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for the greater ChampaignUrbana area including:

Arcola, Arthur, Danville, Mahomet, Monticello, Rantoul, Savoy, Tuscola

fall 12

Illini

ONE Head Coach Tim Beckman launches Illinois Football into Operation New Era. Page 8

le Ce

b ra t i n g !

AUTUMN IN CHAMPAIGN COUNTY page 4

ALUMNI STRONG page 6

BOUNTIFUL ARTS page 36


for the greater ChampaignUrbana area including:

Arcola, Arthur, Danville, Mahomet, Monticello, Rantoul, Savoy, Tuscola

fall 12

Illini

ONE Head Coach Tim Beckman launches Illinois Football into Operation New Era. Page 8

le Ce

b ra t i n g !

AUTUMN IN CHAMPAIGN COUNTY page 4

ALUMNI STRONG page 6

BOUNTIFUL ARTS page 36


Champaign-Urbana is my town. CIRA & FRONTIER AIRLINES are my gateway west. I save on the flight, gas, travel time, and parking. I avoid city traffic and I don’t have to be there two hours early... CIRA just makes sense!

MORE DESTINATIONS BETTER FARES

NONSTOP TO DENVER... AND BEYOND.

FREE PARKING


v10i1 Fall

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Photographs of artists: Stephen Cartwright, left, and Emily Buss, center; images of art work by, clockwise, Larry Steinbauer, Jean Kaufman, and Amy Rueffert. PUBLISHER George Amaya EDITOR Lynn Crandall

editor@ampridecommunications.com

DESIGN Matt Lanter

designer@ampridecommunications.com

INTERN / EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Tolu Taiwo

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Autumn in Champaign County

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Alumni Strong

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Illini ONE

Personal perspectives of three residents offer many reasons to enjoy the season.

intern@ampridecommunications.com

CONTRIBUTORS Amanda Baker, Don Elmore, Jayne DeLuce, Vanessa Faurie, Cynthia Johnson, Erin Lippitz, Dana Mancuso, Nat Norris, Spencer Turkin DISTRIBUTION Skye Croff For additional copies please call: 217-355-9016 ofcmgr@ampridecommunications.com

ADVERTISING George Amaya 217-841-6186

george@ampridecommunications.com

ON THE COVER Illini quarterback Nathan Scheelhaase photograph courtesy of Illinois Sports Information

Community Concierge Magazine is published quarterly by AmPride Communications, Inc. and is distributed throughout the greater ChampaignUrbana area, including Rantoul, Mahomet, Danville, Monticello, Tuscola, Arthur, and Arcola. AmPride Communications proudly uses Premier Print Group for all magazine printing services. For advertising and subscription inquiries please call 217.355.9016. This publication retails for $4.95 per copy. Š 2012, all rights reserved by AmPride Communications, Inc., 1717 West Kirby Avenue, #236, Champaign, IL 61821, 217.355.9016. No portion of this magazine may be reproduced in whole or part without prior written consent. AmPride Communications and our advertising partners have worked diligently to ensure the information in this magazine is as accurate as possible. Neither AmPride Communications, our advertising partners, nor the printer is responsible for errors, though we regret any inconvenience they may cause.

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The University of Illinois Alumni Association is supportive of and supported by hundreds of thousands of alumni.

Head Coach Tim Beckman launches Illinois Football into Operation New Era.

Bountiful Arts Community Concierge Magazine commemorates its 10th anniversary year with an acknowledgement of the artists whose stories have graced the pages.

Calendar of Events Dining Attractions Map Business Directory Shopping Health and Fitness Home Front

02 10 16 18 20 24 28 32


Calendar of Events Celebrating Community Concierge Magazine’s 10th anniversary with a look back at artwork by some of our featured artists. 30 thru Sep 1 Allerton Music Barn Festival, 7:30pm; 10am Sep 2 thru 3, Allerton Music Barn, Monticello 217-333-6284

Patrick Harness

01 Music Among the Vines: The Painkillers, 7:30pm, Alto Vineyards, Champaign 217-356-4784

30 Exhibitions Opening, (recep. for all 02 Hessel Park Concert: Chicago’s

August

exhibitions) 5-7pm, Krannert Art Museum, Champaign 217-333-1861

01 thru Nov 3 Market at the Square, 31 thru Sep 23 School of Art + Design 7am-Noon Sat, Urbana Faculty Exhibition, Krannert Art Museum, Champaign 217-333-1861

217-384-2319

15 thru Sep 29 Sculpture by Chris

Berti, & Collages & Assemblies by Dennis Rowan, 10am-5pm Wed-Sat, Cinema Gallery, Urbana 217-367-3711

08 Opening Night featuring La

24 Dance for People with

Sugar Prophets, 7:30pm, Alto Vineyards, Champaign 217-356-4784

Alex Fekete

25 Soriee du Ballet: Chinoiserie,

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October

of the Grand Prairie, Mahomet 217-586-2612

15 Music Among the Vines: Jeff Helgesen, Alto Vineyards, Champaign 217-356-4784

15 Homer Lake

Starwatch, 7-11pm, Interpretive Center, Homer Lake Forest Preserve, Homer 217-896-2466

15 Ahmad Jamal, 7:30pm,

Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, Urbana 217-333-6280

November

Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat

15 Prairie Stories (hands-on

activities), 10am-5pm, Museum

01 Mr. Turtle’s Backy & Bash,

5:30-7pm concert; & 9pm movie, Centennial Park & Sholem Aquatic Center, Champaign 217-398-2550

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Chungliang Al Huang, Alexander Murray, David Darling, Michael Fitzpatrick, and Ann Yeung, 7:30pm, Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, Urbana 217-333-6280

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20 Emanuel Ax on piano, 7:30pm, Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, Urbana 217-333-6280

21 Fall Prairie Skies, 7pm Fridays,

Staerkel Planetarium, Champaign 217-351-2446

29 Howl of the Coyote: A Full Moon

Hike, 6:30-8pm, (registration required), Sangamon River Forest Preserve, Fisher 217-896-2455

Centennial Park, Champaign 217-398-2550

06 Lilacs in Bloom: Sifonia da

Camera, 7:30pm, Krannert Center for the Performing Arts 217-333-6280

06 thru Nov 24 Studio furniture by

Thomas Skaggs and paintings by Grace Lin and James Wu, Cinema Gallery, Urbana 217-367-3711

07 Vet. Med. Open House, 10am-

Market, 8am-12pm, Staerkel Planetarium, Champaign 217-351-2446

4pm, U of I College of Veterinary Medicine, Urbana 217-333-2761

22 Family Skywatch, Dusk, CUAS

09 Ensemble Basiani, 7:30pm,

27 Artist Talk and Gallery

11 Exhibitions Opening: African

Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, Urbana 217-333-6280

Observatory, rural Sadorus 217-351-2446

Conversation: Indigo from Seed to Dye, exhibiting artist Rowland Ricketts, 5:30pm, Krannert Art Museum, Champaign 217-333-1861

27 thru Oct 7 Steel Magnolias,

7:30pm; & 3pm, Parkland Theatre, Champaign 217-351-2528

October 02 Breaking the Rules: An Evening with Philippe Petit, 7:30pm, Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, Urbana 217-333-6280

Impalas, 7:30pm, Alto Vineyards, Champaign 217-356-4784

and 17 Street Fest, 2 hours prior to Illini home games, a pregame street party on First St. between Kirby Ave. & Irwin Dr., family activities, including interactive inflatable games, sporting activities, live entertainment, Urbana 217-333-1391

featuring Dirty Projectors and Best Coast, Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, and other Venues in Champaign and Urbana 217-333-6280

22 Solar viewing from the Farmer’s

02 Growing Up Wild: Beautiful Birds,

01 15, 22, 29, October 27, November 10 13 The Tao of Bach featuring

Observatory, rural Sadorus 217-351-2446

1

Excelencia, 6pm, Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, Urbana 217-333-6280

DIVIDED, 7:30pm, Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, Urbana 217-333-6280

08 Music Among the Vines: The

September

25 Family Skywatch, Dusk, CUAS

7pm, Stone Creek, Champaign 217-355-7357

Spurlock Museum, Urbana 217-244-3355

Meadowbrook Park Jazz Walk, 5:30-7:30pm, Meadowbrook Park, Urbana 217-367-9575

Staerkel Planetarium, Champaign 217-351-2446

25 Music Among the Vines: The

04 thru Feb 10 A World of Shoes, 07 rain date 08 8th Annual

17 Cosmic Colors, 8pm Fri & Sat,

Parkinson’s, 10am, Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, Urbana 217-333-6280

Singing Sensation Peter Oprisko, 6:30-8pm; movie following concert, The Maltese Falcon, Hessel Park, Champaign 217-398-2550

21 The Builders Association: HOUSE /

27 thru 29 Pygmalion Music Festival 06 Obstacle Mobstacle, 8am,

Singer Candy Foster

10-11am, (preschoolers with an adult, registration required), Homer Lake Forest Preserve, Homer 217-896-2455

03 CultureTalk: Philippe Petit and

Elizabeth Streb, 7:30pm, Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, Urbana 217-333-6280

04 Sudden Sound Concert: Eric and Mary Ross Ultrimedia Concept, 7:30pm, Krannert Art Museum, Champaign 217-333-1861

04 thru 6 & 10 thru 13 U of I

Department of Theatre: 44 Plays for 44 Presidents, 7:30pm; & 3pm Oct 14, Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, Urbana 217-333-6280

Gallery Reinstallation and Rising Dragon: Contemporary Chinese Photography, 6-8pm public reception, Krannert Art Museum, Champaign 217-333-1861

11 thru 13 & 18 thru 20 U of I

Department of Theatre: Dracula, 7:30pm; & 3pm Oct 21, Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, Urbana 217-333-6280

11 thru 21 The 25th Annual Putnam

County Spelling Bee, CU Theatre Company, 7:30pm Thur thru Sat; & 2pm Sun, Parkland Theatre, Champaign 217-344-3884

12 Odyssey, 8pm Fri and Sat, Staerkel Planetarium, Champaign 217-351-2446

13 Kids@Krannert, 10am-Noon,

Krannert Art Museum, Champaign 217-333-1861

13 Resurrection: CUSO, 7:30pm, Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, Urbana 217-333-6280

24 thru 25 National Circus of the

People’s Republic of China: Cirque Chinois, 7pm, Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, Urbana 217-333-6280

25 Gallery Conversation: Creating

Community Through African Art, 5:30pm, Krannert Art Museum, Champaign 217-333-1861

25 thru 27, 31 & Nov 1 thru 3

U of I Department of Theater: A Dream Play, 7:30pm; & 3pm Nov 4, Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, Urbana 217-333-6280

26 27th Annual Halloween FunFest, 6-9pm, Marketplace Mall, Champaign 217-398-2550

27 Royal Drummers and Dancers of

Burundi, 7pm, Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, Urbana 217-333-6280

31 Nightmare on Grove Street,

5-8pm, Douglass Community Center, Champaign 217-398-2550

November 01 Gallery Conversation: China

Today, 5:30pm, Krannert Art Museum, Champaign 217-333-1861

01 thru 4 Annual Student

Productions, Parkland Theatre, Champaign 217-351-2528

01 Pacifica Quartet with Menahem

Pressler, piano, 7:30pm, Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, Urbana 217-333-6280

John & Charlie Sweitzer

14 Concert Artists Guild Winner:

05 thru 6 STREB: FORCES, 7pm Sat; & 3pm Sun, Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, Urbana 217-333-6280

05 World of Science talk, 7pm,

Staerkel Planetarium, Champaign 217-351-2446

Cuba, 7:30pm, Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, Urbana 217-333-6280

20 Family Skywatch, Dusk, CUAS Observatory, rural Sadorus 217-351-2446

20 thru 27 U of I Homecoming,

activities, parade, game vs. Indiana, 11am Champaign 217-265-0513

7:30pm, Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, Urbana 217-333-6280

08 Gallery Conversation: Egungun!

Power Concealed, 5:30pm, Krannert Art Museum, Champaign 217-3333-1861

08 thru 10 Dance at Illinois:

November Dance, 7:30pm, Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, Urbana 217-333-6280

08 thru 10 SITI Company: Café

Variations, 7:30pm, Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, Urbana 217-333-6280

08 thru 10 U of I Opera Program:

Florencia en el Amazonas, 7:30pm; & 3pm Nov 11, Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, Urbana 217-333-6280

14 thru 18 Too Much Light Makes

The Baby Go Blind: 30 Plays in 60 Minutes, 7:30pm; & 3pm, Parkland Theatre, Champaign 217-351-2528 7:30pm, Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, Urbana 217-333-6280

15 Sudden Sound Concert: Thollem,

Club, Urbana 217-351-9841

17 National Symphony Orchestra of

06 Philharmonia Orchestra,

14 Carolina Chocolate Drops,

Naomi O’Connell, mezzosoprano, 3pm, Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, Urbana 217-333-6280

05 Luncheon/Lecture: Metalsmithing 16 ACE Awards, 5:30pm, The Canopy to Materialsmithing: Contemporary Jewelry, Billie J. Theide, Noon, (reservations required), Champaign Country Club, Champaign 217-333-1861

Brian Sullivan

7:30pm, Krannert Art Museum, Champaign 217-333-1861

02 World of Science talk, 7pm,

Staerkel Planetarium, Champaign 217-351-2446

02 No-Holds-Barred Beethoven:

Sinfonia da Camera, 7:30pm, Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, 217-333-6280

03 Santa’s Secret Star, 7pm Sat,

Staerkel Planetarium, Champaign 217-351-2446

17 Family Skywatch, Dusk, CUAS Observatory, rural Sadorus 217-351-2446

22 Turkey Trot, 8am check-in; 9am run/walk, Crystal Lake Park, Urbana 217- 367-1544

23 Season of Light, 8pm Fri & Sat,

Staerkel Planetarium, Champaign 217-351-2446


fall 12

we know they will require Saturday afternoons of laborious raking. Most years we don’t do the actual raking ourselves. We leave that to the Central football players or the sorority girls or another community group that’s raising money for something we want to support. If it’s cold, Susan also gives them hot chocolate.

