Rachel MacDonald, rounding out a tasteful evening with a definite bespoke feel.

Marija Skara and Andreas Askero.

24

men’s style


Vanessa Fennell, Dominique Lomas and Tali Shine.

Monogrammed Burberry Heritage Trench Coat.

The new Mr Burberry fragrance.

Michael and Dunia Wirth.

Paul Cassimaty.

Boe Wren, Adam Zammit and Geoff Foster.

John Mutton and Rachel MacDonald. men’s style

25


Q&A

MUSIC

p28

p42

BOOKS

p43

TRAVEL

p54

MOTORING

FOOD + DRINK

p58

p60

PRIORITY MALE The essential companion for the modern man’s lifestyle

WOMEN

TRULY WONDERFUL AS THE NEW WONDER WOMAN, ISRAELI ACTRESS GAL GADOT MAKES US FORGET ALL ABOUT LYNDA CARTER.

W

hen it comes to Wonder Woman, we confess we’re traditionalists who still harbour not entirely clean thoughts about the original televisual WW played by Lynda Carter, with her golden lasso and her blue, star-spangled granny pants. But we’re man enough to admit that 21st Century Wonder Woman, as played by beautiful Israeli actress Gal Gadot, was about the only decent thing in the recent filmic nonsense that was Batman V Superman: Dawn Of Justice. Ms. Gadot made us sit up and take notice in a way that made us

26

men’s style

entirely forget Ms. Carter’s luscious brunette locks and long, lithe limbs, and ask the question, who is Gal Gadot? The statuesque former Miss Israel (2004) had worked as a model, not surprisingly, and also on Israeli TV until she scored a part in the US as Gisele in 2009’s Fast & Furious, a role she has reprised in the franchise’s many sequels. She also played the “exotic chick” in the moderately amusing Steve CarellTiny Fey vehicle Date Night in 2010. But obviously she impressed as Wonder Woman in the Batman v Superman flick because now she gets her own movie, Wonder

Woman, due for release next year.. and will also reprise the role in coming Justice League films. She’s Wonder Woman forever, basically, and Lynda Carter is at risk of being expunged from our memory banks forever. “I wanted to show that women are empowered and strong, and don’t have to be saved by some male hero, but they can take care of themselves using their intelligence and their power,” the married mother-of-one says of her alter-ego. You go, girl. We’ll be watching as we pack away our Lynda-asWonder Woman VHS copies in the back of the cupboard.


© STEVE SHAW/CHILLI MEDIA/HEADPRESS

Gal Gadot


PRlORlTY MALE

Q&A

FROM PRODIGY TO PRO Men’s Style JUST CAUGHT THE COAT-TAILS OF THE FLYING F1 FRONTRUNNER NICO ROSBERG DURING HIS RECENT VISIT TO MELBOURNE FOR THE AUSTRALIAN GRAND PRIX.

In the busy international Formula One

Has becoming a parent changed your yo life

annual calendar, what are your favourite

significantly?

places to visit?

It’s not so different for me. The job is the same for me and at home, I just feel more m responsibility long-term to make sure myy daughter has a wonderful life, but otherwise oth it hasn’t changed that much.

It’s the three M’s really – Melbourne Monaco and Montreal. Monaco is home, and then the best races – Melbourne is always cool and Montreal is very much like Melbourne actually – the people are enthusiastic, the city is always fun with great restaurants. It’s just a nice location.

What sort of things do you do to get ge away y from the pressure of life as a Grand Gran Prix x

There’s been some criticism of Formula

driver?

One as a sport in recent times – are you

I like cycling, sports in general, games like li backgammon… investing. Not necessarily necessar y in stocks but lots of things... as a creative pursuit. I have some savings of course, from racing, so yes, y there’s some property, shares and bonds. Everything goes Every in waves, all around the world. Property in London was great to be in four years ago but now, now not so much. It’s good to be ahead of the wave rather than on the wave and if you get that right, you’ll yo have success. I enjoy the challenge of it, to try and be ahead of everything else.

confident about its future?

I am. I really love the sport. I’m sure it’s going to be of interest to many people for many years to come. It’s one of the biggest reoccurring sporting events in the world, and a massive spectator sport. Nevertheless, there have been criticisms and we can do things better. We’re reinventing ourselves this year, with the qualifying rules and no radio communication and only three types of tyre allowed to add more variability, so the sport has been thinking about things and is going in the right direction, and I’m sure it’s going to be very exciting into the future.

How detailed is that process?

I go straight through the collection and usually I have a pretty good idea of what I like and what I’m after. I don’t go too crazy with my choices, I like to stay classic in my approach to dressing, and I’ve always been like that.

You always seem to get to some good

How do you approach shopping for clothes?

restaurants when you’re in Melbourne, yet

I don’t like shopping. That’s why I go to Hugo Boss because it’s easy! Other than that, I don’t like to go into shops. My wife, she can go to the shop for me and pick out things and they’ll be perfect, and I really rely on her for that.

all the drivers are supremely fit – how do you maintain a diet while on the road?

Yes, great! I’m on a diet while I’m faced with all these amazing restaurants. But normally, when the season finishes, that’s when I start my diet! Because during the season when I’m travelling – when I’m at home, dieting is no problem – but as soon as I get out the door and am on the road it’s just so much more difficult. There are bits and pieces on offer everywhere and it becomes challenging to maintain a strict diet. You’ve had a long association now with Hugo Boss – why does the brand work for you?

Because they do great suits and I love wearing suits and I also love tailor-made suits, so it’s a great combination. Not only that but even their normal casual looks are very much down my alley. I was just there last week choosing loads and loads of casual outfits for the year.

28

men’s style

How do you handle the pressure and an attention that comes with being at a the top of a global sport?

A lot of it is about getting used to it… because I have done this all my life. I’ve been racing r g forr 20 years. And by watching your father’s experience? expe ?

You’re also a fan of IWC Schaffhausen and we

Not really with how to manage the career ca r situation, no. It was more a matter of becomingg experienced in this life myself.

see you’re wearing one of its pilot watches –

What does life after racing look like? lik ?

do you have your eyes on any others?

Maybe some entrepreneurial stuff. I would w like to stay in racing in some capacity, but I don’t really think about it a lot for the moment. mom .

I have my eyes on – and have asked after – the Big Pilot’s Watch 55, the new version of a legendary watch. And I might have to try and get the old one, which is from the 1940s? (A long three-way discussion about the history of IWC pilot’s watches with IWC’s regional manager Christian Westermeyer ensues). Let’s see if I can get one, I’m trying. Any other weaknesses when it comes to luxury?

I like driving classic cars but I wouldn’t really call it a weakness because I enjoy it so much.

Having visited here many times now, no do you find Australians one of the more enthusiastic audiences for your sport? sp ?

They’re definitely one of the most receptive. rece And now you have an Australian hero in Daniel Ricciardo to follow within the sport and a you’re very lucky because there’s a great future futu in Formula One for him. Unfortunately he just j doesn’t have the right car at the moment but he mom will get better.


THE ROSBERG G RUNDOWN

‘ don’t ‘I d go tooo ccrazyy with m my choices, h I llike k to stayy cclassic in myy app approachh andd II’ve always l been like that.’ b t.’

A Formula One driver since he partnered with Australia’s Mark Webber at Williams in 2006 (aged just 21), Nico Rosberg is undoubtedly closing on his maiden world championship. The son of 1982 World Champion, Keke Rosberg, Nico was raised in Monaco where his Finnish father and his German mother Sina resided. While he also played competitive tennis, junior karting – like his current team-mate and greatest rival Lewis Hamilton – was where young Nico found his metier from the age of six. At age 17 he properly entered the world of single-seater car racing by winning the Formula BMW championship and after experience as a test driver, as well as Formula Three Euroseries and GP2 series, he debuted with Williams. His first podium was a third at the 2008 Australian Grand Prix. Rosberg has finished runner-up in the World Driver’s Championship the past two seasons, though won the last three races of the 2015 season and at time of print, has won the first three races of the 2016 season in Melbourne, Bahrain and Shanghai. Along with team-mate Hamilton, Rosberg’s association with Hugo Boss and also IWC watches stretches back a number of years and he has featured in campaigns for both brands. Men’s Style was proud to have co-hosted an event with Hugo Boss at the brand’s

RRosbergg in Hugo Boss and (inset, opposite) wearing his IWC..

Crown Casino store while Rosberg was in Melbourne for the Australian Grand Prix, a gallery of which can be seen at

mensstyle.com.au

men’s style

29


PRlORlTY MALE

MAN TO WATCH ‘The work I involve myself in is determined by how much it frightens me.’

JUST A COUNTRY BOY TARON EGERTON ANNOUNCED HIMSELF IN KINGSMAN: SECRET SERVICE AND NOW THE SKY’S THE LIMIT.

A

berystwyth. After seeing him as “Eggsy” in Kingsman: Secret , we could have sworn Taron Service Egerton was from East London but no, he was brought up mostly in the small and hard-to-pronounce tourist town of Aberystwyth on the west coast of Wales. Currently on our screens in Eddie The Eagle, playing a real man in hapless English ski jumper Eddie Edwards, Egerton is a long

30

men’s style

way from Aberystwyth now. In fact, in a crowded field of bright young things coming through the acting ranks to claim the unofficial title of “next great British actor”, Egerton would seem to have taken a narrow lead. “To be perfectly honest, I like pressure,” Egerton has said. “It’s something I find exciting. And I am the kind of personality that gets very bored very easily. The work I try and involve myself with

is ordinarily determined by how much it sort of frightens me.” Next up for the 25-year old is Billionaire Boys Club about rich kids in LA, the title role in Robin Hood: Origins, and the sequel to Kingsman – reprising Eggsy – opposite our Winter cover star Chaning Tatum. Some are even quietly tipping Egerton as a future James Bond. Now wouldn’t that be something for a boy from coastal Wales.


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RUG UP, EURO STYLE A BRIEF SURVEY OF HOW EURO MAN DEALT WITH THE LAST WINTER.

C

old weather is fashionably late in Australia this year but presumably we’ll at least get a month or two where we can layer up against the elements. Obviously men in Paris and Milan, where Lee Oliveira captured these images during the European Winter earlier this year, have much more opportunity to pull on the statement coat, the on point beanie and the

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handcrafted scarf for an outing in the town. A serious coat is an increasingly important weapon in a man’s fashion arsenal – see our edit of some of the best options in our main fashion shoot beginning on page 120 of this issue. No matter what else you have on, the right coat adds a degree of polish and gravitas to your look that is becoming of a modern gentleman.

Our Esquire section this issue (page 82) has an instructive piece on the various styles of men’s coats down the ages which may also help you work out which one suits you best. In our view a coat should be relatively simple – you can add interest and difference through what you wear with it, like the men of Paris and Milan.

www.leeoliveira.com


men’s style

33


PRlORlTY MALE

PROFILE

T

wenty years after he blew us away as corrupt cop Roger Rogerson in TV mini-series Blue Murder, Richard Roxburgh is still going from strength to strength with a career embracing big and small screens and stages here and abroad. When we catch up with him, he’s in Denmark, Western Australia, filming Breath, the adaptation of Tim Winton’s novel of the same name. Roxburgh already has Hacksaw Ridge, Mel Gibson’s Australian-shot WWII drama in the can, and later this year he’ll costar with Cate Blanchett in the Broadway production of Sydney Theatre Company’s 2015 play The Present. But right now audiences can enjoy him reprising his signature role as Cleaver Greene in the fourth season of ABC-TV’s comic-drama Rake. “There’s a few appealing new directions for Rake and probably the most appealing comes towards the end of the season,” he teasingly tells Men’s Style. “I can’t give too much away but there’s some good fun stuff ahead.” Season three, which screened in 2014, literally left the character up in the air as he hung upside down from the basket of a soaring balloon. “There were a lot of upset people,” Roxburgh concedes. “I understand that. There’s so much love for the show. But we were quite happy with where it ended. We had to have a really good idea if we wanted to come back.” That idea brings Cleaver back to earth in shattering fashion – and then spins him out into the countryside as a fugitive. In addition to showing the larrikin lawyer as rural refugee, the new

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men’s style

A RAKE’S PROGRESS THE BEST IS YET TO COME FROM RICHARD ROXBURGH, THE ACTOR WHO STILL CALLS AUSTRALIA HOME.

season sees Roxburgh and his cast hitting a “loosey-goosey” groove by including improvisation. “That’s lent a very special character and flavour to this season,” he enthuses. “There’s one scene – it goes for three or four minutes and there’s five or six of us in it – that might be the most enjoyable thing I’ve ever done on screen. Everybody was chucking stuff in. It was incredibly funny and fun to do.”

Rake remains close to Roxburgh’s heart, being his co-creation with long-time collaborator, writer-director Peter Duncan. Cleaver, he says, was inspired by a guy he knew back in his university days. “He was an amazing, extraordinary human being, incredibly charismatic, incredibly brilliant, but ridiculously dangerous and troubled. He was always being beaten up and he owed people money.” But does the character share more than a bit of Roxburgh’s own DNA? The actor laughs. “I guess there’s a lot of my clown in there,” he says. “Everybody’s got a clown and maybe he’s mine. I don’t live a life like that but I’ve overlapped with areas of Cleaver in my life at times for sure – it’s not based on thin air.” That said, Roxburgh’s day-to-day life does include constantly noting places, phrases and legal cases that might find their way into Rake. “I’m always texting Pete links to great legal stories,” he says. “But it’s very difficult to top what happens in real life. Clive Palmer, Jacqui Lambie and Ricky Muir – if you put characters like that in Rake you’d get people saying: ‘It’s a bit far-fetched, we bought it up until the time the guy came on in the fat suit wanting to build Titanic II!” While his Aussie career is going great guns, treading the boards with Blanchett on Broadway will undoubtedly bring renewed American attention to Roxburgh, who a decade ago did big-budget flicks such as Van Helsing and League Of Extraordinary Gentlemen. So, does he want to try Hollywood again? “If there was

‘If you put Clive Palmer, Jacqui Lambie and Ricky Muir in Rake you’d get people saying, “It’s a bit far-fetched”.’ something fantastic and it meant I didn’t have to be away for too long, then yes,” says the 54-yearold, who lives on Sydney’s northern beaches with his wife, TV foodie Silvia Colloca, and their two sons, aged nine and five. “I don’t like the idea of living in America. I’ve got kids. I’m not gonna drag ’em out of school and put ’em in school in Hollywood. I love our life here.” Being in Australia also affords Roxburgh the chance to work on projects he’s passionate about with people he trusts. Duncan, for instance, is a co-writer on Breath, which itself is but the latest of the many Tim Winton projects Roxburgh has been involved with. “I adapted That Eye The Sky to a stage production and that was my entrée into the world of Tim Winton,” he says. “As I pointed out to him, I should really be getting frequent fliers for the amount of Winton work I’ve done.” Being at home also means Roxburgh can get behind the camera again, following up his acclaimed 2007 debut Romulus, My Father, with an adaptation of Rita Kalnejais’ play Baby Teeth. As die-hard fans, we just have to know: how often is he asked about playing The Dodger? “He occasionally crops up again,” Roxburgh says with a chuckle. “I understand – people love that work. I do, too. It’s a seminal piece of Australian TV. Any youngsters who haven’t seen it should because it was the fountainhead for so many things – Underbelly and all those things. It’s such a quality work.”


PRlORlTY MALE

PROFILE Four Olympics, Jamie – you’d

Do the usual suspects shape as

have to be considered flag-

your main rivals?

bearer material, wouldn’t you?

Definitely. Germany, Holland, Belgium and Great Britain are the main threats, and then you have teams like Argentina and India who’ve improved a lot and are thereabouts.

Maybe, I’m not sure. My name popped up last Olympics so I’m guessing it may do so again this time. Maybe it will be [cyclist] Anna Meares … and I think a couple may have gone to five Olympics. If it is me, I’d be honoured and I’d love to do it but if not, that’s also OK.

How does the official uniform by Sportscraft suit you?

I really like it. I like the TOMs shoes and the Sportscraft jacket’s always special. Once you get this with the crest on it and your name inside, it’s serious. It means business…

One gold and two bronze from your previous Games – what do you remember of them?

That it’s obviously not easy to win an Olympic Gold Medal! One thing I’ve taken out of all the Games I’ve been to is how they’re all completely different. Little things happen on and off the field that change the atmosphere of the event. Athens was spread out and had a very relaxed feel and then four years later in China, I was expecting the same but it was completely different – really condensed and structured. Each Olympics has been unique and I’m expecting Rio will be as well. On the field, I’m looking forward to challenging myself and seeing how good I can be and seeing how good the team can be on the bigger stage. I’m also looking forward to being in the village, people watching, seeing famous people… it’s always a great place to be. What are you expecting once there?

The climate will be to our advantage and I think we’ll go in as the fittest team in the world. If we are, we’ll be ahead. I’ve never been to Rio so I’m a little unsure about what it will be like. My main concerns are the travel from the Village to the ground and our training facility is even further away so we’re just trying to prepare for those little things… How are you, physically speaking?

I pay a lot of attention to my body these days. I’m 37 and really

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men’s style

Are you fashion-conscious?

I am little bit… but now I’ve had three kids it’s not as easy. I try to be. Hockey remains out of the mainstream as a sport in

Q

&

A

PATRIOT GAMES RIO WILL BE THE FOURTH OLYMPICS FOR HOCKEYROOS CAPTAIN JAMIE DWYER. THE 37-YEAR-OLD CHAMP SPOKE TO Men’s Style AT THE LAUNCH OF SPORTSCRAFT’S OFFICIAL AUSTRALIAN TEAM UNIFORM. shouldn’t be running as fast as I did at 22, but I am, fortunately. I did a beep test recently and I’m as fit as I was 10 years ago. I’ve just got to make sure that I manage my body. The [coaches] have asked me to rest at times but I’ve said no, let’s go for it. Everything I eat, everything I drink, yoga, stretching, rolling... everything I do is for this Olympic Games. How does the composition of the team shape up?

We’re more on the experienced side. We’ve got some great young players coming through but whether they’ll be picked for the Olympics, I’m not too sure. We were about the oldest side two years ago at the World Cup and we did really well there. I don’t do the cause any favours.

DWYER’S DEETS

Australia – does that frustrate you at times?

It does a bit. We haven’t [as a sport] found our place yet, where we sit, our style. We’ve got a unique sport in which men and women are equally involved and we should use that to our advantage. Obviously the non-Olympic sports get hugely publicised in the media but hockey, while the numbers are still strong, I’d like to see it grow a bit more. We’ve just got to find our space in the market and create a family and fun atmosphere, which I think we could do a better job of.

Name: Jamie Dwyer

You’ve had to travel the world to

Age: 37

make a living from it – is that a

From: Queensland

double-edged sword?

Olympic Games: 2004

For sure. Then again, if I hadn’t done that I wouldn’t have met my wife and had three kids so it was a good thing for me and I made the most of my opportunities. But there’s no place like Australia and I just wish we had a better competition here which also attracted Indians and Europeans to come over here and play.

Athens, Gold Medal; 2008 Beijing, Bronze Medal; London 2012, Bronze Medal World Cup: 2002 Kuala Lumpur, Silver Medal; 2006 Monchengladb h Monchengladbach, 2 Silver Medal; 2010 New Delhi, Gold Th Medal; 2014 The M d l. Hague, Gold Medal. Achievement Most M Achievements:

Last Olympics?

Yep. This is it.

f capped player for g Australia, 326 games 2001-present.

See more images of Sportscraft’s official Olympic Australian team uniform at mensstyle.com.au


“I don’t compromise style for function with my fenix 3” -Commando Steve

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C OSS S O CROSS-SPORT : PERFORMANCE O C : DATA A


REVEL IN STYLE FOR MEN WITH REFINED TASTE, CELEBRATIONS ALWAYS CALL FOR A GL ASS OR T WO OF FINE SPARKLING WINE, HENKELL.


A HE NK E L L P R O M O T I O N

SINCE 1856, HENKELL HAS PRODUCED FINE SPARKLING WINE IN THE GERMAN ST YLE WHICH SERVES AS THE PERFECT ACCOMPANIMENT TO START THE NIGHT, MARK THE OCCASION, OR STAGE A STYLISH CELEBRATION.

F

or the stylish contemporary man, a great night out requires getting all the ingredients right – his look, his circle of friends, the venue, what they’re eating, what they’re drinking. It starts with putting on a well-fitting jacket, a collared shirt, some crisp chinos and a pair of loafers. The night begins – every social event is an occasion, in its way, to be enjoyed and celebrated. Henkell’s eminently drinkable fine sparkling wine has accompanied many such a gathering around the world for decades now. Dry and smooth but with a signature creaminess in the aftertaste, it works on all social levels, from informal

LIKE A FINE WINE, BESPOKE STYLE LASTS FOREVER

catch-up to significant milestone and one-off celebration. Henkell makes the occasion always memorable.

TASTE OF ST YLE Henkell was the perfect accompaniment when it recently partnered with Men’s Style to launch our new website mensstyle.com.au with a party held at Sydney’s This Must Be The Place. A well-dressed, goodlooking crowd of readers and industry people turned out to mark the occasion, with flutes of Henkell abundant as we toasted the site’s launch and a giant bottle of Germany’s finest sparkling wine given away to one lucky attendee.


PRlORlTY MALE

OBJECT OF DESIRE

HIGH PERFORMANCE BREITLING’S CHRONOWORKS DEPARTMENT IS A TEST BENCH FOR INNOVATION… AND THE SUPEROCEAN HERITAGE CHRONOWORKS IS ITS FIRST EXAMPLE.

A

s regular readers of Men’s Style would be aware, crossovers between race cars and timepieces are very common. And just as Formula One teams maintain specialist personnel to refine and innovate the performance of their engines, so Breitling – a brand with a reputation built on technical innovation – has created a Chronoworks department

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men’s style

to develop and test technical innovations for possible introduction to its seriesproduced lines. Result? This 100-piece limited edition version of one of Breitling’s signature models, the Superocean Heritage, has emerged from “the lab” in an all-black version with matt ceramic case, pointed hour markers (recalling the 1957 model) and woven rubber strap. A transparent caseback allows

viewing of the Chronoworks labours: a reworked Manufacture Breitling Caliber 01 movement (below) boasting five technical advancements which enhance energy efficiency and increase the piece’s power reserve from 70 to 100 hours. Chronometer-certified by the COSC, the chrono is a fine example of Breitling’s mission to create masterful technical instruments.


PRlORlTY MALE

MUSIC

Butch Vig WORKS OF ART

CAN’T STOP, WON’T STOP TWENTY THREE YEARS INTO THEIR CAREER, GARBAGE SHOW NO SIGNS OF SLOWING DOWN, WRITES Rod Yates.

W

hat to give the man who has everything? Such was the dilemma facing Butch Vig’s band mates in Garbage last August when searching for a present for the drummer/producer’s 60th birthday. In the end they decided on the deluxe Roxy Music box set, an object of some value for Vig given that he was president of the Roxy Music fan club in his college days. That Vig received his gift smack bang in the middle of writing and recording Garbage’s sixth album, Strange Little Birds (out June 10), may have something to do with the fact the album bears some classic Roxy Music trademarks. “I hear a little bit of that bittersweet romanticism [in the record],” he offers from his home studio in Los Angeles. “There are also some songs where we have these crazy, free form, wild synth parts, and that’s a little bit of a nod towards Brian Eno’s keyboard playing on the first two Roxy Music albums. I hear those Roxy influences on the record,

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and that’s okay with me.” Clearly Strange Little Birds is seeking to do more than just recapture the glory days of the band’s acclaimed 1995 debut self-titled album and its perky hit singles “Queer” and “Only Happy When It Rains”, unleashed at a time when the only thing anyone knew about the ScottishAmerican quartet was that their drummer had produced seminal grunge albums such as Nevermind by Nirvana and the Smashing Pumpkins’ Siamese Dream. Vig does, however, see some resemblances to that debut in the new record. “Shirley [Manson, vocals] has drawn an analogy between Strange Little Birds and our debut album because of this sort of playfulness in experimenting,” says Vig. “When we made the first record there was no pressure on us, we didn’t know what we were doing and we made, at the time, an album that was quite left field. It didn’t really sound like

Butch Vig has produced a number of seminal albums. Here are four he’s proudest of . . .

1

FOO FIGHTERS Wasting Light (2011)

“I think it’s the most representative of how they sound as a band, and I think I was really able to capture the vibe of what they sound like.”

2

KILLDOZER Twelve Point Buck (1989)

“They were the reason Nirvana called, the reason Smashing Pumpkins called, and I think that record still sounds pretty cool and badass.”

3

FREEDY JOHNSON This Perfect World (1994)

“In the height of these alternative rock bands I was doing, I made a record with Freedy, who’s a singer-songwriter. It’s a brilliant record and he’s a total star as a songwriter; he’s incredible.”

4

AGAINST ME New Wave (2006) White Crosses (2010)

“I love these two records. I’m very close with [ frontwoman] Laura Jane Grace and I think these records sound incredibly powerful.”

anything else on alternative rock radio at the time, and this record, we sort of took an approach that we wanted to capture some of that free experimenting, bringing in a bit of our lab-rat tendencies and just trying crazy things.” Perhaps not coincidentally, towards the end of 2015 the quartet took a break from recording to hit the road for a nine-week tour in support of the 20th anniversary of their debut. On the upside, playing that album and its B-sides night after night served as a reminder of what made that record so special; conversely, it also highlighted the passing of time, something Vig has had to deal with a lot of late in the wake of landmark anniversaries for some of the albums he’s produced. Not that it seems to bother him. “When Nevermind had its 20th anniversary, [Nirvana drummer] Dave Grohl and [bassist] Krist Novoselic and me got together and we did a bunch of press for it, and it was really the first time I got to spend a lot of time with those guys, talking about the experience of making that record and it was great. Nevermind changed my life, it changed their life, and we were really lucky to be part of it.” Vig may have turned 60 last year, but he’s not slowing down. He’s about to embark on a promotional tour for the documentary The Smart Studios Story, which focuses on the studio Vig owned and operated in Wisconsin between 1983 and 2010, and in which bands such as the Smashing Pumpkins and L7 recorded, and then he’ll be hitting the road with Garbage. How does he handle the rigours of the road when others his age are getting their pensioner card. “I love playing shows, but the travelling sucks,” he offers. “Planes, trains and automobiles, they wear you down. But it’s a great privilege to be in a band. To walk onstage in front of people and play your music, we don’t take that for granted.”


BOOKS

REVIEWS with

ROD YATES

Bill Shorten

OLYMPIA Self Talk (EMI) Melbourne based singer Olivia Bartley may have started her career as a folk singer, but she’s blossomed into something far more dynamic. On her debut album under the moniker Olympia, the multi-instrumentalist ostensibly operates in the guitar pop sphere, but with the kind of neck twisting songwriting and production tics that both catch you off guard and, on the likes of “Fishing Knots/Blood Vesssels”, reel you in based on supreme command of melody. An assured and fully realised debut.

MODERN BASEBALL Holy Ghost (Cooking Vinyl) If the advance word is to be believed, Modern Baseball’s third album might be the one to push the Philadelphia based indie rockers over the top. Hugely emotional – it deals largely with the death of co-frontman Jacob Ewald’s grandfather and the bipolar diagnosis and near suicide of fellow guitarist/vocalist Brendan Lukens – the band’s Weakerthans-meetsPromise Ring style of rock rushes by in a blur of often sub-two minute songs that never come close to outstaying their welcome.

GARBAGE Strange Little Birds (Mushroom) You have to hand it to Garbage – while many acts who’ve been around more than two decades have joined the nostalgia circuit, they continue to push themselves sonically and creatively. The results on their sixth album will not please everyone – it’s easily their most cinematic record to date, and immediate hooks are light on the ground, with Shirley Manson’s vocals pushed to the fore over the band’s moodiest accompaniment to date. Perseverance will, however, be rewarded.

