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Understanding Exploitation


Speak up for those who cannot speak for themselves, for the rights of all who are destitute. Speak up and judge fairly; defend the rights of the poor and needy.

- Proverbs 31:8-9


Human trafficking is modern day slavery. It is the moving of a human being for the purpose of commercial exploitation. Guns are trafficked. Drugs are trafficked. Human beings are trafficked. When a person is controlled, used, moved and in some way profited from, trafficking has occurred.


Human trafficking by the numbers: 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0

Human Trafficking

$32

$26.7

Billion*

$10.7

Billion**

Billion***

* United Nations ** http://finapps.forbes.com/finapps/jsp/finance/compinfo/IncomeStatement.jsp?tkr=aapl&period=qtr *** http://investor.starbucks.com/phoenix.zhtml?c=99518&p=irol-newsArticle&ID=1492291&highlight=

Trafficking is a $32 billion industry.1 After drug dealing, human trafficking (both sex trafficking and trafficking for forced labor) is tied with the illegal arms industry as the second largest criminal industry in the world today, and it is the fastest growing.2

There are 27 million people enslaved in the world today.3 That is equivalent to the entire 2010 population of Illinois, Missouri, Kansas, Colorado and Wyoming combined.4

WY IL CO

KS

MO


Every year 1.2 million children are trafficked.5

Dallas, TX

That is equivalent to the 2010 population of Dallas, Texas.6


50% of human trafficking victims are children.7


Debt Bondage & Labor Trafficking Debt Bondage is when a family cannot afford the basic necessities for survival (food, water, clothing, shelter) and a trafficker will provide those needs, with interest, if the family works for him. The family ends up doing manual labor in hazardous conditions and without the proper nutrition, hydration, or shelter. The interest rate is so high that they can never pay off the debt, and are thus enslaved. Street children and orphans are often labor trafficked or sexually exploited because they have no where else to go. Natural disasters also increase the threat of trafficking, because people are displaced and loose their jobs. The 2010 earthquake in Haiti reported an increase in trafficking victims in a nation already at high risk.


He who passively accepts

evil is as much involved in it as he who helps to perpetrate it. He who accepts evil without protesting against it is really cooperating with it.

-Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.


Child Soldiery While the majority of child soldiers are approximately 15-18, some are as young as 7 or 8 years old. In addition to being forced to act as a combatant, child soldiers are also required to serve as spies, cooks, and perform sexual acts on older soldiers. Children may even be forced to commit atrocities against their own families. 42 countries are involved in some kind of violent conflict; this encompasses two-thirds of the world’s children. While not all of these countries use child soldiers, two-thirds of the world’s children are at risk of this type of trafficking. This phenomenon is found in every continent, but is most prevalent in Africa and Asia.8


Sex Trafficking & Forced Prostitution Studies show that 70-95% of women in prostitution have been sexually assaulted and/or raped.9 That may seem obvious, but it should be stated that most women in prostitution don’t participate in it willingly. Our culture glamorizes sex, and suggests that loose women are “empowered.” This is a lie. The Journal of Trauma Practice found that 89% in prostitution do not want to be there.10 Legalized prostitution expands the market for criminal sex, creating safe-havens for traffickers. Legalization makes it easier for organized crime to blend in with the “regulated” sector, and makes it more difficult to prosecute criminals.11 According to the Swedish government, “International trafficking in human beings could not flourish but for the existence of local prostitution markets where men are willing and able to buy and sell women and children for sexual exploitation.”12

Sex Trafficking Statistics Sex trafficking has various faces, but it happens in every country around the world, including the United States. • 66% of sex trafficking victims are girls.13 • Sex trafficking is a major cause for the global AIDS epidemic.14 • U. S. citizens account for 25% of child sex tourists worldwide.15 • 100,000-300,000 American children are victimized by sex trafficking every year.16 • Domestic sex trafficking is prevalent among homeless youth engaging in “survival sex.”17 • The average domestic sex trafficking victim is 13 years old. Most are trafficked within 48 hours of running from home.18