Autumn in Champaign County

Tailgating at U of I Homecoming is a fun, seasonal tradition.

Personal perspectives of three residents offer many reasons to enjoy the season here.

Champaign County is a place that collaborates with individuals, organizations, and institutions to create a place many love to call home and others enjoy visiting. As a member of the community and a collaborator itself, Community Concierge Magazine celebrates its 10th year of serving this great community by sharing the personal perspectives of three residents who find many reasons to enjoy autumn in C-U. Don On the first Friday in the fall, my wife Susan and I are sitting outside at Boltini Lounge in downtown Champaign, enjoying the temperate weather and what promises to be another highly photographable sunset. Within two downtown blocks I could be enjoying an art house movie, two microbreweries, a choice of live music, or an incredible variety of dining choices from diner to sushi to locally-sourced gourmet. It’s comforting to know I have these choices if my mood changes, but for now I am perfectly content. We’re here after having just closed our shop across the street for the night. We own a used bookstore in a 108-year-old building. The bookstore had operated there for more than 25 years when we bought it. Before that it was a crafts store, a photography studio, and a dry goods store. Why did we buy it? In the age of Kindles and Nooks and the struggles of local retailers, we

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Community Concierge Magazine

could have chosen a different challenge or not chosen one at all. We had jobs. We volunteered in the community. We were already busy enough. We had been regular patrons of the place and it was an interesting challenge. There was an attraction to the idea of a family business and we had eager participants. But it was also one of those pieces of our place, and we didn’t want that to change. When we’re ready to go home, we walk, passing under the downtown lights, through an expansive park whose sculpture and architecture and welcoming fountain highlight the commitment our community has made to aesthetic elements. We pass the older high school, the one most “townies” claim as their own even though the newer high school opened in 1963—the same year the University of Illinois opened the architecturally incongruous Assembly Hall, an alien spacecraft that somehow settled in the shadow of hallowed Memorial Stadium. The final blocks of our walk are full of images, by now very familiar to us, that frequently turn up as subjects for Larry Kanfer and other local commercial photographers. These are not random factoids but examples of the connected elements, however small and curious, that make our community unique. One might think that a strong sense of place must originate during childhood, but that wasn’t the case with me. I am part of the citizen demo-

by Don Elmore, Cynthia Johnson, and Jayne DeLuce photograph courtesy of Illinois Sports Information

graphic known as “Came Here to Go to College and Never Left.” In addition to the small elements that contributed to my permanence, there were plenty of big, life-altering things: I met my wife here, learned my profession here, raised my children here, coached and cheered and camped here, ran a community newspaper, served on the board of the arts council, and now I serve on the city’s Plan Commission. I never left because at some imprecise point in my stay, I realized I didn’t just live here, this was home. Near the last day of fall we make a ritual pilgrimage on foot to Custard Cup, a landmark family business that serves frozen custard worthy of a 4.2-mile round trip walk. Custard Cup closes for the season around this time, and until the next April there is no substitute that is worth the calories. We could drive, of course, but here’s the thing: the calories burned on that walk are roughly equivalent to those contained in a junior Reese’s Peanut Butter Cup Snowstorm. It is a phenomenon that we cannot reject as mere coincidence. Like every other season, autumn in Champaign has much to offer, from music festivals to high school and college football, tailgating, and the endless variety of activities at the University of Illinois. The weather is often at its best for outdoor activities like bicycling, hiking, or golf. Much of the city is canopied by trees, so later in the fall we enjoy the breathtaking colors even though

Cynthia Autumn is by far my favorite time of year and Urbana is the perfect place to enjoy it. Urbana is a very diverse community, so not only do we have an eclectic collection of opportunities for enjoyment, we also have a diversified community ready to embrace it. Urbana residents are very passionate about our community and eager to show their support, whether it is for a local business or a special event. The residents of our community are a key factor in my pride, which contributes to my love for this season here at home. As a “Tree City,” Urbana provides the perfect setting for all the beautiful colors that fall brings; so many shades of red, orange, and yellow, all peppering the landscape in the trees and on the ground. Urbana offers many free opportunities to enjoy this incredible season, whether it is walking in one of our many parks or simply strolling through downtown. We are fortunate to have such a wide variety of trees lining our downtown streets offering so many colors and textures. Our parks are scattered all over the city, each with its own character. Bike lanes and walking paths provide access to enjoy the weather and the view. The Anita Purves Nature Center located at the north end of Crystal Lake Park provides an opportunity to observe wildlife. And next door, Busey Woods is a 59-acre forest preserve offering a great place for bird watching or nature study. You can take advantage of the State Street Tree Trail that highlights 20 different species of trees and eight different local landmarks. There are many outdoor events enjoyed by our residents and visitors. The Annual Urbana Sweetcorn Festival is a traditional farewell to summer and welcome to fall held at the end of August each year. This free, family-friendly event showcases a variety of food, activities, and entertainment for all tastes. The One Community Together entertainment stage highlights the diversity of Urbana through an international collection of performers. And we can’t forget the feature product of this festival—locally grown sweetcorn! What is fall without football? Urbana High School opened its new athletic complex in 2011, featuring state-of-the-art, weather-proof turf football and soccer fields, concession stand with a full commercial grade kitchen, bathroom facilities, bleachers accommodating 3,100 and 600, respectively, with preferred seating available, and a video display scoreboard that can be used for showing game video, advertisements, public announcements, or instant replay. And the entire complex is handicap accessible, including the press box. Market at the Square is one of the largest and most diverse farmer’s markets in Illinois and demonstrates Urbana’s firm commitment to sustainability. Starting in the spring, it runs through early November and offers a great place for people to

Letter From the Publisher Ten years ago, when my former partner and co-founder of Community Concierge Magazine (CCM), Jim Pride, and I began conceptualizing this magazine, we initially looked at franchise opportunities. More than once we were told not to waste our efforts on Champaign-Urbana. We were regularly amazed by “big-city-folk’s” misinformed impressions of our community. We took exception to their characterizations and decided to put our money where our hearts lay. Both of us being transplants to the area, we understood a simple truth about Champaign-Urbana: this is a heck of a great community to live, work and raise a family! More so, we understood the potential this “little downstate college town” truly held. We had both lived here long enough to come to know and appreciate the richness of our diverse culture, and the profusion of creativity and entrepreneurship that resides here. Immediately we concluded that our mission would be to always present the ChampaignUrbana community at its best! We would always be the cheerleaders for our community, and we would always wear rose-colored glasses in telling the stories of our home. We embraced the opportunity to tell a great story. The best part is that Champaign-Urbana has always made that an easy thing to do! CCM’s basic proposition has always been an invitation for a positive collaboration with the community, local businesses and organizations, and our readers. Our job has been to publish a high-quality, quarterly magazine with outstanding articles about all the wonderful places, events, and businesses we all enjoy, and we couple that effort with an exceptional distribution that reaches all the most desirable audiences our advertising partners need to attract. Our primary goal has always been to drive traffic and consumers—both residents and visitors—toward local businesses and events. Commerce is the lifeblood of all communities and growth is the measure of success. Our labor has always promoted both.

COMMUNITY

This community is particularly gifted with a sizable influx of regular visitors. We enjoy their company and welcome them to our table. A fundamental nature of our community is that it is highly transitional. People and families come to us from all parts of the globe and others depart, making room for more to come, live, and contribute their gifts, creating an even richer community. We know the stories of this community get around. After our second issue, we began tracking all the places that CCM had traveled in the United States. Our first city was San Diego, California. A U of I alum had received a copy of the magazine prior to a visit and called one of our advertising partners to make an appointment during their stay. We were thrilled. The following week, a young professor requested 50 copies to send to her family, who would be traveling here for her wedding. And just like that, the story of our wonderful community was being read in the Philippines. We went out and bought a new map. To date, CCM has traveled to almost every continent and been read by people in many countries. University departments and local busiating! r nesses regularly send copb le Ce ies to recruits and invited guests in hundreds of cities across the United States. In my travels I’ve even found copies at international airports. Locally and regionally, our readership numbers are in the tens of thousands and we regularly receive delightful comments from readers and advertising partners about the value they find in every issue. Over the years we have been truly humbled by the tremendous support and cooperation we’ve received from local businesses, organizations, and our contributing writers. There are too many to mention in this limited space but their contribution can always be found within these pages. We look forward to all the wonderful stories yet to be written about the ChampaignUrbana community. We eagerly anticipate continuing our tremendous partnerships with local businesses, organizations, and our readers. And we are deeply honored and grateful for the opportunity to be of service.

George Amaya President AmPride Communications

continued on p13

Champaign-Urbana, Illinois

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fall 12

by By Vanessa Faurie photograph courtesy of U of I Alumni Association

“We look for a need and we want to fulfill it,” Bob Campbell said at the center’s groundbreaking in 2004. At the time, there was no one location on the U of I campus to welcome home all of its alumni—a place to call their own and from which to re-connect with the campus. An alumni center was a long-held dream by many to provide a place on campus especially for its loyal former students. And it shows. Ever ywhere you look, it seems, there is evidence of the many alumni who helped make the facility a reality.

ACADEMICS

Purchasing a home?

GradFest at Alice Campbell Alumni Center

Alumni Strong The University of Illinois Alumni Association is supportive of and supported by hundreds of thousands of alumni.

“One may judge a University by its faculty, its research, or its students,” David Dodds Henry, president of the University of Illinois from 1955-1971, once said, “but the best measure is the quality and character of its alumni, as reflected in their professional achievement, in their citizen service, in the way they live, and in the values by which they live.” Today, thousands of people throughout the world are forever united in their shared experience of being alumni of the University of Illinois. Regardless of where they come from or what they study, U of I students are transformed by their educational experiences, and many are inspired to want to help ensure that others are given similar opportunities. It’s the role of the University of Illinois Alumni Association (www.uiaa.org) to help graduates remain connected—with the university and with each other—as well as engaged and invested in the welfare of their alma mater. The Alumni Association dates back almost as far as the university itself, when a group of its early graduates decided to formalize their efforts in 1873 to help the university grow and to maintain the bonds with their fellow classmates. Now the Alumni Association is one of the largest organizations of its kind, and counts each of those 680,000-plus

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Community Concierge Magazine

alumni from the university’s three campuses as members. Since those early years, alumni activism has helped shape the history of the university, but it also helps guide its future. In today’s Internet age, the UI Alumni Association utilizes technology to empower alumni around the world to reach out to one another, join online communities, link to their other social networking sites, and access resources such as the Alumni Career Center. The University of Illinois Alumni Network (www.uialumninetwork.org) also features university news and a calendar of alumni events. Alumni also are making a positive difference by advocating for state and federal support for the university through the Association’s Illinois Connection program (www. illinoisconnection.org). More than 11,000 alumni, students, and friends are briefed on the issues and provided with communications tools to effectively reach out to their elected officials and share how the U of I has exerted an impact on their lives. As state and federal research funding decisions get made, alumni advocates encourage lawmakers to preserve the university’s ability to pursue innovation and educate future leaders. Still, traditions remain important aspects of what connects alumni to their university.

First Federal Savings Bank of Champaign-Urbana is a premier residential mortgage lender serving Central Illinois. • Same-Day Pre-Qualifications • Local Service • Local Underwriting • Local Decision-Making • Construction and Home Site Loans • Work With One Loan Officer From Start to Finish

The Alice Campbell Alumni Center.

One of the best-loved college traditions that has its roots at the university’s UrbanaChampaign campus is Homecoming. Every fall, the Alumni Association welcomes graduates with campus-wide festivities, such as a Parade, a Pep Rally for the Fighting Illini football team, complete with Illini Cheerleaders and the Marching Illini band, and the postgame Homecoming After Party at the Alice Campbell Alumni Center. In fact, the center welcomes alumni and friends to the campus year-round. In addition to alumni, it’s also utilized by those in and around the Champaign-Urbana community as a unique venue for banquets, business meetings, receptions, weddings, and other special events. Completed in 2006, the building now serves as the headquarters for the University of Illinois Alumni Association, with offices taking up the third and much of the second level of the center. But the first level is primarily for alumni and the public. Visitors who enter the main doors facing Lincoln Avenue in Urbana, near Illinois Street, are greeted warmly by the smiling portrait of the building’s namesake: U of I alumna Alice Campbell. She and her husband, Bob, are longtime supporters and donors of the university.