MAN IN WAITING BILL SHORTEN’S FIRST BOOK IS TIMELY AS AUSTRALIANS CONSIDER WHETHER HE IS THE ALTERNATIVE PM.

I

n May Melbourne University Press release the first book by Federal Opposition Leader Bill Shorten, For The Common Good. Is Shorten our next Prime Minister? Certainly his odds have “shortened” in recent times as a public perception has gradually formed that Malcolm Turnbull’s government may have lost the road map on the way to future economic growth and prosperity. In that context, a book devoted to Shorten’s formative beliefs and values is timely, for those who like to know such things about their potential national leader. In For The Common Good, Shorten “reflects on the values and beliefs that led him to devote himself to the labour movement and stand for the nation’s highest office”. He recounts his childhood in suburban Melbourne as a way of discussing issues such as education and social justice, as well as his years in the union movement where he first came to national prominence as the face of the Beaconsfield mine disaster in 2006. Shorten’s central thesis is that national progress and future prosperity can only be achieved in Australia by building a renewed common good between workers, businesses, governments and the community, from our cities to the regions. And while that’s certainly an admirable and lofty aim for a national leader, suitable for a book setting out the man’s essential values and his vision, it’s questionable whether it is any more than

that in a national political setting which seems more and more to resemble oldfashion class warfare. First Shorten was called before the Royal Commision examining union corruption, and now he is avidly supporting calls for a Royal Commision into the banking industry. One wonders whether the nation’s bankers will be later predisposed to joining him in establishing a new “common good” When this year’s national election does roll around, Shorten will inevitably also face the ghosts of leadership battles past – his role in the downfalls of both Kevin Rudd and then Julia Gillard, and the resulting perception that at heart, he is a machine politician with only a tenuous grip on the concept of loyalty. One thing Shorten has begun to achieve traction on in the political debate is, of course, the thing the populace should really be focused on – public policy, now and into the future. On that score, For The Common Good further expands on some of the key themes Shorten has adumbrated in his public speeches.

FOR THE COMMON GOOD, BILL SHORTEN MUP, $27.99.

men’s style

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PRlORlTY MALE

ICONS OF STYLE His tall, slender frame helps, assisting him to achieve the illusion that he was seemingly born in a suit.

EVER DAPPER ACTOR COLIN FIRTH SHOULD BE A SARTORIAL ROLE MODEL FOR ANY MAN OVER 45.

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hen we grow up, we want to dress like Colin Firth. The British actor with the plummy voice and the hugely impressive back catalogue playing stoic if frustrated Englishmen on screen is never less than immaculately presented when he has to spruik a film or some other project. And it’s not that he does anything particularly radical or “out there” when it comes to his look. On the contrary, he’s proper conservative, favouring dark navy suits over white shirts with highly polished black Oxfords. But maaaan, does he know how to put it together. Everything he wears is cut just right, sits just right, and looks just right. His tall, slender frame helps, of course, assisting him to achieve the illusion that he was seemingly born in a suit. Add classic, thick-framed eyewear and you have the updated English gentleman par excellence. Cast back to his

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memorable turn as Harry H Hart – private spy masquerading as Savile Row tailorr a Kingsman: Secret Service e . Every look… in just perfect. “I don’t think its eever been somethingg I’m particularly goo good at,” a self-deprecating p AskMen d during pre-publicity bl y Firth told k d about b h his sense for Kingsman, when asked of style. “I suppose w when I was youngerr I hid behind the affeectation that I didn’t care. [But] once yo you gget it right, g there’s no getting away from it beingg a ggood feeling. g You either stumble o on that or someone helps you with it. “But having some someone help p yyou out with the right suit, and th then lookingg ggood in it, is an absolutely won wonderful feeling.” g” Firth confessed h he wass measured su d “to o within an inch of my life” byy a tailor for his Kingsman role, but he kept up the standard as everything he wea wears off set in the p public eye makes us green w with envy. y


ONLY THE BRAVE THE ORIGINAL FRAGRANCE

AVAILABLE AT

*


PRlORlTY MALE

PROFILE

THE SON ALSO RISES Jez Spinks MEETS ONE OF THE NEW BREED OF FORMULA ONE DRIVERS, RENAULT SPORT’S JOLYON PALMER.

M

ore than a dozen sons have followed in the slipstream of their Formula One-racing fathers. And after the likes of the Hills, Villeneuves, Rosbergs and Brabhams, Palmer is the latest surname to return to the grid. Jolyon Palmer is the fastpedalling offspring of British racercum-motorsport-entrepreneur Jonathan, who is arguably better remembered by millions as Murray Walker’s BBC co-commentator in the ’90s rather than the driver who raced for teams such as Williams and Tyrell in the ’80s. The 25-year-old has been promoted from reserve to race driver with the Lotus team that has morphed into the Renault F1 outfit for the 2016 season. Speaking to Men’s Style at the season-opening grand prix in Australia, Palmer said his father actually spent more time teaching him about the crucial machinations of motorsport politics rather than how to drive four-wheeled machinery at high speed.

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men’s style

Palmer on track (above) and his timepiece choice, the Bell & Ross Carbon Forge (top).

“He was helping me as a driver when I was young, though not really the driving but more in detail about what I need to do in terms of working with a team,” says Jolyon. “From the driving side, I’ve obviously got some natural talent I’m sure, but you’re also improving and nurturing yourself.” There’s certainly a racey résumé that points to some talent, with Jolyon recording an early-career high with victory in the 2014 GP2 championship – traditionally a feeder series for F1 whose past winners include fellow Brit and current F1 champion Lewis Hamilton (2006). There are, however, also plenty of drivers with GP2 titles who

either haven’t made it into the motorsport’s most prestigious championship, or have failed to progress once there. Even points might be hard to come by in 2016. Renault only confirmed its takeover of Lotus – which was using its engines – at the very end of 2015, and the team has much catch-up work ahead of it. Jolyon, though, says there are already plenty of positives with both this year’s car and engine. “It’s going to be a tough start to the season but the car feels like a solid baseline,” he says. “It’s not super-quick but it’s consistent... “I know we’ve got some good things in the pipeline, so by mid-season the gap [to the frontrunning teams] should be less.” When a team isn’t quick enough to put a driver into title contention, there’s even more emphasis on comparing favourably with the only other racer who’s in identical machinery – your team-mate. For Jolyon, that’s Kevin Magnussen, whose father Jan also raced in F1.

“I know I’ve got a good teammate beside me, which is good as I think we work well together. [Kevin] is a good reference point; I need to prove myself against someone who’s rated.” Palmer says he’s done everything he possibly can to be prepared for the mental and physical challenge of Formula One, with an intense winter of advance simulator driving (which compensates for restrictions on testing) and fitness training. “I’m fitter, stronger and lighter than I’ve ever been. I’ve had to trim a few kilos, though, as I’m quite a tall driver at just over six foot, and trying to gain strength and lose weight is not particularly easy.” And with a glance of his BR-X1 Carbon Forge watch from new Renault F1 sponsor Bell & Ross, Jolyon realises he’s needed. As he treks across the paddock from the French team’s motor home to the garage, it’s father Jonathan who’s following in his son’s footsteps – in Melbourne to add his paternal presence, and eager to watch the action on the team’s monitors He knew the eldest of his sons had potential when in only his second race in a single-seater he had two wheels on the grass at 260km/h, trying to take the lead. And in his first ever Formula One qualifying session, Jolyon puts in a great lap under pressure to get the

‘I’ve obviously got some natural talent… but you’re also improving and nurturing yourself.’ underdog Renault into the top 15 – notably out-pacing his team-mate. With a broad smile captured on the TV cameras, a dad’s immense pride is beamed globally. It’s only a start, though Palmer senior may be thinking it won’t be long before his boy overtakes the 14 points he accrued in his own, relatively short F1 career.


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PRlORlTY MALE

COMEDY

SOUL MATES CHRISTIAAN VAN VUUREN AND NICK BOSHIER – AKA BONDI HIPSTERS – HAVE MADE LATE, ALTERNATE CAREERS OUT OF TAKING THE PISS, WRITES Michael Adams.

‘In real life I have no facial hair and my hair’s falling out and h like l k that, h I don’t talk anything I just so k a bbogan…’’ soundd llike

‘Back then it was a fantasy to ever pursue a [creative] life, gro ing wings ings or something.’ like growing

– Nick B Boshier hier

– Christiaan Chris Van V Vuuren V n

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hristiaan Van Vuuren and Nick Boshier are amped. Not only is their show Soul Mates set to return to ABC-TV for its second season, but a co-production deal with new US comedy channel SeeSo means their comic alter egos will soon be seen on American screens. “I’m not going to count any chickens yet,” laughs Van Vuuren, aka hipster Dom, when Men’s Style asks if world domination is imminent. “But it’s super exciting to have this opportunity, to be

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shown on a channel where we’re just surrounded by the best comedy from all around the world.” Boshier is a little closer to alter-ego hipster Adrian when he describes the effect the news is having on him: “In its simplest form, it gives me a really aggressive stiffy. One of those angry ones that you could just never sleep on.” You can’t blame them for any tumescence. In a few short years, they’ve taken DIY paths to stardom, first as individuals and then as a

seemingly unstoppable team. But the route to finding their groove was anything but straightforward. “I gave up on it all even though it was a thing I really loved,” says Van Vuuren, now 33, of relinquishing his childhood dreams of acting and singing post-school. “I just focused on having a job and didn’t think a career in any sort of performing art would be a reality. It always bummed me out that had happened.”


That was until fate intervened in late 2009 in the form of a tuberculosis diagnosis that saw him forced to live in quarantine for six months. It was in his hospital room that Van Vuuren started making YouTube videos as The Fully Sick Rapper, helped by his brother Connor. The videos went viral, clocking up millions of views and made him a cult star in a hospital gown. When he was finally released from hospital, Van Vuuren’s outlook had changed. “My life got reset. I’d lost my apartment, my car and all those things. I moved back home with my parents and got the opportunity to start again. I had this feeling life could end at any moment. So I just wanted to focus all my time on something I love doing and this is that thing I love doing.” Like Van Vuuren, Sydneysider Nick Boshier, now 34, came late to performing, having spent his twenties as a music manager. “Ever since I was a kid I’d never stopped thinking about creating stuff and acting,” he says. “But back then it was fantasy to ever pursue it as a life, like growing wings or something.” That changed during soul-searching in his late twenties. “That’s when you really start to analyse your life, like, ‘What am I doing?’” Instead of a yoga retreat, Boshier starred as bogan boofhead Trent From Punchy in a series of videos that soon amassed a huge following on YouTube. He then followed up with Beached Az, in which he voiced a stranded Kiwi whale. “Those were the first things I’d done creatively and they validated that decision to pursue a creative life.” The Van Vuuren brothers met Boshier at a YouTube conference, cast him in a TV pilot they were making, had a lot of fun and decided they all needed to work together again. Christiaan remembers: “I said, ‘I’ve got this idea about two lazy Bondi ex-private school dickheads who start their own fashion label’. Nick was like, ‘I’m in’.” The result was Bondi Hipsters, revolving around Dom and Adrian’s quest, as Van Vuuren puts it, to be “world famous for being underground”. The videos were wildly popular on YouTube, leading to ABC-TV giving Soul Mates a green light. The show, which aired in 2014, expanded on the Hipsters premise, allowing Christiaan and Nick to play Dom and Adrian and their incarnations through time: prehistoric cavemen Rocky and Sticks; 1980s Kiwi assassins Roger and Thinge; and 2093 time travel agents Dave and Rob. It was very ambitious and very, very funny. Season two sees Soul Mates kick it up further. “We can reinvent it from season to season,” says Van Vuuren. “The Ticky Time Tour story resolved itself in season one so this time we’re introducing a new story set in Ancient Egypt…” Bubbling over

The Hipsters in their Soul Mates guises as the Egyptians (top) and the Kiwi assassins Roger and Thinge.

with enthusiasm, he explains a plotline involving the bastard son of a pharaoh who’s teamed with his favourite slave-tradie to build a trap-filled tomb for his demigod brother. “It becomes this workplace comedy about the general OHS type issues that they have to deal with making water traps, secret tiles firing poison arrows, skeletons dropping from the roof. Like, when you test out a boulder trap and it goes smashing through a wall, how do you get it back up the ramp?” But that’s only half of it, with the other half playing out as a parody of Game Of Thrones-style royal family dysfunction. Boshier chimes in: “The new character’s a fuckin weirdo,” he laughs of his eunuch role. “He just straight up has no dick. It’s this family drama of demigods, domesticity and incest.” Laughing, Van Vuuren adds: “The bastard prince has an uncy-dad-pa because his dad is both his uncle, granddad and his dad.” Boshier chuckles: “Bestiality, too, we cover that.” Meanwhile, the existing Soul Mates kick things up to new levels. Dom and Adrian take coffee-wankerism to new heights by opening the Closed Café, the Kiwi assassins Roger and Thinge have to work as father and stepson to stop evil Aussies smuggling child rugby players out of New Zealand, and Sticks and Rocky find themselves grappling with tribe dynamics at the dawn of human civilisation. Their success, they say, is shared with Connor, who co-writes and directs and who insists on finding the humanity beneath the bizarre exteriors of the comic characters. “He’s always urging us to find the heart of comedic scenes and because of that they seem to get funnier,” says Van Vuuren. “We play around with masculine relationships and the way your best friends can be good and bad for you.” With season two set to increase their profiles here and introduce them to the US market, is their privacy becoming a thing of the past? Not so, says Van Vuuren, whose Dom is never seen without a beanie, long tresses and Ned Kelly beard as he pontificates pretentiously in “totes, bro” tones. “In real life I have no facial hair and my hair’s falling out and I don’t talk anything like that, I just sound like a bogan,” he says. “I can so easily spy from within a Bondi café.” Boshier’s more recognisable, not that he minds. “People come up and say they love Hipsters or Soul Mates and that gives me the jollies,” he says cheerfully. “If it wasn’t for them liking what we do, I’d be giving hand jobs for loose change.” Christiaan and Nick have been named in our 9th annual Men Of Influence list – see page 107.

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Fast even room heating in winter. Monitors and maintains target temperature using its intelligent thermostat.

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Powerful cooling in summer. Jet Focus technology can be used for personal cooling, or for the whole room.

The Dyson Hot+Cool™ fan heater projects powerful airflow using Air Multiplier™ technology. It smoothly tilts from its base and oscillates so you can easily direct its airflow. Its acoustic engineering minimises noise, for night time use. And its remote control lets you choose the most comfortable setting, whatever the weather, all year round.


PRlORlTY MALE

ART

Peter Blake

POP ART BENTLEY LEGENDARY BRITISH ARTIST SIR PETER BLAKE TEAMS WITH THE FAMOUS BENTLEY BRAND FOR A VERY WORTHY CAUSE…

B

entley has teamed up with British pop art legend Sir Peter Blake to create a unique, multi-coloured Continental convertible. The myriad bright colours hark back to Blake’s most famous artwork – the iconic album cover design for The Beatles’ Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Band. Here, the St James Red heart hand-painted onto the Continental Yellow bonnet is a nod to the compassionate work of hospices around the world. The Continental GT V8 S convertible’s main body colour, sitting atop a classic British racing green lower body, is dubbed St Luke’s Blue in recognition of Bentley’s local hospice. A Fuchsia pink also brightens the grille surround. Inside, the multi-colour theme continues with each of the Bentley’s four seats trimmed in different hues: Cumbrian Green, Imperial Blue,

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Newmarket Tan, and Hotspur. Those colours are mirrored in the steering wheel, and the gear lever is wrapped in pink leather. A Peter Blake signature is embroidered onto the four seat headrests, as well as the fascia panel. “I am proud to have been involved with transforming this beautiful car, and have enormous admiration for the people at Bentley who brought my design into being, to produce this one-off lovely car,” said Blake. Blake’s one-off Bentley design was created by Bentley’s Mulliner bespoke division. The one-off Bentley will be auctioned by Bonhams at the famous Goodwood Festival of Speed held in England on June 24 this year, with the funds raised from the sale to be donated to the Care2Save Charitable Trust that specialises in palliative and hospice care around the world. www.bentleymotors.com


The bonnet’s red heart is a nod to the compassionate work of hospices around the world.

men’s style

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PRlORlTY MALE

TRAVEL HOW TO BE BOURBON To be considered authentic bourbon, US law states that the spirit must be produced in the United States; be made from grain at least 51 per cent corn; be aged in new, charred, oak barrels; be distilled to no more than 160 proof (80 per cent alcohol by volume); has to enter the barrel for aging at no more than 125 proof; and be bottled at 80 proof or more.

WHY BOURBON?

THE BOURBON TRAIL Matthew Hall VISITS KENTUCKY, THE US STATE THAT APPEARS TO LITERALLY RUN ON BOURBON PRODUCTION.

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et’s begin this journey with news there are apparently more bourbon barrels in the state of Kentucky than people. Kentucky’s population is around 4.5 million people, so that’s a lot of bourbon barrels. Then let’s learn that 95 per cent of bourbon in the world comes from within 75 miles of Louisville, Kentucky’s biggest city. It’s reasonable, then, to assume bourbon plays a big role in the state’s history and culture. After five days on Kentucky’s so-called “Bourbon Trail”, drinking whiskey straight, drinking whiskey cocktails, eating whiskey-infused food, watching whiskey get made and looking into tanks of whiskey so deep you could drown and nobody would find your corpse for weeks, we declare with authority that assumption is 100 per cent correct. Kentucky and whiskey go

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KENTUCKY - USA

together even better than Kentucky and chickens. Even fried ones. Louisville was named for a king of France but don’t let that put you off. Locals pronounce the city’s name something like “Lore-ville”. It’s famous for a baseball bat (the “Louisville Slugger” has its own museum), for being the hometown of Cassius Clay (i.e. Muhammad Ali), for the Kentucky Derby horse race, and for being the hometown of Colonel Sanders. Louisville can also be a base for Kentucky’s Bourbon Trail that, for the hardcore among us, leads you to nine major distilleries all within driving distance (disclaimer: this is America and you will be driving). There’s also small batch craft distillers in the area that open doors to visitors. Give yourself three days. It’s an American road less travelled.

Kentucky met bourbon part by accident and part design. In the 1700s, European settlers were offered cheap land if they grew corn. Most had Irish, Scottish, and English roots. What to do with all that corn? Distill it, of course. Back then, people drank clear and unaged whiskey – that’s how it was drunk in Scotland at the time. When the Kentucky product, stored for several years in charred oak barrels, came out dark and flavoured, bourbon was born. That’s about as much agreement you will get on the history of bourbon. Every distiller has their own version they like to tell. This usually includes their own family as central figures in the spirit’s evolution. At Maker’s Mark in the tiny town of Loretto (population: 623), company President Bill Samuels Jr was a rocket scientist (he worked on the Polaris missile) before he took over the family business. He likes to talk with visitors. “The word is that concept of whiskey being an acquired taste was invented by Kentucky bourbon makers because it takes like shit,” he says. “But drink it enough and you will start to like it.”


Samuels talks like this as we sip his delicious bourbon, rattling from one story to another. He fires up about the way whiskey was portrayed in cowboy movies. “The cowboys would walk into a saloon, knock down a shot of redeye that would in turn knock them down,” he says. “That’s pretty much true but that is also the reason my dad got into this. It started as his hobby because the banks wouldn’t give him any money and my mom wanted him out of the house.” In 1932, Franklin D. Roosevelt ran for President pledging to repeal prohibition. The distilleries were going to fire up again. Samuel’s grandfather went to find investment money while his dad, Bill Samuels Sr, was told to rebuild the family distillery. The taste thing bugged Bill’s dad. “My father wanted to improve the whiskey but my grandfather said, ‘No, the people of Kentucky are thirsty, they will drink anything.’” Times changed and Maker’s Mark, still a family business, is now one of the world’s premium bourbon brands. The number one selling bourbon in the world is Jim Beam, which accounts for 50 per cent of Kentucky’s total bourbon output. The Jim Beam distillery in Clermont is the Disneyland of whiskey distilleries. As well as holding about 1.8 million barrels in storage across 27 warehouses on its sites, the distillery has a restaurant and a gift shop over two floors selling around 500 different types of souvenirs. You, too, can buy an $800 table made from reclaimed Jim Beam barrel wood. Bourbon is big business. “After eight years and a lot of my dad’s money, I finally got out of college,” explains Fred Noe – a grandson of the original Jim Beam – over dinner. It’s a family tie that

Bill Samuels Jr MAKER’S MARK

‘My father wanted to improve the whiskey but my grandfather said, “No, the people of Kentucky are thirsty, they will drink anything”.’

Fred Noe JIM BEAM

‘Dad said, “I am going to teach you how to drink bourbon.”’ recalls Noe. ‘I said, “damn, I thought I had got that down”.’

comes with benefits. “The thing was that when people found out I was Jim Beam’s grandson, I got invited to a lot of parties. I think I went to every single damn one I was invited to.” At college, Noe thought he was a champion bourbon drinker but it wasn’t until he graduated that his father sat him down for what he recalls as The Talk. “Dad said, ‘I am going to teach you how to drink bourbon’,” recalls Noe. “I said, ‘damn, I thought I had got that down’.” “Look at the colour,” Noe explains. “The lighter the colour, the more complex these bourbons are in flavour. “Then, when you stick your nose into the glass, when you smell it, open your mouth. If you keep your nose tightly closed you will pull so much alcohol you won’t get a good smell. Smell with your mouth closed and open and you will see that I am not totally full of shit. It really does make a difference. “Third step is the Kentucky Chew. Dad would put the bourbon in his mouth and physically chew it. He worked it all around his mouth. Different parts of your mouth pick up different flavours. “The fourth step is the finish,” Noe adds. “That’s the flavour it leaves behind when you taste it. If you taste the bourbon and make a face, then it’s too strong. If it is strong for you, add a little water.” THE AUSTRALIAN WAY

Eddie & Jimmy Russell WILD TURKEY

‘We realised everybody was drinking RTDs. It’s unique to Australia. We tried it in the States and we couldn’t sell them.’

If bourbon is treated like wine in Kentucky, its reputation is sometimes a little different in parts of Australia. Eddie Russell, Master Distiller at Wild Turkey, discovered during a trip to Australia with his father Jimmy that ready-to-drink cans and bottles (Russell estimates Wild Turkey sells 2.5 million cases a year in Australia) are the reason Australia beats Japan as Wild Turkey’s biggest export market. “I thought everybody had a beer

bottle in their hand,” says Russell of his first trip to Australia. “At one event, Jimmy and I had a drink with a couple pieces of ice in it but we thought everyone else had beer. It didn’t seem right. Then we realised everybody was drinking RTDs. It’s unique to Australia. We tried it in the States and we couldn’t sell them.” As he talks, Russell stands next to posters of stuntman Evel Knievel and gonzo journalist Hunter S. Thompson – 1970s icons who were infamous Wild Turkey drinkers. Bourbon is undergoing something of a revival again today. The bigger brands are now owned by multinational beverage companies but the family-run Kentucky distillers have survived world wars, the depression, Prohibition, and Mad Men-like drinking trends (vodka was more popular during the 1960s). Meanwhile, Kentucky is not all whiskey. The last day in Louisville is spent at the Muhammad Ali Center, an excellent downtown museum and gallery packed with memorabilia from the good and bad of the boxing legend’s life. You can also feel what it’s like to be smacked in the gut by a heavyweight fighter (hint: not great). There’s also Churchill Downs, the iconic racecourse home to the Kentucky Derby. On Friday’s it’s $3 to get in and you can drink mint juleps all day. So, maybe Kentucky is all about whiskey after all. The previous night, back at Jim Beam as a bourbon-inspired dinner wrapped up (tip: you can make mash potato with bourbon), Ricky the bartender mixed a huge whiskey sour: “Sir, it’s for the road and it’s a long road.” Fred Noe finished off with another story: “My dad would always say, ‘May there be no hell but if there is, I will probably see you there.’” That, or we can all meet in Kentucky.

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PRlORlTY MALE

TRAVEL

SYDNEY ~ NSW

PRIME POSITION HERITAGE BUILDING, CBD CENTRAL, GREAT NEW RESTAURANT – THERE’S A LOT TO LOVE ABOUT SYDNEY’S NEW PRIMUS HOTEL

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ompared with Melbourne, Sydney’s preservation of historically significant buildings until recent times was a disgrace. The famous Rocks precinct, for instance – these days a major Sydney tourist attraction – was only saved thanks to union leader Jack Mundey’s ‘green bans’ in the 1970s. That makes the unveiling of the five-star Primus Hotel in Sydney, inside the former Sydney Water Board building in the heart of the CBD, a significant achievement in the repurposing of Sydney’s heritage buildings. Men’s Style had the pleasure of staying a night at The Primus recently. The restoration is a triumph, which involved master craftsmen from around the world working to blend the building’s significant Art Deco heritage with contemporary touches to create a modern, five-star property.

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The star is undoubtedly the imposing lobby, which Sydneysiders should visit simply to savour what is now a mint condition example of the Art Deco style – the eightmetre high red, scagliola columns, white marble floor and high ceilings providing a dramatic backdrop to checking in, having a drink or meeting for coffee. To the side of the lobby is the 120-seat restaurant The Wilmot, where chef Ryan Hong presides over a busy open kitchen producing classics of Western cuisine with an Asian influence. After some delightful oysters, Men’s Style sampled the Clover Valley Lamb Loin with shoulder croquet, sweetbread, garlic and pearl barley, and finished with the passionfruit cake and a glass of 2014 Singlefile Wines Botrytis Semillon from WA. Hotel restaurants can be hit-andmiss – even five-star affairs – but not this one.

The Primus’ jaw-dropping lobby (top); a suite interior (above, top); the rooftop bar, lounge and pool area (above).

The other star, weather permitting, is the “New York-style” rooftop… most definitely not a period feature. For the hectic business traveller, the 20-metre lap pool, bar and lounge seating – in the thick of the Sydney CBD – provides the optimum space for any “down-time” you can snare. The 172 rooms and suites, over six levels of the building, evoke a “this feels like New York… in Sydney” feeling. Generously proportioned, the dark oak panelling and joinery, polished brass trimmings, marble and bronze bring an old-world, vaguely Barton Fink-esque touch to the in-room experience, brought most definitely into the 21st Century by complimentary wifi, a Nespresso coffee machine, flat screen TVs and bathrooms offering product by Australian skin care brand Appelles. Presidential and Vice Presidential suites are also available, an upgrade offering – among other features – a combined living/dining room space, sizeable bathroom with bath and walk-in shower, and another ensuite bathroom. The Primus is the debut for Greenland International Hotels Group in Australia. The hotel is the leading edge of the in-development Greenland Centre on the site, which will birth the tallest residential building in Sydney once finished. Men’s Style observed a primarily week-day business crowd checking in and out of this new addition to Sydney’s five-star hotel scene, which makes perfect sense. Apart from the elegance and old-world charm delivered by the immaculate restoration of the building’s heritage, the position of this hotel – near Town Hall, Hyde Park and Pitt Street – makes it perfect for the businessperson who appreciates or expects a more high-end experience during their work trips, or equally for the weekend getaway crowd who want to indulge while taking in all the big smoke has to offer.


O LY N 95 $8 C EA

Belle’s exclusive art collection TO PURCHASE YOUR FINE ART PRINT NOW, VISIT MAGSHOP.COM.AU/BELLEWOP

H

SER IES 2: A NGUS MCR I TCH I E


PRlORlTY MALE

MOTORING

DIAL M FOR MAGNIFICENT Jez Spinks WAS ONE OF THE FIRST IN AUSTRALIA TO DRIVE BMW’S BRILLIANT NEW M2 COUPE.

