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Contents Procrastinator #ShamelessSelfie EMILY TAPP Focus On Reality m a p S n O d te r ta S e M t e G ’t n o D Forever Online Point of U Troglodyte’s How To Internet Slang Club To Catwalk Idle Reviews Clichés


Who to Follo “My goal is to tell the story of the dog I am photographing, and this particular dog, Buster the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel, decided to turn our “on-land” photo shoot into an 'in-the-pool' shoot when he started jumping in over and over again in pursuit of his favourite tennis ball. I left, bought a little point-and-shoot underwater camera, zipped back and jumped in. The resulting photos were the beginning of my series of underwater dogs.” Seth Casteel

PR CRAST Things that make you go ‘ARWWWW’!

@renecharlesritchie

@snoopybabe

@lioninthewild

Wanderlust! @humansofny

@glamourhog

@alexstrohl

Instagram

@b A blog by Emily Tapp in which she uses a larger range of vobaulary in one poem than you will find in this entire magazine. She’s the definition of wordy wise. http://cortadochronicles.wordpress.com Ps. Food to make you drool.


Twitter

ow Here are an assortment of hilarious/interesting/awesome twitter accounts. Peruse at your own whim.

EATstagram! @as3920

@emilyoliviatapp

TINAT R

@benandjerrys

@ahlamnajdi

@tumblinbu mblincrumbl incookie

Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Rachel Tisi and Esther Platt performing in a concert to raise money for Home of Hope which provides shelter, food, medical care and education to more than 500 children in Malawi. Impressive or what?


#ShamelessSelfie Alice Brightman @awiceb I love taking selfies. Even if you don’t admit it, I bet you do too. To fill in the oblivious among you, a ‘selfie’ is a self shot photo; a new revelation with the front-facing-camera generation. The Oxford English dictionary defines the phenomenon as: “a photograph that one has taken of oneself, typically one taken with a smartphone or webcam and uploaded to a social media website,” whereas Urban Dictionary is a lot less neutral: “...you can usually see the person's arm holding out the camera, in which case you can clearly tell that this person does not have any friends to take pictures of them.” The other day I was in the sixth form loos and, in a fleeting moment of reckless hedonism, I took a mirror selfie. Another girl in the year below was using the hand dryer, but I thought it was safe to take a covert mirror pic. Snap! I took a photo. You’ll be glad to know I didn’t do a vogue pose, but then something unimaginable happened. Shock, horror! The little white light reflected in the mirror back at me – I’d left the flash on, catching the eye of the girl drying her hands, whose gaze now fell on me with an expression of civil disdain. She knew I had taken a selfie, instead of merely taking a cool, aloof pause to check my phone in front of the sinks. My innards seemed to curl up and die inside of me in embarrassment, while I stupidly looked at my phone like it had just flashed all by itself. With vexed and embarrassed looks, about to escape out the toilet door and run, I viewed the picture on my phone. It wasn’t even that nice of an angle. What was I thinking?! I spent the rest of the day in dejected low selfie-confidence. But why did I feel embarrassed? A quick search of #selfie on Instagram returns almost seven million photos. Smartphones have revolutionised the way we take photos of ourselves and share with others; instagram, twitter, snapchat, tumblr and facebook can all be accessed directly from your photo albums, spreading the word instantly of what you had for dinner, where you are and who you’re with. A study in Australia found that of the 96 percent of girls who had some access to the Internet at home, 72.1 percent upload pictures of themselves. Is this simply a rise in teenage narcissism? I think not: instead of the many hysterical teenage diaries that were scribbled in bedrooms in years before this technology, young girls are expressing themselves visually, where they can receive the validation from friends online. It’s a simple formula: when you feel pretty, have a new outfit, or about to go out - take a selfie. Any favourite, retweet or Like you get from any social networking sites is a mini confidence boost from your friends. If there are over 7 million selfies on one networking site alone, the chances are that the girl who saw me taking a sneaky selfie has taken a few herself. People have been perfecting the art of selfies for centuries. Literally, centuries. Before cameras, think of how time-consuming it was to be obliged to sit in front of a talented artist for days to get a picture of you painted! Not only this, but artists throughout time have been obsessed with depicting themselves, in an image that only they controlled. In early 1500, German Renaissance artist Albrecht Durer painted a selfie, but painted himself in a frontal pose: a pose that was usually solely reserved for pictures of Christ at the time. Self-absorbed, certainly, and the Church was outraged, but if I saw Durer’s self-portrait on Instagram, I’d Like it.