From the Richmond Family Gallery to the Bresee Alumni Lounge and adjoining Hindsley Great Room to the Gougler Memorial Library—and the list goes on—alumni and friends have made gifts to honor a loved one or their family legacy. Family is at the heart of the Alice Campbell Alumni Center. The facility seems to come alive when it is filled with alumni, students, and other guests for some of the major events at the center. Like Homecoming in the fall, hundreds and even thousands of visitors also gather—many in their Illini orange and blue—at commencement time in the spring, when the Alumni Association and its Student Alumni Ambassadors host the annual GradFest celebration for graduating students and their families. Other university and private events keep the facility populated throughout the year. Rental space is available within the center for a wide variety of events, such as a retirement or holiday party, wedding reception, or family reunion. (www.uiaa.org/alumnicenter) While people spend time in the center for business or pleasure, they also can admire various works of art and artifacts on exhibit—for example, Homecoming memorabilia through the years, campus history, and paintings by alumni and students. Several alumni added another element of the fine arts to the building by providing the funds to acquire a continued on p15

Since 1908

356bank.com 217-356-2265

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Champaign-Urbana, Illinois

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fall 12

Illini ONE Head Coach Tim Beckman launches Illinois Football into Operation New Era.

by Spencer Turkin photograph courtesy of Illinois Sports Information

8

Community Concierge Magazine

There is a breath of fresh air coming from the football offices at Memorial Stadium. After a sevenyear stint, the Ron Zook era in Champaign came to an end. Athletic Director Mike Thomas conducted a national search for Zook’s replacement, which led to the hiring of Tim Beckman, who became the 23rd head football coach at the University of Illinois. Beckman comes from the University of Toledo, where he went 21-16 in three seasons as head coach, including an 8-4 campaign in 2011, which earned the Rockets a berth in the Military Bowl. The Orange and Blue have undergone a complete attitude overhaul. Since the day he was hired, Beckman has been preaching “ONE.” He has even provided the entire program with wristbands to remind everyone involved of the most important message. “I’ve always been a big guy on mottos,” Beckman said. “This year we went with ONE, which stands for Operation New Era. The word ‘one’ is important.You have to take one step at a time; you have to take one rep. at a time. It is big because it means Operation New Era, but it’s bigger because it’s one. It is the backbone of everything we are trying to get accomplished.” Beckman is a very competitive person both on and off the field. It is a trait he has instilled in his team since his arrival and one that has been embraced by his players. “That’s life to me, not just football,” Beckman explained. “You have to compete every day in everything you do. You have to compete against an opponent or a different person.You also compete against yourself, and in every facet that we have in football life, we compete.” His players are gaining an appreciation for the constant competition, as well. Beckman has enhanced his inters-squad matchups and practices with rewards, such as steak, and punishments like beans and wieners. It is all just part of the improvement effort. “You can’t play this sport if you’re not a competitor,” said fifth-year senior Supo Sanni. “At the same time, you always want to be on your toes and understand that nothing is guaranteed, and you want to come out every day playing your hardest and giving it your all, because you never know what is going to happen. Coach Beckman does a great job of getting everyone to a place where they are comfortable, but still looking behind you.” After laying the groundwork for a successful mindset, Beckman had to convince four of his most talented players to rejoin the Illini and buy into his revamped program. With defensive end Michael Buchanan, defensive tackle Akeem Spence, corner/wide receiver Terry Hawthorne, and center Graham Pocic all contemplating their futures, Beckman knew he had to keep these core components together for a chance at a winning season. He was able to do so, and the 2012 outlook is now much more promising because of it. “They were the ones who came out and made the commitment (to come back),” Beckman said. “They said they want to come back for their senior campaign and be involved in this program, which was against the norm of what had been happening here in regards to guys leaving early

(for the NFL). I’m definitely happy the young men who had an opportunity to leave, came back.” The offense was a question mark at times in 2011. With the core of Nathan Scheelhaase, Donovann Young, and Pocic all back for 2012, the Illini are on the verge of success. “We still have tremendous strides that need to be made on offense,” Beckman said. “They can be made, but we need to make sure we control the football, play at a more consistent level. But I’m excited about working with them. I think they have improved and will continue to do so.” Scheelhaase, who enters his third year as the starting quarterback, has had to learn a new playbook due to the coaching change, a responsibility he hasn’t taken lightly. “We all knew it was going to be a transition with Coach Beckman,” Scheelhaase said. “The playbook has some differences, but we are all doing our jobs on paper and watching film, making sure we learn what we have to. We will be ready.” The offensive line that will be charged with protecting Scheelhaase on Saturdays has many familiar faces returning to Champaign, but none more important than his center. “It is really nice to have (Pocic) back,” Scheelhaase said. “I think I’ve taken every snap at Illinois from him. He has done a heck of a job improving on the field, but more importantly, with his leadership. He is the guy who gets along with everyone in the locker room.” The Illini also have talent at wide receiver. Gone from a year ago is first-round NFL draft pick A.J. Jenkins, but now Hawthorne is expected to play on both sides of the ball. With this addition, Beckman has more depth at a position that features returning starters Darius Millines and Spencer Harris. “When we were in high school being recruited, Terry and I thought that I would be throwing him the ball all of the time,” Scheelhaase said. “Our freshman year we needed him on defense and he became one of the top corners in the country. It is always nice to add another weapon out on the field, and I have no doubt Terry is going to do a phenomenal job as a receiver.” Evan Wilson also returns as the starting tight end for the Illini. Scheelhaase is expecting him to have an increased role in the new Illini offense. “The tight ends are going to be used a little more in the new offense,” Scheelhaase said. “Evan is 6’6.” He catches well and has done some good things the last two years. We will split him out and definitely look to throw him the ball and let him do some things, but he will be blocking as well.” Defensively, the Illini have the potential to be one of the strongest teams in the nation. With five highly touted starters returning to the lineup, quarterbacks will be feeling pressure from every which way possible. “The one thing I keep stressing to these guys is that they were not the best (defense) in this conference (in 2011),” Beckman said. “They need to strive to be the best in this conference. Michigan State finished ahead of us last year and there are things we can continue to get better at.” Sanni, who was recruited and played four seasons under Zook, is adjusting as best as he can. He is growing more accustomed to Beckman’s style.

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Champaign-Urbana, Illinois

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We Love the Nightlife Ko Fusion in downtown Champagin serves a satisfying experience.

by Tolu Taiwo photograph by Community Concierge Magazine

10

C-U comes alive after dark with sophisticated dining, lively bars, dancing, and entertainment.

Community Concierge Magazine

fall 12

Bustling cities are made up of a variety of different things—great culture, diverse populations, and a safe environment—and in the case of this town, a fantastic education powerhouse. However, there is one more ingredient that can make a town go from “good” to “spectacular,” and that’s the nightlife. According to Responsible Hospitality Institute, “well planned and managed nightlife can have a positive effect on a city’s economy.” Cynthia Johnson, executive director of the Urbana Business Association (UBA), agrees that a healthy nightlife is good for the community. “Having an active nightlife keeps people in town,” Johnson said, “and keeps the money local. The majority of businesses are locally owned and (nightlife) keeps them alive. And it’s exciting to help the businesses.” The nightly social scene can attract visitors to explore different parts of the town, or just enhance the lives of residents. The better the nightlife, the better the vitality of the community for the businesses and residents. And Champaign-Urbana, with its unique restaurants, bars, and events, has a nightlife that easily can be paired with those of bigger cities. “There are a lot of restaurants and bars, providing live music and outdoor patio seating,” Johnson said. “They are in close proximity to each other, and they offer a variety of the nightlife scene.” At the Center of Things Get downtown in Champaign anytime and you’ll find it is busy, as it holds more than 50 businesses. However, around 7 or 8 p.m., the atmosphere of the area transitions to packed, as people take advantage of the amenities fitting of a microurban center. Ko Fusion, a well-known restaurant in Downtown Champaign, contributes to the nightlife. Chef Nigel Morgan said during dinner, the restaurant serves a “variety of specials.” “We use pretty diverse ingredients; it’s items that you won’t see at other menus around town,” Morgan said. “And we use the highest quality of food. We have a certain ambience and atmosphere of food that’s different. It just adds to the town in general.” At times, you may catch live outdoor music at Ko Fusion at night. Regardless, Morgan understands the importance of a city’s social scene and Ko Fusion’s responsibility to C-U’s vibrancy. “It’s nice for residents to have as many different options as possible,” Morgan said. “It contributes to the industry and encourages people to spend money and go out and have a good time.” Another downtown hotspot is Radio Maria. The restaurant offers various kinds of dinner options, including Spanish tapas—something it specializes in. It also has the feel of a nightclub, with one section featuring a multi-colored glass wall (containing several kinds of drinks), and a stone bar guardrail. During the evening, lights add to the fun, nightlife-scene.

Other than its delicious food, Radio Maria’s claim to fame is the salsa dancing on Saturday nights. Dancing is found mostly in the second room (though salsa enthusiasts can dance anywhere), and people with various dance levels come to the restaurant to show off their skills or learn a new type of dance. Downtown Champaign’s nightlife also is enhanced by its various bars, where music is common and dancing is a possibility. Cowboy Monkey hosts salsa and tango dancing on Wednesdays at 8 p.m. Also, there are places with their own brewery, like the Blind Pig or the restaurant Destihl.

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Additionally at KCPA, Intermezzo, a little café/restaurant hybrid tucked in the corner between two theatres, offers a place to refresh and converse. At its start in the mid-1980s, the restaurant originally served Vietnamese pastries and other exotic treats. Now, it has many different sandwiches, coffees, and desserts. The café is open until the conclusion of the last show of the night. In addition to Intermezzo, the center also has Stage 5, a fully stocked bar that allows of-age theatre enthusiasts to grab a drink during intermission. When the night is young, restaurants around town add spice to life in C-U. Milo’s and Escobar’s, in Urbana and Champaign, respectively, ser ve the community Latin flavors along with sophisticated American cuisine. Jane Anderson, the owner of both restaurants, said the dinner menu differs from what is served earlier in the day and offers a unique variety of foods. “We usually have fresh fish specials, which is nice,” Anderson said. “Our chef is careful about what he orders, and he gets what he can in sea-

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DINING

fall 12

fall 12

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son. Our chef is particular about what he serves. The spices, especially with Escobar’s, are a mix of Spanish, Asia, and American spices, things people can’t get at other places.” Anderson said the nightlife in ChampaignUrbana is one of several things that enhance the experience of living here and visiting. “I think it makes it more enjoyable to live in the town and on campus. It helps that we have a university. It’s also important to have the music and art we have,” she said. Bars in Urbana, such as Crane Alley and the Iron Post, help expand options for fun and complement the popular restaurants around the area, Johnson said. “(The people) know which ones to go to,” she said. “Silver Creek, the Courier Café, Hickory River, Milo’s, El Toro—they’re all over Urbana.” For wine connoisseurs—experienced or novice—looking for a nice wine, Alto Vineyards is a pleasing spot during the day and night. Alto Vineyards offers a chance to taste wines or to order a glass of a favorite wine and relax while enjoying the vineyard view. Besides the award-winning wines and soothing nature setting, Alto Vineyard features live music performance during its Music Among the Vines concert series, which lasts until September 15. Don’t settle in for a long evening at home this fall. Champaign-Urbana does not pull in the streets and close down at dusk, it’s just getting started. From delicious dining and a variety of drinks to dancing or just kicking back with friends, local nightlife is calling.