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MW hogs its fair share of pages in the annals of ‘Great Compact Coupes’. Flip to chronological chapters 1972, 1986 and 2000 within such a tome, and, sequentially, you would read about the likes of the 2002 Turbo, original (E30) M3, and the thirdgeneration (E46) M3. The 1 Series M Coupe made a valiant attempt in 2011 to join these legends, though its handling on the limit was ultimately either meddlesome or troublesome – depending, respectively, on whether you had the stability control system switched on or off. Now the Bavarians are betting their über schnitzels on the fastest version of their still freshly christened 2 Series coupe range. The M2 nameplate already resonates with greater credibility, where the hero 1 Series was challenged, title-wise, by BMW’s determination to protect the

BNW’s M2 Coupe marks a winning new chapter in the M Series story.

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heritage of its 1979 M1 supercar. It also brings the entry point to BMW’s revered M-cars another 10 grand below the $100K mark, with an $89,900 starting price. (Though it’s closer to three figures again if you want the $98,900 self-shifting M2 that throws in extra features such as a launch control system and a Harman Kardon audio.) That’s a $12,400 premium over the commendable M235i foundation on which the M2 is built, and $60,000 cheaper than the M4 coupe (and M3 sedan twin) from which the smallest M borrows some key parts. The M2 is propped up by their lightweight, aluminium suspension, while the electronically controlled Active M Differential is also imported to ensure the smallest M’s rear wheels deploy all power to the road effectively (or mischievously). It also nabs the pistons out of the M4 engine’s six cylinders as

part of modifications that beef up the M235i’s 3.0-litre turbocharged six-cylinder to produce the kind of power and torque suitably matched to the M2’s bulging bodywork. A not-entirely-lithe 1,570kg kerb weight (with driver) is offset by 272kW that’s only 14 per shy of the power output produced by the M4. As with most modern turbo motors, though, it’s the torque that is key to the way the M2 goes about its rapid business. The motor is producing its maximum grunt – 465 Newton metres – from just 1400 revs, far earlier than in the historically high-revving engines from BMW’s M division (before climate change altered engineering mindsets). It continues to 5560rpm – with an overboost function that temporarily rounds pulling power up to 500Nm – resulting in elastic performance that makes for effortless progress both in the


PEUGEOT 308 8 GTII

The front end is astonishingly sharp, endowing the baby M with instantaneous directional response… slower confines of the city or the faster freedom of the countryside. The seven-speed dual-clutch auto is the best-of-both-worlds gearbox, serving up the quickest performance – 0-100km/h in 4.3 rather than 4.5 seconds, mostly courtesy of that aforementioned launch control – and highest fuel efficiency – 7.9 litres per 100km v 8.5. Even if you opt for the six-speed manual we tested, the M2’s chubby torque means there’s little need for frequent shifts, though the lever’s heft and accuracy invites them. Pop the M2 into its Sports mode, and electronics will even auto-blip the throttle when you downshift. Heel’n’toe purists can turn off the assistance by choosing Sports Plus, which also brings the M Dynamic Mode into play. This tells the electronic nannies not to coo-coo the driver and allow some wheelslip for impish sideways antics. It’s easy to revel in the M2’s handling even if you’re not looking to be crowned king of the drifters. Front and rear axles that are widened notably over the M235i help to generate purchase at both ends – complemented by broad, grippy rubber to make it remarkably neutral through corners.

The front end e is astonishingly gy sharp, endowing endow g the babyy M with instantaneous directional response p that sees it swinging from corner to corner with delectable dexterity. It’s also rare to drive a performance car these days that escapes the obsession with electronically variable dampers. The M2 may share the M4’s suspension components but it eschews multiple-choice settings to offer up one, virtually perfect set-up. Where the M4 can become twitchy at speed on Australian country roads, the M2 maintains the driver’s trust at all times, remaining unruffled by bumps. And all occupants will appreciate a ride that has an unexpectedly large degree of suppleness. For a car capable of cornering so deftly – and stopping with forceful authority – front sports seats with adjustable side bolsters are handy. At the hold of a button, they can squeeze torsos to prevent body organs somersaulting over each other, or with another press be unfurled for more relaxed cruising. And beyond the driving position, the sporty feel of the two-plus-two cabin is ensured by the M sports steering wheel, Alcantara door trim, door handles and console constructed from carbon fibre, and a healthy smattering of M logos. Complaints could be made about some of the tinny plastics, particularly around the dash, though overall the pros of the M2 are as skewed as far to one side as the power delivery of this rearwheel-drive coupe. Chapter ‘2016’ has just been earmarked.

P PETITE MAIS S BELLE E Jez Spinks dons his beret for a burl in the Peugeot 308 GTi. The French could have settled

stationary-to-100km/h time

for being renowned for their

of 6.0 seconds for the fastest

globally influential gastronomy,

308, though the two-tenths-

or having arguably the world’s

slower 250 hardly feels tardy

sexiest accent.

on the road.

Fortunately for eager drivers

Both benefit from a

on a reluctant budget, the

suspension that is lowered,

country has as much of a

stiffened and widened (at the

penchant for hot-hatches as

front) by the Peugeot Sport

it does for haute cuisine and

team to realise the handling

seductive pronounciation.

potential first detected in the

Renault currently builds the best in the form of the

regular 308. The 250 serves up balanced

Megane RS275 Trophy; last

roadholding – gripping and

year Peugeot’s 208 GTi 30th

slowing assuredly even without

Anniversary model revived

the stickier tyres and larger

memories of its 1980s 205

brakes of its more powerful

GTi, regarded by many as the

off-sider.

greatest ever example of the breed. Peugeot is harking back

The 270’s mechanical limited-slip differential makes it most noticeably different

only 15 years this time – with

in a track environment –

a bigger 308 GTi that’s both a

limiting momentum-cruelling

belated successor (to the 306

wheelspin during cornering –

GTi-6) and a belated rival (to

though on the road the 270’s

the VW Golf GTI).

steering is more prone to

It’s not quite the classic big-engine-in-a-small-car

tugging under acceleration. If the steering isn’t as

hot-hatch formula, either.

involving as the RS Megane’s,

The engine under the bonnet

the six-speed manual not as

is a four-cylinder totaling just

slick as the Golf GTI’s, and the

1.6 litres in cubic capacity.

audio-enhanced engine note

Stifle that smirk, though,

not sufficiently alluring, the 308

because a high-pressure

GTi is still a welcome return to

turbocharger boosts power to

sporty form for Peugeot.

184kW in the $44,990 308 GTi

And with an ability to amplify

250, or a seemingly implausible

its nature with the optional

200kW in the $49,990 GTi 270.

two-tone, red and black ‘Coupe

There’s also 330 Newton

Franche’ paintjob (270 only;

metres of pulling power from

$3,000), plus a cabin that

1900rpm, tapering off at

outpoints competitors for style

4000rpm in the 250 but all the

marks, choosing from the a la

way to 5500rpm in the 270.

carte hot-hatch menu has just

Peugeot quotes a

got tougher.

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PRlORlTY MALE

FOOD + DRINK TO EAT

BEEF TATAKI WITH SHICHIMI TOGARASHI AND SALTED PLUM Saké Flinders Lane By Executive Chef, Jean Paul Lourdes

INGREDIENTS: Beef 150g of beef (we use 28 day dry-aged striploin, but any good striploin will do) 1 tbsp mustard oil Sea salt (for seasoning)

Jean Paul Lourdes

HEAVEN SAKÉ THE WELL TRAVELLED JEAN PAUL LOURDES CHAMPIONS LOCAL PRODUCE AT THE LATEST SAKÉ OPENING, IN FLINDERS LANE, MELBOURNE.

T

he Saké Restaurant phenomenon continues apace in Australia, with a new Flinders Lane location opening in Melbourne during April to complement its Rocks and Double Bay locations in Sydney, and its Eagle Street Pier eatery in Brisbane. Heading up the kitchen at the Melbourne CBD outpost is Executive Chef Jean Paul Lourdes. A former perfumier whose culinary experience encompasses stints in such storied establishments as l’Atelier Joel Robuchon and Shang Palace at the Shangri-La in Hong Kong, Pierre Gagnaire at Hotel Balzac in Paris, and Joel Robuchon Restaurant in Tokyo. Lourdes’ background in scent, combined with a master’s degree in Food Science and Nutrition, means he brings a technical and scientific dimension to his cooking, experimenting with time and temperature. The Yakitori on his Saké Flinders Lane menu, for example, is brined for 12 hours, cooked sous vide at

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54.5 degrees for 12 hours, before being robata-grilled over an ancient Japanese charcoal called binchotan. He’s also inspired by fashion and once created a dish entitled “Savage Beauty” in tribute to Alexander McQueen. The menu will also feature the best of locally sourced produce, including Burrata from Thomastown and organic chicken from East Trentham, both in Victoria, and Kurobuta pork from southern NSW. To celebrate the arrival of Saké Flinders Lane, Chef Lourdes has offered the following recipe for Men’s Style readers...

Shichimi togarashi 200g red capsicum 100g jasmine rice 40g red rice 40g white sesame seeds, toasted 20g black sesame seeds, toasted 20g onion powder 10g dried orange zest (boil in a saucepan of water three times and chop finely) 40g dry wakame, very finely chopped ¼ tsp espelette powder (from gourmet stores, or replace with toasted chili flakes) ¼ tsp sweet paprika Vegetable oil for deep frying Salted plum 1 Mirabelle plum (this sweet orange plum can be replaced with any dark-skinned plum) Sea salt (for seasoning)

METHOD: Shichimi togarashi 1 Slice capsicum thinly, discarding core and seeds 2 Place capsicum, rice and 400ml of water into a saucepan over medium heat, bring to a simmer and cook for 40 mins 3 Drain and blend to a fine puree 4 Spread puree thinly onto a silicone baking mat (silpat) and place in oven at 55°C to dehydrate for 4-6 hours, or until completely dry 5 Half fill a medium-sized saucepan with vegetable oil and heat to 180°C. Break dried puree into fragments and deep fry until they puff up (5-10 seconds) 6 Drain on paper towel and crush in a mortar and pestle to a rough powder 7 Mix the powder in a bowl with the remaining ingredients until well combined Salted plum 1 Cut plum in half, removing stone. Lightly salt the flesh, place on a hot grill cut side down and cook until charred 2 Allow to cool before slicing into small segments Beef 1 Remove all the fat and sinew (or ask the butcher to do it) 2 Heat a pan until almost smoking; sear all four sides of striploin, 3-4 secs each side (it should still be rare inside) 3 Rest for two minutes, slice paper thin, brush with mustard oil and season with salt

Beef Tataki. Some effort involved!

Plating Place beef slices on a plate, top with wedges of plum and scatter with about 1½ tbsp of shichimi togarashi


+ DRINK TO DRINK

Kaine Bayfield

SPECIAL DROP Johnnie Walker has released its much anticipated Private Collection 2016 Edition.

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ohnnie Walker Master Blender Jim Beveridge recently announced the release of the limited release (8,888 bottles) John Walker & Sons Private Collection 2016 Edition, a blending of an array of the finest single grain Scotch whiskies with a special Highland single malt whisky. The most complex edition to date, whiskies were drawn from over 100 casks from five Johnnie Walker distilleries (Cameronbridge and irreplaceable stocks from four now silent distilleries – Caledonian, Cambus, Carsebridge, and Port Dundas) due to the many subtle variations required in flavour styles and effects, to create three vattings. They were brought together into two styles – vanilla, woody, fudge notes most expressive of cask character, and a sweeter, estery, honey character from both cask and distillery. The presentation is top notch – the amber glass decanter graduated to echo the layers and depth of honey notes, with a discreet, angled cut to reflect the slanted label on the iconic square bottle, and set in a golden cream box with copper foil detail, together with the story behind the blend. The 2016 Edition is available exclusively at Dan Murphy’s, $977 (RRP).

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THE CHARGE OF…

he revival of some of Sydney’s most iconic older pubs continues with the Bayfield family soon to unveil the addition of the Brigade Lounge and Brigade Rooftop to Woollahra’s Art Deco hotel gem, The Light Brigade. The 1920s-era pub, which the Bayfields bought in 2015, will see a chic cocktail bar open as the Brigade Lounge, while up one level the Rooftop will offer a peerless view back down Oxford St to the Sydney skyline. “We ventured into the Eastern Suburbs last year and one of the most exciting things about taking ownership of The Light Brigade Hotel is to leverage the

magnificent view it offers,” says Kaine Bayfield, Group GM of Bayfield Hotels. “The Brigade Rooftop has been designed to feel as casual as a neighbour’s terrace,” says Jonathan Richards of SJB, the interior designers. “It will have lush landscaping and a mixture of lounge and dining spaces surrounding a new signature curved bar. The Brigade Lounge has been designed with deep rich tones for an atmospheric cocktail bar. The bar and lounge areas sit within the beautiful Art Deco interior architecture – characterized by the original curved detailing and high ceilings.” www.thelightbrigade.com.au

COOKBOOKS

SURFING THE MENU Former Masterchef contestants Dan Churchill and Hayden Quinn not only have a new ABC TV cooking series on the boil, but an impressive looking book of recipes and pictures to serve alongside. Put together following their travels from as far afield as Broome in the west and Byron Bay in the east – journeying in Gigi, a vintage VW Beetle – Churchill and Quinn celebrate produce, people and places over 240 pages in a very inviting production. From Broome Chicken Biryani to Moreton Bay Bug Rolls and the Bundaberg Beef Burger, Surfing The Menu is a downhome chronicle of tasty, local recipes and regional specialties that is very distinctly Aussie. Surfing The Menu, Simon & Schuster, $49.99.

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PRlORlTY MALE

2014 LUKE LAMBERT NEBBIOLO

DRINKS

(Yarra Valley, VIC, $55) The Yarra Valley and nebbiolo are easy bedfellows, especially the Denton Vineyard where Lambert sources his fruit from. Perfume of red berries and pickled cherries with pepper, savoury nuttiness and dried herbs. The palate has a juiciness, brisk acidity and chompy tannins. Wonderful to drink and will cellar for a long time.

RISING PROFILE Mike Bennie ON WHY

AUSTRALIANS ARE INCREASINGLY DRINKING THE NEBBIOLO VARIETY.

2014 RAVENSWORTH NEBBIOLO

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ebbiolo is a finicky grape variety, rarely seen outside of the famed wine-growing regions of Barolo and Barbaresco in Piedmont, Italy, but there’s a sect of Australian wine producers who are obsessed with it. The best examples thrill drinkers with their haunting fragrance redolent of char, tar, decaying rose petals, pot pourri and cherries. The wines made from the dark skinned grape groan like Gregorian chants on the palate with firm, sinewy tannins. It’s a grape responsible for what could be argued are some of the world’s best wines, and longest to live in cellar. “I think it makes the most perfumed, rustic, beautiful wines in the world,” says Luke Lambert, one of the young guns of Victoria’s Yarra Valley. “And there’s no other variety that compares to nebbiolo for food compatibility. It just makes you want to eat.” Most winemakers agree it’s also one of the most challenging grape varieties to grow, needing plenty of time to ripen properly - preferably slowly - and it needs just the right amount of sunshine to negate the full force of tannin from its thick, chewy skins. Australian grape growers are canny, however, and plantings of nebbiolo are found widely around Australian wine regions, albeit in generally small quantity. Wine merchant David Matters of Sydney’s Best Cellars sells plenty of examples from the spiritual home of Piedmont, but also reckons there’s potential Down Under. “When nebbiolo is grown in the right place in Australia, and handled judiciously by good winemakers, it’s fantastic,” he says. “We’re seeing increasingly good wines, cellarworthy wines, that stack up to the Italian yardsticks,” he continues. “There’s now a raft of Australians who are choosing to carefully work with nebbiolo, and the resulting wines should

(Hilltops, NSW, $33)

be firmly on the radars of those seeking medium weight, savoury red wines defined by tannin and fragrant perfume.” To date, the best regions in Australia for growing and making nebbiolo are the Yarra Valley with its small clutch of producers including Luke Lambert and Mac Forbes, the cool reaches of the Adelaide Hills where Ngeringa and Adelina produce thrilling examples, King Valley where Pizzini create a mature release, heavy hitting style, and the Pyrenees of Victoria where a gaggle of younger generation producers like David Fletcher (who lives in Piedmont, but also makes Australian nebbiolo), works alongside Joshua Cooper, Lethbridge and Latta Wines, as examples. Winemaker Colin McBryde brings to life nebbiolo under his Adelina label, and has several vintages under his belt working with vineyards in the Adelaide Hills. His fine, elegant expression of the variety is wildly perfumed and succulent in texture. “I like the disparity between that gentle colour and the often commanding tannin profile,” says McBryde. “I like tasting the grapes and being left with the flavour for near hours.” “It seems like the ultimate challenge – to make varietal, expressive, savoury, perfumed nebbiolo here in Australia,” says Lambert, “There’s a long way to go but I think there will hopefully be some very serious Nebbiolo made here.”

Luke Lambert

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TRY

THESE

Winemaker Bryan Martin keeps the grape juice in contact with the grape skins for longer than most winemakers, and the result is a wine that shows ripeness of fruit, mouthwatering acidity and ropes of firm, dustytextured tannins. It’s also wildly aromatic with briar and berry fruit. Stunning with red sauce pasta dishes.

2014 LATTA MALAKOFF YOUNG SKIN NO.1 NON DOS (ZERO SO2) NEBBIOLO

(Pyrenees, VIC, $40) Young winemaker Owen Latta sources from the Malakoff Vineyard, ferments naturally, uses no additives, and finishes it off without adding sulphur as a preservative. Superb to drink – shows amaro, earth and dark fruit in bouquet, and is supple in the palate with soft, powdery tannins. Yum.

2012 ADELINA NEBBIOLO

(Adelaide Hills, SA, $40) This is the kind of nebbiolo that Italianophile naysayers of Australian examples need to see. Bold perfume. Heroic tannin. Succulence. Complexity. Impossibly long in flavour. It flushes the palate with savoury yet brooding fruit flavour. It works with charred steaks, stews, terrine, pizza. Bravo.


MAY HELP MAINTAIN HEALTHY CHOLESTEROL LEVELS ENLIVA is a once-a-day active supplement that may help maintain normal cholesterol levels in healthy h individuals when combined with diet and lifestyle. lifestyle

e i a.co .au enliva.com.au

*Contains clinically trialled ingredients that may assist healthy people to reduce cholesterol absorption and maintain cholesterol within normal range. Always read the label. Use only as directed. If symptoms persist consult your healthcare professional. ENLIVA contains Lactobacillus Plantarum (AB-LIFE) 1.2 billion CFU. BGP Products Pty Ltd. trading as Mylan EPD. ABN 29 601 608 771. 299 Lane Cove Road, Macquarie Park NSW 2113. Ph: 1800 314 527. ENLIVA is a registered trademark. AU-ENL-2015-37(1)b. Date Prepared: January 2016. ABB3242/MS

CHC70814 - 06/15

ENLIVA is available at all participating pharmacies across Australia: Australi


PRlORlTY MALE

WELLBEING

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he right shoes, the latest play list and high tech wearables – working out requires a lot of stuff these days. How important are heart rate monitors? Some sports science experts regard them as essential. If you’re trying to lose weight, for example, knowing that you need to spend most of your workout at around 70 to 80 per cent of your maximum heart rate (MHR) keeps you on target. Old-school holdouts maintain that your undivided attention should be focused on your body during a workout, free of the distraction of gadgets. When heart rate monitors first hit the market in the Noughties, they had a valid point. It was tough not to be constantly aware of a strap around your chest at sternum height. Newer models like the Mio Fuse Heart Rate Wristband, however, are only a shade more complex than a Fitbit Surge. Why is tracking the heart so important during exercise? It tells you how hard you’re working. Intensity is difficult to judge and if you’re exercising out of habit, you may be going through the motions. An accurate reading of your heart rate is objective and doesn’t lie. It’s also a lot easier than stopping to take your pulse all the time. There’s a myth that you can calculate your MHR by subtracting your age from the number 220. More of a close guesstimate, the simple sum can cause many men, especially over 35, to be too cautious when judging their MHR. Once a person is fit, they have to lift their game to get the most out of regular training and exercise, and that can mean pushing beyond the average MHR for your age. One of the drawbacks of a heart rate monitor for fit men is once your MHR goes higher than the normal calculation for your age, it will warn that you are over-

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TICKING OVER John von Arnim

EVALUATES THE BENEFITS OF HEART RATE MONITORS WITHIN YOUR FITNESS REGIME.

Fitbit.

Azumio Instant Heart Rate App.

Runtastic Heart Rate App.

extending yourself. Constantly looking at a heart rate monitor could hold you back from reaching the required exertion intensity needed to get to the next level of fitness, or what’s termed “tolerable discomfort”. Less fit exercisers or those just starting a new exercise program, on the other hand, should take notice of a heart rate monitor to avoid attempting too much too soon. It’s important to have a working idea of anatomy beyond knowing that the heart is the major muscle involved in exercise. When you go for a run the heart rate tends to increase even when you are running at the same speed. Why? Because the body is dealing with a heat/loss challenge through two major methods – as your core temperature rises, sweating is the most obvious way the body tries to cool itself. At the same time, blood is redirected to the skin in a secondary mechanism that also gets rid of excess heat. The heart has to work harder to divert the blood and oxygen to the skin to keep your core temperature under control. The heart needs a good workout just as much as the body and staying in your comfort zone does neither any favours.

Generally, if a heart rate monitor sticks at 65 per cent of your MHR, you have to put in more work. The popularity of heart rate monitors has exploded on the back of a flood of new apps. It’s now possible to check your ticker using the camera and flash on a smartphone. The only thing complicated about the process is its correct technical name – photoplethysmography. Each time the heart pumps, tiny capillaries in the skin expand. A smartphone flash illuminates the skin and the camera records the tiny colour changes that occur every time the heart beats. You have to hold pretty still and heart rate apps don’t provide the continuous data that wearable tech heart monitors do, but they have become so popular that the market leader – the Azumio Instant Heart Rate App – boasts 25 million users. Most men check their heart rate for fitness reasons, but changes in your resting heart rate can indicate health problems. An inexpensive or free app is a bargain. The fun aspect of Azumio’s app is that it doesn’t just record the heart rate, it labels activities according to

The heart needs a good workout as much as the body … staying in your comfort zone does neither any favours. exertion from “just woke up” to “exercising”. Spend a few more dollars for the paid version which allows you to store more than five of the most recent measurements. Another top app is the Runtastic Heart Rate Pro, which allows you to filter data using the resting, before or after exercise, or MHR tags. Like Azumio’s app, the clear directions point out that the app is only for fitness, not determining whether you are having a heart attack.


AVAILABLE AT


LOOKS FAST BUT ALWAYS RIGHT ON TIME This bold watch features a black PVD plated stainless steel case, and leather band with fabric overlay and red stitching for an unforgettable look. The 60 minute chronograph, 24 hour time dial and date indicator will make sure you are always right on time, while a water resistance up to 100m (330ft) will ensure this watch, like you, performs well under pressure. $529. www.michaelhill.com.au


GET THE LOOK

p67

FRAGRANCES

p72

GROOMING

p76

BRANDS

p78

SWING TAGS

p80

ON TREND All you need to know to look the part every day

DIESEL POWER

READ OUR CHAT WITH DIESEL FOUNDER RENZO ROSSO (RIGHT) AND DIESEL ARTISTIC DIRECTOR NICOLA FORMICHETTI. Page 78

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DOM BAGNATO Suiting and formal looks are stronger than ever from one of Australia’s master tailors in Autumn/Winter 2016. Shades of burgundy, purple, pink and red in ties and pochettes work in contrast yet also complement navy suiting or bolder patterned suits like the Cesano pictured at right. Dom’s love of paisley, spots and checks bring ever interesting texture and colour to the entire range of suiting, fully completing the look. The black Santo topcoat is the perfect accompaniment for the colder days, classic and with a hint of formality. Available at Myer stores. dombagnato.com.au

GET THE LOOK P HOTO GRAP HY ST Y LING

STEVEN CHEE

KIM PAYNE

GRO O M ING

CLAIRE THOMSON

Dom Bagnato coat, $395, suit, $745, shirt, $149, tie, $99, and pocket square, $49. Paul Smith shoes, $560; socks, $14.95, from David Jones.


ON TREND

LACOSTE This beautifully layered look is created from Lacoste’s The Sailing North collection, nautical-inspired design both functional and superbly finished. Jackets, parkas, water-repellent jersey, warm knits, soft flannel and sailor-striped sweatshirts are key pieces in a collection that mixes technical with traditional fabrics to achieve a luxe and stylish sea-to-city vibe. Lacoste’s historical connection with sport and sailing informs much of its design, resulting in casual yet chic combinations that despite their European feel, match perfectly with the outdoor Australian lifestyle. www.lacoste.com.au

Lacoste pea coat, $499, canvas jacket, $299, sweater, $189, polo tee, $149, and trackpant, $119

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ON TREND

Jeanswest “Hamilton” coat, $199, “Oregon” puffer vest, $119, “Eldredge” sweater, $99.99 (Woolmark blendaccredited), “Chiswick” shirt, $64.99, “Legion” jeans, $99.99, “Wentworth” belt, $39.99, and “Jackson” boots, $169.99.

GET THE LOOK JEANSWEST In a concerted effort to increase its premium offering, Jeanswest has recently launched a new Woolmarkaccredited knitwear collection as part of its Autumn/Winter 2016 range. The Eldredge sweater here is part of that new collection, with the addition of the Woolmark logo guaranteeing quality and longevity of the garment. Always strong in denim, shirting and seasonal jackets, discover how the Woolmark line can be combined with the brand’s overall lifestyle offering at the Jeanswest site. www.jeanswest.com.au

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ON TREND

FRAGRANCES

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early 50 per cent of men nominated blue as their favourite colour in a recent study. It could be the calming effect or the associations with authority figures and intelligence. Plus women find men dressed in blue more attractive whether in a business suit or denim. Designer fragrance brands have hitched their star to the psychology of colour for the bulk of new men’s scent releases, evidenced here...

1

THE MOODY BLUES

1.

DIESEL ONLY THE BRAVE EXTREME

THE DEFINITIVE MASCULINE COLOUR IS A UNIFYING THEME OF MANY OF THE NEW MALE FRAGRANCES, FINDS Elisabeth E King.

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Liam Hemsworth smoulders as the t e first st celeb ce eb to front o t a Diesel ad campaign. g Women’s mags worldwide have been thanking anking the t e brand b a d for o the t e testosteronefuelled H ger ue ed video deo of o the t e Hunger Games h i tailor-made il de to G s hottie, perk up p p females on overcast rcast Monday mornings. g The juice uice is stronger g than the best-selling g Only The Brave and the clenched c e c ed fist bottle bott e iss a more intense te se shade s ade of o blue. b ue A fresh opening, g a manly heart of rose and a spicy seals p y drydown y als the deal. $75 for t e erotic e ot c dea f 50ml; 0ml; on counter earlyy June; 1300 651 991.

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PACO O RABANNE INVICTUS AQUA A

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When is being a popularr fragrance a major compliment? g liment? When women can’t stayy away from your neck. The Internet y rnet iss riddled dd ed with t reviews e e s from om men e on o all a continents co t e ts that t at can be reduced educed to one o e theme: t e e: females e a es love o e Invictus. ctus The he muscular physique p y q of Aussie ussie league player-turned-model Nick Youngquest is credited with taking the fragrance to the dizzying rank of number one men’s fragrance in France. He returns for this marine-style aquatic flanker, beefed up with grapefruit, pink pepper and guaiac wood. $104 for 100ml; 1800 214 092.


Class Action 3.

6.

OBSESSION FOR MEN SUMMER

NEROLI PORTOFINO ACQUA

CALVIN KLEIN In 1986 the original big hitter scent blitzed international fragrance awards. Nicknamed “sweet sex”, alpha male lions preferred Obsession over any other fragrance during mating season. This lighter version dials down the lust factor in response to demands for a tamer version of Obsession suitable for warmer weather. It still delivers on the heatof-the-moment promise of its predecessor with crisp cedar, blue sage brush and herby artemisia. $49 for 125ml; on counter June 12; 1800 812 663.