“Instead of the many hysterical teenage diaries that were scribbled in bedrooms in years before this technology, young girls are expressing themselves visually,”

There are roughly two types of selfie. There is the ‘Organised Selfie’ – the picture you’re willing to at least brush your hair for, a quick squirt of hairspray and perhaps a slick of eyeliner too. Then there is the ‘Spontaneous Selfie’ – the natural reaction to feeling unplanned fabulousness is to capture the moment. My selfie in the sixth form toilet mirror was obviously the spontaneous type, though I didn’t feel that fabulous. If it hadn’t been for the embarrassment, the self-shot probably would’ve been condemned to the forgotten iPhone photo album. Never uploaded, never Liked or favourited. Sad emoji. Being able to share our selfies on the go may seem like technological free-reign, but there are rules. Firstly, let’s begin with the obvious. A selfie must be taken by you, and you alone. Getting a friend/your mum to take a picture of you is okay sometimes, but it’s not a selfie. It doesn’t matter if it looks like you don’t have any friends to take pictures of you: despite what Urban Dictionary says, ‘not having friends’ is the new ‘having friends.’ Secondly, no matter what kind of selfie you decide to take, a little selfie-deprecation goes a long way. Like life, it’s better not to take a selfie too seriously. Poke fun at yourself, find a full length mirror and throw some weird shapes, exaggerate the good old peace sign and stick your tongue out. Have fun with it, though any polished and serious selfie can instantly be made less severe with an “insightful” caption. Next time you take a pouty, smoldering shot worthy of America’s Next Top Model, try the caption “just found out I’m having broccoli for tea :(” or “so much homework to do, but I’m fabulous!” Or even better: app it. Once you’ve mastered which side is your best side, how many shots it takes to get right, where the best lighting is – throw all caution to the wind and add lasers, glitter, cat stamps. Loads of fun cheap apps can be downloaded for smart phones that make the range of instagram filters look like drab curtains of colour. After downloading an app that puts cute rainbows and bows on your pictures, you will wonder how you ever lived without them. Maybe my selfie experience was an unfortunate one, and I apologise to the Year 12 girl who was drying her hands for any second hand embarrassment. Although selfies can be described as a “new craze of self-obsession” and the epitome of instant youth culture, I think they tell us more about ourselves than we think. When technology gives us the ability to connect with millions of people throughout the world and share visual content, it’s expected that teens, especially girls, would want to be able to control the way they are seen, even if it’s down to how they look whilst making a funny face. In a world that constantly stereotypes us and makes us feel insecure no matter what we do, the power of selfies puts the control of how we want to be seen back into our own fingertips. Be proud and shameless of your selfies: selfie on and prosper!


Noontide beams beating down on my back, weighted shoulders bearing heavy camera equipment and picnic provisions, I walk alongside Amber through boundless fields of green in pursuit of a particular location for our photographs. Upon reaching an accumulation of pendular beanstalk trees we dropped our belongings and set to work. Those who are familiar with me will know of my devotion to the art of photography; particularly portraiture. The set of images I created on this specific day were based on the concept of nature and the beauty of returning to our roots. As I watched Amber coil and curl her way through the expanse of forest, I felt that her fluent elegance replicated that of our undulating surroundings: herein, the essence of our shoot was born. Portraying the allure and charm of a subject as organic as nature through a contemporary medium, namely photography, is something I find fascinating. The natural world which we inhabit is so full of wonders; be it a birdâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s azure crest or the blossom on cherry trees in early Spring. As young people in the society of today, it is so easy to lose sight of our own beauty even though we see it so clearly in nature, and in others around us; the laughter behind creases and folds in ageing faces, the love and joy concealed in strength marks on a pregnant belly, the happy days spent in the blazing summer which mark their memory in the form of freckles and sun-spots. To me, this series of images represents the importance in finding the beauty of all things: nature, our roots but most importantly, ourselves.


