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2013 CENTRAL SUMMIT Monday, June 24 | The Center, Bryant, AR

NAME & COMMUNITY:


TABLE OF CONTENTS AGENDA & WELCOME SESSIONS & SPEAKERS NOTE PAGES LEARN ABOUT ArCOP

RESOURCES


AGENDA MONDAY, JUNE 24, 2013  all day training 8:00—8:30 8:30—9:00 9:00—12:00 12:00—12:30 12:30—3:00 3:00—3:30

Registrant Check-in Welcome Session Breakout Tracks Lunch Break Continuation of Breakout Tracks Closing Session

WELCOME Welcome to ArCOP’s 2013 Growing Healthy Communities Central Summit!


WELCOME SESSION 8:30 —9:00 AM COURT 1

ArCOP and Stuttgart representatives will welcome registrants, introduce the day, and highlight the necessity to constantly expand one’s team. ARCOP WELCOME Joy Rockenbach’s roles through the Arkansas Departments of Education and Health allow her to serve in her “fun job” as co-chair of the Arkansas Coalition for Obesity Prevention. She and her husband stay healthy through running and gardening. They’re also fantastic neighbors, happy to lend a wrench (or bottle of wine) whenever needed. WELCOME TO BRYANT Prior to being elected Mayor of Bryant, Jill Dabbs was a business owner/manager, community leader with many different organizations, and a dedicated volunteer. She was a founding member of the People for Parks Committee. Dabbs is also an active supporter of Bryant Public Schools. As Bryant continues to grow she is committed to maintain a city with a high quality of life standard that families, for future generations, will choose as a place to raise their children. COALITION BUILDING 101 A coalition is a pact or treaty among individuals or groups, during which they cooperate in joint action, each in their own self-interest, joining forces together for a common cause. Dechantria D. "Dee Dee" Wallace, MS, CHES, CPS currently serves as a Public Health Educator for the Arkansas Department of Health Hometown Health Improvement Initiative and provides technical assistance and education to communities and coalitions in Central Arkansas. She has worked as a Sexual Assault Prevention Educator and Assistant Prevention Resource Center Coordinator and as an Academic Advisor and Adjunct Instructor for the University of Arkansas at Little Rock Department of Health, Human Performance and Sport Management.

TRAILS COMING SOON TO BRYANT! The Bryant Parks & Recreation Department has received approval for an $11,000 grant by the Arkansas State Highway and Transportation Department for a perimeter trail at Bishop Park. Comprised of a fine chat-rock, the trail will extend the current Bryant Parks Nature Trail by an additional 1.7 miles of trail space throughout Bishop Park. The 10’ wide trail will encourage multiple uses, including serving as a connection to the Multipurpose Fields, Community Gardens, and future Fishing Pier to the rest of the park as well as allowing cross country runners training space. Bryant was awarded the “Growing Healthy Communities” title in 2012.


HOW TO...

IMPLEMENT COOKING MATTERS PROGRAMS IN YOUR COMMUNITY

9:00 AM — NOON, 12:30—3:00 PM WHOLE HOG ROOM (i)

One component of the Arkansas Hunger Relief Alliance/No Kid Hungry campaign is ending childhood hunger in America by connecting kids in need with nutritious food and teaching families how to cook healthy, affordable meals, through Cooking Matters. With the help of volunteer culinary and nutrition experts, participants learn to shop smarter, make healthier food choices, and cook delicious meals. When participants leave this session, they will be trained to coordinate and facilitate Cooking Matters courses and Cooking Matters at the Store tours. Patty Barker currently serves as the Arkansas No Kid Hungry Campaign Director. The Arkansas No Kid Hungry Campaign Director manages the development and implementation of the campaign’s 5-year plan to end childhood hunger in Arkansas. The director oversees campaign personnel and volunteers and works with national, state and local partners to advocate for and expand child hunger programs and assess their effectiveness. Cathryn Chandler is the Director of Cooking Matters at the Store at the Arkansas Hunger Relief Alliance. Cat provides support and training to partner groups across Arkansas, to help them bring guided grocery store tours to their communities and teach families how to shop for healthy food on a budget. Braeden Hall began his AmeriCorps VISTA year with the Arkansas Hunger Relief Alliance in March and will be working alongside Cat Chandler to bring Cooking Matters at the Store programming to even more locations across our state. Before joining the Alliance, Braeden earned a bachelor’s degree from Hendrix College in Psychology and in Philosophy and Religious Studies, worked on organic farms in the Czech Republic and on an 18th century sailing vessel off of the shore of California. Rachel Townsend, has worked for the Arkansas Hunger Relief Alliance as a No Kid Hungry Field Manager where she assisted people in setting up Summer & At Risk meal sites for school-aged children. Currently Rachel is the Director of the Cooking Matters Program for the Arkansas Hunger Relief Alliance.