TOM FORD You’ve tried the body spray and love the ancestor fragrance. Since its 2011 launch no other Tom Ford scent has had such a grip on men everywhere than Neroli Portofino. The release of Acqua and a wallet-bashing version labeled Forte ($398) isn’t just an attempt at mining a lucrative franchise. A lighter eau de toilette formula and a bigger focus on neroli has created a sharper, more effervescent juice that lasts longer than its forerunner. $210; from selected Myer, David Jones and Harrolds stores.

4. MICHAEL KORS EXTREME BLUE

Before you think extreme deja vu – chopper imagery, front man in aviator shades and the favourite blue hue of men worldwide – this wellcrafted aquatic is pretty damn good. For starters, it avoids the synthetic citrus notes of many commercial juices and merits a very nice rating. The creamy, powdery drydown has a herbal back story which stands out from the crowd. From $95; selected Myer, David Jones and Sephora stores.

Women find men more attractive when dressed in blue, be it a suit or denim.

5.

7.

PARISIAN BREAK

BLU MEDITERRANEO CEDRO DI TAORMINA

Three years ago Givenchy launched Gentlemen Only, a more wearable take on its classic Gentleman juice of 1974. Aussie Simon Baker propelled the daytime fragrance suitable for all seasons to global smash. This is the third follow-up after Intense and Casual Chic, and it’s aimed at the travelling man. An elegant, woody/ aromatic sparked with Nepal mint and lemon, the sketch of Notre Dame on the bottle is a warning to choose something far more obvious for a long night of clubbing. $132 for 100ml; Myer and David Jones.

Ralph Fiennes’ manic performance and the scenery of the island of Pantelleria, off Sicily, are good reasons to watch the film, A Bigger Splash. The script centres on forbidden attraction and the effect of the Mediterranean sun on your sex life. Cedro di Taormina is truthfully billed as a distillation of fire, earth and wind, bolder than AdP’s other offerings. A woody citrus with a fresh, spicy middle, a whiff of its close-to-the-skin subtlety might allow you to get away with murder – figuratively, not literally, as Paul does in the film. From $110; exclusive to David Jones.

GIVENCHY GENTLEMEN ONLY

ACQUA DI PARMA

The gentleman action hero – an impeccably dressed gourmet and sophisticate, in addition to being a cool operative – never goes out of style. Why? Because it’s every man’s long-running daydream. Daniel Craig as James Bond was at his sexiest when he jumped on a train in Skyfall and as the carriage disintegrated behind him, calmly adjusted his cuffs. Check out the crop of fragrances aimed squarely at refined elegance that’s definitely not the passive kind… DAVIDOFF HORIZON

Simone Bredariol earned his paycheck filming the ad campaign for this new pillar fragrance from Davidoff. The Italian model faced real sandstorms and extreme heat but still looked ice cool. Cocoa Absolut, vetiver and patchouli add sexual heat, while the amber coloured juice and smooth, curved model suggest a still waters run deep air of restraint. From $80 for 75ml; Myer and David Jones stores.

BURBERRY MR BURBERRY

Mr Burberry plays the “lover” to the Brit brand’s latest scent for women, My Burberry. A woody/herbal fougere by talented nose Francis Kurkdjian, the ingredients echo classic British male perfumery – tarragon, birch leaf, cedar and vetiver. The sort of spritz suave but kickass agent, Harry Hart, would choose to complement his suits in the Kingsman movies. From $90; Myer and David Jones stores.

DUNHILL ICON ABSOLUTE

Natural refinement is a given from Dunhill. The original Icon had most men at first sniff as one of the market’s most masculine neroli fragrances. This smooth compliment magnet features Sicilian bergamot, black pepper and oud. The covetable bottle gets a golden finish and the juice delivers stronger staying power – sweat or no sweat. From $89; Myer and David Jones stores. men’s style

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ON TREND

BRANDS TONI & GUY

ELEMIS

MEN STYLING FIBRE

TIME FOR MEN DAILY MOISTURE BOOST

Just the facts are a major thumbs-up for this versatile hair controller that lasts for hours and washes out in seconds. Here goes: non-greasy, easy to apply, no residue, no shine, no hardness and doesn’t leave your hands feeling sticky. Suitable for all hair styles from classic to casual, shorter or longer. A dab or two goes a long way. $15.99; Woolworths, Priceline, Coles and Big W.

Over six million customers a year can’t be wrong. That’s the number of people worldwide who entrust their skin to the UK’s number one anti-aging spa brand. Celebrating its 25th anniversary this year, Elemis products for men are multi-award winners, including this lightweight lotion. Suppleness and elasticity are the linchpins of the clean-shaven look. Packed with tamanu and citrus oils, regular use conditions, nourishes and decongests the skin. $69; elemisaustralia.com.au

L’OCCITANE CEDRAT SHAVING GEL

A citrus scent blast is the breezy opener for this gel-into-foam skin energizer. Used daily, it adds an extra layer of smoothness and protects the skin against breakouts, nicks, razor burn and irritation. There’s an entire range featuring the Asian fruit, known as citron in English, including a cleanser and face gel, to refine the appearance of the skin and neutralise excess oil. $38; au.loccitane.com

PENHALIGON’S NO 33 EYE CREAM

PERFECT GENTLEMAN

The modern barbershop trend relies on old school classics. Penhaligon’s is marking its 145th anniversary with the No. 33 line, a comprehensive gentleman’s grooming range. A chap’s eyes sometimes show fatigue. Tightening plant extracts in this invigorating eye cream tighten and firm. Consider: the full range from the uppercrust Brit brand of a cologne (a contemporary lavender), cleanser, beard/face scrub and moisturiser. $84; exclusive to mensbiz.com.au

NAIL THE URBAN GENTLEMAN LOOK, WITH THIS RANGE OF ESSENTIAL GROOMING PRODUCT. BY Elisabeth King. CLARISONIC SMART PROFILE SONIC CLEANSER

The prime way to fast-track brighter, cleaner skin is by investing in a sonic cleanser. The latest model of the Clarisonic cleanser boasts smart technology, an intuitive user interface and longer battery life to purge the skin of dirt and grime 11 times better than using your hands. That’s about as complicated as things get to achieve the best skin of your life. A dab of face wash and 60 seconds in the shower does the trick. Don’t overdo it. Tough guy actor, Liev Schreiber, uses his sonic cleanser once a week. Twice max if he needs to squire partner Naomi Watts on the red carpet. $295; clarisonic.com.au

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dress code of smart shoes and high quality, well-fitted shirts and suits are core to the resurgent modern contemporary look. But don’t make the lethal error of ignoring the importance of proper grooming to cement the image. According to a recent US study, overall physical attractiveness and good grooming are the two most powerful factors in looking professional and getting hired. Christian Bale’s detailed grooming routine in American Psycho certainly delivered a polished appearance. But it’s not necessary to spend as much time as an imperial concubine to cover the gentleman’s basics of sleek hair, good skin and teeth. Discipline, time-saving shortcuts and the right – not the largest – number of products provide the critical edge.

WHITE GLO DIAMOND SERIES POWER BRUSH TOOTHPASTE

Teeth that are too white and too perfect look false. Worse, aggressively bright gnashers are out of style. The new minimalism doesn’t mean borderline yellow, of course. Get a whiter, shinier smile with this concentrated formula – the world’s first toothpaste formulated to be used with an electric toothbrush. $6.99; whiteglo.com


BLACK LEOPARD AFTER SHAVE BALM & 2-IN-1 SHAVE GEL CLEANSER.

$49 and $29, respectively.

MEN ONLY AUSTRALIAN-OWNED BLACK LEOPARD IS BECOMING A GROWING PRESENCE IN THE PREMIUM MALE GROOMING MARKET.

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rooming products for men is an increasingly competitive space, developing in Australia from a fairly low base into a category with a range of old and new players and a growing range of products on offer. In a smallish market like Australia, homegrown brands are a particularly brave and admirable breed, though companies such as Aesop and Kevin Murphy are proving success can be had both home and abroad. Melbourne’s Black Leopard is one of the new breed, and has already distinguished itself by introducing a bold, overtly masculine, “men-only” skincare range onto the market that encompasses 11 products including moisturiser, after-shave balm, eye cream, shampoo, body wash and

hair styling cream. The product range has been developed by Cosmetic Chemist Richard Gonano, who has previously worked with the aforementioned Aesop and Kevin Murphy, as well as Sukin and Red Earth. Gonano was sourced by the brand’s founders, the Collins family. “We’ve taken a very hands-on and rigorous approach in the development process, ensuring only the best products have made the cut,” says co-founder Murdoch Collins. “Put simply, we’ve created a skincare range in the same way we like our whiskey – smooth, refined and handcrafted.” While it’s clear the modern gent is far more focused on a personal grooming routine than his father or his grandfather, he’s also increasingly time-poor and as such, is more likely to favour products that offer more than one trick. The Black Leopard range has pre-empted this trend by ensuring the products employ triple-action formulas to hydrate, rejuvenate and soothe the full gamut of male skin types. It describes its signature blend as “earthy citrus”. “We set out to create an unmistakably masculine range that was simple to use, easy to maintain and most of all, effective,” says Collins. “After extensive research and development, we’ve been able to produce a top quality product range.” Gonano nominates the aftershave balm ($49, 100ml) as his ‘hero product’ from the range – “It has a beautiful, soothing, herbal

complex and is great for sensitive skin,” he says. With its first standalone boutique now open on Chapel St in Melbourne’s South Yarra, Black Leopard is also eyeing off potential overseas opportunities after a glowing reception at the Cosmoprof Fair in Hong Kong in 2014. Men’s Style’s preferences from the range? While in the shower, we’re big fans of the Hydrating Face Scrub ($29, 100ml) – Glycolic acid and Aloe Barbadensis combine to remove dead skin cells and give the face a fresh, renewed feel. We also rate the 2-in-1 Shave Gel Cleanser ($29, 100ml), which combines lavender and tea tree oil to make shaving a far smoother and all-

‘We created a skincare range in the same way we like our whiskey – smooth, refined and handcrafted.’ round more pleasurable experience. We’re also with Gonano – the After Shave Balm ($49, 100ml) rehydrates and restores red, dry, irritated, frequently shaved skin It’s becoming a crowded segment, male grooming, but a homegrown premium brand like Black Leopard with a broad range of product based on quality ingredients most definitely has its place. blackleopardskincare.com.au

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ON TREND

GROOMING

EVOLIS SHAMPOO AND TONIC FOR MEN

Long before you’ve become a regular wearer of headgear to hide a receding hairline or bald patch, odds are you’ve tried something to hold on to the falling strands. Hair loss is hereditary, but blame the FGF5 gene rather than your parents. Evolis Tonic uses breakthrough technology featuring an active botanical which inhibits FGF5 to reduce hair loss and increase the number of follicles on the head. Use in tandem with Evolis Shampoo, which enhances hair growth and strength and provides instant volume via a catch-and-release polymer. Better yet, both products have been scientifically proven to reduce hair loss in just 12 weeks. RRPs $35.95 and $59, respectively; evolisproducts.com.au

WIN OVER LOSS DON’T SWEAT FAILING FOLLICLES, WRITES Elisabeth King , WHEN A RANGE OF PRODUCTS OUT THERE CAN HELP THE MAN BATTLING THINNING HAIR.

I

t’s long been known that 40 per cent of men suffer from thinning hair by the time they reach their late twenties. But a new study from Evolis, maker of the first scientifically proven, over-the-counter hair loss products launched in Australia for 20 years, makes even grimmer reading. One in three 18-to 24-year-olds

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have already experienced hair loss. Older Aussies rightly blame ageing as the major cause of a thinning thatch, but 63 per cent of 18 to 34-year-olds believe that stress is the reason their locks aren’t as luxurious as they once were. Millennials who suffer from hair thinning and loss are more likely to feel

depressed than their older counterparts, reports the survey. Feeling self-conscious adds to the misery. With seven out of 10 Australians blaming stress for hair fall-out, there’s been an upsurge of new hair loss, strengthening and volumising products hitting the market. Here are some of the main contenders…

KEVIN MURPHY REPAIR-ME

Few experts know more about boosting hair health than Kevin Murphy, whose high-tech products are sold in 40 countries. The Melbourne maestro has launched three treatment products boosted by encapsulated proteins that strengthen hair without weighing it down. The trio – Repair-Me Wash ($42.95), Rinse ($43.95) and Re.Store ($49.95) – reconstruct, repair and increase the elasticity and strength of weak and damaged hair. Available from June from kevinmurphy.com.au


MISSION CONTROL Solutions isn’t a bad word. It’s just become as ubiquitous as other buzzwords such as turnkey and value-added. A solution is an answer to a need and grooming products have to address specific ones. Whether your problem is oiliness and acne, tired eyes, a dull smile or skin as flaky as a croissant, these fast workers deliver on their promise.

AVEDA INVATI MEN

KLORANE QUININE

NOURISHING EXFOLIATING SHAMPOO AND SCALP REVITALIZER

SHAMPOO, CONDITIONER AND STRENGTHENING SERUM

Let’s state the claim most males are desperate to hear. In clinical tests, this one-two system improved the look of thinning hair in four out of five men. Whether you use them as a preventative measure or are already battling early to moderate thinning, the shampoo kicks off the action by removing pore-clogging buildup and sebum with naturally-sourced salicylic acid. A prep step to the leave-in revitalising treatment that increases micro-circulation to increase hair health and growth. RRPs $49 and $89, respectively; aveda.com.au

Celebrating its 50th anniversary this year, Klorane is the number one haircare brand in European and French pharmacies. Problem-solving is a core strength and this quinine-rich lineup has posted double-digit growth in Australia over the past two years. In addition to high-performance quinine, other key ingredients include B vitamins and caffeine to help treat permanent and temporary hair loss whether the cause is ageing, heredity, illness or stress. With regular use of all three products, hair appears thicker and stronger as the scalp is stimulated. Shampoo and Conditioner, each $10.95; Strengthening Serum, $32.95; pharmacies nationwide.

FAT MUK

VO5

VOLUMISING BLOWOUT MOUSSE

EXTREME STYLE MATT FIBRE

The new crop of men’s hair products promise to do everything bar clean the bathroom floor. But oldies are goodies when it comes to pumping up the volume of fine hair. Mousse is unbeatable for keeping thinner strands in place. Use on wet hair for a sleek look or dry hair to shape, hold and re-do your hairstyle without stickiness during the day. With a unique polymer system, this multi-tasker also locks out humidity and protects and conditions the hair. $24.95; mukhair.com

Gel on thinning hair advertises, rather than conceals, the fact that your crowning glory has lost a lot of its oomph. What’s needed is texture and fullness without any sheen to keep the sun from shining through to the scalp. This reasonably priced hair builder from the number one men’s styling brand in the UK is easy to wash out, too. $8.99; priceline.com.au

LA ROCHE-POSAY SEROZINC

Whether you suffer from acne, the odd zit or oiliness, this cult product boasts a triple action formula that slots into any anti-blemish or oil control routine. Containing zinc sulphate to refine pores and reduce excess oil, a quick spray mattifies the skin and soothes razor burn and irritated skin. Also good for acne outbreaks. $23.95; pharmacies nationwide

LA MER THE LIFTING EYE SERUM

Eyes are the first giveaway of age. Many eye creams simply hydrate, but this serum contains patented Stretch Matrix Complex. The eye area feels tighter on contact and regular use gives a more lifted, defined look. One drop per eye does the trick, so the bottle really lasts. $330; cremedelamer.com.au

THE BODY SHOP HEMP HEAVY-DUTY BODY MOISTURE PROTECTOR

Keeping fit or playing sport can take a heavy toll on your body. Cold and falling on the field wreaks havoc on your shins, knees, elbows and more. There’s no need to slather on body lotion every day, this “moisture with muscle” provides 96 hours – four days – of hydration for really dry and flaky skin. $29.95; thebodyshop.com.au

WHITE GLO DIAMOND SERIES EXTREME WHITENING PEN

You didn’t follow the advice – no alcohol, tea or coffee. Whether it’s a first date or an interview, your teeth need to look better. Simply brush on this new whitening gel up to three times a day for a brighter smile. Comes with a bonus seven whitening strips. $19.99; supermarkets and pharmacies.

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ON TREND

BRANDS Playful, rebellious and brave – some looks from Diesel’s Spring/Summer 2016 range.

Renzo Rosso

Nicola Formichetti

CREATIVE ENGINES Men’s Style SPEAKS WITH DIESEL FOUNDER RENZO ROSSO

AND THE MAN HE HAS CHARGED WITH REBOOTING THE BRAND, ARTISTIC DIRECTOR NICOLA FORMICHETTI.

I

n the 1990s, Renzo Rosso presided over one of the coolest brands in the world. Diesel – the denim-led company he’d founded in Italy in the late 1970s – was famed all over the world for its edgy, creative, socially aware ad and marketing campaigns, and to own a pair of Diesel jeans was to definitely be one of the “cool kids”. But coolness, as it does, particularly in fashion, soon passses and through an early noughties period where the energetic Rosso expanded his empire under his Only The Brave parent company bringing Maison Martin Margiela, Viktor & Rolf, Marni and some non-fashion businesses into the fold – Diesel inevitably lost some of its cutting-edge cred.

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For the past couple of years under artistic director Nicola Formichetti – known to some as Lady GaGa’s personal stylist and to others as a wunderkind of London fashion magazines in the last half of the last decade – Diesel is in the midst of a brand reboot with no less a mission than to recapture the hip factor that made it great in the 1990s. Both Rosso and Formichetti were in Australia for Melbourne Fashion Festival in March, speaking at a seminar as part of the festival’s Business Events Program, and took time out to speak to Men’s Style about the progress of Diesel’s reinvention. For Rosso, it was a return to the town he’d first visited in 1985, bringing a bag of Diesel product which he convinced the

late Mark Keighery (founder (fou off Marcs) to put in his stores as an stor introduction of the brand to the bran Men Style y Australian market. Men’s wondered aloud what th the local o audience for his appeara appearance at Melbourne Fashion Fest Festival wanted to hear from the man ac acknowledged g as guru of high-end den denim.. “My formula is very ssimple,” p Rosso tells us. “I am very brave, I am willing to take a ris risk and I like to do new things. I’m a man who likes motivation. I’m veryy curious and I travel a lot, and I can get inspiration from a b bar, from a restaurant, from a disc disco,, from a street… everywhere I ccan find something interesting. O Of course, I’m also very lucky becau because I have so many designers on boar board and when


Diesel advertising campaigns from the 1990s won numerous awards for their combination of sometimes outrageous imagery combined with social commentary.

DIESEL’S KEY DATES 1978 ~ Rosso founds Diesel with business partner Adriano Goldschmied in Italy, the name Diesel taken because it was an “alternative” to petrol during the 1970s oil crisis, and Rosso wanted his jeans perceived as alternative. 1981 ~ Rosso begins his mission to take the brand global, distributing his denim in other markets via strategic partners. 1985 ~ Diesel exits the original parent company, Genius Group, with Rosso taking full control. 1991 ~ It’s famous “For Successful Living” ad campaign is first launched. 1995 ~ The company launches www.diesel.com, one of the first fashion companies to launch a website. 1996 ~ Diesel begins launching its own flagship stores, initially concentrating on the US and UK but by 1998 encompassing 35 directly owned stores internationally. y. 2007 C with L’Oreal O on 00 ~ Collaboration Diesel’s first fragrance, Fuel For Life. D g Collabs with Fiat and adidas followed the C next y year.. n 2008 8 ~ Introduction of new premium line extension,, Diesel Black Gold.. 2013 3 ~ Appointment off Nicola as N o Formichetti o s Artistic s Director. D o

“My formula is very simple … I am very brave and I am willing to take a risk.’ – Renzo Rosso

you have so many creative people working for you it’s very easy to share opinions and share ideas.” Rosso has previously said his approach to marketing his denim creations was shaped by his love of classic 1950s American culture – the rise of the rebel, biker culture, an anti-establishment mindset. It’s this DNA which Formichetti immersed himself in when he started with the brand in 2013, spending time in the Diesel archives in Italy in order to reacquaint himself with the cultural underpinnings of the brand. “I wanted to make Diesel the coolest brand on the planet again, like it was in the ’90s,” says Formichetti of his mission when he started with the brand. “And that’s still my goal and I never thought that I’d achieve it overnight. “When I first went to the museum, I arranged the history into the most important parts of Diesel, which is the denim, the leather, the biker style... it was very important to keep that when I created the collection for today and for tomorrow because that’s at the heart of the brand. The archive pieces still feel relevant and they still will in five or 10 years, because it’s such a timeless thing and we’re so lucky to have this beautiful DNA.” Since Diesel’s glory years years, of course, much has changed c g in both the world and the fashion t e wo d a d t e as o world wo d – the rise of the Net and social media,, and a d the t e arrival a va of o “fast ast fashion” as o on o the high street. Both developments g p provided a challenge p g to a company p y that had made its name t at ad ade ts a e with wt head-turningg outdoor and print p advertising. g Rosso says y that digital g has transformed “everyy industry” y and that Formichetti,, still in his 30s, has brought g vital knowledge g to o the company about how to interact p y with today’s y consumers online.. “You have to p payy attention to “ everything you put e y g y p on the web,” observes Rosso. obs s Rosso “Even if it’ss not o important where you p y buy, y it’s important that you p y represent p yourself in a nice wayy otherwise y

you’re dead. Before people buy in the store, perhaps 70 or 80 per cent of them already know your product form online research.” Formichetti agrees, though having been repeatedly asked about social media during his Australian trip, also has a slightly different take. “Let’s not get eaten by social media,” he counsels. “The most important thing is to have your own image, and know what you want to say. Social media is just a tool to reach people and that’s it. I feel like everyone is just going a bit bananas, trying to take selfies…” Formichetti says whereas he once found ideas and inspiration in platforms like Tumblr, he currently finds himself more often referring to old-school formats like books and printed art for creative concepts and creating content “which exists in the places we live, from billboards to online and which says… Diesel!” Of the challenge posed by fast fashion brands to a company like Diesel, which has always hung its hook on premium materials and construction, Formichetti sees a developing trend. “Things that are special are becoming more important today,” he says. “You can get anything for super cheap these days but the quality isn’t there. We have a crazy level of workmanship in our denim, and when you do that it’s hard to make the prices very low. But it’s important to have that one special garment you save up for, buy and wear for a long time.” Rosso, now 60, clearly invests a lot of faith in Formichetti to renew the famous brand, saying “he’s as brave as I was”. Does he ever wonder whether the global brand he created will still be around in 100 years? “We have built a very solid statement for this brand,” he says. “It’s incredible what we have done in 38 years. I think we’ll still be here in 100 years, but of course, in a different way. Diesel is very solid, very human and part of an incredible lifestyle.”

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ON TREND

S SWING TAGS

MARCS The always accessible Australian brand comes to the Winter party with a bunch of simple and elegant layering options, including the Gilet (pictured, right), a fashion essential originating from the 19th Century which Marcs combine with a collared shirt and chinos for a clean and finished look. Bomber, Macintosh, baseball and denim jackets are also part of the seasonal offering.

www.marcs.com.au

OUTERKNOWN The desire for ‘sustainable’, ecologically conscious menswear is behind eleven-times world-champion surfer Kelly Slater’s (pictured, above, with creative director John Moore) creation of the Outerknown brand. Available now in David Jones, The Iconic, Incu and selected boutiques, Slater was recently in Australia to promote the brand’s new Spring/ Summer 2016 collection, centered around wardrobe essentials for men on the move. Outerknown was launched in the US in July 2015, blending function and style whilst establishing responsible manufacturing processes across the supply chain.

www.outerknown.com

CALIBRE Calibre’s Autumn/Winter 2016 Out Of Office collection restores sartorial elegance to weekends, with casual jackets, blazers and trousers to build your look around for a Saturday night. Mohair sweaters, Italian cotton shirting and moleskin jackets ensure warmth on the cold nights, while highlights from the collection include a classic trench and a biker jacket in super soft suede. Luxe accessories include hand-painted leather sneakers and hand-made Doucals leather boots.

www.calibre.com.au

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CONVERSE We’ve covered all the iterations of the Converse Jack Purcell shoe in Men’s Style and the latest silhouette is the Converse Jack Purcell Signature CVO, offered in monochromatic Inked, Dolphin, and White colourways, along with a colourblock option in Ambient Blue/Egret. The sneakers boast all the recognisable features of the Converse Jack Purcell Signature model, including the original two-piece smile and a herringbone outsole for traction. As ever with Converse, versatility is key – wear them with anything in the wardrobe.

BURBERRY This season Burberry introduces monogramming to its iconic trench coats, allowing consumers to embrace the increasingly popular trend to customise the things we love. Either in store or via a special online tool, customers can add up to three initials in a selection of 15 thread colours, the embroidery positioned below the inner buttonhole and centred on the internal facing panel that sits closest to the body on the double-breasted trench coat when the coat is closed. The Heritage Trench Coat Collection is available in four colours for men: Honey, Stone, Black and Navy.

www.converse.com.au

www.burberry.com

ACADEMY BRAND Founded in 2007 and channelling a vintage Californian aesthetic, Academy Brand has grown as a go-to brand for stylish wardrobe builders. The label’s Autumn/Winter 2016 collection focuses on a range of relaxed parkas, bombers and chinos in a palette of navy, red and neutral colours. Premium feel and craftsmanship in the finish complete the appeal.

academybrand.com

BOSS In stores from June, BOSS Menswear launches a new collection of Signature, Italian-made leather accessories including business bags (folio and document case, laptop bag), softer, unlined options for work-to-weekend use (holdall, tote, messenger bag and more), and formal and casual shoe styles. The Signature bags (pictured, above) are available in five colours and fully crafted in Florence.

hugoboss.com

men’s style

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MANUAL

T skills,, tips and knowledge that every man requires to look and be his best.. The ~ COATS O ~

FOUR OUTFITS,, FOUR COATS HOW TO STAY WARM NO MATTER THE OCCASION

HOW TO SHOW LEG G THREE-QUARTER-LENGTH COAT T P : More contemporary-looking; PRO g long g enough g to cover your suit jacket, but not too long. g CON:: Cold knees, shins, and ankles..

BALL GAME G E

WEEKEND

Nylon-and-down puff ffer jacket by Banana Republic; banan-arepublic.com. Alpaca-wool-and-linen sweater by y J. Crew; jcrew.com. Cotton jeans by y Levi’s; levi.com. Suede boots by y Clark’s; clarksusa.com.

Wool peacoat by J. Lindeberg; jlindebergusa.com. Two-button wool jacket by y Tommy y Hilfiger; tommy.com. y Cotton shirt by y Bonobos; bonobos.com. Cotton trousers by Leather shoes y Burberry y Brit; burberry.com. y by y Vince Camuto; vincecamuto.com.

K G T KNEE-LENGTH COAT P O: Will W keep your ass warm iff you have to sit on PRO: h ld llike k a stadium d something cold, seat. CO Cold shins.. CON: ANKLE-LENGTH COAT T P O: Warmth from top to bottom.. PRO: CO : Wondering if you’re really pulling this off. CON:

A FEW THINGS GS O BEFORE O E TO KNOW

G AN BUYING OVERCOAT O CO T

A checklist off signs off quality Before you y even try y it on or look at h price tag, pick k it up. It should h ld be b the h enough h that h you could ld use it weighty f a ffew light sets off bicep curls. for Next, check the interior label ffor h materials. l The h more naturall the h the ) fibers ((i.e., wool, cashmere, angora), the greater the indication off quality d warmth. h and h the h coat open, study d the h llining. With bl stitched h d to the h exterior Is it visibly material of the coat ((good)) or fused ( ) (glued on, which is bad)?