Amber Gallagher Photographed by Emily Tapp


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Omri D

A Poin

Omri Dahan, an 18-year old from Israel, embodies a person who has taken full advantage of the opportunities provided by the Internet. Acting as family photographer at a young age, Omri has always had a keen interest in the art of capturing a moment. However, one year, on a trip to Alaska, he clicked the shutter, taking a life-changing photo that inspired him to take his photography to the next level (above centre). He used mediums such as Facebook and Flickr to start a photography business called ‘A Point of U’. He explains the name: “five photographers can take five different pictures from the same point and with the same equipment. I always wanted to give the photography world an other point of view.”

“Today it’s o my photos, b it can be you


Dahan

nt of U

only me and but tomorrow u and yours.â&#x20AC;?

In the coming years he wants to develop the business into a global enterprise, encompassing the views of young photographers around the world. He encourages everyone to take photos and celebrates how accessible photography has become nowadays with the improvement in camera phones. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Anyone who has an iPhone or android can be a photographer, and maybe one day they will become the best.â&#x20AC;? More than anything, he is full of zeal for new photographers to exhibit and develop their skill. He is certainly an inspirational young adult who demonstrates how passion and determination can lead to images that contain such precise beauty and joy.


â&#x20AC;&#x153;Anyone w iPhone or an a photogra maybe one d become t


who has an ndroid can be apher, and day they will the best.â&#x20AC;?


Goodbye Facebook. It was fun, but now it’s over. Au revoir to the endless poke wars; adios to the generic birthday posts; auf wiedersehen to everincreasing invitations to the farmcandy-pleaseleavemealone-ville. Now, say hello to Facebook’s younger, more instant and slightly too chirpy cousin: welcome to Twitter.

Troglodyt

Step 1 – Setting up your account For goodness’ sake, pick a good username. With the popularity of Twitter on the rise, who knows how long this trend could last? In any case, you don’t want to be catalogued as “MrsStyles15” on the Internet forever (how deep is your love for Mr. Styles going to be in ten years?) Generally, just avoid being Mrs anyone. Once you’ve chosen an appropriate username, then you have to tackle the bio and display picture for your account. I took the coward’s way out and used a song lyric from one of the chef d’oeuvres of this millennium; the Hannah Montana hit ‘Pumping Up The Party’. Some people are more succinct giving only clues to their identity such as their age and the country in which they live. Others use the bio as a promotional space, detailing every achievement/ business venture/success that they can remember. Remember, the bio doesn’t have to be a life story, just a small indication of who you are. The next big indicator is your display picture. A difficult choice, although a familiar one. If you were a resident of Facebook then you will be used to the trauma of picking a profile picture. The saving grace of Twitter’s display photos is that it is not possible to delve into the dusty archives of past display pictures. No one ever needs to know that once you used a picture of you wielding a knife as your display photo, no one ever needs to know…

Step 2 – Follow some people Now that you have an account, tim your favourite comedian, singer, p whoever into the search bar and w of those who have access to the In everyday, so if they have a pulse an account.

Step 3a – Knowing wh Hashtags? They’re used they have several uses. “Woo! It’s Monday! #sa buzzword for a certain example, at the beginni corner, now everyone w serving as a filter so tha could type #TakeMeOu tweets about those show sometimes even the wo

Step 3b – Knowing what everything is for – Retweet and Favourite You see a particularly hilarious photo of a cat conforming to the shape of a bowl. In the days of Facebook, onc this photo then it would disappear into the black hole of the Internet. Now, you can favourite this tweet, addin tweets anyone can access holding all the stuff that you saw and wanted to keep for future lols. You can also ret photo to lighten up the days of all your followers with this cat’s liquid-like properties. Or you could quote the this would involve writing another person’s username, thus alerting them to this comedy genius you have stum You are welcome hypothetical and anonymous twitter user.

