Page 1

7th Annual Lou Dantzler Legacy Program African-American Male Teen Summit U.S. Coast Guard Academy New London, Connecticut June 20 - 23, 2013


The Society of African-American Professionals sincerely thanks our generous sponsors of ...

7th Annual Lou Dantzler Legacy Program African-American Male Teen Summit U.S. Coast Guard Academy New London, Connecticut June 20 - 23, 2013

2 Society of African-American Professionals

Boys & Girls Clubs of America


Welcome! June 2013

Dear Summit Participants and Guests: The Society of American American Professionals (SOAAP) would like to welcome you to the 7th Annual African American Male Teen Summit (AAMTS) The Summit is a component of the Lou Dantzler Legacy Program and is dedicated to Lou Dantzler, our former colleague, friend and mentor, for his steadfast commitment to the ideals of SOAAP and the resulting impact on the children and youth served through the Boys & Girls Club Movement. His memory continues to live on through the hundreds of young men that have experienced the summit over the last several years as well as the countless number of Boys & Girls Clubs professionals whom lives he has impacted. Referred to by many as America’s most pressing challenge, the condition of our African American male youth cannot continue to deteriorate. Since 2007 the summit has been held on a college or university campus with the clear understanding that our young men are an asset to our communities not a liability. Initially lead by four Midwest Boys & Girls Clubs hosting the program, this year we are going beyond our walls and working with other community groups that have partnered with their respective Boys & Girls Clubs to expand our reach and impact more young men.

Lincoln D. Ellis Society of African-American Professionals

“You can dream and accomplish what you put your mind to and work toward ... and there are people around you who believe in you, too, and want to help!

We have recently added the James Cox Scholarship Program that will provide financial assistance to some of our young men that go on to attend college. James Cox, a Boys & Girls Club professional who dedicated his life to positively impact the lives of America youth, was an originator and facilitated the development of the Summit. Over the years of the Summit we have had the opportunity to hear from many of you, young male participants, and with your input we have been able to better serve our African American young men, including enhancing the skills and abilities of our youth development professionals as it relates to your identified needs and preferences. We welcome you to this year summit. To our staff, presenters, guests, and observers we appreciate you taking the time out of your schedules to join us. Your presence sends a strong message to our participants that you care and are willing to invest time, talent, and yes even treasure to assist them in preparing for their journey. Special appreciation to those organizations that have worked over the past several months in preparing for the summit. The summit is the product of your hard work and efforts. Finally I would like to express my appreciation to the United States Coast Guard Academy in serving as host for this year Summit and the tremendous support that has been provided. We truly can change lives based upon our willingness to invest in our young men. Each of you can make a difference is someone’s life, it all starts with you. Most sincerely,

Lincoln D. Ellis

Dean, Society of African American Professionals

African-American Male Teen Summit Handbook 3


4 Society of African-American Professionals

Boys & Girls Clubs of America


Summit Norms

African-American Male Teen Summit

The Purpose of Norms We want to establish the basic values of how we want to be together and work with each other as part of the Summit. We also want to help each other stay accountable to these values to make sure the Summit experience is safe and supportive for all involved. Further, we want to ensure input from all participants, not just those who are most vocal or the most experienced leaders. Norms will be introduced at the beginning of the Summit and participants are asked to agree to these for the purpose of a successful Summit. Norms are posted in breakout and session rooms as a present and a constant reminder

Be a Warrior!

Speak Your Truth

Step Up/Step Back

This norm is about knowing your experiences, your ideas, your input matter and you need to speak it. Additionally, this norm is to acknowledge this is YOUR truth and not necessarily THE truth, or even representative of others who may have had very different experiences.

We all need to know when it is time to step up and when it is time to step back. This is about self monitoring. If you’ve been talking frequently and others have not, it’s is time to step back. If you have not been talking, it may be time to step up. Be aware of yourself and your involvement for the greater purpose of the Summit.

Listen for Understanding This norm builds on the previous one to emphasize the need for all of us to listen for the purpose of understanding the experiences and perspectives of others, not for the purpose of responding to them or even creating our own argument against them. We want the day to be about understanding a variety of experiences, not just those of the loudest or most articulate people.