DINING Escobar’s | Educating CU on the variety and passion of the best of Latin cuisine from Central and South America and the Caribbean. Inspired Latin cuisine for the other than Mexican palate. Separate lounge available for private parties. p13 KoFusion | Find this eclectic, cosmopolitan restaurant and bar in downtown Champaign and enjoy the globally inspired contemporary American menu featuring fusion sushi, natural meats, and wild caught seafood. p12 Li’l Porgy’s Bar-B-Q | Established in 1979, the restaurant specializes in genuine hickory smoked barbecue with fresh-made sauce. The famous ribs, rib tips, and chicken are served with delicious steak fries. Catering from 25-500. p11

2870 S. Philo Rd. Urbana www.milosurbana.com • 217.344.8946 • menus available online • call for reservations & hours

12

Community Concierge Magazine

Milo’s | Inspired American cuisine from American ingredients. Steaks, seafood, pasta, pork chops, duck, chicken... with a passion for flavor, presentation, and service. And for something different try our famous upside-down pizza! p12 Radio Maria Restaurant and Tapas Bar | Now serving tapas every day, along with 35 wines by the glass and 27 draft beers. More information at www.radiomariarestaurant.com. p11

Community continued from p5 come and enjoy the local fare. In September, The UP Center will host the 3rd Annual CU Pride Fest. Urbana is the perfect setting for this festival as a reflection of our community. 2012 finds Pygmalion Music Festival, held in late September, adding an outdoor concert venue in downtown Urbana. In October, Jay Goldberg Events presents The International Beer Tasting & Chili Cook-Off in downtown Urbana, an annual event featuring more than 150 different specialty and import beers. The C-U Folk and Roots Festival celebrates American roots music, dance, stories, and arts in downtown Urbana each November. For those just wanting to enjoy a nice evening out, many Urbana restaurants and bars offer outdoor seating as an option and often provide music entertainment. These are just a sampling of the fun things you can find in the fall, right here in Urbana, that add to the list of my reasons for loving this community this time of year. And this collection of events is a direct reflection of the diversity our community is made up of. There are so many options of things to do, it’s impossible to list them all. Jayne Autumn is my favorite season of the year, especially in Champaign County. It’s about the anticipation of the return of the Illinois students, along with kicking off the Illini football, volleyball, tennis, and soccer seasons. It’s about the re-opening of Curtis Orchard and the University of Illinois Ice Arena, the kickoff to the Krannert Center for the Performing Arts season, and anticipating Illinois Homecoming, Savoy Orchard Days, and other fall events. Autumn means cooler temperatures, changing leaf colors, bonfires, hayrack rides, and s’mores—and picking out the best pumpkins to decorate my porch. The fall season activities seemed simpler when our two daughters were younger. My husband Joe and I took them on hikes at Lake of the Woods or through the corn maze at Hardy’s Reindeer Ranch in Rantoul. We camped on group trips through U of I Campus Recreation and we spent hours picking out pumpkins and naming scarecrows for our yard display.We picked out the best Halloween costumes and looked forward to the Champaign Park District’s Funfest at Marketplace Mall.We built big leaf piles in Robeson Park to capture the best “leaf pictures” of the girls jumping into the leaves.We tailgated at Illini football games and watched the Illinois Homecoming parade with the girls’ attempts to get the best candy thrown to the crowd. Now that the girls are 14 and 12, the autumn season is all about sports, primarily soccer and volleyball. We spend our fall driving to practices and watching competitions. My favorite, of course, is Illinois Futbol Club’s Fall Cup at Campus Rec. and Dodds Park soccer fields. The leaf pictures still happen, usually with groans, and the pumpkins are bought quickly without much family input. We do try to attend Illini football and volleyball games, and my younger daughter is a volleyball ball kid. Autumn has become all about managing school and sports schedules, so instead, I enjoy the season through my role at the Champaign County Convention & Visitors Bureau, where I’m able to refer our wonderful amenities to visitors who come here for meetings and conferences, sports tournaments,

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COMMUNITY fall 12

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Don Elmore is director of business development at The HDF Group and owns Jane Addams Book Shop with his wife, Susan. Cynthia Johnson is executive director at The Urbana Business Association. Jayne DeLuce is president and CEO at the Champaign County Convention & Visitors Bureau..

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beautiful Steinway grand piano. The outdoor setting is just as aesthetic as the inside, with a large fountain, the Blackwell Flag Court, and the Hallene Gateway, which features the historic entry portal of the original University Hall from the campus’s early years, on the north side. The patio in this area, as well as on the east and west sides, is populated with engraved stone pavers from still more alumni and friends sharing personal tributes and triumphs: “In memory of my mother Lillian Gray who sacrificed to make it possible for me to attend here, John Gray CE Class of 1959”, reads one engraving. And several markers exclaim school pride, such as: “Illinois forever!” and “Go, Illini!” or send greetings to the next generation, such as, “To the future Illini, cherish your education.” A paver is a way that many more alumni, students, families, and friends can leave a permanent mark of their time on campus or pay homage to its transformational impact on their lives. “The Alice Campbell Alumni Center achieves the vision of providing the complete U of I experience for alumni,” according to Loren R. Taylor, president and CEO of the UI Alumni Association. “This gift from alumni and friends, for alumni and friends, has created an atmosphere of fraternity and goodwill for the University of Illinois, the Alumni Association, and the community at large. It really is welcoming home family.”

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agricultural research, leisure group travel, U of I Dad’s weekend, Illinois Black Alumni Reunion, or just a family fun weekend. When the girls’ schedules slow down, my “autumn bucket list” includes such things as attend more Krannert and Parkland theatre performances, become a master gardener, play tennis outside at Atkins or Lindsay Courts until the first frost, watch more Illini tennis matches and swim meets, check out Alto Vineyards and Wyldewood Cellars with friends, take a cooking and art appreciation course, learn to play golf (maybe), hike new trails through the Champaign County Forest Preserves, bike to every public art sculpture in the area, attend a Japan House tea ceremony, pick apples at Curtis Orchard in Savoy to make my own apple butter, try a fall dinner at Prairie Fruits Farm (or at least come back with good cheese and gelato), hit the Market at the Square more often, and continue the journey to discover my favorite tea at our many amazing restaurants. Until then, in-between practices, I’ll navigate my own favorite leaf watch—driving east on University between Prospect and State or First Street between St. Mary’s and Kirby are two favorites spots. I’ll try to slow down enough to enjoy the many wonderful things to do in Champaign County during the autumn season.

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Champaign-Urbana, Illinois

15


Fall for Entertainment Find outdoor festivals, live music, and an array of entertainment as colorful as the local foliage this season.

Performances of the CUSO’s 53rd season promise delight for the whole family.

16

Community Concierge Magazine

by Erin Lippitz and Amanda Baker photograph courtesy of CUSO

Autumn will mean many things this year to the citizens of East Central Illinois; a drop in temperature and crisp air, changing leaves, returning students, the anticipation of upcoming holidays. For many who call Champaign County home it also means outdoor festivals, live music, and an array of entertainment as colorful as the local foliage. Champaign-Urbana Symphony Orchestra Since its inception, the Champaign Urbana Symphony Orchestra (CUSO) has striven to provide the best orchestral music and local symphony possible. Today the Symphony is the orchestra-in-residence at Krannert Center for the Performing Arts (KCPA), and its mission is much as it was in 1960: to enhance the community through live performances, education, and outreach. By introducing area children to classical music through live symphonic experiences and making music accessible to the entire community, the Symphony has become a local treasure. “The CUSO is a great Champaign-Urbana cultural asset with a rich legacy,” said Executive Director Jeffrey Farlow-Cornell. “That’s shown by the fact that we have had only three conductors/music directors in over 50 years.” The 53rd season promises to be an exciting one as the Symphony chooses the next music director and conductor. Farlow-Cornell describes it as “the prelude to a new era of the CUSO.” This season will include four Classics Concerts, each led by a guest conductor aspiring to be chosen as the new Maestro. “We had a terrific pool of candidates from which to choose our four finalists,” Farlow-Cornell said. “It’s a shor t season and I expect the excitement will build as we watch the finalists conduct, hear the music they have chosen to present, and meet them personally.” The 2012-2013 season of the Champaign Urbana Symphony Orchestra begins on October 13 with the concert, “Resurrection” and will feature works by three of the greatest musical minds: Brahms, Mozart, and Beethoven. Led by guest conductor Farkhand Khudyev, this concert will take the audience on a musical journey beginning with Brahms’ Third Symphony and moving back in time to Mozart’s Clarinet Concerto and culminating with Beethoven’s Pastoral Symphony. The Clarinet Concerto also features renowned and prizewinning clarinetist, Emil Khudyev, brother to the guest conductor. The guest conductors submitted their own programs, developed their own theme for each concert, and invited the guest artists they wanted to have perform with the orchestra. “All four of the guest conductors are great choices,” Farlow-Cornell said. “We think our ticket holders will enjoy them.”

Daniel Black returns to guest conduct the Holiday Concert on December 13, featuring the Central Illinois Children’s Chorus and a choir made up of members of local church choirs. The program includes familiar classics the whole family can enjoy. Audience participation is welcomed during the sing-along. Half a dozen church choirs were chosen to sing with the children’s choir, and it took quite of bit of planning to make that happen, said FarlowCornell. “You can’t just get people together to sing,” he said. “It takes a lot of organization. But conductor Daniel Black is so full of energy. He just stepped right into it and was sure we could do it. It’s going to be a lot of fun.” The children’s choir, directed by Andrea Solya, will lead the traditional sing-along. Farlow-Cornell said the audience looks forward to the sing-along, which has been done for many, many years. The music varies each year but will be familiar to the audience. Words for each song will be printed in the program to assist the audience in participation. “From the first Classics Concert featuring Emil Khudyev playing Mozart’s Clarinet Concerto to the final concert featuring Winston Choi playing Prokofiev’s Piano Concerto No. 3, it is a season full of favorites,” Farlow-Cornell said. “I am sure ticket holders will find something they love in each CUSO performance this year.” For more information about the Champaign Urbana Symphony Orchestra, ticket information, and a full concert schedule, visit www.cusymphony.org. Pygmalion Music Festival The 2012 Annual Pygmalion Music Festival, now in its eight year, begins Thursday, September 27. It’s become a destination festival for original indie music lovers, set in a small, unassuming but vibrant Midwestern town. The three-day, multi-venue “tastemaking” festival will feature a packed schedule of artists, including indie-avant garde rockers Dirty Projectors, electro-thrash artist Sleigh Bells, and sunny-post punks Best Coast, psychedelic folk band Grizzly Bear, and alternative distortionists Dinosaur Jr. as headliners. Pygmalion’s festival model is based on presenting artists in the best venues in and around Champaign-Urbana. This year, as a response to community and audience feedback, the festival organizers are taking a bigger and broader approach and incorporating outdoor stages in both downtown Champaign and Urbana for all three days. This is a major step forward from last year’s single outdoor concert for the Polyvinyl Records’ 15 Year Anniversary “Each year,” Seth Fein, Pygmalion founder, said, “we learn a bit more about what our audience, and this community demands, and we continue to improve on it annually.” On Friday night, Downtown Urbana will play host to Krannert Center for the Performing Arts’ outdoor stage, with Dirty Projectors taking center stage. Original festival venue stalwart, The Canopy Club, will be home to the Opening Night show with Sleigh Bells, as well as the late show continued on p22

fall 12

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17


6.1 18 7 3 17 4 2 8 1

3.1

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6

5.2

7

Neil St

Prospect Ave

I I II

27

20

Lincoln Ave

I I 5 I I 29 23 I I Bloo I I I min Dodds 22 I gton Park I I Rd I I I I I Hazel Bradley Ave I I Bradley Ave Park I I I I Heritage I I Park SpaldingI I I Douglass I Park Park I I I II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II I I I I I I King Park I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Downtown 7.1 I I 5.5 I I I I Midtown I I I Provena Chamapaign Church St I I II Covenant I Eisner West Side Hospital I I II 12 University Ave I I University Ave 21 Park Park 6

Urbana Country Club

30

Weber Park

8.1

Champaign City Building Illinois 10.3 Terminal

3.1

Christie Clinic

8.1 2.7

9.1

1.5

University Ave

9.2

3.2 11 10

Hessel Park

Kirby Ave

9.6 8 Wisegarver 9.8 Park

3.1

4.1 5.1

11.1

Memorial Stadium

Assembly Hall 11.2

Graduate Library South Quad

Illini Grove

McKinley Health Center

Urbana Free Library

Robeson Meadows West

5.4

Windsor Rd

3.1

15

14

4.2

Morrissey Park

13

3.3

3.3

Noel Park

Washington St

Prairie Park

Florida Ave

Blair Park

Florida Ave

Crestview 17 Park

University of Illinois

3.3 Lohmann Park

Stone Creek Golf Course

Windsor Rd

3.1 7.4

9

South Ridge Park

Philo Rd

Race St

11

Savoy

PUBLIC PARKING

Old Church Rd

47 48 50 54

1

2.5

2 MILES

10.2

10.5

CMI Willard Airport

Prairie Fields Park

Jones Park

UIUC Golf Course

Dana Colbert Sr. Park

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

3.1

Downtown urbana

SHOPPING CENTERS

32

31

BUSINESS PARTNERS HOTEL & MOTELS

Neil St

Curtis Rd

First St

Prospect Ave

Mattis Ave

Duncan Rd

3.1

Burwash 5.3 Park

CaMpustown

John St

Wheatfield Park

Meadowbrook Park

Green St

Green St

Philo Rd

Arboretum

1.9

Hallbeck Park

Weaver Park

Carle Park

Lincoln Ave

3.4

3

16 9.5

Washington St

4

Mattis Park

Lincolnshire Fields Country Club

3.1

3.2

24Illini Union 3.4 Hallene 2.6 Gateway U of I Quad Krannert Center

1.8

9

Urbana

3.1

Krannert Art Museum

11.3

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Sixth St

Champaign Country Club

Green St

Campustown Campustown

Ave

Urbana Free Library

8.2

County Courthouse

3.1

Federal Building

Lincoln Square Mall 1.10

1.6

Illinois St

1.4

1.7

1.2

9.9

Main St3.2

1.1

Vine St

Clark Park

Scott Park

Champaign 9.3 Public Library

sity

ver Uni

AMBUCS Park

Springfield Ave

Champaign Public Library

Fourth St

Johnston Park

Robeson Park

Staley Rd

7.5

9.7

Broadway Ave

1.3

Green St

Springfield Ave

8.3

12

0

9.4

Race St

7.3

Midtown

Bardeen Quad

3.4

I I I I I I

10

Boneyard Creek

Carle Hospital

33 41

Vine St

3.1

Christie Clinic

Springfield Ave

Bian Park

Zahnd Park

Dog Park Weber Park

26

Chief Shemauger Park

Busey Woods / Crystal Lake Park

Race St

I I II

I I II

3.3

2 3.2

Centennial Park

Porter Family Park

28

I I

Kaufman Park

Turnberry Ridge Park

Mullikin Park

6.2 20

7.2

Church St

Neil St

1

Garden Hills Park

Airport Rd

All maps Š2012 AmPride Communications, Inc.