COOKING MATTERS KITCHEN KIT Coming Soon: Thanks to a grant from the Arkansas Department of Health and cooperation from the Arkansas Hunger Relief Alliance, ArCOP’s Access to Healthy Foods workgroup team has created Cooking Matters Kitchen Kits. These kits will include items such as knives, aprons, pots, pans (and more!) along with an evaluation component. Watch for news on arkansasobesity.org for news on how to check one out.


HOW TO...

INCREASE ACCESS TO HEALTHY FOOD

9:00 AM — NOON, 12:30—3:00 PM WHOLE HOG ROOM (ii)

A community garden can be urban, suburban or rural. It can grow flowers, vegetables, herbs or community. It can be one community plot or many individual plots. It can be at a school, hospital or in a neighborhood. It also can be a series of plots dedicated to “urban agriculture” where the produce is grown for a market. Farmers' markets are one of the oldest forms of direct marketing by small farmers and, in the last decade, have experienced a renaissance throughout the US. In a farmers' market, a group of farmers sell their products at a designated day, time and public place. Some farmers' markets also have live entertainment, prepared food vendors, and artisan booths. When participants leave this session, they will be trained to build a team, create a plan (including grant writing for needed equipment/training), and start implementation of a farmers’ market, community garden, or Farm to School Program. Guy K. Ames, BA from Texas A&M, Commerce; MS in horticulture (fruit crops and pest control in fruit crops)

from University of Arkansas, Fayetteville. Guy has operated Ames Orchard & Nursery, producing both fruit and fruit plants adapted to Ozark conditions, for 23 years. Currently, Guy is a Horticulture Specialist with ATTRA, the national sustainable agriculture information service managed by the National Center for Appropriate Technology. He is the author, most recently, of Community Orchards. Ashley Anderson, RDN, LD is a Health and Wellness Program Manager for the Midwest Dairy Council, where she is responsible for promoting programs in schools like Fuel Up to Play 60 and serves as a liaison to health professionals and media spokeswoman in Arkansas and eastern Oklahoma. Ashley serves as co-chair of the Access to Healthy Foods Team with the Arkansas Coalition for Obesity Prevention where she promotes access to healthy and affordable foods. Bob Bell was introduced to School and Community gardening as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Maharashtra, India in the mid 1960's. He came to Arkansas in 1970 and his career has included serving as Texarkana’s Director of Community Development, working with Governor Dale Bumpers, and working with rural schools on a plethora of projects. In 2012, Bob assisted Lawrence County Schools in creatin the partnership which received the first USDA Farm to School grant in Arkansas. Robin D. Bridges has spent 28 years as a County Extension Agent, 25 with the LSU Ag Center, and 3 with University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture in Union County. He is happily married to Gail and they have two grown and successful children. Life is a series of events designed to give us opportunities to be of service to others. Robin feels blessed to get paid for it. Josh Fendley is the President and CEO of The People Tree, Inc. Among other roles, he serves as Project Facilitator for The People Tree’s collaborative urban farm projects, the North Little Rock Community Farm and The Field. Josh is also a proud husband to Audrey, father to Emmett, and Portfolio Manager for Regions Wealth Management. Josh is an organic product of Stone County, Arkansas, but has called Central Arkansas home for over 10 years. Derek Phillips is the City of Bryant Parks Director and serves as District Commissioner for Babe Ruth / Cal Ripken. He is a board member of both Keep Bryant Beautiful and Imagination Library of Saline County. Derek enjoys golfing, fishing and spending time with his niece Sydney. Rosemary Rodibaugh, PhD, RD, LD is a Professor with the University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture. She chairs Extension’s Nutrition and Food Safety Initiative Team and is the project director for the UA Division of Agriculture’s Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education project (SNAP-Ed). Rosemary is a member of the Arkansas Coalition for Obesity Prevention, Arkansas Child Health Advisory Committee, Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and the Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. After graduating from the University of Georgia with a degree in Environmental Health Science, Rachel Spencer joined the inaugural cohort of FoodCorps service members. FoodCorps brought her to Marshall, Arkansas to build a school garden program there. Though she now works for FoodCorps as the coordinator of Arkansas' state program, her proudest career moment might be when one of her 6th graders told her that she made the best food in town, even over Sonic.


