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2013 SOUTHEAST SUMMIT Wednesday, May 29 | Grand Prairie Center, Stuttgart, AR

NAME & COMMUNITY:


TABLE OF CONTENTS AGENDA & WELCOME SESSIONS & SPEAKERS NOTE PAGES LEARN ABOUT ArCOP

RESOURCES


AGENDA WEDNESDAY, MAY 29, 2013  all day training 8:00—8:30 8:30—9:00 9:00—11:30 11:30—12:00 12:00—3:00 3:00—3:30

Registrant Check-in Welcome Session Breakout Tracks Lunch Break Continuation of Breakout Tracks Closing Session

WELCOME Welcome to ArCOP’s 2013 Growing Healthy Communities Southeast Summit!


WELCOME SESSION 8:30 —9:00 AM GRAND PRAIRIE CENTER SALON B

ArCOP and Stuttgart representatives will welcome registrants, introduce the day, and highlight the necessity to constantly expand one’s team. ARCOP WELCOME Andrea Ridgway, MS, RD, LD, CDE, is currently the Branch Chief for Hometown Health Improvement in the Center for Local Public Health at the Arkansas Department of Health and the Chair Elect for ArCOP. Andi works with ADH colleagues and state partners to improve the health of Arkansas’ communities. WELCOME TO STUTTGART Marianne C. Maynard is currently serving her 7th year as Mayor of Stuttgart. Volunteering is her way of life! Her volunteer roles include service through the Stuttgart City Council, Arkansas Municipal League, St. Alban’s Episcopal Church, Grand Prairie Festival of Arts and many more. She and her husband, Neil, have been married 50 years this June and are the proud parents of 3 great sons who have brought 3 wonderful daughters-in-law as well as 6 fantastic grandchildren into the family. COALITION BUILDING 101 A coalition is a pact or treaty among individuals or groups, during which they cooperate in joint action, each in their own self-interest, joining forces together for a common cause. Shealese Washington is the Hometown Health Improvement Coordinator with the Arkansas Department of Health for the Southeast Region. Shealese is a native of Brinkley, AR where she and her husband of 20 years and 4 children still reside. She has enthusiastically served the citizens of the Delta for 9 years in various capacities. Shealese received her Bachelors Degree in Health Promotion in 2004 and her Master of Science in Health Sciences Education in 2011; both from Arkansas State University.

ARKANSAS COUNTY, GHC 2013 Arkansas County Partners in Health (ACPIH) was selected by ArCOP to receive the “Growing Healthy Communities” status in January 2013 because their volunteeroriented community has a demonstrated interest in increasing quality of life for the county’s population of 18,892. For the past 10 years, ACPIH has built a coalition that now includes Arkansas County Cooperative Extension Services, Arkansas Department of Health, University of Arkansas Phillips Community College, Baptist Health Medical Center-Stuttgart, Stuttgart School District, DeWitt School District, RSVP, elected representatives, local civic clubs, volunteers, and more to continue to make advancements towards increasing access to healthy foods and increasing the number of the county’s population that is physically active.


HOW TO...

IMPLEMENT COOKING MATTERS PROGRAMS IN YOUR COMMUNITY

9:00 —11:30 AM, 12:00—3:00 PM GRAND PRAIRIE CENTER CLASSROOM A

One component of the Arkansas Hunger Relief Alliance/No Kid Hungry campaign is ending childhood hunger in America by connecting kids in need with nutritious food and teaching families how to cook healthy, affordable meals, through Cooking Matters. With the help of volunteer culinary and nutrition experts, participants learn to shop smarter, make healthier food choices, and cook delicious meals. When participants leave this session, they will be trained to coordinate and facilitate Cooking Matters courses and Cooking Matters at the Store tours. Patty Barker currently serves as the Arkansas No Kid Hungry Campaign Director. The Arkansas No Kid Hungry Campaign Director manages the development and implementation of the campaign’s 5-year plan to end childhood hunger in Arkansas. The director oversees campaign personnel and volunteers and works with national, state and local partners to advocate for and expand child hunger programs and assess their effectiveness. Rachel Townsend, has worked for the Arkansas Hunger Relief Alliance as a No Kid Hungry Field Manager where she assisted people in setting up Summer & At Risk meal sites for school-aged children. Currently Rachel is the Director of the Cooking Matters Program for the Arkansas Hunger Relief Alliance. Braeden Hall began his AmeriCorps VISTA year with the Arkansas Hunger Relief Alliance in March and will be working alongside Cat Chandler to bring Cooking Matters at the Store programming to even more locations across our state. Before joining the Alliance, Braeden earned a bachelor’s degree from Hendrix College in Psychology and in Philosophy and Religious Studies, worked on organic farms in the Czech Republic and on an 18th century sailing vessel off of the shore of California. Cathryn Chandler is the Director of Cooking Matters at the Store at the Arkansas Hunger Relief Alliance. Cat provides support and training to partner groups across Arkansas, to help them bring guided grocery store tours to their communities and teach families how to shop for healthy food on a budget.