OFFICE CE

BLACK C TIE TE Wool topcoat by y Ralph Lauren Black Label; ralphlauren.. com. One-button wool tuxedo, cotton eveningg shirt, and d velvet bow tie by y J. Lindeberg; jlindebergusa.com. Patent-leather shoes, Florsheim by y Duckie Brown; florsheimbyduckiebrown.com. y

CO MISTAKE COAT S NUMBER 1:

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men’s ’ style yl

Wool coat by Bonobos; bonobos.com. Two-button wool suitt by y Caruso; carusomenswear.com. Cotton shirt by y Tommy y Hilfiger; tommy.com. Silk tie by y y Thomas Pink; thomaspink.. com. Leather monk-straps, Alfred f Sargent ffor J. Crew; jcrew.com. j

Wearing a coat that is shorter than the jjacket underneath it. W

h you try it on, wear the h jacket k When ll have h d the h you’llll typically on under k sure the h fit is right. h Pay coat to make l attention to the h shoulders, h ld particular h is the h h d as that hardest area to correct h h tailoring. l . through h k to Cliff l ff Hunt, head h d off buying b Thanks d visuall at Paull Smith. h. and


~ COATS O ~

HOW TO BELT YOUR TRENCH H

Things h g a Man h ld Keep in Should h Coatt his

A MAN HAS S OPTIONS. O O S FOUR, O ACTUALLY. C .

His h hands d (when he’s forgotten his gloves)) Glovess Wallet e in an iinterior pocket k P Phone

TIED T IN THE FRONT T PRO: P O You’re wearing g the jacket as intended. j CON: CO Which can look oo a bit put-upon. p p .

LET IT HANG L G PRO: P O Devil-may-care y nonchalance.. no CON: You’re g going CO g to lose it.

TIED AROUND THE BACK T U PRO: Displays P O D y advanced styling s g acumen. CON: Y You risk looking CO g like you’ve tied a bow on y your back. y

COMPLETELY REMOVED CO O PRO: concerns about P O No o co ce s abou what to do with y your belt. w CON: That incomplete CO p ffeeling. g

In helpful f f lowchart form! f

hk ? Are you hiking?

Is it raining? ?

NO O

NO O

Is it very y cold o out? ou ?

l vortex? ? Polar

YES S

YES S

NOT T REALLY..

T Tickets Handkerchieff Flask s

THE BBB COAT O SELECTOR O YES S

Wooll cap p

A $20 bill thatt he’ll fforget and find n next winter i

T g He Things h ld Nott Should Assorted sso ed timepieces for f salee

NO O NOPE, NOT T AT ALL..

Lint int B Bottle off liquorr

Illustrations by PETER OUMANSKI

M Movie-ticket stubb

How are things in Queensland?

From left: Cotton trench coat by Burberry Heritage; burberry.com. Polyester-and-polyamide anorak by Stone Island; stoneisland.com. Polyester-cotton-and-down parka by Canada Goose; canada-goose.com. Wool peacoat by Tommy Hilfiger; tommy.com. Wool coat by John Varvatos; johnvarvatos.com.

Scrap off paperr scribbled with thatt woman’s number Gun Pocket square

men’s ’ style yle

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~ COATS O ~

he Periodic The d Table bl of Coats Coa s

1

CIVILIAN ORIGINS S

2

U ULSTER

CHESTERFIELD, S ULSTER, S MACKINTOSH, S DOWN O JACKET, C LODEN O N

MILITARY ORIGINS S

EISENHOWER, S BOMBER, DUFFLE, TRENCH, PALETOT, GUARDS S COAT, PEACOAT T

3

4

Mn MACKINTOSH C OSH

D DOWN JACKET T

ATHLETIC ORIGINS G POLO, O O CO COVERT T

C CHESTERFIELD D 5

6

Ln L LODEN N

7

8

9

Es EISENHOWER R

Du uE DUFFLE

Tr r H TRENCH

1 11

12

13 3

14 4

Gc GUARDS COAT T

P PEACOAT

Po o

Co COVERT T

B

BOMBER

1

T C S D THE CHESTERFIELD What y you think of when y you think of a standard topcoat. Single-breasted with a fly g front, meaning g the buttons are hidden under a flap. p Often equipped q pp with a velvet collar.

2

S R THE ULSTER Named after the Irish province where p it originated and designed for the cold winters g g there, it’s ankle-length, g double-breasted, and often made of heavy Donegal g tweed..

3

C OSH THE MACKINTOSH The “Mac” was patented in 1823 by T original g Scottish chemist Charles Macintosh,, who waterproofed material by covering g it with rubber dissolved in a coal-tar naphtha solution. Style-wise, y it’s knee-length g with three or four buttons..

4

O C T THE DOWN JACKET Aft A er Eddie Bauer nearly y died of hypothermia y when his wool shirt got g wet on a winter fishing a goose-down jacket, g trip, he designed g g patenting g America’s first in 1940 and sparking g our love affair with the quilted, lightweight, g g yet warm performance coat.. p

T O LODEN 5 THE Made of loden cloth,, which comes

ffrom the thick, coarse, nearly y waterprooff wool of mountain sheep, it’s often a bluish-green w g

POLO O O

c p collar and color with a stiff stand-up silver buttons. s u o s. T S O EISENHOWER 6 THE A style of jacket popularized during g World

War II as s a standard-issue s ssu item to o American troops. p The hem is cut short and trim at the waist and fuller through g the chest. T O BOMBER 7 THE The T U. S. Army y Air Corps debuted the A-2

jacket in 1931, so that airmen could stave off the j wind and cold at high g altitudes. Cut like an Eisen-hower but crafted in leather, it has two front-flap p pockets and trim knit cuffs. p T U E DUFFLE 8 THE First made in England in the 1890s with g

double-faced wool and signature toggle g gg closures (to ( keep Royal Navy sailors warm without restricting their movement), ) it became so popular it was traded among g officers in the army and Royal Flying g Corps.. T C TRENCH 9 THE So S named because it was made for

British troops p in the trenches of World War I. Thomas Burberry y made it from a fabric he created called gabardine—a tightly woven g g cotton that keeps p moisture out without trapping g in heat..

10 0

Pa a T PALETOT

0 10

O THE PALETOT With roots in the French military y iin Napoleon’s day, y the paletot is cut slimmer and more fitted than the chesterfi eld. mo s

11

T T THE GUARDS COAT Originally worn by the English Officers of the O g g Guard, it looks very G y similar to the paletot but has a half belt in the back, no cuffs, a p peaked lapel, h p and buttons p placed far apart. b p

12

T CO T THE PEACOAT Double-breasted with a wide collar and Dou s o a whiff of seafaring g style, the peacoat was first designed at the beginning d g g g of the 18th century. IIts shortness made for better maneuverability y for sailors, who had to climb a ship’s rigging, s gg g and the pijj c cloth in Dutch,, tthick melton-wool material ((orr p hence the name “pea”)) it’s traditionally cut from h easily e y braved the elements.

3 13

T O O THE POLO Also as A so known o s a camel coat o for o its s use us of camel’s hair, it was the sideline jacket for players. c y

14

T T THE COVERT Similar to the chesterfield in that it’s sinS gle-breasted, midlength, g g and has a notch lapel. Different in that the cut D u is s trimmer and crafted in covert twill, a heavy, tightly woven woolen fabric c g tthat’s warmer and can easily take a beating. g.

T f Thanks to Mark-Evan Blackman, menswear design professor at the Fashion Institute off Technology.. B S THE BBB EXPLAINS: T

O Y DONKEY

S l it h h to d hd k k l h company George Keys b d d Surprisingly, has nothing do with donkeys. In 1890, b bespoke-clothing began producing and s f selling the jackets to miners and canal workers. The style became the workingman’s uniform, but when workers on a d drippy canal-construction project in Manchester, England, became ffed up with getting the shoulders off these boiledw work jackets wet, they weatherproofed them by waxing denim with tallow ((a hard substance made from wool r rendered animal fat)) and added the panels onto the jacket's shoulders. Not long after, this feature was added to the K design. The company still makes them today, albeit ffor a more ffashionable crowd. Keys Th k to Nigell Calladine ll d at George Keys.. Thanks

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m men’s ’ style yl


~ COATS O ~

PICK A PATTERN, ANY PATTERN

A ONE-SIDED CONVERSATION ABOUT T

T TAILORING O A L LEATHER JACKET C T YES, YOU CAN TAILOR A LEATHER ASK JJACKET. BUT U YOU U SHOULD U YOURSELF A FEW Q QUESTIONS FIRST T.

F For instance, is it cheaper tthan buying a new leather jjacket that fits?

Oh, you’d rather have a vintage lleather jacket? Hou Houndstooth s oo

Herringbone g e

B Black Watch p plaid

Okay. Then see if the armholess are high enough and the jacket fits in the shoulders and chest. Those are the most expensive to alter. Take a look k aat the lining, insulation, aand d construction. The h more complicated l d they h are, the h more difficult the jacket will be to tailor. l .

P Paisley

JJacquard q

Gu Gun-club u check

Yes, well, Y ll “tailor” l might h b be an understatement. Feel free to call your tailor to see if he’s up to the task, but you’ll probably want to use a leather worker..

Because it’s a lot more diffi B fficult to w work k with h skin k than h it is to work k w with h cloth. l h You might h even want tto find someone who works with biker jackets. k You know k they’re h probably more vigilant about not pissing off their clientele..

What h do d you mean? Just go to a b biker k b bar and d ask k around. d

Oh, h right. h Maybe b just call ll the h b bartender d and d ask kh him. Prince o of Wales P s check

Glenurquhart G q

B My Legs Are Cold, But ld Too Let me sing the praises of underpants. Not undershorts. Not L f Pants that go under your trousers. Under. Pants. briefs. Wh your average man leaves l h house h h winter, When the in the h has h maybe b three h or four f l b h waist. And d he layers above his b l his h waist? Often f k This h seems below just jeans or kh khakis. l unfair f to the h lower l h lf off the h body. b d outrageously half h b h me a pair off llong underwear. d lh h My mother bought Although sk l I tried d them h d b morning, skeptical, one dreary November d I’ve never llooked k db k I wear llong underwear d and back. every d dayy d h winter. But often, f ll wear my long l d r during the I’ll underwear d h spring or early l in the h ffall. ll My rule? l Iff I have h deep into the h and d sweater on top, I want two layers l b a shirt on bottom to b l h by b 2(x)ist. ( ) —A . J. JACOBS balance. Long johns CO MISTAKE COAT S NUMBER U 2:

Donegal D g

M k Itt Make

A DOUBLE O E Double-breasted, D bl b d or DB, as the h rushed like to call it,, is about more r than making g you look extra fancy— — it i keeps you y extra warm. The overlap p of fabric across the chest makes a big m g difference in your capacity to retain heat, making g you y considerably y warmer without adding a g much bulk.

T There should be enough room for only y one jacket underneath your y overcoat—not two or more and a small animal.

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A MAN’S G GUIDE TO C OS E CLOSURE

1.. ZIPPER Your only sure option to c completely seal out the cold. P Patented by a Swedish-born e engineer in 1917, the zipper pp d d make didn’t k it o onto o coats o s until leather-jacket pioneer S Schott first put one on its jackets in 1925.

1

2

3

What W We Owe O

THE T MILITARY A Y

2. SNAPS 2 S Nearly invisible, snaps allow the coat closure to lie flat,, c creating a seamless line in the s lho silhouette. More o casual s l and d remedial than regular buttons. 3. BUTTONS U S You know ’em. They’re likely plastic but can also be silver, g gold, or leather knots. And regardless g of how well made y your coat is, one or more buttons will come off in its lifetime. A good coat has an e extra button sewn in, usually around a pocket. Like a spare tire.

STORM FLAPS S fficers Requested by First World War offi b l k d through h h because rainwater leaked the breast flap.

4. TOGGLES S P Pieces of wood or plastic that loop through fabric or leather to keep a coat closed. Thanks to Glen Hoff T ffs, director off men’s design fforr Brooks oo s Brothers. o es

4

GS D-RINGS ll used d to hold h ld equipment.. Originally

SCIENCE!

H OW

TWEED W O R K S

Tweed is a rough, medium-to-heavy-weight wool fabric that originated in Scotland and comes in different patterns, including herringbone, diamond, and checks. After the wool is woven into a design, it’s felted through either warm or cold water, detergents, and agitation (back in the day, urine was also used) so that the fibers become matted, making the material softer, more resilient, and more apt to retain warmth. Because its fibers are especially big and hollow, they can capture and hold a lot of air, specifically air that’s been warmed by your body heat, keeping you warmer than thinner-fiber wools.

BBB B EXPLAINS: S:

H OW

DOWN W O R K S

Down, the fluffy underlayer beneath the feathers of ducks and geese, keeps them — and you — warm by tightly packing itself to create dozens of filaments, which trap and retain the air heated by your body and keep the cold air out. Down is rated on its fill power, an indication of compressibility, and its weightto-warmth ratio, which is determined by how many cubic inches one ounce of a certain down will occupy. For example, if one ounce of down takes up a volume of 650 cubic inches, it is given a fill-power rating of 650. The higher the fill power, the greater the warmth, the greater the comfort, and the higher the price tag.

WALRUS-TEETH TOGGLES GG

No N animals were harmed in the making g off your duffl ffle coat. Original g toggle gg closures were made from deer horns, which were filed down and smoothed into a shape m p reminiscent of walrus tusks, hence their name. Even w v when first used, they y were never v made from actual tusk. Or teeth. Nowadays, plastic. t y they’re y just j p .

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S EPAULETS b traced d back b k to ancient Roman Can be f uniforms, but shoulder straps were added h coats in World ld War I.. to trench

S O S SNORKEL PARKAS f U. S. flight crews in the 1950s, Designed for borrowed heavily ((stole)) from the Caribou Inuit..


~ COATS O ~

THE WARMTH MENAGERIE

THE THERMIC GIFTS OF OUR FURRY FRIENDS. AND WORMS. SILKWORMS R What they make: S Silk lk Why it’s warm: Silk, crafted from f filament that’s used to make the cocoons off several types off Asian moth caterpillars, is the warmest ffiber per pound we know of. f The expense off a five-pound f silk coat, though, would b prohibitive. be hb COWS S What they make: L Leather h Why it’s warm: The layers of tanned leather hide form a barrier, so less off your body heat escapes, while h l also l blocking bl k the h wind. d GEESE What they make: D Down Why it’s warm: Down is the h und l derlayer that h keeps k geese warm

b beneath their ffeathers. It produces aair pockets that capture your body h heat and d then h k keep it there, h insullatingg yyou. Plus, l it’s llightweight gh gh and d llong-lasting. g l g SHEEP P W What they make: Wooll W it’s warm: T Why The ffleecyy undercoat d that h k keeps sheep h warm does the same ffor yyou, o owing primarily l to each h individual d d l f b wide diameter and natural fiber’s crimp. These h properties llead d to meshing h g and d entanglement, gl which h h create those h necessary pockets k i which in h h warm air can llinger. g The h p pores in the fiber f also absorb a d release and l moisture ggradually, d lly k keeping the wearer comfortable f and d y. dry.

C CAMELS W What they make: Camel hair W Why it’s warm: Th The reddish-tan dd h ffibers come from domesticated B Bactrian camels ((the kind with two h humps), ) who need to stay warm iin the h Gobi b Desert, where h winter ttemperatures can d dip to minus 40 d degrees. What h we call ll camell h hair is aactually the shorter, finer fibers that sserve as an insulating l llayer under d a ccamel’s l llonger, coarser h hair — which h h iis not used for coats. These fibers act m much h llike k wooll and d are more d durable bl tthan cashmere, though they’re often bl blended d d with h it. GOATS What they make: C Cashmere Why it’s warm: Technically, h ll true c cashmere comes from only the

ffiber off the Kashmir ggoat. As w with camels, a ggoat’s softer, f shorteer underlayer y off hair beneath its ccoarser topcoat makes k up more tthan 95 per cent off cashmere ffabrric. The h average overcoat requires ffleece ffrom 30 to 40 ggoats, and b because cashmere is soft f and ffragg iile, it is often blended with wool. RABBITS S What they make: Angora/lapin Why it’s warm: The h h hair comes f from the Angora g rabbit, mainlyy raised d in France and d England. gl d The superfine, f delicate ffibers are warmer than h wooll and d unbelievablyy soft. f They’re y also veryy v l bl considering valuable, d g one Angora g a rabbit bb produces d only l 7 to 14 ounces off fiber f per year.

Illustrations by PETER OUMANSKI

THE NEW INSULATORS MANY SYNTHETIC S C ATTEMPTS S at keeping g us ffs off what nature has already warm are rip-off f perfected. Just as tiny pockets off goose down c h air warmed d by b your body, b d so do d allll capture the kinds off synthetic-coat insulation. NASA’s aero-l d with h liquid l d carbon b dioxd gell, a silica gell treated d is extremely l porous, containing nanopores ide, h aren’t visible bl to the h human h so smallll they eye b can retain lots l h f but off warm air without transferh d as insulation l h ring heat. It was used on one off the l available l bl in jackets k f Mars rovers b but is also from Ch l about b Champion. It’s also five times as expenh synthetics, h l k Thinsulate. h l sive as other like

CO S COAT MISTAKE NUMBER 3::

k an insulation l l d Pertex makes off polyamide th keeps k d and d warm by b preventing that you dry th chilling h ll ffects off evaporation. It draws d the eff m f h h fi fib moisture from rain or sweat through bers th work k like l k thousands h d off capillaries, ll ll that pulling d spreading d it up into narrow spaces and it over l f h a large surface area, where it can more easi-l evaporate. ly d l One naturall nondown alternative is C l d by b Polartec l Cocona, utilized Eco-Engineering, h h creates carbon-based b b d insulation l d which made f h industrial d l waste off coconut husks h k that h from the ld otherwise h l dfillll. would go to a landfi

Wearingg a topcoat p over a plain p shirt. Put on a blazer. Or at least a sweater.

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Literary y Types y and a d their e Popped P pp Collars

THE PARKA TO END ALL PARKAS S Canada Goose’s Snow Mantra parka is used by y the Canadian Arctic Rangers and the Nationall Science Foundation’s Division off Polar Research in Antarctica ffor good reason n

[A] HOOD [ OOD Real coyote fur. The animal’s uneven y hair length g creates a windbreak and reduces heat loss in the face. Strung g with a wire in order to stay up in highg wind conditions. o o s.

A

[B] [ ] COLLAR CO R The same high-pile fleece that lines g the pockets lines the collar as well. p It wicks away you start to y moisture if y sweat. s .

Albert Camus B

[C] [ ] POCKETS S Lined in warm high-pile fleece. Like g wearing gloves.. g a second pair of g

D

S Samuel l Beckett k t E

[D] [ ] ZIPPER AND A FLAP AP Heavy-duty two-way-locking g zippers keep p the coat closed and are protected p by y a storm flap. [E] [ ] EXTERIOR OR The exterior is water-repellent, keeping g rain and melting g snow off, though g the coat is intended more for cold dry y climates s than cold o wet ones. o s

Hunter S. Thompson H p n

DOWN FILLING G 675-fi ll hypoallergenic down from 6 g Canadian Hutterite g geese is regarded g as types a one of the warmest, lightest g of down because the birds are larger, g with dense down plumes that hold and p retain more other o warm air than most os o types of down.. y

C

J James J Joycee

It’s constructed d to keep k you warm to minus 22 degrees, d but b it still p performed well when it was tested at an unthinkable minus 94 degrees. Polyester-cotton-and-down Snow Mantra parka g P y by Canada Goose; canada-goose.com. g m

ORGAN WARMERS S Keeping kidneys warm helps g your k d h l main-tain your body’s y y core warmth and keeps your blood circulation up. Two mesh y pouches that can be loaded with p disposable warmers to heat the kidneys y sit in the lower back of the jacket. j .

Truman Capote

1 Q U EST I O N / 1 A N SW S ER

What Iss

Jack J k Kerouacc

DOUBLE O – C FACED

WOOL? OO ?

Basically, it’s wool made from two wool pieces of roughly the same w g weight. They are attached during w g g the weaving w g process, so the wool comes out on ou of o the mill finished s o both o sides. s s The is that the inside of a T upside p double-faced coat is doub e ced wool oo co s as s handdsome as its outside. Plus, it keeps you y warmer than regular wool. For the w g same size square of material, for ex-q ample, you a y get g eight g ounces of wool instead of four, without adding g foot-age ag or much bulk.

E Edmund Spenser p r CO MISTAKE COAT S NUMBER U 4:

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m men’s ’ style yl

Owning only ly one coat.

U USER’S GUIDE

TO O HOODS OO S When you can. And when you can’tt. A

YES S

IIt’s suddenly raining g and d you forgot g an umbrella. u .

NO O

Any other time.


~ COATS O ~

OU OUTERWEAR’S S MOST OST

And d a Few ew

F FAMOUS O S COSTARS COS S

ACCESSORIES O S As for the rest of your y exposed body, y BBB has got you y covered with tthese cashmere options

Withnail h l The h Doctor

R Blaine Rick

W l Wool-cashmere-and-deerskin h d d ki gloves l b Brioni; brioni.com. b . by

Sherlock h Holmes l

Paddington dd n C l bo Columbo

WITHNAIL & I W The h ankle-length kl l h coat worn by Richard E. E Grant’s Grant s Withnail, Withnail an unemployed actor in 1969 London who h heads h d to the h English l h countryside, became as much a cult classic as the 1987 film. Andrea Galer, the film’s Emmy-winning costume d designer, still ll sells ll the h design, d completely l l bespoke, b k on her h Web b site, andreagaler.co.uk, for f about US$2,500.. SHERLOCK S K Benedict d Cumberbatch’s b b h coat on the h BBC’s Sh Sherlock l k was an off-the-rack coat from Belstaff called the Millf ford. What makes his different ff from f yours is that h the h show’s h costume d designer stitched h d red d buttonholes b h l on his. The jacket was part off the b d 2009 collection brand’s ll and d hasn’t h b been made d since 2010.

Illustrations by PETER OUMANSKI

11975 5

COLUMBO C The h coat worn by b homicide h d detecd tive Lieutenant Columbo was first owned by Peter Falk, who played h him. Falk lk bought b h the h trench h in 1966, just before landing the series, when h h he was walking lk d down 57th h Street in New York k and d got caught h in the h rain. He wore it throughout h h the h 69-episode d run and viewers noticed it getting more haggard as the show went on. Much like Falk himself. f

CASABLANCA A The h “Here’s llooking k at you, k kid” d moment of the 1942 film happened in a Burberry b trench h coat. Or so we think. When the company used the image for publicity in 2012, Bogart’s son maintained d that h the h originall coat might h not h have b been Burberry, b saying, “It is well ll k known my father f was a loyal Aquascutum customer in his personal life.” f Regardless of the brand, no one will ll ever look as good d in a trench. h

DOCTOR WHO The h show’s h Time Lord, d Peter Capaldi, wears a navy wool coat with a red lining and velvet collar ffrom Crombie. The company, which has made d wooll coats since 1805, says as soon as the BBC released images of Capaldi in the coat, calls to the company doubled.

P PADDINGTON BEAR R T The UK’s iconic bear is pretty ttraditional in his blue British dufffle coat, complete with hood and w wooden toggles. This past spring, B BabyGap b sold ld a llimited-edition d d P Paddington Collection, including a mini blue duffle coat. For your k kid, d not you.

2014 0 4

THE NEW ENDORSEMENT: S

h h by b Cashmere hat l . Paull Stuart; paulstuart.com.

Cashmere scarff by ll Cucinelli. ll . Brunello

THE SWAGGER COAT T

When Joe Namath donned a coat made from coyote W y fur with Norwegiang f trim for fox f the Super Bowl XLVIII coin toss, he wasn’t referencing f the I IKEA monkey and he definitely f wasn’t poking fun at the ffur coat he used to w wear 40 years ago. He was reminding the world that Broadway Joe was the original king off sideline swagger. Several players soon came to copy Namath, but none would ever compare. The NFL later banned players and coaches f from wearing attire that wasn’t approved by the league. That means gone are the days of Tom Landry–style statement headwear. And maybe it’s for the better. We’d be afraid f to see what Johnny Manziel would wear when he w wasn’t on the ffield. But that doesn’t mean you can’t p pull off ff a swagger coat iff you’re not a legendary q quarterback ffrom the ’70s. There are two keys to w wearing a bold ffur coat: First, you should be wearing a classic, understated suit underneath. Second, you have to have Namath-level confidence. f m men’s ’ style yle

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WAT C H E S The finest new timepieces

from around the world.

AFTER THE SHOW

ELISABETH KING ASSESSES BASELWORLD 2016, WHERE VALUE, CONTEMPORARY CLASSICS AND A FEW HEAD TURNERS WERE THE STORY OF THE FAIR.

I

t’s easy to become too forensic when analysing raw figures. The Swiss watch industry is coming off five years of spectacular growth because of once-in-a-lifetime demand in the

Chinese market. But the million dollar installations at this year’s Baselworld showed how quickly the major watch brands are reacting to neglected markets and catering to customers looking for

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Continued from p91 more bang for their horological buck. There’s no denying that Hong Kong, where many Chinese mainlanders concentrate their timepiece buying, has slumped 22.9 per cent, but it’s still not clear where the Chinese will travel en masse this year. Australia is already a major beneficiary of shifting patterns with Chinese tourism lifting 21 per cent last year. Outranking every other tourism market, the Chinese spend a total of $8.3 billion and luxury watches are a purchasing priority. There was more good news for the 145,000 visitors at this year’s Baselworld. The US, the world’s second largest watch market, almost flatlined last year with only a 0.8 per cent decline in sales, and the rest of the world which accounts for 56 per cent of total Swiss watch revenues increased by two per cent. The words “quality, value and wearability” were more prevalent at Baselworld 2016 than in years gone by. But the 1,500 exhibitors delivered on excitement with new colours and materials, a clutch of new smartwatches and the sort of intelligent watchmaking that surmounts passing market trends. Titanium, blue dials and sports watches again struck a dominant note. Rolex led by example to grab a big chunk of the limelight. The new Daytona (see opposite page) boasting a Cerachrom bezel – the brand’s proprietary futuristic material – created maximum buzz with its nod to the 1965 model with a black Plexiglas insert. Nostalgia also triumphed in the substantial re-working of the Oyster Perpetual Air-King. A tribute to Rolex’s long association with aviation and exploration, the well-priced reprise features a high degree of anti-

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magnetism, a must for would-be adventurers, and the original type on the dial in yellow or green. It’s a different market, yet the fact is that smartwatches outsold Swiss watches for the first time in the last quarter of 2015 – 8.1 million shipped to 7.9 million of Switzerland’s finest. No-one seriously believes that smartwatches will replace mechanical timepieces, but there’s a huge amount of FOMO in an industry scarred by the quartz watch tsunami of the late 1970s. Last year, Frederique Constant’s first smartwatch sold 16,000 units. The follow-up features a world timer function that syncs with a smartphone and amps up the style with a navy blue dial, blue crocodile strap and gold-plated case. The sportiest smartwatch up for consideration was the Tissot Smart-Touch – with 30 functions and a titanium case. The strategy for brands to go in-house to up their serious watch-making cred has become an imperative. Chanel’s first men’s watch, the J12, became a cult hit with both sexes. The Monsieur de Chanel is uncompromisingly manly and introduces the fashion house’s first in-house movement. Chronographs are always on-trend because they are the ultimate tech-meets-elegant partnership. TAG Heuer reaffirmed its commitment to smart watches with a Connected Watch Bar at Baselworld, yet also attracted major kudos for its 40th anniversary tribute to the original Monza Chronograph, launched to honour Niki Lauda’s first FI world championship. Breitling debuted its enhanced BO1 chronograph movement in a new iteration of the Superocean Heritage – a

Tissot Smart-Touch.

