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A STORY STILL UNFOLDING Forty Years of Arsenal Pulp Press 2011 marks the fortieth anniversary of Arsenal Pulp Press; forty years since a renegade group of young Vancouver writers and thinkers fired up a copying machine and produced the first Pulp book: Please Wait for Attendant to Open Gate, by Tom Osborne. None of us currently active at the press have been here quite that long but we do feel connections to those early days in 1971, a period when so many changes were happening in the culture. Since then, the issues have evolved, but the protests, the riots, the free thinking—the ideas—have not gone away. And neither have we. At the same time, the book industry has undergone a revolution in recent years, both good and bad; in the midst of the commotion, we maintain our commitment to publishing books that are distinctive in both voice and theme, offering alternative narratives that tell stories not easily found in the dominant culture. A number of new titles this fall speak directly to the history of the press; among them are new editions of legendary Pulp titles being brought back to life as part of Vancouver’s 125th anniversary—Betty Lambert’s Crossings, D.M. Fraser’s Class Warfare, and Jon Furberg’s Anhaga—as well as a new edition of The Imaginary Indian, Daniel Francis’s classic nonfiction book. These books have lost none of their power or relevance over the years, and we are very pleased to introduce these gems to a new readership. Meanwhile, a new art book, Stan Douglas: Abbott & Cordova, 7 August 1971, bridges both the past and present in documenting another forty-year-old event, based around a giant photo mural by artist Stan Douglas in the atrium of Vancouver’s new Woodward’s complex that recreates the infamous Gastown Riot in the summer of 1971. And we extend our international reach with The Inverted Gaze, our third translation from France and one that adds the voice of a prominent French intellectual (François Cusset) to our queer list. Finally, we look to the future with new, highly anticipated fiction by Kevin Chong and Kristyn Dunnion, and other books like Hoopla, the follow-up to the bestselling Yarn Bombing, on the “art of unexpected embroidery.” Above all, this year is, for us, a celebration of the great authors and artists we’ve published over the decades and continue to work with; we are proud to be part of your journey. As well, we thank our partners in crime, not only our reps, distributors, and printers, but the booksellers who sell our books and the media who write about them. Despite the vagaries of the business, we are more than optimistic about 2011 and beyond. Our own story is still unfolding. You’ll have to stick around to find out what happens next. Brian Lam Publisher

Robert Ballantyne Associate Publisher

Arsenal Pulp Press gratefully acknowledges the support of the Canada Council for the Arts and the British Columbia Arts Council for its publishing program, and the Government of Canada through the Canada Book Fund for its publishing activities.

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f11-arsenal-pulp-press  

FALL 2011 CATALOGUE Celebrating forty years of publishing. A STORY STILL UNFOLDING Forty Years of Arsenal Pulp Press Above all, this year is...

f11-arsenal-pulp-press  

FALL 2011 CATALOGUE Celebrating forty years of publishing. A STORY STILL UNFOLDING Forty Years of Arsenal Pulp Press Above all, this year is...

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