Duncan Rd

Staley Rd

I I

5

High Cross Rd

Town Center Park

Cunn ingh am A ve

3.4

Oaks Rd

42 46

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I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

I I I I I I

Market St

Mattis Ave

Interstate Dr

I I I I

Powell Park

55 56

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16

9.5

businEss & hotEL/ MotEL DirECtoriEs

4

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BUSINESS & HOTEL / MOTEL DIRECTORY

BUSINESS PARTNERS MAP

BUSINESS TYPE / NAME

HOTEL & MOTELS

DTC=Downtown/Midtown Champaign Map; DTU=Downtown Urbana Map; CM=Campustown Map GRID AD

1.0 - ART GALLERIES 1.1 - Cinema Gallery............................................ DUM ......p17 1.2 - Eclectic Co-op............................................. DUM ......p17 1.3 - Framer’s Market............................................... D3 ......p17 1.4 - Heartland Gallery......................................... DUM ......p17 1.5 - indi go Art Gallery ...................................... DCM ......p31 1.6 - International Galleries ................................. DUM ......p17 1.7 - Kalarte Gallery ............................................. DUM ......p17 1.8 - Krannert Art Museum .......................................E4 ......p17 1.9 - Larry Kanfer Photography Gallery ................... D5 ......p17 1.10 - Wind, Water & Light ................................... DUM ......p17 2.0 - ATTRACTIONS 2.1 - Alto Vineyards ................................................. B1 ......p31 2.2 - Miller Park Zoo, B ........................................... B1 ......p22 2.3 - Bloomington Center for Performing Arts, B ..... B1 ......p25 2.4 - Champ. Co. Forest Preserve, Mahomet. .......... B1 ........p7 2.5 - Escape Locally, So. IL ..................................... B7 ......p26 2.6 - Krannert Center for the Performing Arts ...........E3 ........p7 2.7 - SODO Theatre ...............................................DTC ......p31 3.0 - BANKS & CREDIT UNIONS 3.1 - Busey Bank ..... B5, C2, C3, C4, DTU, D5, E3, F5 .....p31 3.2 - First Federal Savings Bank .........DTU, C3, D4, E3 ........p7 3.3 - Heartland Bank ..............................B3, C5, F3, F4 ......p33 3.4 - UIECU ..............................................C1,D5,E3,F3 ......p14 4.0 - FINANCIAL SERVICES 4.1 - Country Financial | John May ....................... D4 . ......p9 4.2 - Country Financial | Scott Jackson ................ B5 . ......p9 5.0 - HEALTH & FITNESS 5.1 - Beltone ............................................................ D4 ......p29 5.2 - Creative Smiles ............................................... D2 ......p30 5.3 - HMD Academy of Tae Kwon Do....................... D5 ......p21 5.4 - Pride Clinic ..................................................... B5 ......p27 5.5 - Provena Covenant Medical Center ...................E3 ......p30 6.0 - HOME FRONT, HOTELS, HOUSING, REALTORS 6.1 - Candlewood Suites ...................................... D2 ..... p33 6.2 - Eastland Suites ........................................... F2 ..... p15 7.0 - RESTAURANTS & NIGHTLIFE 7.1 - Escobar’s ......................................................... D3 ......p13 7.2 - KoFusion.......................................................DTC ......p12 7.3 - Li'l Porgy's BBQ ........................................ C3, F3 ......p11 7.4 - Milo’s ...............................................................F5 ......p12 7.5 - Radio Maria...................................................DTC ......p11 8.0 - SERVICES 8.1 - Conservatory of Central Illinois ................... DTC ..... p15 8.2 - Urbana Business Association...................... DTU ..... p23 8.3 - WILL Radio ................................................. E3 ..... p35 9.0 - SHOPPING 9.1 - CV Lloyd .......................................................DTC ......p31 9.2 - Furniture Lounge...........................................DTC ......p31 9.3 - Hair Cuttery ..................................................... D3 ......p35 9.4 - Jane Addams Book Shop ..............................DTC ......p26 9.5 - Market at the Square ...............................DTU, F3 ......p26 9.6 - Old Farm Shops .............................................. C4 ......p15 9.7 - Ten Thousand Villages ..................................DTC ......p25 9.8 - UPS Store ....................................................... C4 ......p14 9.9 - Wooden Hanger, The .....................................DTU ......p26 10.0 - TRANSPORTATION 10.1 - Central Illinois Regional Airport, B-N............B1 ...CVR2 10.2 - Flightstar ....................................................... C7 ...CVR3 10.3 - Amtrak (Illinois Terminal) ...............................DTC ......p34

20

FAMILY MATTERS

fall 12

Community Concierge Magazine

MAP

BUSINESS TYPE / NAME

GRID AD G.

10.4 - MTD ...............................................................p3 ......p34 10.5 - Willard Airport............................................... C7 ...CVR4 11.0 - UNIvERSITy OF ILLINOIS 11.1 - UI Assembly Hall........................................... D4 .......n/a 11.2 - UI Athletic Division ........................................E4 ......p33 11.3 - UI Memorial Stadium.........................................D4 .......n/a

DON’T FORGET TO TELL THEM YOU SAW THEIR AD IN COMMUNITY CONCIERGE MAGAZINE!

Champaign-Urbana Area Code: 217 Important Local Numbers All Emergencies | 911 Police (Non-Emergency) Champaign........................................................ 333-8911 Urbana .............................................................. 384-2320 U of I ................................................................. 333-1216 Fire (Non-Emergency) Champ. ............................................................. 403-7200 Urbana .............................................................. 384-2420 Medical (Non-Emergency) IL Poison Center.......................................(800) 222-1222 Carle Hosp. ....................................................... 383-4636 Provena Cov. Hosp. .......................................... 337-2000 The Pavilion ...................................................... 373-1700 Utilities Ameren IP ................................................(800) 755-5000 Illinois Am. Water Co. ........................................ 352-1420 Champaign, City of City Hall ........................................................... 403-8700 Park Dist. .......................................................... 398-2550 School Dist. 4.................................................... 351-3800 Post Ofc ............................................................ 373-6000 Urbana, City of City Hall ............................................................ 384-2499 Park Dist. .......................................................... 367-1536 School Dist. 116................................................ 384-3600 Post Ofc ............................................................ 337-6297 Higher Education U of I Info. ......................................................... 333-1000 Parkland College............................................... 351-2200 Danville Area Com. College ............................... 443-3222 Transportation Amtrak .............................................................. 352-5905 Gryhnd .............................................................. 352-4150 MTD .................................................................. 384-8188 Trailways........................................................... 352-4234

MAP

HOTEL / MOTEL

WITH THE HMD VALUE PACKAGE

PHONE (217 AREA CODE)

CHAMPAIGN 1 - Baymont Inn & Suites, 302 W. Anthony Dr. ............356-8900 2 - Quality Inn, 305 Marketview Dr. ............................352-4055 3 - Candlewood Suites, 1917 Moreland Blvd ...............398-1000 4 - Country Inn & Suites, 602 W. Mktview Dr. ..............355-6666 5 - Courtyard by Marriott, 1811 Moreland Blvd. ...........355-0411 6 - Days Inn, 1019 Bloomington Rd. ............................356-6873 7 - Econo Lodge, 914 W. Bloomington Rd. ....................356-6000 8 - Extended Stay America, 610 W. Mktview Dr. ..........351-8899 9 - Fairfield Inn/Marriott, 1807 Moreland Blvd. ................ 355-0604 10 - Hawthorn Suites, 101 Trade Center Dr. ..................398-3400 11 - Hilton Garden Inn, 1501 S. Neil St. .......................352-9970 12 - Homewood Suites, 1417 S. Neil St. ......................352-9960 13 - I Hotel & Conference Ctr, 1900 S. First St. ............819-5000 14 - La Quinta Inn, 1900 Center Dr. ............................356-4000 15 - Microtel Inn, 1615 Rion Dr. .................................398-4136 16 - Red Roof Inn, 212 W. Anthony Dr. .........................352-0101 17 - Super 8 Motel, 202 W. Marketview Dr. ...................359-2388 18 - Wingate, 516 W. Marketview Dr. .............................355-5566 URbANA 20 - Eastland Suites, 1907 N. Cunningham Ave. .............367-8331 21 - Hampton Inn, 1200 W. University Ave. ....................337-1100 22 - Holiday Inn Hotel, 1001 Killarney St. .....................328-7900 23 - Holiday Inn Express, 1003 Killarney St...................328-0328 24 - Illini Union, 1401 W. Green St. ..............................333-1241 26 - Manor Motel, 1102 N. Cunningham Ave. ..................367-5427 27 - Motel 6, 1906 N. Cunningham Ave...........................344-1085 28 - Ramada, 902 W. Killarney St. ................................328-4400 29 - Sleep Inn, 1908 N. Lincoln Ave. .............................367-6000 30 - Super 8 Motel, 612 Killarney St. .........................384-8000 SAVOy 31 - Best Western-Paradise Inn, 709 N. Dunlap Rd.......... 356-1824 32 - Senator’s Inn, 801 N. Dunlap Rd. .........................352-0002 DANVILLE 33 - Best Western-Regency, 360 Eastgate Dr. ..............446-2111 34 - Best Western-Riverside, 57 S. Gilbert ................. 431-0020 35 - Comfort Inn, 383 Lynch Dr. .................................443-8004 36 - Danville Inn, 388 Eastgate Dr. ..............................446-2400 37 - Fairfield Inn, 389 Lynch Dr. .................................443-3388 38 - Hampton Inn & Suites, 370 Eastgate Dr. ...............442-3300 39 - Holiday Inn Express, 310 Eastgate Dr. ..................442-2500 40 - Sleep Inn and Suites, 361 Lynch Dr. ....................442-6600 41 - Super 8 Motel, 377 Lynch Dr. .............................443-4499 RANTOUL 42 - Magnuson Hotel Heritage Inn, 420 S. Murray .......892-9292 43 - Days Inn, 801 W. Champaign ................................893-0700 44 - Quarters Inn & Suites, 200 Linden Ave..................893-1234 45 - Rantoul Motel, 303 N. Century Blvd. ......................893-5500 46 - Super 8 Motel, 207 S. Murray Rd. ........................893-8888 TUSCOLA 47 - Baymont Inn & Suites, 1006 Southline Rd. ............253-3500 48 - Super 8, 1007 E Southline Rd. ...............................253-5488 MAHOMET 49 - Heritage Inn, 801 E. Eastwood ..............................586-4975 ARCOLA 50 - Knight’s Inn, 640 E Springfield Rd. .........................268-3031 51 - Arcola Inn, 236 S. Jacques St. ..............................268-4971 52 - Comfort Inn, 610 E. Springfield Rd..........................268-4000 53 - Diamond House B&B, 229 E. Jefferson St. .............268-4876 54 - Flower Patch B&B, 225 E. Jefferson St. .................268-4876 MONTICELLO 55 - Best Western, 805 Iron Horse Place ......................762-9436 56 - Foster Inn, 1414 N. Market St. ..............................762-9835

1ST MONTH FREE for Tae Kwon Do Lessons Not valid with any other offers, discounts or coupons. Offer Expires 11/30/12

Sign up 2 family members for lessons & get

50% OFF

for each additional family member.

CALL NOW FOR DETAILS 217.352.3939

Not valid with any other offers, discounts or coupons. Offer Expires 11/30/12

or email @ hmdtkd@gmail.com

Understanding Tae Kwon Do As An Art Family does matter, which is why the HMD instructor staff is trained and ready to help you communicate family values to your children through the art and discipline of Tae Kwon Do. As parents, we have a limited amount of time to prepare our children for the future. If we want our kids to embrace good values and achieve their highest potential, we need to focus on the hearts of our children and equip them with effective tools that support a good outcome.

HMD Academy of Tae Kwon Do 1701 Woodfield Drive, Savoy

Locations also in Mahomet, St. Joseph & Monticello Champaign-Urbana, Illinois 21 www.hmdacademy.com


fall 12

at Bloomington’S

zoo!

The Pines Philo Rd

Windsor Rd.

University District

Florida Ave.