HOW TO...

MAKE YOUR SCHOOL & COMMUNITY HEALTHIER

9:00 AM — NOON, 12:30—3:00 PM ARKANSAS BONE & JOINT ROOM

A joint use agreement (JUA) is a formal written agreement which forms a partnership between two separate entities – often a school and a city or county – setting forth the terms and conditions for shared use of public recreational property or facilities. Joint use is intended to maximize access to physical activity spaces and recreational programming and is considered a cost effective use of local resources, as partnering entities share space and operation costs for the space. Successful JUAs require ongoing collaboration and cooperation in identifying each partner’s roles and responsibilities of the partnership to address areas such as scheduling, operation and maintenance costs, and liability. Nutrition & physical activity resources are constantly being updated and can get overwhelming. Because of that, ArCOP’s Early Childhood & Schools workgroup is creating a resource toolkit that will include the latest nutrition and physical activity opportunities including steps to conduct vending machine audits within the school districts, healthy fundraiser options, and more. When participants leave this session, they will be trained to leverage and utilize evidence-based resources by navigating through the Early Childhood and Schools, Nutrition and Physical Activity Toolkit. Susi Epperson, MSE Educational Leadership/Administration, is a district level administrator at Cedar Ridge School District. She is currently an active member and volunteer for the Independence County Hometown Wellness Coalition. In the past four years, she has secured over four million dollars in grant funds to improve the health of the community where she works and lives. Brandon Griffin, City of Bryant’s Recreational Superintendent, has nearly 10 years of Parks and Recreation experience stemming from three different City Governments in Minnesota and Arkansas. Brandon obtained his B.S. in Speech Communications before finishing his Master's Degree in Non-Profit Management and Public Administration with an emphasis in Grant Writing. With a background as both a teacher and recreational programmer, he is very familiar with maximizing resources and utilizing Joint Use Agreements (JUAs) in the community. Lori Golden currently serves as the Healthy Schools Program Manager in Arkansas for the Alliance’s Healthy Schools Program. Her background includes identifying client training needs, conducting specialized training programs and cultivating relationships with legislators and community providers. Lori earned her MPA from California State University at San Bernardino. Audra Walters is the Professional Education Coordinator for the Injury Prevention Center at Arkansas Children’s Hospital. Audra previously worked for the Arkansas Department of Health where she served as the Coordinated School Health Advisor. This experience gave her a comprehensive understanding of the importance of environment and systems change in making Arkansas schools and communities healthier places to live, learn, work and play. She brings several years of experience in grassroots coalition building to promote prevention initiatives.


HOW TO... LEAD WALKABILITY AUDITS 9:00 AM — NOON, 12:30—3:00 PM AEROBICS ROOM

Compact, walkable communities allow residents to walk to services, shopping, schools and jobs and can reduce traffic congestion, decrease air pollution and improve public health. Walkability audits are a key planning tool that provides communities & schools with the technical assistance necessary to assess walking and biking conditions and create a plan for improving them. When participants leave this session, they will be trained to identify areas in their communities where the built environment does not support healthy living. Leesa Freasier is the chair of ArCOP’s Built Environment workgroup team. For the last 5 years she has been with the Arkansas Department of Health as the Physical Activity Section Chief. Additionally, she gained the Nutrition Section Chief position in 2011. Leesa has been a member of ArCOP since 2008 and is the proud mom of her 12-year-old daughter, Katlee. Vanessa Smith is a Social Worker and has devoted the last 20 years to her work in human services. She has been the Program Coordinator of the Arkansas Disability and Health Program since 2005. She lives in Sherwood with her husband and son and enjoys cooking, gardening, and reading.

HOW TO...

