Page 33

Classic Elite, I got a phone call from a man in Texas who raised mohair goats. He asked me if I’d be interested in buying his fiber and having it spun in a mill in Biddeford, Maine. That was the first time I’d heard that there was a mill spinning YARN right down the street. I called the owner and we became friends and then, after a few crazy conversations, we decided to start a yarn business. I can’t tell you how exciting it was for me to imagine making a yarn in an old mill right down the road. That mill still spins most of our yarns. But we now spin in three other mills, as well. For me it’s nothing less than tragic that we’ve almost entirely lost our textile industry. At one time, we spun yarn and wove fabrics in buildings that stretched, literally, for miles along New England rivers. All that is gone now. What excites me most about Quince is not just that we sell yarn, but that we MAKE yarn using US manufacturers. It isn’t easy. It’s not cheap. But that’s what keeps me inspired. In the world we live in, sourcing and manufacturing in your own country is becoming harder and harder... I can relate to that. What was it like at the beginning stage? Also, any other challenges?

I was very lucky to have a yarn spinner willing to work with me. I knew I wanted to make wool yarn and wanted to source the wool from US sheep. We started with four yarns. I didn’t want to make a singleply and combine strands to make different weights. I wanted each yarn to have a distinct personality. So we began with these: Chickadee, a bouncy three-ply yarn (sport weight) spun from a soft fiber, Lark, a fourply (plies are finer than those in Chickadee, so it’s more "refined"), Osprey, spun from very fine fiber, a three-ply Aran-weight in which the plies have a relaxed twist so the yarn is soft and squishy, and Puffin, a singleply chunky.

がっているように見えますね。さて、Quince & Co。なぜ糸メーカーを始めようと決心した のですか?

Quince & Co. は思いがけない偶然が重なって 生まれたの。Classic Elite で働いているある とき、テキサスでモヘアゴートを飼育してい るという男性から電話が掛かってきたの。彼 からモヘアを買ってメイン州のビッドフォー ドの紡糸工場で糸にしないか、という提案 だったわ。そのとき初めて、家の近所に毛糸 を作れる場所があることに気づいたの。すぐ にその紡糸工場のオーナーに電話をして親し くなり、何度か好き勝手な会話をしているう ちに、一緒に糸を作ろうというはなしになっ たの。自宅の近所の歴史ある紡糸工場で毛糸 が作れると想像するだけで、どんなにわくわ くしたことでしょう!私たちの製品の大半は その工場で作られているの。今では他の工場 とも契約しているけど。 我が国のテキスタイル業がほぼ完全に失われ てしまったなんて、悲劇としか言いようがな いわ。ある時代には、紡糸・紡績施設がニュー イングランドの河川沿いに、文字通り何マイ ルも続いていたものなのよ。もう何も残って ないわ。何より感激なのは、糸を売ることよ りも、Quince はアメリカの製造メーカーと 一緒に糸を作っているということよ。簡単で はないわ。安くもない。でもそれが私の原動 力なの。

現代の世の中において、自国で原料調達から 製造まで行うのはどんどん難しくなっていま すよね。私もその問題意識を持っています。 事業を始めたころ、どんな様子でしたか?苦 労はありましたか?

私と仕事をしたいという紡糸工場があって本 当にラッキーでした。最初から考えていたの は、ウール糸を作りたいということと、国産 の羊の毛を使いたいということ。まずは 4 種 類の糸から始めました。シングルプライを 1 種類作り、それを何本か縒り合わせることに よって毛糸の太さを変えることは可能だけれ ど、それはやりたくなかったの。それぞれの 糸にはっきりとした特徴を持たせたかった。 Chickadee( 柔らかい毛で作った弾力のある 3ply で、太さはスポーツ )、Lark (Chickadee よりも細い糸を縒り合わせた 4ply)、Osprey

33

amirisu F/W 2014  

amirisu - a bilingual online knitting magazine from Japan. This issue features Pam Allen, the owner of Quince & Co.

amirisu F/W 2014  

amirisu - a bilingual online knitting magazine from Japan. This issue features Pam Allen, the owner of Quince & Co.