Downtown ln co e. Av

Community Concierge Magazine

Champaign Co. Forest Preserve District With more than 3,800 acres, CCFPD’s five preserves (Lake of the Woods, Homer Lake, Middle Fork, River Bend, and Sangamon River) offer enough to keep you busy year-round. Call 5863360 or visit www.ccfpd.org. p7

Eastland Suites Hotel & Conference Center Features 126 guest rooms and intimate meeting space. Double guest rooms are great for sporting teams, and the two story, two bedroom loft suite is perfect for a family. Group discounts are available. p15 Flightstar | Founded in 1978, Flightstar is an aviation service company located at the University of Illinois-Willard Airport in Savoy. Flightstar’s operations include aircraft charter, fuelings, and airline and private aircraft maintenance. Cvr2 Urbana Business Association | The UBA is a membership driven, not-for-profit organization whose mission is to promote Urbana as a dynamic place to live, work, and do business. Experience the verve! p23

Lin

22

Bloomington Parks, Recreation & Cultural Arts | Expands life in McLean County. Through countless leisure and enrichment programs, parks facilities that include nature parks and Miller Park Zoo, and top-quality performances at Bloomington Center for the Performing Arts, the district feeds the spirit of the community. p25 Central Illinois Regional Airport | Located on Route 9 East in Bloomington, just 45 minutes from Champaign-Urbana, downstate Illinois’ premier airport features affordable fares, free parking, and a beautiful new terminal building. Cvr

Main St.

St.

309.434.2250 • www.millerparkzoo.org

Alto Vineyards | Offering a delicious selection of award-winning wines, enticing gourmet foods, and unique gifts, Alto Vineyards is a popular local attraction. There’s no better place to relax with a glass of Illinois’ finest. p13

Race

Photos © Joel Sartore

ATTRACTIONS

ATTRActions

Champaign-Urbana MTD | Offers frequent service every day to downtown Champaign, downtown Urbana, and the University of Illinois campus. One-way fares are only $1! Park the car and ride today. p34 | Champaign’s Willard Airport New destinations and more convenient and competitive fares. Your hometown airport is minutes away and takes you every place you want to go. Get here and go. Visit www.FlyCMI.com. Bk Cvr The Conservatory of Central Illinois | A notfor-profit community music school, organized to provide music instruction and experiences to residents of East Central Illinois of all ages and skill levels. p15

St.

new

dent ACE Award winner; it is an honor I will never forget,” she said. For more information go to 40north.org or call 217-351-9841.

Vin e

See what’s

ACE Awards Seven Champaign County residents will be honored at the 8th Annual ACE (Arts, Culture, and Education) Awards on October 16th at 5:30pm at The Canopy Club in Urbana. It’s here that the creative minded people of Champaign County gather to celebrate distinguished peers and leaders in the arts community. The evening promises to be full of excitement, entertainment, laughs, tears, cheers, and toasts. Presented by 40 North | 88 West, the ACE Awards celebrate the outstanding efforts of local individuals, businesses, artists, teachers, students, arts organizations, volunteers, and government and community leaders who helped strengthen the arts, culture, and education of Champaign County through the gifts of their time and incredible creative energy and talent. From public nominations, winners are carefully selected by an independent panel of community-based judges representing a broad cross-section of Champaign County. ACE winners are presented with a sculptural award made of a polished clear acrylic orb nested inside a custom stainless steel assembly. In addition to the winners, all the nominees will receive much deserved recognition during the ceremony for their exceptional contributions. “Our nominees don’t do this work for fame or glory but because they believe in the value the arts bring to all our lives,” said Kelly White, 40 North Executive Director. “Award winners are sometimes quite well known, while others work outside the spotlight. It is with great pleasure that we host this event each year to honor those people that are

dedicating their time, energy, and passion to the arts of Champaign County.” Each ACE category represents a field in which there are meaningful opportunities for individuals to make significant contributions to the arts, culture, and entertainment community. Seven categories recognize a comprehensive list of contributions: an advocate who broadened awareness, accessibility and participation in the arts; a student with outstanding artistic achievements; a volunteer who significantly impacted the arts and culture community; a teacher who demonstrated a unique and creative approach to merging the arts and education; an artist for their contributions to the excellence of the arts; a business that demonstrated outstanding support of the arts; and an individual for their continued, outstanding lifetime support of the arts in our community. 2011 ACE winners were: Advocate ACE – James Barham, Indi Go Artist Coop; Student ACE¬ – Caitlin Caruso-Dobbs (new category as of 2011); Volunteer ACE – Hiram Paley; Teacher ACE – Mark Rubel; Artist ACE – Kathleen Everingham; Business ACE – Shared Space Artists Co-op (now Eclectic); and Lifetime ACE – Kimiko Gunji, Japan House. Caruso-Dobbs said receiving the award was significant to her. “Winning an ACE Award really made me realize what an impact the things I am doing make on the arts in my community. To me, I’m just doing what I love, but to others I am actually making a difference. The fact that 40 North sponsors this program is an incredible thing. I am so proud to be the first Stu-

d.

For more information and to purchase tick- law should probably not be legal because they ets, go to www.pygmalionmusicfestival.com. have been so hot!” The chili cook-off is judged by a panel made The 11th Annual International Beer Tasting up of local community members and media. and Chili Cook-Off Each chili is judged on a list of criteria that The annual International Beer Tasting and Chili includes aroma, consistency, color, taste, and Cook-Off returns to Downtown Urbana for its even aftertaste. 11th year on Saturday, October 6th. A simple “The requirements to win are to have the best festival for folks who like beer and chili, it is chili,” Armintrout said. expected to attract more than 100 different There also will be a People’s Choice winner beers from all over the world and professional that is voted on by the attendees of the event. and amateur teams cooking up giant batches Each person will receive a raffle ticket at the gate of delicious chili. and can vote for their favorite chili throughout the “This is a really great fall event,” said Mike event. The earlier you arrive at the event, the better Armintrout of Jay Goldberg Events & Entertain- your chances are of being able to try a variety of ment. “It’s something we look forward to each chilis. Each team of cooks is only required to make year.” five gallons of chili and usually once it’s gone, it’s The event began out of a shared love for gone. Plus, the first 500 patrons through the gate the City of Urbana. A group of employees at all receive a commemorative beer sampling glass Jay Goldberg Events wanted to provide a fun that can be used that night, which encourages event for the community they lived in, aside many to come out early, Armintrout said. from the concerts they helped produce at the While this event is affectionately referred to Canopy Club. locally as a “festival,” the focus of the event is “It also combined two things we love about beer and chili, so there is no live music or other the fall,” Armintrout said. “Beer and chili.” traditional entertainment. Should you want to Armintrout said festival-goers can expect get into the beer business or try your hand at small microbrews to brews from some of the home brewing though, look for some seminars largest international breweries. And while lo- at this year’s tasting. cal brews have not been featured much at past Admission to the International Beer Tasting tastings, the event is about celebrating and and Chili Cook-Off is $5 in advance and $8 at supporting all things local. the gate. Sampling tickets are 75 cents each Of course we can’t forget about the chili. and can be used to receive a 4-ounce beer or Armintrout said the festival has had every- chili sample. Gates open at 3 p.m. For more thing from basic red chili with beef, to chicken information about the event and where to purchili, vegan chili, white chili, and some that, “by chase tickets, visit www.urbanabusiness.org.

oR

ATTRACTIONS continued from p17 on Friday, with Best Coast. On Saturday, all day, Downtown Champaign will take center stage, hosting another all day outdoor show, with both Grizzly Bear and Dinosaur Jr. set to anchor the show. The outdoor Saturday concert will feature more than 12 acts on two stages. Every year, Pygmalion showcases both national and local talent. “I really stay on top of what is happening both locally and internationally within the realm of indie rock,” Fein said. “Reading magazines like Pitchfork, Stereogum, PASTE, etc., of course, is key, but it’s only a part of the process. I try my best to include who I feel is doing great work here locally in terms of our own music scene; bands that are active, writing, recording albums, touring, and the like. Plus, it’s great to have locals support the national headliners, too.” Festival passes are currently on sale for $85 and will jump to $100 once those sell out. The festival pass guarantees admission into every show at the festival, depending on capacity limitations. Single tickets for every show will be available, as well. The on-sale date for those shows and tickets will be announced at a later date as well. Festival passes can be purchased here: http://tinyurl.com/pygfest2012. Additional artists include Cloud Nothings, Tennis, Hospitality, Willis Earl Beal, Frankie Rose, Big Freedia and The Divas, Lord Huron, Julia Holter, Lotus Plaza, Craft Spells, Owen, Oh No Oh My, Zeus, and more.

fall 12

Ph il

ATTRACTIONS

Five Points University Ave.

Experience The Verve www.urbanabusiness.com

Champaign-Urbana, Illinois

23


fall 12

by By Nate Norris photograph by Skye Croff

Illinois Wine Production of quality wine is a pleasing and growing development in the state.

When the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) releases this fall its most recent study of wineries and grape production in the state of Illinois, it is sure to confirm what many in the industry are already aware of: the wine business in Illinois has never been better. While still not outpacing California, which produces nearly 90 percent of the grapes used to make wine in the U. S., or New York, which accounts for almost four percent of the nation’s production, Illinois’ output has steadily risen since the turn of the century and by leaps and bounds in the last 10 or so years. According to statistics compiled by the USDA and the Illinois Grape Growers and Vintners Association, only 16 wineries were located in Illinois in 1999. Since the beginning of 2012, that number has changed to about 106 licensed wineries and more than 450 vineyards stretching from the state’s rich southern region all the way north to Galena. Explanations offered for the rapid growth range from the availability of fertile land and readily available experienced personnel, to the romance of the business and the allure of the industry’s beauty. “I think a big factor is that we now have specialists that can help new growers establish their

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grape crop,” said Bill McCartney, executive director of Illinois Grape Growers and Vintners Association. “We didn’t have those 15 years ago.” Ryan Dubnicek, who manages the Champaign-based tasting room for one of the state’s top wine producers, Alto Vineyards, believes there are many contributing factors to the recent growth. “It’s growing every day,” Dubnicek said. “The central part of the state really isn’t ideal for growing grapes, but people are finding new ways to make it work. There’s a great market for wine in Illinois. I think that the baby boomers have a lot to do with it. There are those with the time and money to invest and they are making it work.” Whatever the reasons, the growth of Illinois wine production is predicted to continue. Dubnicek said he doesn’t see it curtailing anytime soon. He believes the industry will continue to expand in Illinois for the foreseeable future. With that promise of success, Alto Vineyards and other area wineries are capitalizing on the popularity. Having emerged from its Shawnee Hillsbased home, Alto Vineyards’ Champaign wine-tasting room exhibits the versatility wineries are capable of. Along with offering consumers the opportunity to sample its products in a relaxed setting, the winery also hosts several events throughout the year,

Wines from Illinois wine producers, such as Alto Vineyards, are growing in popularity.

including festivals, concerts, various ceremonies, cheese and food samplings, weddings, and other private events. In the warm months of the year, the winery hosts a continuing live concert series that features mostly blues and jazz musicians. A complete schedule of events is listed at www.altovineyards.net. Teaming music and various celebrations with wine is a natural combination, Dubnicek said, and one that has helped build the business. “We do a lot of events here,” he said. “It’s a fair amount of our business. It’s something we h ave re a l ly seen grow in recent years.”

Founded by the Renzaglia family in 1988, the Shawnee Hills Alto winery produces 25,000 to 35,000 gallons of wine annually, ranking it near the state’s top producers. Though not the size of Alto Vineyards, Oakwood area’s Sleepy Creek Vineyards has carved out a nice niche for itself over the last decade. Using grapes it grows along with those purchased from other vineyards, Sleepy Creek turned more than 50,000 pounds of grapes into wine last year, producing several blends that have become consistent sellers. “We have a couple of really good-selling wines,” said Kayla Johnson, the vineyard’s business manager. “The sweeter wines are really our most popular.” According to McCartney, currently 250 members belong to the Illinois Grape Growers and Vintners Association, though he says there are several growers around the state who aren’t members. The state’s grape-growing business accounted for an impact of $257 million in the state’s economy in 2007. That number is expected to rise in the newest census. Jumping into the grape growing business requires a significant financial investment. McCartney estimated it takes $8,000 an acre, in addition to the cost of purchasing the land, to raise grapes in Illinois. The investment goes up if adding a tasting room, which “can easily cost you a quarter of a million dollars,” McCartney said. But despite the costs, families are willing to take that plunge. Having celebrated its one-year anniversary July 1, Effingham’s Tuscan Hills Winery has become one of the newest destinations for wine connoisseurs. Started by Amanda Pitcher along with Wes and Wanda Pitcher and Larry and Annette Jackson, Tuscan Hills Winery is a primary wine caterer for events. Though the owners experimented by planting 380 grape vines, which they plan to harvest for the first time next year, future plans center on continuing to purchase wine from grapes purchased from other vineyards and increasing its annual production, which currently is 11,500 gallons of wine. Amanda Pitcher said the vineyards’ biggest seller “by far” is Pretty in Pink, which is a blend that is an exclusive to the winery. Pitcher is excited about the possibilities in the wine business. She agrees that many factors are at work, but in particular, sees the social side of wine as boosting and sustaining the popularity of the business. “We definitely see it as a growing trend. There has been a big push toward wine, and it’s good for you,” she said. “The social aspect of it is fun. Wine is something that brings people together.” That popularity is evident not only in the growth in production but also the proliferation of wine-related trips. Illinois is now divided into seven main wine trails, up from four just a few years ago. Included in that is the East Central Illinois Trail, along with the most popular destination, the Shawnee Hills Wine Trail.

