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P.R.ofessional

A Newsletter for entry-level PR job seekers

Spring 2014

Sifting through the noise to develop your rythm. Tom Resau’s advice on developing a career in PR. By Alex Pihlak Finding a certain niche workplace after graduation can seem like a job for a full time concert ochestrator. Being flexible is one of the key attributes that guest speaker Tom Resau advocates for success within the public relations major. Resau was one of the first graduate of Penn State’s newly founded Advertising/Public Relations program in 1999. Resau’s fisrt job was at Merritt Group from 1999-2002. He then went to Symantec Corporation from 2002-2007; Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman from 2007-2012; and now he is the vice president at W2 Communications. Resau’s focus is in information technology communications. One area of focus that many public relations graduates overlook. “You need to be flexible” Resau said when asked about the learning curve when he first enetered the information technology public relation sector. Resau stated that theer are many outlets to learn about different public relations sector. Developing the skills needed for specific secotrs in public relations can be daunting, Resau said. When asked about what are some beneficial ways to learn about the subject matter that a public relations grad will be working in, Resau went through numerous was of learning different disciplines, in and out of school. Some examples Resau gave were: Take some classes on diffent subject matter while you’re still in college; Branch out into different clubs and organizations that cater to public relations; find free online materials that interest you, there are a plethora of free resources to learn on the internet, Resau said. Having that extra knowledge can really put you ahead of the compition

Tom Resau explains the benefits of public relations in information technology .

Making your mark as an individual in the communications job market can be a very difficult feat. While public relations is on par with similar majors in placement rate and meadian salary, it is still very competitive. Having extra knowledge can put you that much closer to outing your competition and landing a job. Resau spoke about how profitable the information techology sector is, and how public relation proffessionals are direly needed to keep up with the growing market. Having external subject knowledge is one thing to put you above and beyond your competiton, but theres also something that many people over-look that could possibly hinder their career success. Your personal social media can be a very helpful and harmful tool in landing a job; especially in the information technology market. Here are some tips on developing your scial media prescence to further your career (continued on page 2.)


P.R.ofessional

Personal Branding with the Use of Social Media, How to Tweak Online Accounts and Get Hired

Having a respectable social media presence is becoming a key factor for success in the current job market. More than 2.6 million companies are on LinkedIn and that number grows every second. A Facebook page, LinkedIn profile, and Twitter account are all personal extensions of a potential employee. Companies treat these social media platforms as an 24/7 access interview in which they can view any and all information posted. Companies always look at an candidate’s social media profile because it is easily-accessible and provides a look into his or her lifestyle. Developing a respectable social media presence has the ability to turn a potential employee into a hired employee. When companies look into social networks, they are looking for anything that will discredit a potential employee, hence why it is crucial to have a clean presence online. Recruiters can have an indefinite number of résumés on hand and have no problem throwing some out based on candidates with unsuitable content on the Internet. Having a social media presence can be a very helpful tool for an individual, but it can also cripple the chances of getting a job if it isn’t respectable. Here are the basics of using social media creatively and strategically: Clean up Facebook and Twitter. Take down any pictures that may be inappropriate or offensive. Delete any statuses or tweets that contain vulgar or discriminatory words. Use Twitter to your advantage. Don’t be afraid to interact with companies and retweet articles that pertain to your desired career goals. This shows potential employers your communications skills and that you have a true interest in the field. Stay away from tweeting about negative or poor thoughts, especially if it means bashing your employer. Enhance your LinkedIn profile. LinkedIn is a great tool for connecting with prospective companies so take advantage of 2nd and 3rd degree connections.

Page 2

Recommendations and endorsements look great on a profile but they aren’t a one-way street. Create a personal website. There are many sites available that allow you to build your own website, such as Wix, Weebly, and Wordpress. Spend the extra cash to have your own domain. Build and upload a portfolio of classwork and other materials from internships or previous jobs. Create a blog. If you have the spare time to dedicate to a blog, do it. It shows employers your commitment as well as your willingness to improve your writing skills. Writing in your blog once every five months will reflect poorly, so try to write at least once a week. Try new things. More and more public relations companies are expanding their social media presence and are using websites like Pinterest. Create your own professional Pinterest board and pin articles pertaining to personal and professional development. Taking this step will surely set you apart from the competition when seeking out a job. Personal branding plays an important role in the beginning of a building a professional career. A good résumé or job interview doesn’t cut it anymore—employers want someone who can represent their company in a respectable way. The slightest of mistakes made in the realm of social networking can make a huge difference in being hired.


Alex Pihlak