Bulgari Octo Finissimo.

Rolex Oyster Perpetual Air-King.

Ulysses Nardin Grand Deck Marine Tourbillon.

limited edition of 100. The Omega Speedmaster Moonphase (opposite) with its head-turning blue dial and moon carved from a real meteorite teamed quirkiness with style. Those looking for a bargain should bookmark the Seiko Presage models – one with a black dial and one with a white dial – which mark the 60th anniversary of the brand’s first wristwatch. Other value propositions were thick on the stands. The Tudor Heritage Black by Bronze with its bronze-aluminium case designed to patina with wear, was the most talked-about entry level timepiece. Citizen time-traveled back to its game-changing solar watches of the 1970s with the Eco-Drive One, featuring a paper-thin thickness of 2.98 millimetres. Showstoppers are an unwavering tradition at Baselworld, no ifs, buts or financial downturns. Searching for the thinnest repeater ever made? Enter the Bulgari Octo Finissimo – 50 pieces only. A case crafted from a hunk of sapphire gives star quality to the Hublot Big Bang Unico Sapphire (see page 95). The words tourbillon and affordable rarely appear in the same sentence, but a US$15,500 entry price for the TAG Heuer Carrera Caliber 02 Tourbillon represents a 75 per cent ‘discount’ on the average price of a tourbillon. The new reality hasn’t fazed the master craftsmen at Ulysse Nardin. Priced at US$280,000, the Grand Deck Marine Tourbillon drew gasps for its finely tuned pulley system. The days of stratospheric prices for little-known brands are definitely over. But Baselworld 2016 again showcased meticulously crafted and newsworthy timepieces to make the hearts of watchlovers beat louder and faster.


W AT C H E S

BREITLING Avenger Hurricane $11,570

HURRICANE FORCE BREITLING’S EXPERTISE WITH MATERIALS IS TO THE FORE OF THIS IMPOSING PIECE.

A

t 50mm diameter, you can’t miss this hyper-masculine chronograph which, despite its size, is extremely light and durable. Employing a patented high-tech material known as Breitlight, which is 3.3 times lighter than titanium

and 5.8 times lighter than steel – yet harder than both – this military-influenced piece is also highly functional and reliable, powered by the Manufacture Breitling Caliber B12 – a self-winding chronograph with a 24-hour display and and chronometercertified by the COSC (Swiss

Official Chronometer Testing Institute). It’s the quality of the materials and the finish that stand out here, offering the wearer resistance to scratches, traction and corrosion, anti-magnetic, thermal stability and antiallergic properties. Simply, hard to ignore.

OMEGA ROLEX Cosmograph Daytona

Boy, did this one excite the purists at Basel. A new version of a legend in chronographs (and motor sport) first created in 1963 and which blends the best of its heritage with 21st Century tech. Specifically, the 904L steel case and monobloc Cerachrom bezel, the black colour of the latter recalling the 1965 model, its tachymetric scale measuring average speeds of up to 400km/h. The 2016 version also carried the Superlative Chronometer certification redefined by Rolex in 2015, a guarantee of superb time-keeping accuracy and performance.

Speedmaster Moonphase

Amateur astronomers may be aware the lunar month is not 30 days but slightly more than 29.5 days. The art in this new Speedmaster released at Baselworld is the ability of the OMEGA mechanism to accurately measure these phases, which only needs adjusting after 10 years and requires only a few turns of the crown. The piece is equipped with the inhouse OMEGA caliber 9904 co-axial escapement movement and certified as a “Master Chronometer”. With its sun-brushed blue dial, ceramic bezel, stainless steel case, Liquidmetal on the tachymeter scale and rhodium-plated circles on the sub-dials, it’s a major addition to the Speedmaster family. $21,000

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SET TO SAIL EDOX’S ASSOCIATION WITH THE EXTREME SAILING SERIES HAS S PRODUCED O UC THIS S POWERFUL-LOOKING O U OO G CHRONO. C O O

EBERHARD Scafograf 300

A dive watch reintepretation – introduced this year at Basel – of a collection first released in the 1950s, the self-winding Scafograf retains a vintage aesthetic but is updated with a 43mm steel case, unidirectional rotating ceramic bezel, luminescent markings and applied indices, curved sapphire glass and an automatic helium escape valve at 9 o’clock. The model is water resistant to 300m and includes a personalised caseback with an engraved starfish. Available on rubber strap or steel bracelet.

EDOX Grand Ocean Chronograph Automatic $4,000

A

heritage, boutique Swiss brand it may be but Edox’s multiyear involvement with the international Extreme Sailing Series – held each year in waters from Sydney to Singapore – is a thoroughly 21st Century pursuit. This new release represents the official timepiece for the aforementioned series and presents as a fitting evolution for a brand that has numerous hard-wearing sports watches in the back catalogue. A durable 45mm steel case with scratch-resistant sapphire glass and ceramic bezel, ratcheted to mark off dive times, houses a reliable automatic

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movement based on the ETA Valjoux j x 7750. A tachymeter scale on the outer case allows average speed and distance travelled to be calculated, while a special sub-counter on the dial under 12 o’clock enables sailors in the Extreme series to count, down to the second, the four minutes before each race start. Water-resistant to 300m, the chrono’s rubber strap completes the sporting cred of this highly masculine watch, offering both bespoke and general functionality, accuracy and durability in sometimes testing conditions. Serious sailors place enormous faith in their craft, and now also their watch.

ALPINA Alpiner 4 Manufacture Flyback Chronograph

Alpina are a heritage name when it comes to pilot’s watches and here put the flyback function – invented in the 1930s to aid pilots – front and centre of this sporty and stylish chronograph, powered by the Manufacture AL-760 calibre. The case is Black PVD-treated stainless steel, 44 mm in diameter, with start-stop pushers at 2 o’clock and reset button at 4 o’clock, sapphire crystal and engraved steel caseback. The sophisticated looking piece is water-resistant to 100 metres. $7,050


W AT C H E S

TRUE ORIGINAL

TUDOR WAS ALL ABOUT THE HERITAGE BLACK BAY AT THIS YEAR’S FAIR.

F

our new models were added to Tudor’s Heritage family at this year’s Baselworld but it was changes to the Heritage Black Bay, first intorduced in 2012, which caused most comment. The addition of a model with steel bracelet as well as coloured fabric straps to match the bezel, and the inclusion of an updated in-house movement, MT 5602, to the collection,

is testament to the importance of the Black Bay line in the house of Tudor. The movement offers a 70-hour power reserve, The new fabric strap on the version pictured is produced according to the traditional “Jacquard” technique mastered by a century-old family business located in the St-Etienne region of France. TUDOR Heritage Black Bay $4,350.

TAG HEUER Carrera Heuer-01 Grey Phantom

One of a number of new versions of the highly successful TAG Heuer Carrera Heuer-01 introduced at Baselworld last year, the Grey Phantom is an all-titanium edition which thoroughly updates the collection’s look, showcasing the signature skeleton dial and the addition of the metal bracelet to the collection. A showpiece of TAG Heuer’s modular design, allowing multiple combinations of materials and colours, other versions released at Basel include an all-steel model and black ceramic on black rubber strap model. All house the TAG Heuer Calibre Heuer-01, Manufacture movement, based on the 1887 calibre.

HUBLOT Big Bang Unico Sapphire

Again demonstrating its ability with difficult materials, at this year’s Baselworld Hublot introduced this 500-piece limited edition in which the case middle, bezel and back are cut from blocks of sapphire, a very hard material to machine. Combined with its skeleton dial, made from transparent resin which reveals the gears of the proprietary Unico HUB1242 movement, and a transparent strap that allows the wearer’s skin to be seen through it, this is a highly unique, exquisitely crafted timepiece. $76,400

$8,100

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GUCCI G-Timeless Automatic $2,445.

BEES AND STARS AND HEARTSS I S ALL ABOUT IT’S OU THE FINER DETAILS S AS S GUCC GUCCI UPDATES U S ITS S G-TIMELESS G SS LINE.

T

hree new variantss were added h to this flagship Gucci G i line, l at Baselworld, including a g this light yellow-gold PVD case (above) as g y gold well as a stainless steel version. Perfect for the design-conscious, it was the beautifully realised new indices which created most comment – the traditional numerals replaced by a

ORIS Artelier Calibre 112

A new iteration of the brand’s Artelier collection designed for the frequent traveller and housing a new variation – the Calibre 112 – of its in-house movement. This inclusion sees a second time zone complication added, with hours and minutes and day/night indication displayed. The 43mm diameter allows the sizable display of each complication, including a power-reserve dial. The hand-wound movement provides a 10-day power reserve. A stylish evolution of the collection.

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mixture xture of symbols symbol in i the h light yellow-gold, including bees, stars and a single g g g heart att 7 o’clock. The striking indexes o clock. are overlaid onto silver or black dials that display a fine-grain ‘rosette’ guilloché finish, adding texture to the piece. All three pieces house the ETA 2824 movement, with the inner mechanics and oscillating weight visible through

a transparent caseback. The dials show w the ‘Gucci Automatic’ stamp at 12 o’clock t e Gucci and date at 6 o’clock. The G-Timeless 2016 version is available in black or brown alligator leather strap. The restrained 38mm case size makes it a versatile timepiece, elegant enough for a suit, yet blingy enough for your best luxe casual.

PATEK PHILIPPE Nautilus 5711/1R

Forty years after the original, Patek Philippe releases a pink gold version of its famous Nautilus model. Patek Philippe has refined the links in the metal bracelet for greater comfort and to reduce the overall weight of the piece. The gradated brown-black dial with its characteristic Nautilus horizontal lines complements the overall appearance, while the three-hand automatic movement is hallmarked with the Patek Philippe Seal and has the benefit of a Spiromax® silicon balance spring.


W AT C H E S

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uilding a watch collection comes with responsibilities. Constant vigilance against theft, fire and loss for starters. A burglary is committed somewhere in Australia every minute and, because of their size, watches and jewellery are top of the most wanted list. The problem is huge internationally, too, and our dependence on the Internet has springboarded the ancient crime of fencing to new heights. The Art Loss Register, the world’s largest private data base for lost, stolen or looted artworks, antiques and collectibles, has even started a service called thewatchregister. com, which matches the serial numbers of Switzerland’s finest with timepieces sold by auction houses, pawnbrokers and private individuals to determine whether they are stolen goods. “High calibre” (read: wealthy) consumers always enquire about insurance and the fixed costs of owning a boat, a luxury car or expensive watch. But younger clients often overlook the associated upkeep and insurance costs to protect and maintain luxury items, particularly watches, say insurers. Whether you own one expensive watch or several they need to be insured separately because they aren’t covered by a standard household contents policy.

SAFE HAVEN Due diligence is also mandatory, even if you do update an insurance policy annually with a broker. The safest way to guard and store your watches is in a bank deposit box. But, unless you are going away for an extended period, it’s a drag to go to the bank and undergo a security check every time you want to wear a particular model. A home safe is a much better option. Don’t be too cheap. Professional thieves have long been able to access the simple ones sold in hardware stores, even when they are bolted to the wall. A huge range of digital, fire-proof and in-floor safes are available

A Bas And Lokes watch rolll.

INTENSIVE CARE MEN’S ST YLE’S COMPLETE GUIDE TO PROTECTING AND STORING WATCHES. By Elisabeth King.

online or in store to protect your horological investments. Check out: sentrysafe.com.au, cmisafe. com.au, justsafes.com.au and safesgalore.com.au BOXED IN Dust, moisture and neglect are the other major threesome that pose a significant threat to the value and performance of a luxury watch. Watches also need to be stored separately to avoid wear caused by friction or physical damage. The original boxes aren’t just packaging, they’re specially made by the luxury watch brands to maintain the lustre of the timepieces. The problem is that three or four of them can take up too much space. Speciality watch boxes come in all sizes, but the standard ones can store from three to 20 models. The smaller ones are perfect if you want to keep a collection of dive or chronograph watches together. The larger ones come in single and double layers to protect watches from the biggest danger to their functioning – dust.

A specialty watch box.

An electric watch winder.

Watch boxes can be as cheap as $50 or cost thousands if they are bespoke types made by storied manufacturers such as Hellermann in Germany ( hellermann.com). Heritage Brit brands, including the

royal jeweller Asprey, Aspinal (aspinaloflondon.com) and Rapport (rapportlondon.com) specialise in watch boxes for gentlemen. DL Trading (dltradingau.com. au) claims to be Australia’s number one watch box seller, and offers tips on watch maintenance. One piece of advice that should be written in stone is that storing your watches in a box is a good first step. “Every timepiece needs to be overhauled every three to five years by a watch expert to check the efficiency and performance of the product.” WIND UP AND ROLL Many connoisseurs store their watches in a winder because automatic watches stay precise by relying on the movement of your arm. Mechanical movements remain in top condition if they are constantly wound, so the lubricants inside don’t pool and maintain their purpose. Most high-end watches guard against over-winding, but you should bear three major things in mind. Is a winder easy to program for different watch models? Does the winder have a program? And is it powered by a battery or electricity? If you store your watches in a safe, battery-powered is the obvious buy. Good selections are available from: clockmaker.com.au and watchwinderworks.com.au Watch rolls are having a moment. The most expensive ones are made from leather, but fabrics that can also be laid flat and can be rolled up into a small bundle are popular, too. Sydneybased brand Bas and Lokes (basandlokes.com) are a small artisan company, but its watch roll designs have been getting major attention from overseas watch fans. The new Manolo watch pouches are handmade to order and come in a range of leathers for only $89 each. Other watch roll names to note are Louis Vutton for its monogrammed watch rolls, Dunhill, Tod’s, Berluti and the US-based Royce Leather Gifts (royceleathergifts.com) men’s style

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Channing Tatum

COV E R

FAME BECOMES HIM After a troubled time as a kid and jobs as roofer, male stripper and model, actor Channing Tatum has emerged as one of the true movie stars of his generation.


“He’s the guy in that stripping movie, right? The one who dropped his pants in that movie…” Er, yes, that’s him. Channing Tatum. The opening quote is a summary of the reaction we got when we showed anyone over the age of about 37 the photo on this issue’s cover. For anyone under that age, recognition was far more instant. They’ve grown up with the guy. Sure, there was the torso-led fame of Magic Mike, and Magic Mike XXL, but earlier, there was Tyler in dance movie Step Up, Jenko in 21 Jump Street, Duke in GI Joe, and even much earlier, young Antonio in the highly praised if rarely seen A Guide To Recognising Your Saints. Point being, Channing Tatum is “next-gen”. The new breed, even though he’s been around a decade or more now. Our friends at Esquire dubbed him, “the first honest-to-God movie star of his generation”. And that’s because beyond the pecs, and the godgiven jawline, and the all-round hyper-masculine, alpha male appearance, this Tatum chap can really act. Watch him in Magic Mike, closely. The scenes where he’s not ripping his clothes off, we mean. Like when he’s in the bank trying to get them to loan him money, pretending he’s anything but a stripper. The not inconsiderable balancing act, performance-wise, of trying to convey cock-suredness, vulnerability and fear all at once. Tatum manages it. He’s convincing. The story goes he was an overactive and at times “troublesome” kid (that’s the word the profiles of him most favour when describing his youth), originally from Alabama before the family moved to Tampa, Florida. His dad fixed roofs and his mum worked for an airline. Channing was good at sport, sizeable for his age, and considered playing football at higher levels. He wrestled, did martial arts, and also learned to dance. An unsuccessful period at College in West Virginia followed school, after which Channing moved back home and began working as a male stripper – the reallife material for the Magic Mike character. Eventually

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‘I learned how to act in auditions… reading for Thug Number Two or Thug Number One.’ Channing Tatum

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Channing Tatum

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he moved out to Los Angeles, apparently without any firm idea of what he’d do there. “I didn’t do much when I first got there,” he told Esquire’s Tom Chiarella for the magazine’s cover story on Tatum in December 2014. “I was a roofer for a while. It was mostly long days and hours, and hours at night spent in dance clubs. I mostly learned to dance by hanging out in clubs and grinding on girls. Women, cars, alleys. Fun one night, then ugly, too. Then I started modeling. And the travel schedule, the food, the demands brought things together for me. That was a full day, with expectations every day. I’d never had that. Suddenly, every hour of the day was accounted for. Busy. And I never want to be without that again.” Campaigns for the likes of Abercrombie & Fitch, Dolce & Gabbana, Sean John and Armani followed, while in between Tatum hit the LA audition circuit. He’d had a taste of the screen when he danced in Ricky Martin’s “She Bangs” video in 2000, but when he was cast in the 2005

he’s such a good actor is that he’s not afraid of anything.” The role which truly showed the potential of Channing Tatum was the 2014 film Foxcatcher, playing real-life US Olympic wrestler Mark Schultz. Tatum’s physical yet emotionally vulnerable performance opposite the brilliant Mark Ruffalo was a stand-out, and evidence that while earlier he may have been regarded as “eyecandy”, there was much more than meets the eye. “I’d come to this place where I didn’t want to just keep doing parts because I think the movies will do well,” he told Vanity Fair. “I want to do character work. I still like all the movies I’ve done … but with Foxcatcher I went deeper. I became obsessed with everything about [Schultz], even the way he holds a fork… I’ve never dabbled in a sport that is more suffocating than freestyle wrestling. You have an opponent staring you in the face, trying to dominate you. It’s fear-driven. You don’t want everything you’ve worked for to go away in a second.”

‘I’d come to this place where I didn’t want to just keep doing parts because I think the movies will do well.’ Samuel L. Jackson vehicle Coach Carter, about a high school basketball coach, the film career of the former tradie, stripper and athletic prodigy had now shifted to drive. “I learned how to act in auditions, not even in movies, but by reading for Thug Number Two or Thug Number One,” Tatum told Vanity Fair. “You’re trying to learn by reading three lines and hoping that you get the part.” His physique and “fat neck from playing football” meant Tatum was never likely to be offered lawyers and bankers as roles, but he continued to impress as the muscle through a series of films both good and bad in the next few years, earning the attention of critics and the praise of co-stars. “There’s no vanity with Chan,” his co-star in Dear John, Amanda Seyfried, once told Details magazine. “That’s the first thing that struck me about him. I saw this intensely good-looking guy, and I expected some vanity. But he’s not like that at all. He’s not afraid to be embarrassed, not afraid to look stupid. One of the reasons

PHOTOGRAPH Y

A sentiment which perhaps describes his career, not that there’s any fear of that happening for the foreseeable future. Recently seen on Australian screens, first in the latest Quentin Tarantino flick The Hateful Eight and then the Coen Brothers retro Hollywood take, Hail, Caesar!, Tatum has a raft of work coming up, including lead billing for the sequel to Kingsman: Secret Service, Kingsman: The Golden Circle, opposite acting young gun Taron Egerton. Clearly the roles he’s securing are changing as his resume lengthens. Off screen he has been married to Jenna Dewan since 2005 – who he met on the set of the dance film, Step Up – and they have a daughter, Everly. Life is in a good place for the kid who was once diagnosed with ADHD and dyslexia. And his ambition has not been sated yet. “I would, in the end, like to know that I’ve made at least one movie that will stand the test of time, that will be up there with the work of the people I grew up watching.”

BRIAN BOWEN SMITH/AUGUST/RAVEN & SNOW men’s style

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.com.au For the considered edit of men’s fashion, watches, fragrances and grooming, motoring, lifestyle and more. Plus, get exclusive video and bonus content from the quarterly editions of Men’s Style.


MEN OF

INFLUENCE

2016

THIS YEAR’S MEN OF INFLUENCE LIST FEATURES OUR MOST DIVERSE COLLECTION OF MEN EVER, FROM VERY DIFFERENT PROFESSIONS AND VERY DIFFERENT WALKS OF LIFE...

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PETER STEFANOVIC JOURNALIST

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What responsibilities come with influence? My responsibilities are

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reporting accurately and fairly. The work I do can be highly influential as it informs viewers about a story or situation. They can then form their own opinion so it’s very important that the information I provide is correct. What talent are you proud of? My work ethic is very strong. I’ve worked hard ever since I was a stablehand at 12 years of age. Work hard, things happen.

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ANNUA

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What’s a weakness you’d admit to? 

MEN

Food. Always food! Tell us a secret… I often talk to myself. Ideas, observations, thoughts.

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HUNTER PAGE LOCHARD AC T O R

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What does influence mean? To be

Welcome

to the 9th edition of our annual Men Of Influence list – a group of men under 45 from diverse backgrounds and careers whose endeavours make them individuals of note.

a positive role model to not only the youth of today but the youth of my indigenous culture. What skill are you most proud of?

My writing. It’s a skill not a lot of people know I have but the one I work on perfecting. I believe if you know how to write stories it’s easier to delve into characters. Tell us a secret… I’m obsessed with cartoons. To the point I get told “can we watch something serious now?’ Page-Lochard appears in CLEVERMAN, ABC, June 2 at 9.30pm.

HENRY WILSON DESIGNER

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What responsibilities come with influence? In my work I’m selective

about what I make and why. If I was to influence people it would be to question what they produce and be mindful of the impact it has on resources and society in general. What skill are you most proud of?

I like to think I’m good at observing. People, places, processes. I find it all very relevant to my work. Tell us a little known fact… I’m an atheist and believe we can be morally good without guilt from a “god”.

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CHRISTIAAN VAN C VUUREN AND NICK OS BOSHIER, AKA O S S BONDI HIPSTERS PERFORMERS

What W responsibilities p come with influence?

The only person I have any influence over is my one-year-old son, Felix, and that scares the shit out of me. I can’t believe I’m in a position to shape an actual human being’s life. What if I get it all wrong? I keep having these visions of a 17-year-old version of Felix smoking an ice pipe, all because his Dad is naked on the internet. I need to stop getting naked on the internet. NICK: As I was growing up in entertainment I was extremely porous to opinions because I had everything to learn. Being in that position, the people you look up to have the capacity to inspire, or derail you, by their words and advice. So I feel responsible to give people advice that is elemental: work hard, learn everything and be nice, and less specific to my own path. CHRISTIAAN:

MITCH LARKIN O LY M P I C SW I M M E R

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What is the burden of influence?

Young athletes watch us like hawks and our actions are reciprocated by those who will become the next generation of Australian swimmers. As a kid I learnt a lot by watching the older generation... it taught me the importance of sportsmanship, as well as being humble. What skill are you most proud of?

I’m a bit of a perfectionist... both a good and bad thing. Often I’ll swim a race and everyone will come up to me and say “great job”, however I’m never satisfied.. Tell us a secret... I have a big interest in investments, specifically property. I’m always searching for the next area to buy an investment property.

What skill are you most proud of?

The ability to convince people to do things that might not actually be the best thing for them to do. I’m not right all the time, but I always think I’m right, so I prepare very convincing arguments. NICK: I’m good at talking. I’m good at being generally quite curious about people. I get a lot out of simple exchanges with most people. CHRISTIAAN:

What’s a weakness you’d admit to?

My main weakness, is not accepting that I have any weaknesses. NICK: I procrastinate a tonne. I kid myself I’m busy sometimes, but when I really look at the output of that “busyness”, there is nothing to show for it. CHRISTIAAN:

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TROYE SIVAN MUSICIAN

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At just a tender 20 years, his social media following alone is enough to make someone who wants to be famous but isn’t cry like a baby four million Instagram followers, about the same on Twitter. The openly gay, South African-born prodigy, who built his musical career largely on Youtube, has also appeared in films (X-Men Origins: Wolverine, the Spud trilogy) and his first EP, 2014’s TRXYE, went No.1 on iTunes in more than 55 countries.

ED COWAN PARTNER, TRIPOD COFFEE/CRICKETER

33

What responsibilities come with influence? Be honest with yourself and others, find ways of positively contributing to your community rather than taking from it, and show compassion to other people’s journey. What skill are you most proud of?

Rightly or wrongly I’ve never really viewed myself as incredibly skillful, but I’ve found I have a talent to cut out distractions and get to any task at hand. What’s a weakness you’d admit to?

I think sometimes I’m not ruthless enough. Having played with some world-class athletes, what separates them is their unwavering ruthlessness.

TODD GREENBERG NRL CEO

44

What responsibilities come with

younger people. One of my passions is being able to listen and offer advice for younger people be they students, rugby league players or aspiring sports administrators. What skill are you proud of? To use a cricket analogy, I like to play with a straight bat so I’d say my front foot defence... my brothers would say I get wrapped on the pads too many times. What’s a weakness you’d admit to?

Being shown up by my wife in long distance running. I can’t catch her.

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S A M R U T T Y N / T H E D A I LY T E L E G R A P H

influence? Being a role model for


WALEED ALY B R OA D CA S T E R , T H E P R OJ E C T

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Some people scoffed when our last cover, which featured this man looking extremely dapper, bore the coverline “Most Important Man On TV”. And yet this year he was nominated for the Gold Logie! Which is not, of course, why we used that line, since shamelessly adopted by newspaper op-ed writers. We deemed the academiccum-nightly television broadcaster as “most important” because he brings a rare intelligence, perception and fearless approach to discussing serious issues within a magazine-style TV format. Beyond that, whether he likes it or not, his background combined with his cultural upbringing makes him “a face” of modern Australia. There are few more influential people currently on our small screen.

NICK BELL T E C H E N T R E P R E N E U R / S TA R T U P I N V E S TO R (WME, APPSCORE) 35

What is the responsibility of influence? The responsibility to give

back – not only financially, but also through teaching and mentorship. What talent are you most of? It may be a talent or a flaw, but I never doubt myself in business, or generally in life. With any challenge, I can find a solution and keep my stress levels in check, which has allowed me to obtain decent success in business. Tell us a secret… I melt like butter when given a head rub.

SIMON HANCOCK S O C I A L M E D I A I N F L U E N C E R / D I R E C TO R , HUDDLE GROUP 28

What responsibilities come with influence? To lead by example. No

matter what you do or who you are, if people look to you for guidance you have a responsibility to be the very best version of yourself and have a positive impact on those around you.

JONATHAN BARTHELMESS CHEF

36

What skill are you most proud of?

I’m proudest of the business skills I’ve developed through building my PR & Communications agency Huddle Group and my online lifestyle site, Mr Simon Hancock. I come from a family of laidback creatives so it’s taken a lot of hard work to develop the focus required of a business owner. What’s a weakness you’d admit to?

Wine and Italian food. Herringbone suits. Literally every dog on earth.

The reach of the man who created buzz in Sydney dining once more with The Apollo (opened in 2012) and later, Cho Cho San, both in Potts Point, now extends with the recent opening of The Apollo Ginza in Tokyo. A modern Greek restaurant in Japan? So crazy, it must work, and Barthelmess’ record with business partner Sam Christie speaks for itself. We wonder – and watch – to see what comes next... men’s style

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DAVID WARNER CRICKETER

G THIAK ADUT T DENG L AW Y E R

Working as a lawyer in Western Sydney in the areas of criminal, family, personal injury and employment law, Deng’s story came to prominence when he was part of a film made to promote University of Western Sydney. A conscripted former child soldier in Sudan, he was shot in the back and later smuggled out of Sudan in a corn sack on the back of a truck. In Australia he worked in a service station and studied law, and now advocates for other refugees in legal matters. A book about his life is currently in the works.

T TIM WILSON SON FORMER HUMAN RIGHTS COMMISSIONER, L I B E R A L CA N D I DAT E F O R G O L D S T E I N

36

What does influence mean to you?

I’m always conscious that people in positions of political influence are responsible for setting the tone of debates. If they get it wrong debate can become damaging and divisive. What talent are you most proud of?

My optimism. I always look for the good in situations and people. What’s a weakness you’d admit to?

I can be a bit excitable, but that means I have a rush of energy and focus. Sometimes I need to remind myself to slow down and focus on the marathon ahead, not the sprint.