MAKE YOUR WORKSITE HEALTHIER

9:00 AM — NOON, 12:30—3:00 PM FIRST ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE ROOM

The CDC’s Worksite Health ScoreCard assists employers in identifying gaps in their health promotion programs, and helps them to prioritize high-impact strategies for health promotion at their worksites across the following health topics: organizational supports, tobacco control, nutrition, physical activity, weight management, stress management, depression, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, signs and symptoms of heart attack and stroke, and emergency response to heart attack and stroke. Arkansas’ Department of Health has created a smartphone application that makes using the ScoreCard even easier. When participants leave this session, they will be trained to understand what worksite wellness is and how it impacts the community as a whole. Worksites in the community will have the tools to conduct an assessment on their current or future worksite health promotion programs by identifying gaps and prioritizing high impact strategies in their worksites. Participants will leave with a 6 month plan that includes their goals, objectives, and budget. In addition to chairing ArCOP’s Worksite Wellness Team, Treg Long currently serves as the Arkansas Health Systems Director for the American Cancer Society providing staff leadership for cancer control relationships and initiatives in Arkansas for the Mid-South Division. He works to integrate cancer control objectives with health care providers, managed care organizations, health insurers, coalitions, worksites, Medicare quality improvement organizations, and a variety of other key health systems as needed. Previous positions include; Government Relations Director, Advocacy Manager, and Medical Affairs Director. Bernadette Gunn Rhodes serves as the City of North Little Rock’s Fit 2 Live Coordinator. Fit 2 Live focuses on creating a City environment that promotes healthy eating and active learning. Bernadette directs the City’s employee wellness, community garden, and public health outreach initiatives. She also facilitates the Built Environment and Bicycle Friendly Community Committees and supervises the City’s Safe Routes to School program.


CLOSING SESSION 3:00—3:30 PM COURT 1

Before leaving the Summit, participants will learn tips helpful to submitting a powerful grant proposal and review ArCOP’s 2013 Growing Healthy Communities Regional Grants application. GRANT WRITING 101 You can’t receive a grant without first writing the application! As with most things, practice makes perfect—and your likelihood of receiving funding increases with each grant writing experience. Chris Love serves as the Program Director for Arkansas Community Foundation. He has also served in a variety of other nonprofit leadership roles with organizations such as City Year and Arkansas Coalition for Excellence (ACE), Arkansas’ state-wide nonprofit association. He holds a bachelor's degree in sociology from Columbia College of Missouri, a Master of Ministry degree from Temple Baptist Seminary and is currently pursuing a Master’s degree in Leadership and Ethics from John Brown University REVIEWING ArCOP'S 2013 GHC REGIONAL GRANTS APPLICATION Thanks to funding from the Blue & You Foundation for a Healthier Arkansas, the Arkansas Coalition for Obesity Prevention is excited to open grant opportunities to communities represented at 2013 Growing Healthy Communities Regional Summits. A minimum of $10K will be awarded among communities in each region in support of 6 month projects starting July 15, 2013 and ending January 15, 2014. Applications, due Friday, July 12, will have tiered budget requests, allowing communities to request funding for prioritized projects. Information on these grants and a link to the application form can be found at: arkansasobesity.org/2013/05/2013-grants/ Amanda Potter Cole is an independent contractor excited to work with ArCOP’s Growing Healthy Communities. She studied at Hendrix College, served in the founding corps of City Year Little Rock, and helped the Women’s Foundation of Arkansas ring in a new decade. Amanda is passionate about food, running, and helping others empower themselves.

HEALTHY EATS ArCOP has worked with Dinner’s Ready to provide a healthy lunch: your choice of smoked turkey, ham & cheese, grilled chicken salad, or veggie—served with fresh fruit, pita chips & hummus, water, and unsweetened tea. Vegan option available for those who registered before June 21. Beverages and snacks, courtesy of Harps and The Center, may be found in Court 1 throughout the day.

CURRICULUM: HANDS-ON LEARNING ArCOP’s volunteer Workgroup Teams created the curriculum for each breakout track. “Field Trips” have been integrated to provide all summit participants with hands-on learning experience. Share your expertise with others around the state—join a workgroup team!