Step 6 – Knowing the limits Twitter is not new and like any established space there are a few, not many but still some, unspoken rules. - Keep it inoffensive. If you wouldn’t say it to your kind-faced and forgiving granny then don’t post it in a public forum. No on with insults because he/she is dating their favourite singer. There’s no excuse, you will be called a troll. - Do not overhashtag. Please, two at most. This is not instagram. - Be wary not to overshare-y. Those who post every little detail about their life are tiresome at best. Don’t get addicted; it’s jus


te's How To

Suddenly, you find yourself in a brightly coloured world of hashtags, at signs and trending topics. This whirlwind tour of six steps should educate you in how to work Twitter, the terminology of that ever so foreign modern speak and, most importantly, the social protocol of the Twitter-verse.

me to become a follower. Type the name of presenter, politician, friend, parent, dog, watch their account come up. Over a quarter nternet are on twitter with 135,000 new users nd a wifi router, they probably have an

hat everything is for – Hashtags. d to denote numbers, right? Wrong. In the Internet world Firstly, they’re used to give context to your post such as arcasm”. Hashtags can also be used to indicate a topic or event that’s being discussed on Twitter. For ing of a TV show you might see a hashtag pop up in the who is tweeting about the show is using that hashtag, at all tweets about this program can be easily viewed. You ut or #XFactor into the search bar, lo and behold! Witty ows will appear magically from all over the country and orld. Cool or what?

ce you had seen ng it to a list of tweet this e tweet, usually mbled upon.

St Tw ep 5 fo itte – W l fa low r is atc v in our you that h th te ra ite a . So it is e fo ct l o wi nd r n e a tw low th e n e o yo twe oug wa rs r o e u y by t yo h yo str ll i n e u u cl ick r tw wi et: ! in ee ll h you g on ts! Y ave can a b ou a l fo ut ca egit llo w n to se aud pe n e sa op w ie yi ng he nce le b ‘C n p on ut on eo p ne pl tent eop ct e m er ’a ho le c e a tt n he tio oks n a to n y to lso p ou or

Step 4 – Finding Your Twitter Voice So you’ve got a good-looking profile set up but there’s just one thing missing: some tweets. Twitter is, essentially, a broadcasting platform, so broadcast away! Go tell those followers about your delicious breakfast! Go post a picture of that funny looking cloud! Go tweet that Dickens quote you found on the back of a cereal box! You can be funny or profound or sad or motivating or ambiguous or whatever you want; the world is your oyster.

ne likes the douchebag who says that women should stay in the kitchen or the twit who bombards some popstar

st a bit of fun.


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‘Club to Catwalk: London Fashion in the 1980’s.’ Review of Exhibition at V and A, 10 July 2013- 16 February 2014. Elin Davies

"Everyone seems to think that the Eighties was all about shoulder pads, about Dallas and Dynasty. There were shoulder pads, of course, and we didn't leave them out on purpose, it was just more of an American thing," says Professor Wendy Dagworthy, Head of Fashion and Textiles at the Royal College of Art. The Victoria and Albert Museums latest fashion exhibition, ‘Club to Catwalk: London Fashion in the 1980’s’, explores London’s iconic style during the 1980’s. The exhibition shows how the newly forming music scene influenced the outfits worn by many young Londoners in the eighties. New nightclubs and magazines were appearing during the decade that actively encouraged creative and eccentric ideas. For example, The Blitz Club, Covent Garden only permitted entry to “the weird and the wonderful". This led to many people exploring fashion in a way that had never been done before.

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The V and A’s exhibition is spread out over two floors. On the ground floor visitors are reminded of the serious names in the 1980’s fashion world such as English Eccentrics, Betty Jackson and Vivienne Westwood – who were already challenging traditional fashion ideas. The mezzanine level above contains black catwalks with mannequins wearing clothes from just some of the era’s main styles such as New Romantic, Rave and Goth. This display also includes outfits worn by Adam Ant, Leigh Bowery and many more. The small Club Room on this level also screens looped films from the legendary eighties clubs, including Blitz and Taboo, all to a typically 1980’s soundtrack. I think that it is fair to say the outlandish and DIY clothes that were worn by some in the eighties are very different to the clothes worn by most people today. Some people may say that this is a good thing, but secretly I think we all hanker for the days where a customized Levi jacket festooned with gold hair clips is seen as an everyday piece of clothing!