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Australia’s Vice Captain has drawn his share of headlines through his career to date, both for his blazing on-field talent and less gloriously for some of his off-field behaviour. But fatherhood appears to have settled the top-order batsman, whose skill and aggression can change a match in a very short period of time. A key team member in all three formats of the game, there’s lots of pressure and expectation on Warner as the Australian team continues to regenerate.


BENJAMIN LAW AU T H O R A N D J O U R N A L I S T

33

What responsibilities come with influence? Not being a jerk, being

vocal about issues that matter and maintaining basic hygiene. What skill or talent are you most proud of? As a child, I used to be

able to pull out my “innie” belly button and turn it into an “outie”, but the last time I drunkenly tried to do it as an adult resulted in bleeding. So my latest skill is making sourdough bread – a few multigrain loaves a week. It takes the entire day, has consumed my life and I now have a living organism I call Greg living in my refrigerator. What’s a weakness you’d admit to? Homosexuality. Actually, scrap

that – I consider it a strength. Tell us something about you not everyone would know… Even now,

I only type with two fingers. And I’m a full-time writer.

TIM GURNER C E O, G U R N E R

34

What responsibility comes with influence? Honesty and

commitment. As we grow and more people become interested in what we do, it’s integral that we follow through... and deliver more than what we promised. What skill are you proud of?

Dogged determination and looking outside the square. I strive to push the boundaries in everything we do, be it branding, staff presentation, product and design, even selecting the certain shape of a door handle for one of our projects.

TRAVIS FIMMEL AC TO R

36

The son of a cattle farmer from country Victoria, it was Fimmel’s body that first made him famous. After injury prevented him making it as an AFL footballer, he started modelling and was soon one of the highest paid male models in the world, most famously for his Calvin Klein underwear ads. Now he’s famous once more for his visceral lead role as Ragnar in Vikings, a show with a passionate following. His wild appearance has inspired Ragnar-lookalikes everywhere.

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SHAUN CHANG G OPTOMETRIST AND FOUNDER, EYES4EVEREST 30

What is the responsibility of influence?

It’s t’s important to inspire people to make a positive impact on our world. What talent are you most proud of?

Following my heart, never giving up and getting the job done. Helping children with vision difficulties is my passion so when I encountered it in the Sherpa community of Mt Everest, it made sense to start Eyes4Everest. Back home, we also made an App that refers children with vision difficulties to trained optometrists. Tell ell us a secret… Good weather follows me when I’m trekking or climbing.

K KENT “SMALLZY” SMALL LL N OVA F M H O S T

BEN SIMMONS BASKETBALLER

A college prodigy widely tipped – until recently – as the likely No.1 pick in the 2016 NBA draft in June, Simmons was raised in Melbourne, the son of Dave Simmons who came to Australia from the US in 1989 to play in the NBL for the Melbourne Tigers. After playing for Box Hill Senior Secondary College in Melbourne and for Australia at the under-17 World Championships, the power forward

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moved to the US in 2013 and since last year has played college basketball with Louisiana State University, where he soon emerged as the favourite to be the No.1 draft pick, a position peviously held by the likes of LeBron James, Allen Iverson and Shaquille O’Neal. Will Simmons live up to the hype? Time will tell. Meanwhile, down here, we just hope he turns up to play for the Boomers from time to time.

32

What responsibilities come with influence? If you have the power to

connect with a lot of people, you’re a role model whether you like it or not. Judgement comes with that so you have to be conscious of everything you say. What skill are you most proud of? My ability to communicate with people and get them to feel comfortable. Tell us a secret… I’m a big believer in conspiracies. Anything you’re told is probably only 20 per cent truth... and after that my mind races! Kent hosts Smallzy’s Surgery on NOVA FM, Mon-Fri nights from 7pm-10pm


HAYDEN COX F O U N D E R , H AY D E N S H A P E S

34

What responsibility comes with influence? I’ve always been passionate

about innovation. The more Haydenshapes has grown, the more important it is to help champion progression within the industry and continue to evolve.

HERBERT APPELROTH

What skill are you most proud of?

What responsibilities come with

I’d say design. I geek out on all aspects of it. I’m a believer that doing what you love showcases your true talent.

influence? To be an effective leader,

F E R R A R I AU S T R A L A S I A C E O

Tell us something about you not

you have to appreciate the power of influence. It should be positive and inspirational – giving vision, empowering and encouraging people, and cultivating an environment of innovation and energy.

everyone would know… My wife tells

What talent are you most proud of?

me I make the world’s best Margarita.

My passion and enthusiasm. Ferrari is about luxury and aspiration – not just about making cars, but in the business of luxury, inspiring passion and driving people to strive hard in pursuit of their dreams.

What’s a weakness you’d admit to?

Having no idea about pop culture. I probably should keep more up to date.

CHRIS & BRAD SCOTT A F L C OAC H E S

39

Twins Chris at Geelong and Brad at North Melbourne represent the leading edge of the next generation of AFL coaches: articulate, thoughtful, innovative and good communicators with players, fans and media. And while Brad can’t as yet put “premiershipwinning” after his name (Chris won his in his first year of senior coaching, in 2011) both have brought the tough, tenacious reputation they had as flagwinning players for the Brisbane Lions to their coaching careers. Ones to watch for a number of years yet. men’s style

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SCOTT MCLAUGHLIN, V 8 D R I V E R / E D OX A M B A S SA D O R

CLAYTON WELLS S H E A D C H E F, AU TO M ATA

34

What responsibilities come with influence? To share knowledge, ideas

and inspiration to keep things moving forward. Ego doesn’t breed innovation. What skill are you most proud of?

Resilience. This business is tough and will kick your ass. Being resilient helps me focus on what’s ahead. What’s a weakness you’d admit to?

Public speaking, but getting better I hope! That, and changing the music mid-service. Tell us something about you not everyone would know…

I have collected a spoon from every restaurant I’ve ever worked in.

CHRIS BOSHUIZEN, C O - F O U N D E R & C TO, P L A N E T L A B S

38

What does influence mean? Influence

is a privilege and I feel obligated to teach and enable others, especially people early in their career, to do their best. What talent are you most proud of?

I think I’m a really good coach, and I love finding out where each person on my team wants to go in their life, and tailoring our time together to help them move in that direction. Tell us a secret…

I used to train as a free diver and can hold my breath for five and a half minutes. It’s going to come in handy when an evil computer locks me out of my spaceship!

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What responsibilities come

What’s a weakness you’d

with influence? To be an

admit to? Swiss-made

inspiration or role model to young drivers trying to get to the highest level in motorsport. The responsibilities are high – I’m supported by a bunch of blue chip brands that require me to represent their companies at a high level throughout the whole year. What skill or talent are you

watches. In 2015, I announced my partnership with Edox, a great company with some wicked cool time pieces including the Chronorally range. They’ve also recently been appointed as premium partner of the Sauber F1 Team. I’ve had a passion for watches for a long time now.

most proud of? My skill as a

Tell us something about you

race driver is a pretty cool one! I’m proud to have reached this point in my career where I’m racing at the highest level and getting paid to do so.

not everyone would know…

I’m a massive computer nerd. I love pulling apart a computer, installing all the new bits, like graphics cards and other things.


JOE SNELL A R C H I T E C T, S N E L L A R C H I T E C T S & JUDGE ON CH 7’S HOUSE RULES

38

What responsibilities come with influence? When you make or create

something it comes into the world and has an impact. There are two responsibilities that come with this: one is to ensure what you make has a positive impact, and the second is to keep making, to keep doing, and to not give up. What skill or talent are you most proud of? I try hard to communicate

complex and often abstract ideas of design into everyday language and emotion. What’s a weakness you’d admit to?

My biggest weakness is taking on too much. One of my primary goals at the moment is discipline with this. Tell us something about you not everyone would know…

Party trick – forward flip off my hands. A rare occurrence – and due to my height, a pretty scary sight.

LUKE BAINES

JOHNNY SCHEMBRI

AC T O R

FA S H I O N D E S I G N E R , BY J O H N N Y

What responsibility come with

What responsibilities come with

influence? As you get more

influence? To be your authentic

successful, the more people put you on a pedestal. That’s a tough thing to grasp when you yourself are still navigating life the best you can.

self. If you’re true to yourself, and your beliefs and values, authenticity will allow you to succeed. What skill are you proud of? Over the years I have grown with the business and in turn I’ve become good at solving problems. It’s an important skill to have, especially when running a small business.

What’s a weakness of yours?

All of them. Ego, gluttony, pride, envy, laziness (Netflix hasn’t helped). It’s a constant battle. Anyone who disagrees can add lying to their list.

What’s a weakness you’d admit

Tell us a secret…

to? Donuts on a Sunday.

I’m stupidly sentimental. I’ve saved every card I’ve ever been given.

Tell us a secret… I have different

sized ears!

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MEN

OF

INFLUENCE

DR MATTHEW W BELL L MANAG G PARTNER, ERNST MANAGING S AND YOUNG O G CLIMATE CHANGE AND SUSTAINABILITY

39

What’s your view of influence?

You’re given the choice every day to make the right decisions. Influencing companies to consider how they impact on society and the environment is often challenging. My responsibility is to stay true to the facts, to act on behalf of the silent stakeholders, and to have integrity in what I’m advising. What skill are you most proud of? I listen to what people really care about. Listening seems such an easy thing to do, yet it’s the thing most consultants forget – for fear they’re not filling the conversation with their insights.

WINSTON MCCALL L E A D S I N G E R , PA R KWAY D R I V E

33

What responsibility comes with influence?

Simply letting public perception and personal belief go hand in hand. If people are going to be influenced by me, I’d rather them look to a human than some “rock star”. I’ve always been a person of strong conviction but I’m not without my flaws. In a world that is quickly becoming about manufactured personas, there’s a responsibility to present an honest and true self to the public. What talent are you most proud of?

I can talk fairly well, ha ha. As a kid I was terrified of public speaking. The fact that my job now is a very aggressive form of public speaking never loses its irony. What’s a weakness you’d admit to?

Naivety. I always give people a chance and I always try see the best in them, which comes around to bite me more often than not. It’s fuelled plenty of songs.

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JAMES SPITHILL A M E R I CA’ S C U P S K I P P E R

36

The lad from Sydney’s Northern Beaches who mucked around in boats is now one of the highest paid sailors in the world, and famously led billionaire Larry Ellison’s Oracle Team USA to an amazing comeback America’s Cup win in 2013. A veteran also of numerous Sydney-to-Hobart races, the now Bermuda-based Spithill – known as the “pit bull” for his aggressive race tactics when sailing – is busy preparing for the Cup defence in 2017.


BEN ROBERTS-SMITH V I C T O R I A C R O S S R E C I P I E N T, TV EXECUTIVE 37

The former soldier, awarded the Medal of Gallantry and the Victoria Cross for his bravery during combat while in Afghanistan, is now forging a new career as a television executive. He was recently appointed general manager, Seven Brisbane, adding to his duties as GM of Seven Queensland, meaning he’s responsible for the Network’s largest footprint in Australia (all of Qld, basically). The civically-minded Roberts-Smith is also chair of the National Australia Day Council.

GAVIN RUBENSTEIN P R O P E R T Y S P E C I A L I S T, R AY W H I T E

ANH DO COMEDIAN/PRESENTER

38

28

What responsibilities come with influence? Remaining relevant and

The former refugee from Vietnam with the infectious smile and self-deprecating lines seems to be everywhere at the moment. From handing you pasta sauce in aisle two at your local IGA (in the ads, at least) to reuniting families on Ten’s Long Lost Family and having Russell Crowe announce he wants to make a film version of Do’s 2010 autobiography, The Happiest Refugee, his career is in overdrive at present.

Though he studied Business/Law at university, Do chose stand-up comedy over life in a law firm. He’s also an accomplished artist – his portrait of his father Tam Do was a finalist in the 2014 Archibald Prize. Apart from Long Lost Family, Do has most recently been touring a live version of The Happiest Refugee, using photos and films to re-tell his journey to Australia in 1980 on an eight-metre fishing boat with 47 other Vietnamese refugees.

credible in my industry. Staying ahead of the trends and setting the right example. What skill are you most proud of?

The ability to negotiate and having positive energy, which both play a major role in my business. What’s a weakness you’d admit to?

Pasta and chocolate... But I only give in when I’m on holiday. Tell us a secret… I used to be a dancer at school and before real estate I was a nightclub promoter in London. men’s style

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FA S H I O N

P HOTO GRAPHY

BEN SIMPSON STY LING

KIM PAYNE HAIR

ALAN WHITE M AKE -UP

CLAIRE THOMSON WITH THANKS TO THE WO O LM AR K CO MPANY

The versatile properties of wool are key in this season’s beautiful array of coats and outerwear.

WA R M B O D I ES

Prada coat, $6,720, and pant, $1,350.


HIM:

Bally coat, $8,000, sweater, $1,095,

and pants, $1.095. HER:

Bally dress, $4,500.


HIM:

Polo Ralph Lauren coat, $2,799,

shirt, $299, and pants, $599; Ben Sherman watch, $169.95 HER:

Ellery coat, $3,640,

fur, $2,890, sweater, $1,250, scarf, $420, and pants, $890; H&M boots, $59.95.


Ben Sherman coat, $299.95, scarf, $59.95, and pants, $149.95; Wrangler shirt, $109.95.

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HIM:

Gucci coat, $5,040, pants, $765, and shoes, $975.

HER:

Gucci floral sweater,

$1,205, skirt, $1,610, socks, $90, and shoes, $1,215.

Gant coat, $799; Jac + Jack shirt, $240, and pants, $399; COS shoes, $250.


HIM:

BOSS coat, $1,699, pant, $449, and shoes, $899.

HER:

Deadly Ponies coat

$2,209; Sport Max pant, $700; H&M boots, $59.95.


Tommy Hilfiger duffle coat, $950; Craig Green navy sweater, $689; RM Williams Akubra, $190, and boots, $495; COS pants, $150.

FA S H I O N

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BOSS coat, $2,399, roll-neck sweater, $249, and pant, $449.

HIM:

H&M coat, $89.95, sweater, $59.95,

and pant, $69.95. HER:

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men’s style

H&M dress, $69.95.


Paul Smith coat, $880, shirt, $270, and pant, $340; BOSS shoes, $899.


Kestin Hare coat, $699, and jacket, $239; Nautica shirt, $99.95; Waven jeans, $149.

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INSIDE ISIS


F E AT U R E

Matthew Hall speaks with two researchers who have interviewed numerous ISIS defectors and discovered what really goes on inside the world’s most infamous terrorist organization.

THEY CALLED THE KID OMAR*. He was 14 years old and had a story that no 14-year-old should ever have to tell. “They wanted to make me a button,” he says. He was not being cute. His teachers, who he trusted, had made a compelling case for a mission no child should ever have to consider. They would give him drugs. They would tell him to drive a truck toward a building. He would follow instructions: “You push the button, you won’t feel a thing, and then you’ll be straight in paradise.” The teachers had trained Omar to be a suicide bomber. Boom. Welcome to life inside the Islamic State. Omar’s experience is one story told by a group of Syrians who last year defected from IS – the most-feared terrorist organisation in the world today. IS is a death cult that has waged a brutal war to carve out chunks of territory in Syria and Iraq, terrorized communities across the Muslim world, and made high-profile attacks on restaurants, cafes, rock concerts, workplaces, train stations, and airports in the West. The defectors who told their stories now live in Turkey and were interviewed by academics working on behalf of the Washington DC-based International Center for the Study of Violent Extremism. The research will be published as a book in mid-2016. Their experience of the defectors reveals the reality of life inside IScontrolled sections of Syria as a daily diet of violence, drugs, fear, and conflicting morals – all at odds with what they actually believed to be the true interpretation of Islam. According to the defectors, all IS fighters have volunteered for military service but for many Syrians, years of civil war has left limited civil infrastructure, a crippled economy, and the breakdown of social structure. A big chunk of the population is desperate and vulnerable to exploitation.

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F E AT U R E

“At the third class, I declared that I was ready to be a suicide bomber as I was really affected by the preaching of the teacher,” explains another teenager recruited to be a “Cub of the Caliphate”. “There were 300 students like me,” claims Abu Jamal*. “The classes lasted two hours per day. They usually lectured about the political problems Muslims are facing around the world and about how Muslims were assimilated and how their lands and wealth was imperialised. They spoke about how [Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s] soldiers were raping our sisters and that we should be sending birth control pills to our sisters if we chose not to fight Bashar.” According to the defectors, military training for recruits includes bombing and weapon tactics and survival training. In what sounds like a plot from an apocalyptic movie, recruits who were identified as having psychopathic traits or who took pleasure in cruelty were selected to become executioners. Abu Walid*, one of the defectors, says fighters are typically given “one pistol – a Glock, a Colt, or a Smith and Wesson; one rifle – an M-16 or an AK-47; at least two hand grenades; a backpack with medical supplies, food and water; and at least 500 bullets”. Abu Jamal*, a former IS commander recalls: “The weapons are coming from everywhere but mostly we take them from other groups and from the battles we win. We had obtained a lot of [Assad’s] army warehouses as well. They left all the weapons.” In a video recording of his interview, 14-year-old Omar looks almost comical if you ignore that his testimony is that of a former child soldier. Dressed in keffiyeh-style headscarf and over-sized dark sunglasses wrapped around his head to cover his face, Omar sits in a plastic chair against a white wall backdrop and describes weapons training in a military camp. He recalls classmates as young as six years old, how recruits were told to behead a captured “infidel” as part of their initiation, and how other prisoners were drowned when the cages they were held in were intentionally dropped underwater. “They are not real Muslims,” Omar says of his experience with IS. “They are infidels killing innocent people, just here for the money. They train children to blow themselves up and say they will go to heaven – but none of it is true.” Dr Anne Speckhard (pictured, right), one of the interview project’s researchers, has spoken with over 500 terrorists during her career. A psychologist, she worked with Professor Ahmet Yayla, a Turkish academic, to locate and interview the 25 Syrian defectors hiding out in Turkey. Those interviewed had undergone Sharia law and military training and sworn allegiance to IS before becoming fighters for the group, some active in the IS military wing for 18 months. Some had been commanders, others ordinary soldiers – including Omar, the 14-year-old groomed to become a suicide bomber. Conducting the interviews proved difficult. Besides logistic and language issues, the defectors live in fear of reprisals from IS. Speckhard, Yayla, and their local fixers and interpreter were also at risk. Midway through the project the danger was brutally highlighted. They learned an IS fighter had crossed into Turkey, won the trust of two activists, Ibrahim Abdulqader and Fares Hamadi, working for the activist group Raqqa Is Being Slaughtered Silently, and then murdered and beheaded them in their apartment in the city of Sanilurfa.

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‘AT THE THIRD CLASS, I DECLARED THAT I WAS READY TO BE A SUICIDE BOMBER.’ “We’d heard a lot of stories of other defectors that were killed trying to leave,” says Speckhard explaining the additional danger to the Syrians. “They’re immediately beheaded. But they leave Syria because of the corruption, the brutality, the double standard, the criminality, and the things that they know are not right and are not Islamic and they don’t want any part in it.”

I

S RECRUITS FIGHTERS BY EITHER IMPOSING ITS WILL on the population of captured Syrian or Iraqi towns and cities or by luring vulnerable and desperate people to its ranks with a promise of a better life than the one they now live. For recruits from outside Syria and Iraq, especially many from Europe, a common thread is discrimination and isolation at home and the promise of adventure in a far off land. “It used to be the virgins in paradise but now it is sex,” Speckhard says of the extremist’s promises. “You’ll get a partner now; you’ll get a sex slave now. For a young man, that’s a powerful motivator. You’ll get a job. So if you’re in Molenbeek, Brussels, and you’re facing 30 per cent unemployment and a lot of marginalisation and discrimination, Dr Anne Speckhard has come [to fight in Syria]. You’ll be very interviewed over 500 terrorists respected as a Muslim, you’ll have a for research projects. high social status, you’ll be given a job, you’ll be able to marry, and you’ll be sexually gratified. Of course, you’ll be in danger and you’ll have to fight – but that is romance.” One defector confirmed that marriage is also a strong lure for foreign fighters who come from economically poor regions of several Muslim countries including Tunisia – a country that has delivered a large number of young foreign fighters to IS – and Turkey. “‘Come take our 10-day Sharia course!’” explained Abu Walid*, mocking an IS call to arms. “After you graduate you can be in IS. ‘You can have money, a gun, a car! Now you will be important’.” The defectors claimed that female slaves, usually women and girls captured when IS takes territory, are given to Westerners who do not have wives. The slaves live with the fighter until he gives or sells her to another fighter. “If the man wants to marry the slave he can,” explains Abu Nasir*. “She can come in the presence of other men to serve chai and coffee. She does not require a chaperone. When you have one, it’s like your wife. Although unlike wives, there is no limit on the number you


In English, the Islamic State in Iraq and

A fundamentalist organisation that

Sham (IS) is also known as the Islamic

follows an extreme interpretation of

State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL);

Sunni Islam, IS leaders proclaimed a

in Arabic it is known as ‘ad-Dawlah

caliphate in 2014 – a claim that it holds

al-Islāmiyah fī ‘l-Irāq wa-sh-Shām’

religious, military, and political authority

or Da’ish or Daesh). IS demands it is

over Muslims worldwide. Abu Bakr al-

known as ‘adDawlah’ or ‘the State’.

Baghdadi was declared its caliph.

WHAT IS ISLAMIC STATE? A version of IS took part in the Iraqi insurgency that followed the U.S.-led 2003 invasion of Iraq in which Australia played a small

Amid complicated rivalries

role. The embryonic faction was

and allegiances, the start of

led by Musab al-Zarqawi,

the civil war in Syria in 2011

a Jordanian Al-Qaeda emir

provided the perfect storm for

who died in 2006.

IS to become a regional force as it filled power vacuums in Estimates vary dramatically on the

Syria and Iraq.

number of IS fighters – different intelligence agencies put the number somewhere between tens of thousands to 200,000. While most fighters are from Iraq and Syria, the group has attracted an estimated 30,000 foreign fighters from around the globe.

At its peak, the organisation has controlled territory across Iraq and Syria equivalent to the size of the United Kingdom.


can have. If you are with her and have a child with her, and she becomes a Muslim, she can become your wife.” Women that fail to comply with imposed dress standards are brutally punished. One defector recalled an incident where a woman brought tea to her husband who was working outside repairing his car. The Hisbah, a type of female morality police, accused her of being uncovered. The defector said the couple was beaten before the husband was flogged 50 times. The woman, apparently pregnant, miscarried after she too was flogged.

I

S ALSO LAYS CLAIM TO UNBORN CHILDREN. A European defector named Layla* originally travelled to Syria with her husband where she became pregnant. Her husband, an IS fighter, was killed in an airstrike. Layla attempted to flee Syria before she was forced by local IS leaders to remarry another IS fighter – a common practice. She claimed she was sent death threats by text message and demands that she give up her baby to IS: “You can leave but you need to return first. Bear your child, nurse it, and leave your child with us because the child is ours.” According to Speckhard and Yayla’s research, foreign fighters are usually kept separate from Syrians and Iraqis. Chechens and Kazaks are considered battle-hardened fighters and make up the equivalent of Special Forces units and are often battlefield leaders. The defectors told stories about Chechens ruthlessly and brutally executing prisoners. A Serbian was identified as a psychopathic executioner. Chinese foreign fighters were also identified. “There is [a] Chinese village of IS fighters who speak fluent Quranic Arabic,” recalled defector Abu Jamal*. “There are around 500 of them with their families. They are settled in a big village. I do not know how but they speak very fluent Arabic as they are genuine Chinese people.” But not all IS fighters are psychopaths. Some Syrians join the cult terror group because they have no choice or – in a country ravaged by civil war – it is a pathway to some form of financial security. When IS takes over an area it manages the population by controling the food supply chain, local housing, and employment opportunities. If you want to survive in an IS-controlled region you have to get with the program. Faced with combat, many IS fighters are given drugs – often an amphetamine called Captagon – to overcome fear.

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“In 30 minutes, I became a different man, as if I am a hero,” says Abu Said*, recalling his front line experience when an IS leader recommended he ‘swallow a brown pill’. “I went into the battle very bravely. My friends told me to come back but instead I went forward, and said, ‘No, I want to die!’ I became so brave. I did not sleep afterward for three days. It gave me so much power. I felt as if I am indestructible and unbeatable. I went back home on the fourth day without sleeping. Then I laid down for three to four minutes and I felt like I had not slept for years. At that moment, I could not move my arm and could not speak.” Executions of captured enemy fighters are often carried out on the battlefield. “Because they say they are at war, they do not need a trial so they execute their prisoners instantly without waiting and consulting anyone,” explained Abu Jamal*, who had kept video of executions on his mobile phone. “During the Battle at the Al-Tabqa air base, IS captured and killed almost 700 soldiers there. Almost all were killed via beheading. Two hundred fifty of them were executed in front of the people to spread fear. The human blood from the executions ran like a river.” Why did the defectors quit and run? Most originally believed they were signing up to an organisation that fulfilled a promise of true Islam. The deeper they got, however, the more they came to understand IS was not following true Islamic principles. The defectors say obtaining full cult membership also includes completing training on Sharia law – an extreme interpretation of Islam – and a gruesome graduation ceremony. “At the point where they are judged [to have graduated training] they bring them a prisoner and they behead the prisoner,” says Speckhard. “I don’t think you can evade it. We had one informant tell us he had the knife in his hand, he had the prisoner, and he was ready to do it, and then he said, ‘No, this is another human being, I can’t do it’. He threw the knife and ran. They ran after him, arrested him, and then he was recycled. He was put through Sharia training the second time and he was punished. “So there’s the peer thing – a lot of pressure to go with the group once you’re in it. That means that the kids that are coming back to us in the West, they’ve got blood on their hands unless they somehow managed to evade this.” * Some names have been changed to protect the identity of sources and interviewees.

‘THE KIDS THAT ARE COMING BACK TO US IN THE WEST, THEY’VE GOT BLOOD ON THEIR HANDS.’


Aysal, Director of the Center for Policy Research

HOW TO BE A SUICIDE BOMBER

in New York. “It’s not that religion doesn’t matter at all but it matters very little compared to competing and compared to alliances. We tend to think of suicide attacks as being something that religious organizations start with but the Tamil Tigers are not religious at all and they were the kings of suicide terrorism.” In other words, if al-Qaeda is using suicide bombers then IS is compelled to use two. “You put $50 down – I’m going to put $100 down,” says Asal. He adds: “A lot of policymakers and the

“Did you just do drugs or just have sex?” asked

media, for very good reason, are obsessed

Anne Speckhard, surprised while interviewing

with what’s going in the Middle East and

a female prisoner in a jail in Israel. The reason

Islamist terrorism. But there are terrorists out

for her surprise and the subsequent question?

there all over the map that are doing all sorts

The prisoner, who had been caught before she

of bad things. In the 1970s, it wasn’t Muslim

was about to attempt a suicide bomb attack,

organisations that were killing the most people

was wide-eyed and in a state of euphoria while

– it was the leftists who were killing the most

recalling her six-week wait for a bomb that never

people. The ideological focus on what’s killing

came.

the most people can change over time.”

“Do you see how you’re kind of high right now?” Speckhard asked. “Telling me about this and almost like you’re drunk?” “That’s exactly how I felt for six weeks,” said the failed suicide bomber, equating the tension before her mission to a binge of sex and drugs. “It was the best time in my life.” Contrary to wide belief, religious extremism is not a driving force for suicide bombers. The Tamil Tigers, a militant group during the Sri Lankan civil war fought between 1983 and 2009, are credited with inventing suicide belts and using women as bombers. The Tamil Tigers were a secessionist group with no religious ideology. Terrorist tactics are more usually influenced by groups sharing information and rivalries between organisations, according to terrorism experts. “If your rivals are using it and you have access to the knowledge about how to do it well, you are more likely to do it,” explains Professor Victor

"The man in the hat" – allegedly Mohamed Abrini – recently arrested for participation in the bombing of Brussels airport.