COOKING MATTERS KITCHEN KIT Coming Soon: Thanks to a grant from the Arkansas Department of Health and cooperation from the Arkansas Hunger Relief Alliance, ArCOP’s Access to Healthy Foods workgroup team has created Cooking Matters Kitchen Kits. These kits will include items such as knives, aprons, pots, pans (and more!) along with an evaluation component. Watch for news on arkansasobesity.org for news on how to check one out.


HOW TO...

INCREASE ACCESS TO HEALTHY FOOD

9:00 —11:30 AM, 12:00—3:00 PM GRAND PRAIRIE CENTER CLASSROOM D

A community garden can be urban, suburban or rural. It can grow flowers, vegetables, herbs or community. It can be one community plot or many individual plots. It can be at a school, hospital or in a neighborhood. It also can be a series of plots dedicated to “urban agriculture” where the produce is grown for a market. Farmers' markets are one of the oldest forms of direct marketing by small farmers and, in the last decade, have experienced a renaissance throughout the US. In a farmers' market, a group of farmers sell their products at a designated day, time and public place. Some farmers' markets also have live entertainment, prepared food vendors, and artisan booths. When participants leave this session, they will be trained to build a team, create a plan (including grant writing for needed equipment/training), and start implementation of a farmers’ market, community garden, or Farm to School Program. Andrew Carberry is a Program Coordinator for the Arkansas Grow Healthy Study. Andrew’s role on the study is to develop a farm to school pilot program for Head Start centers and elementary schools. Andrew also serves as the Arkansas state lead for the National Farm to School Network. Trudy Redus Communications & Manager for Saracen Landing. Saracen Landing is a 10,000 sq. ft. covered Pavilion located on Lake Saracen in Pine Bluff. The award winning walking trail starts around this 500 acre lake. Trudy also manages the Farmers Market. The “Healthy Lifestyles” initiative began in 2011 to focus on healthy eating and physical activity; whether you are shopping at the farmers market or walking on the trail. Dr. Mildred Barnes Griggs is interim director of the Arkansas Delta Seeds of Change initiative. The initiative works to have a positive impact on ability of residents to have access to nutrition food and to enhance the financial livelihood of food producers who market produce to such outlets as Farm-to-School programs. After graduating from the University of Georgia with a degree in Environmental Health Science, Rachel Spencer joined the inaugural cohort of FoodCorps service members. FoodCorps brought her to Marshall, Arkansas to build a school garden program there. Though she now works for FoodCorps as the coordinator of Arkansas' state program, her proudest career moment might be when one of her 6th graders told her that she made the best food in town, even over Sonic.

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CURRICULUM PROVIDED BY ArCOP’s (volunteer) Workgroup Teams created the curriculum for each breakout track. Share your expertise—join a team!

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HOW TO...

MAKE YOUR SCHOOL & COMMUNITY HEALTHIER

9:00 —11:30 AM, 12:00—3:00 PM GRAND PRAIRIE CENTER CLASSROOM C

A joint use agreement (JUA) is a formal written agreement which forms a partnership between two separate entities – often a school and a city or county – setting forth the terms and conditions for shared use of public recreational property or facilities. Joint use is intended to maximize access to physical activity spaces and recreational programming and is considered a cost effective use of local resources, as partnering entities share space and operation costs for the space. Successful JUAs require ongoing collaboration and cooperation in identifying each partner’s roles and responsibilities of the partnership to address areas such as scheduling, operation and maintenance costs, and liability. Nutrition & physical activity resources are constantly being updated and can get overwhelming. Because of that, ArCOP’s Early Childhood & Schools workgroup is creating a resource toolkit that will include the latest nutrition and physical activity opportunities including steps to conduct vending machine audits within the school districts, healthy fundraiser options, and more. When participants leave this session, they will be trained to leverage and utilize evidence-based resources by navigating through the Early Childhood and Schools, Nutrition and Physical Activity Toolkit. Jerri Clark is the Coordinated School Health Grant Manager at the Arkansas Department of Education. She has been active in the area of federal and state grant management for approx. 10 years and has been an advocate for programming for children and youth experiencing social, economic and health disparities. She currently serves as the coordinator for the Joint Use Agreement State funded grant program. Susi Epperson, MSE Educational Leadership/Administration, is a district level administrator at Cedar Ridge School District. She is currently an active member and volunteer for the Independence County Hometown Wellness Coalition. In the past four years, she has secured over four million in grant funds to improve the health of the community where she works and lives. Taniesha L. Richardson, MPH has been employed at the Arkansas Department of Health since 1999. She is currently the Public Health Section Chief II for the Child and Adolescent Health Section- School Health Programs. Prior to this position, Richardson was the Program Director of the Communities Putting Prevention to Work Initiative, Public Health Educator for the BreastCare Program, Staff Development Coordinator for the Workforce and Career Development Branch and the Federal Program Manager for the Tobacco Prevention and Cessation (Stamp Out Smoking) Branch. Heather Rhodes-Newburn is the Coordinated School Health (CSH) Program Coordinator for the North Little Rock School District. Heather received a Bachelor of Science in Biology from the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff. After which, she received a Masters of Public Health from the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences College of Public Health.