NOTES & IDEAS


NOTES & IDEAS


NOTES & IDEAS


NOTES & IDEAS


NOTES & IDEAS


ABOUT ArCOP Arkansas Coalition for Obesity Prevention (ArCOP)

MISSION Improve the health of all Arkansas communities by increasing physical activity and healthy eating to reduce and prevent obesity.

VISION GOAL ABOUT

COALITION MEETINGS arkansasobesity.org


ArCOP PARTNERS                                    

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GROWING HEALTHY There is a movement afoot in Arkansas—across the nation, really—to turn our communities into vibrant, livable, healthy environments.

GROWING HEALTHY

WHY GROW HEALTHIER?

WHAT’S INVOLVED?

SIMPLE, BUT NOT EASY?


FIVE WINNING STRATEGIES TO GROW A HEALTHIER COMMUNITY TODAY Arkansas—and America—is experiencing a public health epidemic that threatens to swamp much better known health risks like heart disease, cancer and car wrecks.

1

Increase access to healthful foods:

2 3 4 5

Increase opportunities for physical activity:

Enhance policies that foster health:

Improve worksite wellness:

Organize for change:


ArCOP WORKGROUP TEAMS EXECUTIVE TEAM CO-CHAIRS: Joy Rockenbach & Becky Adams | CO-CHAIR ELECT: Andrea Ridgway

ACCESS TO HEALTHY FOODS CO-CHAIRS: Ashley Anderson & Andrew Carberry WEBPAGE: ARKANSASOBESITY.ORG/WORKGROUPS/ACCESS-TO-HEALTHY-FOODS/

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BUILT ENVIRONMENT CHAIR: Leesa Freasier WEBPAGE: ARKANSASOBESITY.ORG/WORKGROUPS/BUILT-ENVIRONMENT/

most promising     


ArCOP WORKGROUP TEAMS EARLY CHILDHOOD & SCHOOLS CO-CHAIRS: Taniesha Richardson WEBPAGE: ARKANSASOBESITY.ORG/WORKGROUPS/EARLY-CHILDHOOD-AND-SCHOOLS/

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HEALTH CARE CHAIR: Joy Rockenbach WEBPAGE: ARKANSASOBESITY.ORG/WORKGROUPS/HEALTH-CARE/

WORKSITE WELLNESS CO-CHAIRS: Katrina Betancourt & Treg Long WEBPAGE: ARKANSASOBESITY.ORG/WORKGROUPS/WORKSITE/


SUMMIT ROSTER HOW TO IMPLEMENT COOKING MATTERS PROGRAMS IN YOUR COMMUNITY                     

HOW TO INCREASE ACCESS TO HEALTHY FOODS                     


SUMMIT ROSTER 

HOW TO MAKE YOUR SCHOOL & COMMUNITY HEALTHIER               

HOW TO LEAD WALKABILITY AUDITS     

HOW TO MAKE YOUR WORKSITE HEALTHIER                    


STAKEHOLDERS GUIDE Below are some folk, in no particular order, who—if you haven’t already—you may want to invite to your team! 

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PLANNING GUIDE When working on your community’s health & wellness, consider the big picture of your project. WHAT? WHO?

HOW? WHEN?

WHAT?

WHAT? WHO?

WHY?

RESOURCES

ACTIVITIES (INPUTS)

MEASURES (OUTPUTS)

OUTCOMES

IMPACT

$

Immersion Training

BMI

 Obesity

Healthy Communities

Manpower

Regional Summit

Weight/Height

 Hypertension

 Hospitalization

Tools

Other Trainings

Quality of Life

 Diabetes

 Healthcare Cost

School Participation Policy Changes

 Economic Development

Farmer’s Markets

Environment Changes

 Quality of Life

Breakfast Programs

Food Changes

 Safety


FEASIBILITY MATRIX When deciding where to get started, take a moment to plot the feasibility and size of impact of each project your community team is considering.

Feasibility To Get

High

Medium

Low

Size of Impact for Target Need Large

Medium

Small


For information on Growing Healthy Communities, contact: Joy Rockenbach, ArCOP Chair | 501-683-3600 | joy.rockenbach@arkansas.gov Amanda Potter Cole, GHC Project Director | 479-981-1343 | amanda@ampcideas.com Web: arkansasobesity.org | Facebook: facebook.com/arkansasobesity | Twitter: @AROBESITY


Central Summit Program