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PARTNER NEWS

Image: www.siemens.com/press

Alcoa grows its multi-material aerospace portfolio by acquiring titanium specialist RTI Lightweight metals specialist Alcoa has completed the acquisition of RTI International Metals, the global leader in titanium and specialty metal products and services for the aerospace, defence, energy and medical device markets. RTI’s titanium operations include melting, ingot casting, bloom, billet, plate and sheet production; manufacturing extrusions for aerospace, oil and gas applications, high speed machining, and production of integrated sub-assemblies primarily for aerospace.

The Siemens electric motor weighs just 50KG and delivers a continuous output of about 260 kilowatts – five times more than comparable drive systems.

SIEMENS AND AIRBUS PLAN TO BUILD ULTRA-QUIET HYBRID AIRCRAFT

RTI’s acquisition expands Alcoa’s additive manufacturing capabilities into producing 3D-printed titanium, specialty metals and plastic parts for aerospace, medical and energy applications.

Siemens and Airbus are aiming to create an aircraft powered by an ultra-quiet hybrid engine, capable of carrying up to 90 passengers.

Alcoa itself has titanium investment casting and forging capabilities, and says the deal will allow it to create a closed titanium scrap loop, which will add value to the group.

The aircraft, which could be flying by 2035, will use a small jet engine, a battery and an electric motor to drive propellers and could use up to 50 per cent less fuel than a conventional aircraft.

The motor produces enough power to fly a four-seater aircraft with a takeoff weight of two tonnes, when used in conjunction with a small jet engine and is scheduled to begin flight-testing before the end of the year.

Earlier this year, Siemens announced researchers had developed a new type of electric motor that weighed just 50 kilograms and had a continuous output of about 260 kilowatts – five times more than comparable drive systems.

Siemens says the hybrid design allows the aircraft to use additional power from the battery while taking off and climbing quietly. It would then switch to using power from the jet engine.

It expects the acquisition will increase Alcoa’s 2014 pro forma aerospace revenue by 13 per cent to $5.6 billion. RTI recently secured a contract with Airbus for finished titanium structural supply parts for the new A350-1000 aircraft programme. Under the agreement, Alcoa will supply titanium parts for the fuselage, among other components.

The motor had been specially designed for use in aircraft and Siemens said that, thanks to its record-setting power-toweight ratio, larger aircraft with take-off weights of up to two tonnes would be able to use electric drives for the first time. Siemens says its motor has a powerto-weight ratio of 5kW/kg, which is five times higher than a normal industrial motor and can drive propellers directly, without the use of a transmission.

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“This innovation will make it possible to build series hybrid-electric aircraft with four or more seats,” said Frank Anton, head of eAircraft at Siemens Corporate Technology, the company’s central research unit. “We’re convinced that the use of hybridelectric drives in regional airliners with 50 to 100 passengers is a real mediumterm possibility.”

RTI will be renamed Alcoa Titanium & Engineered Products. Alcoa has been aggressively growing its aerospace business. Last year, the company completed the acquisition of leading global jet engine component producer Firth Rixson and in March, Alcoa completed the acquisition of TITAL, a leading manufacturer of titanium and aluminium structural castings for aircraft engines and airframes.

AMRC with Boeing Quarterly Journal Q4 2015

The AMRC with Boeing Quarterly Journal  

The Quarterly Journal is the Advanced Manufacturing Research Centre (AMRC) with Boeing's magazine. It features all of the latest development...

The AMRC with Boeing Quarterly Journal  

The Quarterly Journal is the Advanced Manufacturing Research Centre (AMRC) with Boeing's magazine. It features all of the latest development...

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