HOW TO...

LEAD WALKABILITY AUDITS

9:00 —11:30 AM, 12:00—3:00 PM GRAND PRAIRIE CENTER MEETING ROOM

Compact, walkable communities allow residents to walk to services, shopping, schools and jobs and can reduce traffic congestion, decrease air pollution and improve public health. Walkability audits are a key planning tool that provides communities & schools with the technical assistance necessary to assess walking and biking conditions and create a plan for improving them. When participants leave this session, they will be trained to identify areas in their communities where the built environment does not support healthy living. Leesa Freasier is the chair of ArCOP’s Built Environment workgroup team. For the last 5 years she has been with the Arkansas Department of Health as the Physical Activity Section Chief. Additionally, she gained the Nutrition Section Chief position in 2011. Leesa has been a member of ArCOP since 2008 and is the proud mom of her 12-year-old daughter, Katlee. Vanessa Nehus is the Principal Investigator for the Arkansas Disability and Health Program. Previously the program’s director, she has been involved in the Disability and Health Program since 2002. Vanessa has a Master of Arts and a Bachelor of Arts in psychology and is a Juris Doctorate Candidate (2013). Vanessa Smith is a Social Worker and has devoted the last 20 years to her work in human services. She has been the Program Coordinator of the Arkansas Disability and Health Program since 2005. She lives in Sherwood with her husband and son and enjoys cooking, gardening, and reading.

HOW TO...

MAKE YOUR WORKSITE HEALTHIER

9:00 —11:30 AM, 12:00—3:00 PM GRAND PRAIRIE CENTER CLASSROOM B

The CDC’s Worksite Health ScoreCard assists employers in identifying gaps in their health promotion programs, and helps them to prioritize high-impact strategies for health promotion at their worksites across the following health topics: organizational supports, tobacco control, nutrition, physical activity, weight management, stress management, depression, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, signs and symptoms of heart attack and stroke, and emergency response to heart attack and stroke. Arkansas’ Department of Health has created a smartphone application that makes using the ScoreCard even easier. When participants leave this session, they will be trained to understand what worksite wellness is and how it impacts the community as a whole. Worksites in the community will have the tools to conduct an assessment on their current or future worksite health promotion programs by identifying gaps and prioritizing high impact strategies in their worksites. Participants will leave with a 6 month plan that includes their goals, objectives, and budget. (Con’t)


HOW TO...

MAKE YOUR WORKSITE HEALTHIER

Katrina Betancourt, MS, RCEP is the Worksite Wellness Section Chief for the Arkansas Department of Health. She is completing her Doctorate in Health Education and is a Registered Clinical Exercise Physiologist. Her role is to provide technical assistance for worksites to promote lifelong health by increasing community and organizational level interventions.

CLOSING SESSION 3:00—3:30 PM GRAND PRAIRIE CENTER SALON B

Before leaving the Summit, participants will learn tips helpful to submitting a powerful grant proposal and review ArCOP’s 2013 Growing Healthy Communities Regional Grants application. GRANT WRITING 101 You can’t receive a grant without first writing the application! As with most things, practice makes perfect—and your likelihood of receiving funding increases with each grant writing experience. Kaye Murry is the Southeast Region Hometown Health Improvement Manager. She has worked for the Arkansas Department of Health for 22 years through many different programs including the School Based Clinics, teaching Smoking Cessation Classes, CPR, HIV Prevention Counseling Course and provided health education resources to 14 Counties. Kaye and her staff provide resources to the 14 Southeast counties to assist with Hometown Health Improvement focus areas and providing funding when possible to the coalitions. REVIEWING ArCOP'S 2013 GHC REGIONAL GRANTS APPLICATION Thanks to funding from the Blue & You Foundation for a Healthier Arkansas, the Arkansas Coalition for Obesity Prevention is excited to open grant opportunities to communities represented at 2013 Growing Healthy Communities Regional Summits. A minimum of $10K will be awarded among communities in each region in support of 6 month projects starting July 15, 2013 and ending January 15, 2014. Applications, due Friday, July 12, will have tiered budget requests, allowing communities to request funding for prioritized projects. Information on these grants and a link to the application form can be found at: arkansasobesity.org/2013/05/2013-grants/ Amanda Potter Cole is an independent contractor excited to work with ArCOP’s Growing Healthy Communities. She studied at Hendrix College, served in the founding corps of City Year Little Rock, and helped the Women’s Foundation of Arkansas ring in a new decade. Amanda is passionate about food, running, and helping others empower themselves.