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Among the Illinois River Wine Trail wineries is Mackinaw’s Mackinaw Valley Winery. Started by Paul and Diane Hahn, the winery opened to the public in 2003. The Hahns grow their own grapes and produce more than 20 different wines that have continued to grow in sales. “I think wineries are an interesting destination,” Diane Hahn said. “Most wineries have a nice ambiance. Most are family-owned, and a lot of people are just excited to visit. A lot of people like wine.” The Hahns have expanded their event schedule to include several charity events each year and numerous festivals, live music performances, and food-tastings. The social aspect of wine not only helps sustain the business, it’s good for the community by providing entertainment and a sense of place, Hahn said. “I think most wineries are very involved in the community,” she said. When purchasing that next bottle of wine for a special event, gift, or just to enjoy at home, keep in mind some of the tips offered by area experts. “Our number one tip is to buy what you like,” Dubnicek said. “I think sometimes people get bogged down in trying to decide what to buy. What matters most is that you like it.” Pitcher added that prestige can often be overrated, so don’t be dazzled. “Just because a wine is older doesn’t make it better,” she cautioned. “White wines typically have an age-life of no more than three years. Red wines can age for longer.” Enjoying an Illinois wine is reason enough to put it on your to-do list, said Johnson, who suggested there are many reasons to buy Illinois-produced wines when choosing your next bottle. “For the experience is one (reason),” she said. “I think our products are appealing. People are always looking for alternative things. I think we provide that.” To learn more about Illinois wine and for a complete list of wineries and vineyards from around the state, visit www.illinoiswine.com.

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ATHLETICS

Athletics continued from p9 “I’m starting to love it with every day that goes by,” Sanni said. “Just seeing what he believes in and the fact that his beliefs match ours, I think that is going to help lead us forward.” Sanni is the leader of a defensive backs unit that loses two key components in Trulon Henry and Patriots second-round pick Tavon Wilson. With Hawthorne, Justin Green, and Steve Hull patrolling the secondary, Sanni believes his corps will still be strong. “Tavon was a great loss. Not many people understood what he did for our team,” Sanni said. “At the same time, we have a lot of experience back. I think having us back with another year of football under our belts together will just help the defense explode into what we think it can be.” The defensive line may be the strongest part of this team. With the return of Buchanan and Spence, the trenches will be won more times than not. The one thing everyone in the locker room agrees on is that the biggest commitment to return to the Fighting Illini sideline was Defensive Line Coach Keith Gilmore. “I love Coach Gilmore,” Buchanan said. “He’s a great coach, a great mentor. He teaches me life lessons every day. He’s a guy you want to go play for, and that’s why he has been successful.” Jonathan Brown anchors a linebacker corps that will be counted on to provide stability. He has been named to numerous award watchlists, including the Dick Butkus award, which is presented to the nation’s top linebacker annually. Houston Bates, who did well in the earlier portion of the 2011 season, is also expected to make big contributions. “(Jonathan’s) name has been involved in a lot of awards,” Beckman said. “The challenge that I have for him is, to make yourself better each and every day, and for him to be a better linebacker and a better leader than he was last year.” The Illini open the 2012 slate with a familiar foe, the Western Michigan Broncos. Though the Orange and Blue have played the Broncos twice in the past four seasons, there is one person who is even more familiar with the MAC opponent than the Illini, the new head coach. “It’s kind of crazy that my first opponent is from the MAC,” Beckman said. “It’s just the way the schedule falls, but I’m proud to have been involved with the Mid-American. The conference has had some successful coaches come through there.” The Orange and Blue will make the return trip of home-and-home series with Arizona State, and then prepare to face a difficult slate of conference rivals, including road games at Wisconsin, Michigan, and Ohio State. The players were forced to make a quick adjustment and regain their footing with a new head coach in town. They have done so successfully and are hoping to prove it come September 1st. “Anytime you get to play a football game in the Big Ten Conference it is a huge honor,” Scheelhaase said. “When you think about the tradition Illinois has, it’s an even bigger honor. I feel so blessed to be able to put the Orange and Blue jersey over my pads every Saturday.”

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Disaster Looming on the Horizon?

Acknowledging the reality of potential disaster in our lives sets up a healthy mindset to be prepared.

Zombies are clawing at the windows and shambling in hordes in the streets. A gigantic asteroid is heading for earth, promising to send up giant dust clouds that block out the sun. Intense solar flares turn the world into toast. From rising sea levels due to global warming to Mayan calendar predictions of solar shifts, disasters both real and imagined seem to speak to our very human perception of our fragile place in the world. Prediction or Explanation Experts contend that the popularity of various disaster stories suggests there is existential fear all around. We’re very aware that there are many things out of our control that could harm us, destroy life as we know it. In some cases, the disaster stories take on a sense of a cautionary tale, as though humans are punished for daring to tinker with nature or technology or play God. And though the way that death and destruction are doled out upon humans changes from story to story, the themes persist throughout cultures and time, according to History Channel documentary, Zombies: A Living History, and have foundation in real life—in the past. That’s the thing about predictions. Experts, such as Anthony Aveni, a

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Maya expert and archaeoastronomer at Colgate University in Hamilton, New York, say presumed predictions generally are a reference to a past event, such as a plague, astrological event, or violence of some sort that people tried to explain or assign purpose. “The whole timekeeping scale is very pastdirected, not future-directed. What you read on these monuments of the Long Count are events that connected Maya rulers with ancestors and the divine,” according to Aveni, in an article for National Geographic News. “The farther back you can plant your roots in deep time the better argument you can make that you’re legit. And I think that’s why these Maya rulers were using Long Count time. It’s not about a fixed prediction about what’s going to happen.” So, the Mayans weren’t telling future generations about the end of the world in 2012. And the zombie plague concept most likely is a throw-back to Spanish Flu or Bubonic Plague. That doesn’t mean we’re safe. Disasters All Around There’s no avoiding the fact that in Central Illinois we face plenty of real threats to our lives and those of our family, as well as the security of our homes. The zombie virus may be fictional but Awais Vaid, epidemiologist for Champaign Urbana Public Health District (CUPHD), said we need to take precautions to avoid contracting real illnesses that circulate the county every year.

by Lynn Crandall photograph by Community Concierge Magazine

“Humans are smart. So are the diseases,” Vaid said. “And I think sometimes the diseases are smarter because we act dumb. That’s why they get smarter. Most of the reemerging diseases have come back to the forefront because we thought we were smarter than them. But that’s not the case. Viruses and bacteria are really smart. They know how to adapt.” As a local epidemiologist, Vaid leads the county investigation of any outbreak, tracks disease trends in the community, and coordinates with local hospitals and clinics to address the situation. He said a certain few diseases occur in numbers every year and have for the last 15 to 20 years that the county has been keeping track. Those include mostly food- and water-borne disease, such as salmonella, E. coli, and shigella. Also, because ChampaignUrbana is a university town with an international population, it sees a few cases of malaria or typhoid yearly, along with infectious diseases seen reemerging in foreign countries, such as measles, mumps, and tuberculosis. “In this community, some diseases we thought just 10 years ago were under control and on the brink of elimination, now we see more and more every year,” Vaid said. But the diverse population is not the sole reason for outbreaks of certain diseases, according to Vaid. Misuse of antibiotics contributes to the reemergence of some diseases because the viruses and bacteria change their genetic makeup

and become more resistant to treatment. Also, not everyone gets immunizations, not everyone washes their hands frequently, and not everyone stays home when they’re sick. “The most common diseases are spread because of personal hygiene, so keeping personal hygiene a priority will really make a big difference in reducing most of the infectious diseases,” Vaid said. “The other thing is when people are sick, they should stay home. By doing so they are doing themselves and their community a favor. Themselves, because they are sick and should be resting. Their community, because they are not transmitting the illness. And do not self-medicate with antibiotics. You are making those bacteria and viruses resistant to further treatment. Also, get vaccinations.” Vaid said that some people prefer not to get vaccinated for flu, but it’s a risky choice, in his opinion. “Flu vaccines have been proven to be very effective,” he said. “If you have an immune compromised system, flu can really make you sick. It can also have complications that can kill you. Every year 10,000 to 20,000 people die because of just flu.You might be healthy and ride it out but you can infect others, and those people may not be able to ride it out.” Like tornado and flood, disease is considered a true disaster because it calls for preparedness and an emergency response, but it’s something that happens regularly. “A flood or a tornado may happen once every 10 years, but we plan and prepare and respond to disease all the time,” Vaid said. According to Jane Li, emergency preparedness planner at CUPHD, the public health district has its own Hazards Vulnerability Assessment (HVA), as do the hospitals and Champaign County Emergency Management Agency. The assessment rates the vulnerability of the county to specific disasters according to the probability of their occurrence, the scale of their disruption, the degree of harm to the citizens, and the level of the agency’s capability and preparedness to respond. While each organization addresses disaster from its perspective, they all collaborate to educate the public, prepare for disasters, and manage the disruption caused by a disaster. “My role as a an emergency preparedness planner in public health is to ensure that we have plans in place and we are actually practicing our plans to care for the public health needs in an emergency, in a disaster,” Li said. In the past, Li said, disaster plans were very focused on outbreaks and bioterrorism, but the emphasis has shifted in the last 10 years or so to an all-hazards model that incorporates man-made and natural disasters. “All the agencies understand tornadoes and severe weather pattern to be our largest vulnerability in Central Illinois. For CUPHD, the next hazard vulnerability rated is an epidemic, like a flu variance,” Li said.

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ment practices and that we have the infrastructure we need to not only manage disruption but to lessen the time between stages of response, recovery, and rehabilitation,” Li said. Systems in place to protect the public during times of disaster depend on individuals, families, and businesses to prepare, too. Though obsessing on the precariousness of life isn’t advisable, acknowledging the reality of disaster in our lives sets up a healthy mindset, said Vaid. “I seriously don’t expect that anybody should live in fear, but there should be healthy caution,” he said. “As long as you’re planning and preparing and following basic, simple strategies, 99 percent of the time you’ll be safe.” Li added that community resiliency and communication are integral parts of preparedness in this economy. She recommended individuals prepare in three basic ways: create a disaster kit for home, work, and auto; make a plan; and stay informed about disaster preparedness activities throughout the country. A disaster kit for your home should contain at least a three-day supply of non-perishable food and supplies, like toiletries, candles, utensils, a manual can opener, first aid, and contact information you may need. Those who take medications—prescription and nonprescription—should have a backup supply for at least 30 days, Li said. The kit should have an ample water supply for three days. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) advises storing at least one gallon of water per person per day for drinking and sanitation. Keep track of food expiration dates and replace outdated supplies with fresh ones. FEMA suggests changing food and water supplies every six months and storing your kit in an easily accessible location that everyone knows about. Li suggested also including photo copies of your major credit cards in your kit in case in a disaster you’re without your wallet, and other important documents, such as your driver’s license and birth certificate. Your kit for work should include food and water, as well as any supplies you’ll need during the first 24 hours. It should be ready to grab and go in case of evacuation. Severe weather may strand you in your vehicle, so make a vehicle kit that includes emergency supplies such as jumper cables and flashlights, energy bars and water, and a blanket and shovel. Be sure to make an all-hazards emergency plan with your family that addresses evacuation possibilities, how you’ll leave the building if necessary and where you’ll meet and how you’ll contact each other if you’re separated. Li said people who may need assistance—those who need a wheelchair, are hearing impaired or need a translator—during an evacuation should plan ahead and notify METCAD so that they have the necessary contact information readily available. FEMA offers a range of information about emergency and disaster preparedness at www. ready.gov. Live Well Li suggests that we not only prepare ourselves and our family, but also get involved in assisting the community during an emergency situation

by volunteering for the Medical Reserve Corps (MRC), a group of medical and nonmedical volunteers who assist the county in emergencies. “We’re looking for a cadre of volunteers who are interested in knowing more about emergency preparedness and can work with the community response teams,” Li said. “Our MRC were essential to the county’s H1N1 response in 2009. Since then, they continue to serve through continual preparedness training.” Making the time and putting forth the effort to plan for disaster may seem like an unnecessary bother and placing too much focus on something bad that may or may not happen. But disaster experts who work day in and day out with disaster events of various kinds agree that being prepared not only enhances survival but empowers you to live well by relieving your mind; you know what you need to know, you follow health guidelines, and you’re equipped and ready for what may happen.

T R A N S P O R TAT I O N

“I seriously don’t expect that anybody should live in fear, but there should be healthy caution. As long as you’re planning and preparing and following basic, simple strategies, 99 percent of the time you’ll be safe.”

T R A I N S P O R TAT I O N

Awais Vaid

epidemiologist for Champaign Urbana Public Health District

“Though the human race is very resilient,” Li said, “there are always systematic things we can do to ensure better safety and health for people. It’s helpful to make sure you and your family are safe and understand how our system works so that there is not a sense of panic. It’s imperative that better planning and preparedness occur. We want everyone to have a fighting chance in an emergency, bottom line.”