Idle R

Our film, theatre and TV expert, Hattie Idle, reviews the best (and so

T V THE WRONG MANS No, that is not a typo. That is what it’s really called. The Genre: Action-Comedy The Premise: Down-on-life City Council worker Sam Pinkett and his 31-year-old mailroom assistant friend Phil Bourne (surely an allusion to the action-assassin of the same name, Jason Bourne?) get into a spot of trouble when Sam witnesses a car-crash and answers a phone with a rather disturbing message. The two blokes are thrown into a world of espionage, kidnapping and organised Crime, and action and hilarity ensues.

The Good Parts: An unusual blend of genres, this blinder of an opening episode pulls it off with some style. Although the main characters are mainly farcical (especially Corden’s Smithy-esque Phil Bourne), the crisis and the stakes are real, and the writing and sleek, moody camerawork takes it with all the seriousness it deserves. The show has a stellar cast as well, with the perfect casting of “Horrible Histories” Matthew Baynton, an actor I would really like to see more of, and James Corden as his comically on-point self. Sarah Solemani is a good addition also as Sam’s exgirlfriend and boss, though I felt her character slightly redundant in this episode. The Bad Parts: There are few bad parts in this first episode, though I did feel they slightly glossed over the build-up of the duo’s relationship a little; I would have liked to have seen more ground work to strengthen the pair’s bond, though already the two have dazzling chemistry on-screen. Additionally the writers (The episode was co-written by the stars Baynton and Corden) did utilize the “switcharoo” plot device a few too many times, making some of the twists rather predictable. Overall: An enthralling start to an action-adventure saga. At the start I was worried that the show would lean more toward comedy, making the situations and villains silly and unbelievable. However it was shot, written and performed like a thriller action film, and so that is how the viewer sees it. The main pairing are a perfect match also, especially as they are reminiscent of the Simon Pegg/ Nick Frost relationship, that we know from “Hot Fuzz” suits buddy-action-comedy so very well, and makes the show ever more endearing.


Reviews

ometimes the worst) passive entertainment out there for your consumption.

THEATRE 1 9 8 4 The Genre: sci-fi, partial horror The Premise: based on the famous George Orwell Novel “1984”, ministry of Truth employee Winston Smith struggles in the dystopian oppressive society where The Party, led by the mysterious and omnipresent “Big Brother” is watching everyone at all times. In a time when even thinking the wrong thing is a crime, Winston starts a diary, questions the party, and falls in love. The Good Parts: The atmosphere created by the actors and the staging is astounding. The impressive use of doors, corridors and windows gives the play a very oppressive feel, as well as slight surrealism being added such as repeating scenes over and over again makes the audience feel like they are inside Winston’s mind as he slowly goes insane. The actors largely played their roles very well, often playing many roles throughout the play. Particularly impressive I felt were Winston Smith, played by Mark Arends, and O’Brien, played by Tim Dutton. Their scenes together I felt were the most affecting and tense. The Bad Parts: I can imagine a viewer who had not read the novel would find the beginning of the play very hard to unravel, and would often feel lost in the subtleties; the production company very bravely decided to dramatize the appendix to the novel (the section about the history of newspeak) and so viewers unfamiliar with the book may be confused by the changes of time and place from a class studying the novel of Winston Smith, to Winston’s story itself. Also I felt the relationship between Winston and Julia a little too over-romanticised; Some of the dialogue, although I recognised as being from the book itself, in the context of a play felt slightly like something from a Nicholas Sparks novel. An additional warning: if viewers are uncomfortable with scenes of violent brutality and blood, then I would suggest giving this play a miss, some of the torture scenes in the Ministry of love is hard to watch. Overall: I found this play completely enthralling, and the atmosphere was suitable tense and spellbinding. However I can imagine people not used the novel would find the play slightly muddled and unclear, especially as the actors play more than one part. Still; a great dramatization of a fantastic novel.


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Certifiably cringeworthy, beautifully banal, as familiar as your pyjamas and oversized jumpers but oh so applause and cheers of encouragement. Ready to pack a punch and bring back your mojo Here they are for your visual You CAN H and G


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o wonderfully inspiring. People of the internet I give you the power of the clichĂŠ. The written round of jo. So we leave you with these handwritten, personal messages of support from strangers. al and emotional enjoyment. N do this.! G xoX


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