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H&M zip jacket, $49.95, satin bomber, $79.95, and sweat pant, $39.95; Emilio Pucci sunglasses, $550.


FA S H I O N P H OTO G RAP H Y ST YL IN G G RO O M IN G

STEVEN CHEE

KIM PAYNE

PETE LENNON

PERFECT CONDITIONS This season’s casual looks are all about conveying a calm and well finished exterior.

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Nautica puffer jacket, $199.95.


Paul Smith sweater, $440, shirt, $710, pant, $440, and shoes, $680.


Lacoste sweater, $229, and shirt, $179; Gucci pant (part of suit), $2,620 from matchesfashion.com, and Gucci belt, $550..

Raey cashmere cardigan, $1,580, and sweater, $1,253, from matchesfashion.com; Polo Ralph Lauren scarf, $199; Breitling Chronomat 44 GMT on alligator strap, $17,200.


Bottega Veneta jacket, $2,960, pant, $910, and scarf, $400; Breitling Chronomat 44 GMT on alligator strap, $17,200.

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Louis Vuitton top, $4,150, and pant, $1,290.

FA S H I O N


Polo Ralph Lauren jacket, $899, tee, $49, and jeans, $149.

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Bally jacket, $1,150, rollneck sweater, $850, pants, $825, and sneaker, $650; Breitling Chronomat 44 GMT on alligator strap, $17,200.


Salvatore Ferragamo shirt, $875, pants, $1,395, and scarf, $295; Gucci Dive watch, $1,375.

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Three Over One cardigan, $339; Raey singlet, $264, from matchesfashion.com; Kestin Hare pant, $279; Dita "Flight 004" sunglasses, $500; Gucci Dive watch $1,375; Paul Smith wrist band, $190; Lacoste sneakers, $249.95.


Burberry coat, $4,795, zip jacket, $1,075, and pants, $1195; Dita "Grand Master Five" sunglasses, $975.

W IT H T H AN KS TO W H I T E H AVE N M OTO R YACH TS

www.whitehavenmotoryachts.com.au men’s style

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F E AT U R E

AFGHANISTAN: INDIVIDUAL EXPERIENCES MAY VARY Australia’s commitment in Afghanistan lasted more than 13 years, involved more than 26,000 servicepeople, and cost 41 dead and 261 wounded. Yet most people know next to nothing about it. Some of those who served there told Mark Dapin about their deeply personal experiences and kindly supplied their pictures for this story.

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R.I.P – Greg Sher

‘I saw similar faces over and over again, every time we had these attacks. You can see they’re petrified. Which is absolutely normal.’ – Amied Shadmaan

'Anyone who trains for a living wants to do the job.' – Matt Nunn


G

GARTH CALLENDER WENT TO THE WAR in Afghanistan because he was almost killed by a roadside bomb in Iraq. He talks about the earlier explosion with detached, professional interest. The IED (Improvised Explosive Device) that blew his Armoured Personnel Carrier (APC) across a Baghdad street in October 2004 left scars on his face and forehead but none on his soul. Callender was a 27-year-old troop leader with the 2nd Cavalry Regiment on a routine APC patrol when a bomb went off in a parked car. The blast blew off Callender’s helmet and goggles, and his vehicle careered over the road, slammed into a tree and tore it from the ground. “So we had a pretty reasonable car accident as well,” he says, dryly. At first, he thought he had been shot in the head. At the Coalition Support Hospital, surgeons cut open his neck to reach the internal bleeding, and cleaned out pieces of fragmentation lodged in his forehead and nose. Callender’s mate took an unhappy snap of him in hospital: his face was painted with his own blood (opposite, top left). Callender remembers thinking, “I should call home but I don’t have a phone. I don’t know what I should be doing.” “There was a lot of shit going on around me,” he says. “There was one stage when I was a bit more lucid and I remember being in tears.” With genuine puzzlement, he adds, “I wasn’t really sure what I was upset about. I think it was the shock. And maybe the painkillers had worn off a bit.” Callender had to be evacuated to Germany for further surgery, but he survived to return to Iraq for a second tour. But he was a changed man. “It’s like I got an instant afro from the heat of the blast,” he says. “It shrivelled all my hair up. For weeks and weeks afterwards, I had little curly bits of hair dropping out of my head.”

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F E AT U R E

In 2007, he was posted to Canberra to work with the Counter-IED Taskforce, and his personal experience as a survivor of a blast steered him to volunteer to lead a Weapons Intelligence Team in Afghanistan in 2009, eight years into the “War on Terror”. THE DETAILS OF THE AUSTRALIAN Defence Force’s commitment in Afghanistan was largely a mystery to most Australians. Reporters generally found it difficult to get official permission to speak to Australian troops – who, in their turn, were often reluctant to talk to the press – and so the experiences of ordinary soldiers and airmen remained largely untold. Starved of war information, the public’s attitude to the war drifted from excitement through indifference to the nagging feeling that it was all a bit of a waste of time. Whatever turns out to be the result of their efforts, Australians performed an enormous range of military tasks in Afghanistan. Garth Callender spent a year visiting the sites of explosions like the one that wrecked his APC, and combing through the rubble for clues about the bomb-makers. He had an entirely different experience to Australian Army Captain James Brown, who was posted to the International Security Assistance Force, part of the Allied Joint Force Command, in 2008. “There was this one war but so many different parts of it,” says Brown. “There were people who were living in Kabul, shopping on Friday, drinking on Thursday nights in the pubs around town, and spending most of their day emailing and doing PowerPoint: a very normal kind of life. And there were people I worked with who were on tiny little plywood compounds in the middle of nowhere, in a place that takes 13 hours to drive to – if you can get through the roads – where you’re so nervous about your security that you designate the hill behind you off-limits, so if anyone walks up there you have to shoot them, because they can get such an advantage on you.” Garth Callender has an image of a mock poster circulated among the military in Afghanistan. On the left is a picture of two smiling female soldiers carrying takeaway trays from an on-base fast-food outlet. On the right is a patrol of heavily armed silhouettes trudging through ruins, barely visible. The tagline reads, “Afghanistan: individual experiences may vary”. SYDNEY-BORN AMIED SHADMAAN’S individual experience of Afghanistan may have been unique. Shadmaan was an RAAF

technician, and his parents are Afghans born in Kabul. He speaks fluent Dari, one of the two official languages of Afghanistan. Shadmaan, an affable bloke with an easy smile, grew up in Sydney and joined the RAAF in July 2001, after he finished Year 12. He had applied to become a pilot but failed one of the practical exams. Rather than wait six months to re-sit the test, he decided to take an engineering route into the service. His time in the military began with a 10-week recruit-training course. “At around nine weeks, you go on your big ‘mock battle’,” says Shadmaan. “They wake you up in the middle of the night and they get you ready to go as if you’re being attacked. About half way through this week when you’re getting very little sleep and you’re out in the bush and you’re really isolated – no access to phones, no internet – they come up and tell us that the Twin Towers has gone down and this is a terrorist attack. And we’re all sitting there thinking, ‘Oh yeah, yeah.’ We didn’t really buy into it. It was only upon us returning to base that they put us in a room and said, ‘This is the likely scenario – you guys are fresh recruits, we’ll push you up to some of our bases in the north to defend Australia.’ “I had not even thought about going to war when I joined the military,” he says. “I thought about all the things that they sell to you in the seminars: you’re going to get an education; you’re going to be doing fun stuff; you’re going to learn how to shoot a weapon. Considering I had so much more invested in it than just being at a war – it was a war that was going to be in my homeland, essentially – there could’ve been some conflict morally. I was assessing everything I’d done in the last seven years, and there’s this subtle drive that you have inside: you’re constantly training for this war that you’re never actually going to go to. You’re doing all the ground-defence training, you’re doing frequent weapons training, you know all your first aid. You know everything you need to do in a situation when it comes to war, and it’s conditioned in you without you really thinking about it. So you kind of want to go to war and put that into practice. That’s what I really felt. That was the urge and this was the opportunity.” Before he left for his deployment in 2008, Shadmaan went through six weeks’ preconditioning training, where troops were acclimatised and given the information they needed in case they were abducted by insurgents. “The scariest part of going to Afghanistan is before you’re actually over there,” says Shadmaan, “learning about how you’re going to be tortured.”


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‘Standing in a row of people saluting a coffin going off is not going to help anyone … Going and doing the work potentially will.’ – Garth Callender

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1. Garth Callender, in a picture taken by a mate, after he'd been injured by an IED in Iraq.

2. One of Callender's pictures of a Bushmaster stuck in a culvert. 3. Australian defence engineers carry the casket of Cpl. Richard Atkinson, killed by an IED, at Tarin Kot on February 5, 2011.

4. Callender's pic of a home-made mortar with distinctive "det" cord.

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RAAF PILOT OFFICER MATTHEW NUNN was among the first Australian servicemen to reach Afghanistan, as a pilot of a Lockheed C-130 Hercules in 2001. “It was some of the best flying I’ve ever done,” says Nunn. “Low level at night time, on night-vision goggles, landing at dirt airfields with no lights, under the impression that there are enemy forces surrounding that airfield. And we’re inserting Special Forces so they could go and take the airfield, and bringing other people out. And we had other aircraft – A-10s, C-130 Spectre gunships and airborne warning aircraft – all around us, a package for us to get in there. And that is exhilaration. That is some of the best flying that any pilot could ever dream of. It was amazing.” Nunn returned to Afghanistan several times over the following 12 years, transporting soldier and supplies. “The army people – the first-timers – are excited about being there,” says Nunn.

“Again, anyone who trains for a living wants to do the job. Other guys who’ve been there one or two times are focussed. I’ve done my fair share of repatriations – in terms of bringing home our fallen – and that’s the time when you see the difference in attitude. That mourning period is probably the time it hits home a lot more.” Shadmaan says, “I was fairly calm going into Afghanistan. I’ve always felt strong. If something’s pressuring me, I’ll just talk myself out of it and rise above it, and not let it affect me physically or mentally.” But in his first week in Afghanistan, he began to feel ill for no reason. “All of a sudden you start shaking and getting a little bit nauseous,” he says, “a bit sick in the stomach – that’s essentially how I felt. That happened one or two more times in that first week and then it was gone.” Hobart-born Lieutenant (later Captain) John Bale, a Signaller, deployed to Afghanistan in

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‘I’ve done my fair share of repatriations – bringing home our fallen – and that’s the time when you see the difference in attitude.’ – Matthew Nunn

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2008 and 2010 as a troop commander setting up communications stations. He was stunned by what he saw when he went outside the bases. “It really shocked me that we’d been there for so long,” he says, “and so much money had already been expended, and yet it was still dirt poor.” Bale went through school, ADFA and Duntroon with Lt Mick Fussell. In Afghanistan in 2008, Fussell was a Joint Terminal Attack Controller, whose role was to call in aircraft or gunfire in support of the ground troops. Arthur Shisman, a garrulous and generous Ukraineborn Melbourne-raised Bushmaster Protective Mobility Vehicle driver with 1st Armoured Corps, remembers Fussell well. Shisman’s Bushmaster always travelled behind Fussell’s truck in convoy. Early in the morning of November 27, Fussell was part of a patrol moving along a path towards a compound in the Mirabad Valley where they hoped to find a local Taliban leader, Abdul Hai,

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“Objective Rapier”. A warrant officer suggested they should not take the path because it was laced with IEDs, but the OC maintained this was the best chance they would get to reach their objective, and Fussell stepped on a mine. “I was on piquet,” says Shisman. “I was the guy looking at them through Ninox [night vision goggles]. I heard a big bang, and I looked to my one o’clock, and I saw it as the smoke went up. The news was broken to us just after I finished piquet. My troop leader came up to me. He said, ‘Shiz, we need you in your BM.’ He got us all into the Bushmaster. He told us, ‘There were two WIAs and one KIA. Lt Fussell passed away earlier tonight.’ The breath went out of us.” On the return drive to Camp Russell, “It was a terrible feeling,” says Shisman. “Nobody was talking in the car: I was used to seeing him, a short fella with a slouch hat, and that was it, I didn’t see him anymore, he wasn’t there.

5. Garth Callender pics of a Weapons Intelligence Team examining an IED blast site in the Baluchi Vally, September 2009. 6. Personal pic of Arthur Shisman during service in Afghanistan. 7. Amied Shadmaan joined the RAAF in 2001 and served as a technician and Afghani liaison in Afghanistan. 8. Camp Palomino, where Shadmaan spent most of his time while on tour. 9. Another Garth Callender pic of a Bushmaster in a secondary track.


On the way back, I was just staring at that truck the whole way through.” After the death of Fussell, his mate John Bale began to think what he could do to help veterans and their families. Back in Australia, Bale was posted as a watch-keeper to Joint Operations Command, which oversees all Australian deployments in Afghanistan and elsewhere. “What I was seeing was very highly classified,” he says. “It wasn’t getting out to the community: the guys were getting wounded, or were in firefights, and it wasn’t getting across. How can the community care about these guys if they don’t even understand how much of a war this is, and how many of our guys are actually getting wounded?” Bale went on to co-found the charity Soldier On to support wounded service-people, but the voices of the veterans are still rarely heard, except in the increasingly loud public conversation about PTSD and combat stress. AMIED SHADMAAN SPENT MOST OF his tour at isolated Camp Palomino in Kandahar Province south of the large Joint Multinational Base in Tarin Kowt. Shadmaan’s base was attacked by enemy rockets at least twice a day for two months. He remembers the expressions in the eyes of men as they hit the ground when the warning sirens sounded. “I saw similar faces over and over again, every time we had these attacks. You can see they’re petrified. Which is absolutely normal.” Most of the Chinese-made, 107-mil rockets either missed their targets or did not explode but shortly before Shadmaan was due to leave Kandahar, an Australian commando, Greg Sher, was hit by a rocket at Patrol Base Qudus. “Greg came to Afghanistan on the same day that Mick Fussell died,” says Arthur Shisman. Both Shisman and Sher were Jewish, but their paths did not cross until January 2009. Shisman was with troops looking for a Taliban leader codenamed “Objective Flambard”. “We thought if we could occupy his house where he lived,” says Shisman, “he would unmask himself – we were always told that: they would ‘unmask’ themselves, and then bang! – and we’d take him out. We wanted to provoke him.” They pulled up at Patrol Base Qudus, and Shisman was watching as the enemy rockets came into the base on Sunday, January 4 at 12:55pm. Qudus, like the other patrol bases, was surrounded by a Hesco wall of earth-filled defensive barriers, inside which sat a collection of Conex shipping containers and tents. When the enemy rocket came in, “It went through the

hessian fence – there was a hole, or a crack, in it,” says Shisman. Its next obstacle was a Conex storing fresh water bottles. “It went through the water container,” says Shisman, “we saw the holes – three centimetres or so lower and it would’ve hit the water. It hit Greg directly, hit the hessian fence that was a few metres from him – boom! – exploded, and killed him. “His body flew into the air,” says Shisman. “It spun around, he landed on his back, and then they started shooting at us. The left side of his body, from underneath his armpit to his waist, was all covered in blood. A lot of the Bushmaster guys were in tears. A couple of guys, the rocket went straight past their backs. There could’ve been a lot more casualties. Greg took that rocket for all of us.” Shadmaan had been in Afghanistan for a couple of months before a Brigadier found out he could speak Dari and had him posted briefly to Kabul, where he was tasked with engaging with the local people to find out what they thought about the Coalition. “I felt I got a better gauge of it when I was talking to kids,” he says, “because kids don’t lie. They tell you how their parents feel. They can’t hide those things. I was able to pull some aside and ask what they felt about the Allied forces and they didn’t know what it meant. They didn’t know what Australia meant. They were very inquisitive of why I knew how to speak the language.” The children didn’t like the Taliban, he says. They felt the Allies were fine if they were there to bring peace. Shadmaan enjoyed the whole experience of Afghanistan, but he “treasured more than anything” his interactions with local people. GARTH CALLENDER BECAME ALMOST a connoisseur of IEDs, perfectly at home in the intimate silence after a bomb scene. “In most, if not all, the bomb sites we went to,” he says, “there was an almost surreal feeling of calm, in an area where you know not that long ago there’d been a massive explosion, people being injured, helicopters coming in and taking casualties, people doing first aid.” At times, Callender speaks about IEDs – and the stories they can tell – with a hobbyist’s enthusiasm. “Individual insurgents have their own signature traits about how they build things,” he says. He shows me a picture of a cluster of mortars wrapped together with strips of motorcycle inner-tube and a bit of electrical tape, with an orange detonation cord knotted on top. “Everyone ties knots slightly differently,” says Callender, “and det cord was a great one for seeing individual bombmakers. Technically,

there’s the right way to tie a det cord. Some guys have had obvious training. But, ‘If you can’t tie knots, tie lots.’ You’d see lots of clumps of knotted det cord.” He began to recognise the knots, from different bombsites or earlier reports. “You can link them together with other incidents,” he says, “and start to develop a picture of the insurgent networks just from those simple things like knots and the motorcycle inner tube.” Callender’s fascination fed his efficiency. He always stuck tightly to his objective. Unlike many troops, he did not attend the “ramp ceremonies” held to farewell the bodies of dead soldiers. “It didn’t make that much sense to me,” he says. “I’m not the sort of guy who is into ceremony. Standing in a row of people saluting a coffin going off is not going to help anyone. It’s not going to stop IEDs going off. Going and doing the work potentially will.” Matt Nunn, who had carried some of those bodies home, also flew some of the last Australian troops out of Uruzgan when Tarin Kowt airfield was closed down in 2013. “When I first went there in 2001,” he says, “there was only one sealed bitumen road – now there’s many – and they were clearing landmines off the airfield. Now it’s very safe to fly in and out. There’s a lot less risk, a lot less focus. It’s been a few years since we’ve really felt the pressure of the war in Afghanistan. It became a routine run, rather than a massive war-like operation.” Few men admit to missing being at war. “Any time you’re involved in operations,” says Matt Nunn, “something would have to be slightly wrong with you if you weren’t, on a personal level, worried about it in a certain capacity. No-one wants to hurt anybody else. You’re trying to do it for the greater good. You have to come out on top of your emotions.” Nunn, like everyone interviewed for this story, is no longer in the military full time. He does not wish he was back in Afghanistan. “No-one in their right mind would miss flying in a zone where you could potentially get shot at,” he says. “But there’s a Qantas pilot who takes off from one airfield and lands at another airfield 13 hours later, and 12 hours and 59 minutes of that is on auto-pilot. Whereas what we do in the Middle East is very hands-on flying, very military-style, low-level, really intense workloads – that’s a rush that any pilot would experience. “I miss the flying,” he says, “for sure.”

Garth Callender's memoir After the Blast: An Australian Officer in Iraq and Afghanistan is published by Black Inc., $29.99.

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D SON DYSON

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JJames Dyson has h almost single-handedly g revolutionised r o u o s this s standard household s ous o appliance. His latest pp release is the Cinetic Big r g Ball vacuum,, which solves es the problem of barrel p vacuums which tip v p over. The design g of the Dyson y Cinetic, C , with the heaviest st components nearest the c p e floor, ensures it self-rights g ts when toppled, meaning g you y won’t re-vacuum a spot. p Maintenance or loss of o suction suct o are a e also a so redundant redu da t as there t e e are a e no filters to wash or bags g to o buy and replace. Genius. $699; www.dyson.com.au

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RETAIL

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BRIXTON NORTH FACE Serious Winter adventurers are well acquainted with North Face and its technical, innovative outdoor apparel. Now the brand releases a limited Summit Series collection, available in Australia and New Zealand for Autumn/ Winter 2016. Built by and for the core mountaineering and climbing community, the collection of jackets utilises a range of advanced materials to ensure warmth, insulation, water repellence and durability. Leading retailers and online for a limited time.

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Founded in 2004, Brixton is the collaboration of three friends who wanted to convey their lifestyle through unique products. And while they may have established themselves through their range of headwear from pork pies to fedoras and snap caps, the brand has evolved into a full lifestyle offering of tees, pants, shirting, jackets, boardshorts, backpacks and more. The clean, classic design of the Brixton collection has a modern yet timeless feel, and each piece is a quality construction designed to see you through for a long time. Swanson fedora, $149.94, Presley fedora, $119.95.

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PANASONIC LUMIX This new LUMIX DMC-GX85, from Panasonic features powerful new technologies including 5-axis image stabilisation (IS), an advanced sensor and 4K Photo and Video. The upshot is more stable imaging for those who are on the move while taking pictures. The 5-axis in-body stabilisation operates during both photo and video recording, including 4K shooting, to deliver a superior performance whether capturing images at slow shutter speed or with a telephoto lens, or handheld video shooting. $1,099-1,699.

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DIESEL If you read our profile of Diesel founder Renzo Rosso on page 78 you’ll understand he favours the brave. His company, after all, is called Only The Brave.It’s also the name of his successful men’s fragrance, contained in a bottle designed to match the tattoo on the knuckles of Rosso. Only The Brave is a fragrance for men who choose to be masculine, built around a leather accord accentuating masculine oriental woody notes – contrasted with hints of lemon and amber – to leave a strong and lasting impression. $59; available at Chemist Warehouse.

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HARMAN KARDON Harman Kardon Onyx Studio 2 provides best-in-class audio delivered in an iconic design. The unit offers wireless Bluetooth connectivity and a rechargeable Li-ion battery, as well as new features such as an built-in speakerphone with Harman VoiceLogic echo and noise cancellation as well as an auxiliary input. Clearly constructed of premium materials, Onyx Studio 2 provides the audio excellence Harman Kardon is renowned for. $799.

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TOMS

LG

Above is the official TOMS brogue Australian athletes will wear in the Opening Ceremony of this year’s Olympic Games in Rio. it’s more than a shoe, however. TOMS - founded by American traveller Blake Mycoskie in 2006 – gives a pair of shoes to a child in need for every pair of TOMS purchased. TOMS is celebrating 10 years this May, with over 50 million pairs of shoes given around the world and 360,000 people’s sight restored through purchases of TOMS Eyewear. Australians can now buy their own piece of Olympic history to t wear,, the limited edition 2016 Olympic Shoe available at 2 y HYPE DC,, MYER,, and selected H independent stores. $130. i p $ 0.

The LG Stylus DAB+ device features the world’s first builtin DAB+ broadcast digital radio. DAB+ covers 50 million people in 40 countries around the world. Users will be able to access more radio channels with DAB+ than traditional FM, with up to 30 free digital only stations. Unlike radio broadcasting apps that use hefty amounts of data for streaming, DAB+ lets users listen to the radio for free and in excellent audio quality, plus DAB+ broadcasts pictures and text on screen. The LG Stylus DAB+ is 7.4mm 7 4mm thin and weighs 145g, 145g with w t a 5.7-inch 5 c screen sc ee on o which w c to enjoy j y a variety y of content. Availability y still to be confi co rmed. ed

to s co toms.com

w www.lg.com.au

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NIKON

BOSCH

Nikon have released three new cameras in its Premium Compact range, including the DL18-50mm f/1.8-2.8 (above). The camera’s combination of an 18mm focal length with a wide aperture of f/1.8 offers the fastest maximum aperture in NIKKOR history, surpassing that of its interchangeable lenses for SLR cameras. This enables the lens to capture dynamic perspectives, with high contrast and a deep bokeh, with outstanding shutter speeds for freezing movement in low light. Nano Crystal Coat also reduces ghosting g g and flare, reducing g the need for post-processing. g Available va ab e from o June. Ju e

Bosch DIY has launched two drills that are 20 per cent smaller and ten per cent lighter than conventional cordless drill drivers. Ergonomic design aligns the tool with the grip so that it perfectly fits into your hand during screwdriving and drilling, resulting in less fatigue during use. The forward/reverse switch has also been modified to make it intuitive to use - slide the switch forwards and the tools will drive screws; slide it backwards and it loosens them. Pictured is the PSB 18 LI-2 Ergonomic cordless impact drill. $269.

mynikonlife.com.au u

G STAR After finding inspiration in a passing motorcyclist in the South of France in 1996, head designer Pierre Morisset created the original G-Star Elwood 5620. Twenty years on, the G-Star Elwood 5620 continues to represent the core of the brand’s DNA, a symbol of innovation as the first design using the 3D denim method of construction. $220, G-Star Stores, Myer, David Jones, Glue and selected independent retailers.

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THE WISDOM

BEN FOLDS

Failure can… teach you not to fear it. You

The American musician and former Adelaide resident discusses music, love and an end-of-day Scotch. Interview by MICHAEL ADAMS

A wise man knows… is that a complete

If I could quit doing one thing it’d be… the

sentence? It sounds like a complete sentence. But the opposite is true. A wise man doesn’t know. But a wise man should know… not to buy small-ass shoes. A foolish man… hangs onto beliefs without thinking. What makes me laugh is… a surprise attack. I laugh hardest at something that involves the element of surprise. Growing up I thought I’d be… a musician. But, really, I didn’t look that far ahead. If I could tweet my teen self I’d say… “Relax: chill… the… fuck… out.” Growing up, my heroes were… Muhammad Ali, Andy Kaufman and the cartoon character Underdog. My role models were… I really didn’t have that gene. Not that I didn’t look up to people but I think I was too much in my head for role models. I never looked at someone and said, “I wanna be you.” It was only parts of them – “I wish I had that voice” or “I wish I looked like that”. My best quality is… interest. I’m interested when I see and hear about someone.

goddamned gambling addiction! No, anything I’ve wanted to quit I’ve quit. Okay, maybe I’ve got a reflex that’s a not-relaxed reflex. People see something and go, “Yeah… that’s cool.” I see something and say “Motherfucker!” initially and then a bit later I’m like, “Okay… that’s cool.” Maybe I’m a bit more wound up than I’d like to be.

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i never looked at someone and said, ‘i want to be you.’

Success is… so in your head. You can make

any amount of success seem like a fucking drag. So I’m pretty sure that it’s not external. I’ve been having a career for 25 years and I think longevity is success. But I guess if it had ended and I was happy with that, then that could’ve been success, too. It really is in your head.

need to have it in order to have any measure of success. When I’m in doubt I… try to remember the last 10,000 times I was in doubt, that it’s part of the process and that it does pass. It’s like when you’re driving and you hit snow: you need to let off the gas, the brakes and the steering wheel, just go with it for a moment. If you try to change course in that time, then whatever has created the doubt is probably going to produce a bad decision. Music is… tension and release and some form of Morse code that tells you something. It’s communication that’s probably a little deeper than metaphor. The sweetest sound is… dependent on what it’s set against. Like, some hairy dude that you don’t want to see might actually be the sweetest sight if you were drowning and you needed some big hairy dude to come save you. That’s the way I look at music: even screeching can be a lovely sound if you know how to set up the context where it’s welcome in that way. So the sweetest sound is the key of undrowning major. If a song could play whenever I arrived somewhere it’d be… the 20th Century

Fox theme. I measure my work by… the value of music

is absolute. You’ve either been valid, honest, direct, or you’ve fallen short. It becomes all about feel. If the impulse that I had to compose, write, whatever, has been seen through, then it’s worked and that’s good. After a hard day I unwind with… old man shit. I pour a little bit of Scotch and I sit down and read a book. Or I work on my photography. Real style is… a limitation of vision so that things keep coming out similarly. It’s being happily boxed in and not being frustrated about it. Looking at the stars I think… about the atmosphere. I think stuff like, “It’s hazy – there’s a lot of pollution today.” Or: “Wow – it’s not hazy but fuck, it’s cold, let’s get back inside.” Love is… absolute acceptance. My epitaph will read… “Ben Folds was an Eagle Scout”. I wasn’t an Eagle Scout, but I’ll put it on anyway.


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Men's Style Australia Issue 68, 2016