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A Place to Call Home

ready in place as neighborhoods grow, not to come back and have to put them in later,” Rains said. Along with an ongoing approach to infrastructure, the plan works to address the diversity of residents found in the community. “One of our goals was just seeing more choices in neighborhood types and types of housing,” Rains said. “We tried to think through the various stages of life. If I wanted to stay in Champaign through all of these stages of life, would I have the kind of neighborhood I want to live in?” This attention to life-long housing needs is having an effect on housing plans. Although previously choices were fairly limited to apartments and single-family detached homes, Champaign is now trying to expand options for urban lifestyles beyond student housing. “Young professionals want an urban lifestyle but don’t always want to live on campus or above a restaurant downtown,” Rains said. Plans call for walkable places near the city center with a range of housing options. And it focuses resources on fully developing neighborhoods that have already begun construction or infilling in areas that could benefit from redevelopment. Rains pointed to the Scott Park area as a prime example of a successfully redeveloping area and to housing developments such as Trails at Abbey Fields and Trails at Chestnut Grove as locations that help the city grow in places where there are already services and amenities. “This is cost effective for all of our taxpayers,” Rains said.

The local housing market caters to a range of personal and lifestyle preferences. by Dana Mancuso photographs by Community Concierge Magazine

They say home is where the heart is, but no matter where your heart wants to settle—in a single family home, a low-maintenance condo, or a character-filled apartment— the variation of housing options in Champaign-Urbana means it’s guaranteed you’ll find a place to suit your price and your preference. A mix of neighborhoods, home styles, and home sizes, as well as a range of property types, from urban to rural, is available, all in a very tight geographic area. Expanding Housing Options If you’re new to town, you may be struck by the many options available to both buyers and renters in Champaign-Urbana. Brandon Boys, redevelopment specialist with the City of Urbana, said that the variety is something not found in every community. “We have affordable single-family, detached units and condos all the way up to places like Stone Creek and Beringer Commons, (which are) newer,” Boys said. “In west Urbana we have many beautiful historic homes. Overall, Urbana has a wide range of price points that you probably wouldn’t find in a lot of communities.” He noted that the same situation exists in rental units, which run the gamut from smaller apartments all the way to single-family homes.

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Urbana’s Economic Development Manager Tom Carrino explained that the variety available in the community is due to good planning on the part of communities and developers, and reflects consumer demand. “Modern planning principles encourage mixed use and mixed development. Go to neotraditional developments around the country, they strive for that. As far as what’s on the horizon in Urbana, I think the city is encouraging of mixedunit types and mixed incomes,” Carrino said.

“You can live in the suburbs, live in a quaint small town, or live in a bustling dense atmosphere.” Brandon Boys,

redevelopment specialist at the City of Urbana

A new development planned for Kerr Avenue in Urbana will be an ultra energy efficient mixedunit area, he explained. It will be a model of a sustainable community, and it will have some attached units, some detached, and some mixed income. Lifestyle is often affected by density, Boys pointed out, but locally people can choose what

fits them best. Urbana offers near-campus denser (student) housing, housing that is in close proximity to downtown, therefore walkable, as well as development that is more suburban. “In Urbana you can live in the suburbs, live in a quaint small town, or live in a bustling dense atmosphere,” Boys said. Planning for Complete Neighborhoods Having a variety of places to call home is all part of the plan, according to Lacey Rains, a planner with the City of Champaign. A 2011 comprehensive plan for the city set a vision for a variety of neighborhood types and housing options they might contain. When creating the latest plan Champaign decided to accept the concept of a “complete neighborhood,” Raines explained. “A neighborhood isn’t just housing. It’s parks, commercial options, and schools,” she said. When staff were developing the complete neighborhood concept, they took into account community survey data regarding the kinds of neighborhoods preferred by local residents. Overwhelmingly, respondents mentioned easy access to commercial services, parks, and other amenities. And for the city’s part, best long-range planning practices point to growth that includes public facilities, as well. “We wanted to continue to grow with those things, like fire stations, and complete streets al-

Choosing Amenities and Services In both Champaign and Urbana, research and casual conversations revealed consistencies in residents’ preferences for neighborhoods and what is appealing in communities in general, and that is access to natural settings. “Trees,” Boys said, “especially in west Urbana. Trees make you feel like you are not in the city. It has a feel all its own. Bigger and mature trees are very distinct. You can appreciate the city’s urban forestry focus in the 1970s and how that has paid off.” The theme holds true in Champaign, too. Rains said that trails and trees are at the top of the list for those surveyed. “People want walking and biking—on and off street recreational trails,” she said. Rains and Carrino both pointed to walkability and public transportation as assets that some use as top-tier reasons to choose one home location over another, and for making changes in the ways neighborhoods are planned. “We clearly have the auto-oriented developments,” Carrino noted, “but also bicycle, pedestrian, and mass transit-oriented development. We probably have more of that type of pedestrian and transit-oriented (development) than a similar-sized Midwestern town, because of MTD and the competition to get close to the university.” Rains said the communities are in line with the country in planning for walkable and transitservices available neighborhoods. “There is a nationwide trend of more people wanting not to rely on the car for every single thing,” she said.

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HOME FRONT

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Finding the Right Fit Mark Waldhoff, a realtor with Keller Williams Realty in Champaign, said that when he works with clients he asks them to determine a few important factors that will help him lead the buyer to the right property. -Set your budget. Talk to a lender and get preapproved. You will need to not only determine what you can afford (what you are approved for), but what you want to afford. “People are searching online earlier than they used to in the home buying process, Waldhoff said. “Get comfortable with the available stock in your price range.” -Keep an eye open. Do your homework and notice locations and neighborhoods you like. -Understand your needs. Determine, if you can, how long you will stay in your home. The shorter your potential stay, the likelier it is that Waldhoff will point you toward homes in areas with a history of continual appeal to buyers. -Make a must-have list. Do you need three bedrooms because you have two kids? Do you need a single-story because your knees just aren’t what they used to be? -Make your wants list. Make sure your must-have list is not the same as your wants list. Would you turn down any home with a detached garage, or would it depend on what else the home has to offer? Ranking your wants and needs will help you get closer to your ideal home.

“Knowing that the magazine goes to the hotels in the community and the university is important. I’ve seen and heard people come to the restaurant as a result of seeing the ad in Community Concierge Magazine. It reaches people who are looking for a different kind of restaurant. It helps us extend our brand name.” David Spears, Owner, Radio Maria

“One of our goals was just seeing more choices in neighborhood types and types of housing. We tried to think through the various stages of life. If I wanted to stay in Champaign through all of these stages of life, would I have the kind of neighborhood I want to live in?” Lacey Rains,

a planner with the City of Champaign

Much of what goes into a home choice should depend on your values and your anticipated lifestyle. When Waldhoff consults with clients, he asks the question, What do you want and why? “For example, a person may say they want three acres, but really what they want is a fenced yard so the dog can go out and not get away,” he said. Waldhoff gave examples of recent clients who chose a different home based on life circumstances. “One family moved out of a two-story home and into a ranch,” he said. “They wanted to downsize to fit their lifestyle. Another had an older parent moving in with her and wanted a one-story accessible home so that dad could live there.” Lifestyle and life stage, combined with price, help each individual or family decide what home choices might be right for them. But timing may also play an important role in when you make that next move.

34

Community Concierge Magazine

Home Front

While the housing industry locally and nationally has not yet returned to its pre-recession levels, those seeking to buy have some advantages, whether seeking a first home or larger home. Joni Utnage, mortgage originator at Busey Bank in Champaign, said there will always be first-time buyers trying to enter the market, and now is not the time to hesitate, as there are many programs to help them. “These (current interest) rates are the lowest they have ever been. They are a gift. Now is not the time to sit on the fence. There are lots of programs out there to help you,” she said.

M2 and other apartment and condo developments offer urban living opportunities.

Dennis Mulvany, vice president of Mortgage Business Development at First Federal Savings Bank of Champaign-Urbana, said the market as a whole has become more active. “Lenders have been busy due in large part to the refinancing activity,” he said. “However, we are speaking with more prospective buyers now, and you see more sold signs as you move throughout the community.” Whether you are sold on living in a downtown area and walking to shopping and dining, want a new home with the latest amenities, or long for an older house with character to spare, you can find a place to call home that matches elements important to you.

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HOME FRONT Busey Bank | More than 140 years of strength and service. Five lines of business. One promise. And countless dreams fulfilled. Visit busey.com or any location for solutions to your personal, business, and wealth management needs. p27 Country Financial / Scott Jackson, John May Get a free comprehensive analysis of your insurance and financial planning program. Call Scott today at 359-9335, or John at 352-3341. p9 First Federal Savings Bank | Serving Champaign County since 1908, First Federal provides local service, local decisions, and same-day pre-qualifications on mortgage loans. Club Fed Checking­—the travel club worth checking into! The one place to go! p7 Heartland Bank and Trust | is an independently owned community bank with offices in 32 communities throughout Illinois and Northeast Missouri. Offering free business and personal checking, Heartland Bank also provides customized lending and cash management solutions. More information is available at www.hbtbank.com. p33

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Bountiful Arts

Community Concierge Magazine commemorates its 10th anniversary year with an acknowledgement of the artists whose stories have graced the pages. by George Amaya

We here at Community Concierge Magazine believe that the soul of a community resides in its art and we have embraced its promotion as an intricate part of our mission. When we began this magazine, Champaign-Urbana’s creative and cultural renaissance was just beginning to gain momentum. Throughout our community, tucked away in small galleries and restaurants and stages and home studios were local artists devoting every ounce of their passions into doing what artists have always done: creating for the rest of us expressions of the human soul. As the magazine enters its 10th year, we want to reflect on the truth of one of its founding concepts by recalling the many artists whose stories and works have graced the pages. We’ve had the honor of featuring 36 incredibly talented local artists since we began. We’ve highlighted painters and musicians, woodworkers and dancers, writers and sculptors, photographers and ceramists, jewelers and fabric artists, glass artists and local theater troupes, potters and jazz musicians, quartets and fiber artists, and we’ve only scratched the surface. From local music legends like Candy Foster to nationally recognized sculptors like Alex Fakete, local artists have enriched our lives with lively song and memorable experiences, and given us wonderful imagery to contemplate. Ceramicists like Catherine Wiesener and ballet dancer Emily Buss have inspired us with the beauty of expression and directed us toward deeper appreciation of the human form. Painters such as Don Lake, and the father and son woodworking duo of Charlie and

John Sweitzer have made us proud every time a visitor from a big city (which shall remain unnamed) dares a yawn at our cultural vibrancy. We savor our galleries and theaters and music venues and festivals and small shops that invite us to enjoy our local artistic expressions and joyfully display beautiful works of local art. Local businesses and galleries are our greatest supporters and presenters of local art. Many talented artists have launched careers in Champaign-Urbana. Many have gone on to enjoy success and now live in other communities. Early on we had the opportunity to highlight a nationally recognized local artist who has made our community proud but who no longer lives or performs in the area. Though we were star-struck by the celebrity, we decided that our charge, and the community’s interest, was to celebrate artists who reside and show or perform locally. Within our mission “to always present the C-U community at its best!” we’ve taken seriously our modest role in promoting our community and driving traffic to local businesses and venues. After all, our local entrepreneurs are fantastic supporters of the arts and, we believe, they too are artists in their own right, investing their passions and creativity in developing great restaurants and shops and businesses that make this such a great community in which to live, work, and play. Throughout the years we have also been graced with great local partnerships that are the bedrock of the arts in our wonderful community. Contributions and collaborations from Krannert Center for the Peforming Arts, Krannert Art Museum and Kinkead Pavilion, Parkland College Gallery and Theater, the Station Theater and C-U Theater Company, and CU Ballet have offered us a solid foundation from which to feature our local arts as we reach out to residents and the huge number of visitors who read our magazine every quarter.

We also are very proud to live in a community where local residents and our community leaders alike invest time and effort in supporting and promoting public art for all to enjoy. The Public Art League and the Urbana Public Arts Program both are founded on a fundamental premise that values the arts: its creation, the public’s engagement, and the general enjoyment. We are particularly proud of our partnership with 40 North, Champaign County’s arts, culture and entertainment council, who now write our artist and attraction features every quarter. We are truly fortunate to have such a proactive group supporting and promoting our local arts scene to the benefit of all. And we send a special shout out to Carolyn Baxley, owner of Cinema Gallery, who is a true visionary and impassioned supporter of the arts. Her unfailing support and always sage counsel on all things art has been an invaluable help to Community Concierge Magazine throughout the years. We invite all our readers to avail themselves of our bountiful arts community and play their part in supporting this vital community resource.

Robert Chapman

Catherine Weisener

Gerald Guthrie

Rimas VisGirda

Jeff Helgeson

Don Lake

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Community Concierge Magazine


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Fall '12 Community Concierge Magazine  

Community of Champaign-Urbana and surrounding towns.

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