NOTES & IDEAS


NOTES & IDEAS


NOTES & IDEAS


NOTES & IDEAS


ABOUT ArCOP Arkansas Coalition for Obesity Prevention (ArCOP)

MISSION Improve the health of all Arkansas communities by increasing physical activity and healthy eating to reduce and prevent obesity.

VISION GOAL ABOUT

COALITION MEETINGS arkansasobesity.org


GROWING HEALTHY There is a movement afoot in Arkansas—across the nation, really—to turn our communities into vibrant, livable, healthy environments.

GROWING HEALTHY

WHY GROW HEALTHIER?

WHAT’S INVOLVED?

SIMPLE, BUT NOT EASY?


FIVE WINNING STRATEGIES TO GROW A HEALTHIER COMMUNITY TODAY Arkansas—and America—is experiencing a public health epidemic that threatens to swamp much better known health risks like heart disease, cancer and car wrecks.

1

Increase access to healthful foods:

2 3 4 5

Increase opportunities for physical activity:

Enhance policies that foster health:

Improve worksite wellness:

Organize for change:


ArCOP WORKGROUP TEAMS EXECUTIVE TEAM CO-CHAIRS: Joy Rockenbach & Becky Adams | CO-CHAIR ELECT: Andrea Ridgway

ACCESS TO HEALTHY FOODS CO-CHAIRS: Ashley Anderson & Andrew Carberry WEBPAGE: ARKANSASOBESITY.ORG/WORKGROUPS/ACCESS-TO-HEALTHY-FOODS/

  

BUILT ENVIRONMENT CHAIR: Leesa Freasier WEBPAGE: ARKANSASOBESITY.ORG/WORKGROUPS/BUILT-ENVIRONMENT/

most promising     


ArCOP WORKGROUP TEAMS EARLY CHILDHOOD & SCHOOLS CO-CHAIRS: Taniesha Richardson WEBPAGE: ARKANSASOBESITY.ORG/WORKGROUPS/EARLY-CHILDHOOD-AND-SCHOOLS/

  

HEALTH CARE CHAIR: Joy Rockenbach WEBPAGE: ARKANSASOBESITY.ORG/WORKGROUPS/HEALTH-CARE/

WORKSITE WELLNESS CO-CHAIRS: Katrina Betancourt & Treg Long WEBPAGE: ARKANSASOBESITY.ORG/WORKGROUPS/WORKSITE/


SUMMIT ROSTER HOW TO IMPLEMENT COOKING MATTERS PROGRAMS IN YOUR COMMUNITY             

HOW TO INCREASE ACCESS TO HEALTHY FOODS               

HOW TO MAKE YOUR SCHOOL & COMMUNITY HEALTHIER 


SUMMIT ROSTER             

HOW TO LEAD WALKABILITY AUDITS    

HOW TO MAKE YOUR WORKSITE HEALTHIER        


STAKEHOLDERS GUIDE Below are some folk, in no particular order, who—if you haven’t already—you may want to invite to your team! 

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PLANNING GUIDE When working on your community’s health & wellness, consider the big picture of your project. WHAT? WHO?

HOW? WHEN?

WHAT?

WHAT? WHO?

WHY?

RESOURCES

ACTIVITIES (INPUTS)

MEASURES (OUTPUTS)

OUTCOMES

IMPACT

$

Immersion Training

BMI

 Obesity

Healthy Communities

Manpower

Regional Summit

Weight/Height

 Hypertension

 Hospitalization

Tools

Other Trainings

Quality of Life

 Diabetes

 Healthcare Cost

School Participation Policy Changes

 Economic Development

Farmer’s Markets

Environment Changes

 Quality of Life

Breakfast Programs

Food Changes

 Safety


FEASIBILITY MATRIX When deciding where to get started, take a moment to plot the feasibility and size of impact of each project your community team is considering.

Feasibility To Get

High

Medium

Low

Size of Impact for Target Need Large

Medium

Small


For information on Growing Healthy Communities, contact: Joy Rockenbach, ArCOP Chair | 501-683-3600 | joy.rockenbach@arkansas.gov Amanda Potter Cole, GHC Project Director | 479-981-1343 | amanda.pottercole@gmail.com Web: arkansasobesity.org | Facebook: facebook.com/arkansasobesity | Twitter: @AROBESITY

2013 GHC SEAR Summit Program  

Program for ArCOP's 2013 Growing Healthy Communities Southeast Arkansas Summit hosted at Stuttgart's Grand Prairie Center on Wed, May 29.

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