Child Sex Tourism Child sex tourism is an industry based around having sex with children. Offenders will travel to other countries for the sole purpose of having sex with children. Most sex tourists are pedophiles, seeking out underage boys and girls. Others may decide to “experiment� with the sex trade. Health concerns and myths about AIDS transmission in children also creates an increased demand for younger victims. It is estimated that victims are required to have sex with as many as 30 men each day.19


What are the causes? The vulnerable are most at risk for trafficking. Vulnerability leads to exploitation. There are as many causes to trafficking as there are forms of trafficking.20 Some causes include: Legalized prostitution Pornography Poverty and unemployment Drug and alcohol abuse Corruption Expansion of organized crime Low status of women and girls in many countries Illiteracy and lack of education Inadequate or non-enforced laws Lack of political will to end the practice Natural disasters War and political unrest

There are three main ways that women and girls are trafficked into the sex industry. • They are sold by a family member. Under extreme poverty, many have no other choice for the survival of their entire family.

• They are tricked.

Traffickers give false hopes of a job in another city, but actually put victims in a brothel.

• They are kidnapped.

Traffickers will steal victims from their homes, and force them to work as a prostitute under threat of violence.


The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing.

- Edmund Burke


Rescue Process Because it is very dangerous, Rapha House does not physically rescue girls out of brothels. Traffickers and pimps want to protect their investments and are known to bribe the local law enforcement. Rapha House works with international law enforcement organizations, highly skilled lawyers, and social workers that professionally gather intelligence and shut down entire exploitation operations at one time. These law enforcement organizations never buy slaves out of prostitution. Instead, they gather intelligence and organize brothel raids and sting operations.21 Rescued victims are then placed in aftercare programs like Rapha House.


For to be free is not merely

to cast off one’s chains, but to live in a way that respects and enhances the freedom of others.

-Nelson Mandella


Rapha House Rapha House exists to love, rescue and heal children who have been rescued out of slavery and sexual exploitation. Operating as a 501(c)3, Rapha House began in 2003 to fight against slavery and sexual exploitation. Rapha House does this by providing safe homes and aftercare programs for young girls who have been rescued out of exploitative situations.

Our First Priority The safety of the girls in our programs is our highest priority. When girls come to Rapha House, they receive the safety of the home, social work services, medical care, three square meals a day, their own bed, education, counseling, and vocational training options.


To get up in the morning and do the monumental tasks that face us, our labor is best fueled by love.

–Cornel West


At Rapha House Services are provided based on the individual needs of each girl. Our social workers conduct family assessments and work holistically with families and communities. We pursue justice for Rapha House girls. We want them to understand that they have value. Where We Are & Who We Are Reaching

Rapha House currently has three homes in Southeast Asia. There are approximately 150 girls in our safe house programs at this time. In addition, we reach hundreds more children each month through prevention programs and social work efforts in at-risk communities. Prevention Programs

Rapha House not only strives to rehabilitate victims of human trafficking, but desires to prevent the social problems that contribute to the epidemic. Halfway Homes & Integration

When girls are old enough and emotionally ready to leave safe homes, they reintegrate into society slowly by moving on to a halfway house where they are taught skills for employment. Integration programs exist to help restore girls and their families to sustainable freedom. Whether a girl needs to stay at Rapha House for several years or a few days, the reintegration programs are in place to ensure that when she goes back out into society she is able to look forward to a healthy future. How is Rapha House different?

Other programs working with victims of sexual exploitation have reported a 80% failure rate. (Success and failure is based on whether or not a victim will return to an exploitative situation.) At Rapha House, our success rate is currently over 95%. We believe that all children are close to the heart of God, and are worthy of honor, protection and freedom. We take a holistic, Christcentered approach to recovery. Girls participate in devotionals and are presented with the Gospel, but are not forced to accept Jesus.


What You Can Do Pray

Rapha House wholly believes that our program is a success because of the prayers of those who hear and respond. Remember — God is on the side of the oppressed. • Pray for the rescue of those still in slavery. • Pray that God will keep Rapha House and the girls safe. • Pray for the girls total healing — body, mind and soul. • Pray that the demand would end. • Pray for justice for every victim. • Pray that as Rapha House grows, we follow God’s leading. • Ask God how you can fight on behalf of the oppressed, and encourage others to do the same. Educate Yourself

In order to fight injustice, you must understand it. Check out our list of resource materials to learn more about human trafficking. With a working knowledge on the subject, you will be equipped to raise awareness and make a tangible difference. Share Your Knowledge

No one can win this fight on their own. Battling injustice is a team effort, and it will require working together to overcome it. Tell others about what you know, and together we can make intentional actions to change the world. Partner With Us

Rapha House is always looking for people to join our cause. Whether you would like to support us financially or raise awareness, we would love for you to partner with us. You can plan an event based on your individual interests. The most successful events have come as a result of people combining their passions to raise awareness. Whether you cook or make movies, anything can be used to help our cause.


Resource Materials Books Kevin Bales David Batstone Melissa Farley Gary Haugen Victor Malarek Benjamin Skinner

Disposable People Understanding Global Slavery Not for Sale Prostitution, Trafficking and Traumatic Stress The Good News About Injustice Just Courage Terrify No More The Natashas: Inside the New Global Sex Trade The Johns: Sex for Sale and the Men Who Buy It A Crime So Monstrous

Online Facts & Figures UNICEF unicef.org/media/media_45451.html United Nations Office of Drugs & Crime unodc.org/unodc/en/human-trafficking/faqs.html United States Immigration & Customs Enforcement ice.gov/human-trafficking United States Department of Health & Human Services acf.hhs.gov/trafficking/about United States Department of State state.gov/g/tip Movies At the End of Slavery attheendofslavery.com Bhat secure.ciy.com/store/pc-118-16-baht-dvd-updated-edition.aspx Call + Response callandresponse.com/trailers.php Sex Slaves pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/slaves


End Notes 1 United Nations. www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?NewsID=22009. 2 U.S. Department of Heath and Human Services. 3 Kevin Bales. Disposable People. 4 United States Census 2010. 2010.census.gov/2010census/data/apportionment-pop-text.php. 5 UNICEF. www.unicef.org/protection/index_exploitation.html. 6 Texas Department of State Health Services. dshs.state.tx.us/chs/popdat/ST2010.shtm. 7 U.S. Department of State. Trafficking in Persons Report. 2004. Washington, D.C. 8 US Dept. of State, August 8, 2005. 9 Concerned Women for America. cwfa.org/images/content/factsheet.pdf. 10 Farley, Melissa et al. 2003. “Prostitution and Trafficking in Nine Countries: An Update on Violence and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder.� Journal of Trauma Practice, Vol. 2, No. 3/4: 33-74 11 US Dept. of State, Bureau of Public Affairs. 12 Swedish Ministry of Industry, Employment, and Communications. 2004. Fact Sheet: Prostitution and Trafficking in Women. http://www.sweden.gov.se/content/1/c6/01/87/74/6bc6c972.pdf. 13 Nazarene Compassionate Ministries. www.ncm.org/awareness/humantrafficking/sextrafficking. 14 Nazarene Compassionate Ministries. www.ncm.org/awareness/humantrafficking/sextrafficking. 15 World Vision. www.worldvision.org/content.nsf/learn/globalissues-stp-faqs. 16 United States Department of Justice. www.justice.gov/criminal/ceos/trafficking.html. 17 Shared Hope International. www.sharedhope.org/Portals/0/Documents. NationalReportFACTSHEET11.18.2010.pdf. 18 WTVC News Channel 9. www.newschannel9.com/articles/sex-1001306-trafficking-human.html. 19 World Vision. www.worldvision.org/content.nsf/learn/globalissues-stp. 20 World Vision. www.worldvision.org/content.nsf/learn/globalissues-child-trafficking. 21 International Justice Mission. www.ijm.org.


For more information on Rapha House, visit raphahouse.org facebook.com/RaphaHouse twitter: @raphahouse



Understanding Exploitation