Take Care of Your Needs Do what you need to do in terms of your health, emotional or biological needs as necessary for you to maintain the rest of the norms. Restroom breaks, a drink of water, standing and stretching are all a part of taking care of your needs and should be done in a way that supports the rest of the norms rather than disrupts them.

Respect Each Other

Give Gentle Reminders

Again, building on the previous norm, the Summit has to be about respecting differences and respecting the perspectives ,as well as needs of each other.

We are all working together for this Summit. If we see another person not living up to the norms, it is our duty to offer them a gentle reminder. This means doing so privately or quietly and in a respectful tone so as not to embarrass or put someone on the defensive.

Be Present If the Summit is going to be a success, every participant must be present in mind, body and spirit. If we are going through the motions or thinking about being somewhere else, we are undermining the purpose of the day.

African-American Male Teen Summit Handbook 5


Code of the Warrior

Every warrior should read, study and live by this code.

1. The warrior must at all times be ready for combat and must always be of right mind. The warrior, therefore, is forbidden to taste any alcoholic drink or use a drug substance. The warrior’s mind must always be free and ready for immediate action. 2. The warrior must abstain from sex. The two strongest drives in human beings are the hunger drive and the sex drive. Both are directly linked to human survival. Those who don’t eat will die and those who don’t procreate cease to exist. The warrior must exercise the highest order of his human spirit by mastering the drive for they are physical, mental and spiritual distractions. Many warriors have died because of their inability to master the sex drive. The warrior must remain pure and in full strength, in total commitment to his duties. The mission of the warrior is too great to be stymied by the consequences of sex (emotional ties, disease, babies, etc.) 3. The warrior must never use derogatory or provocative language. The warrior never speaks aimlessly or carelessly. The warrior speaks with words of comfort, not words of destructions or vulgarity. The warrior exercises his vocabulary to rightly communicate ideas, thoughts and opinions. “From the fruit of his lips a man enjoys good things, but the unfaithful have a craving for violence. He who guards his lips guards his life. But he who speaks rashly will come to ruin.” 4. The warrior must never be lazy or lounging. The warrior should never be preoccupied with video games, television, radio or other distracting behaviors. These are states of sleep and sleep is the cousin of death. The warrior should be reading, exercising, practicing or otherwise working towards his mission. The warrior should always carry himself in a manner that exemplifies a true, serious, committed and strong

6 Society of African-American Professionals

warrior. If the warrior is asleep, the enemy will creep into the village unseen and destroy it unexpectedly. 5. The warrior must walk righteously. The warrior must not be engaged in illegal or unrighteous affairs. No gambling, cursing, cheating, stealing, murder, fornication, gossip, hatred, revenge, lying or any other action that would discredit the warrior’s mission. “The man of integrity walks securely but he who takes crooked paths will be found out.” What you reap, that also will you sow. The righteousness of the blameless makes a straightway for them but the wicked are brought down by their won wickedness.” 6. The warrior must uphold truth and justice. The warrior brings light to darkness and exposes all that seeks to be hidden. The warrior rids the land of deceit and bondage with his weapon of truth may hurt, but the truth sets free. Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. 7. The warrior maximizes his education. The warrior achieves the highest scores in his academic courses. The warrior achieves the highest scores because he seeks not a grade or score, but the mastery of the subject. The warrior is present and prepared for every lesson and test. The warrior knows education is the passport for the future. Tomorrow belongs to those who prepare for it today. 8. The warrior’s education is not restricted to school. The warrior supplements his education by reading outside of school, visiting libraries, museums, historic sites, films, volunteering, study groups, etc. The first and best line of a good self defense is a good mind. The warrior always looks to sharpen his greatest weapon, his mind.

Boys & Girls Clubs of America


9. The warrior must always be disciplined. The warrior is neat, organized, responsible and orderly in all things. Failure to plan is a plan to fail. The warrior must always be in order.

15. The warrior is intimate with God. The warrior is consistently pursuing God and constantly striving to live according to God’s laws. The beginning of knowledge is the fear of God.

10. The warrior must always be open to be disciplined. The warrior is not unwilling to learn or unwilling to be corrected. The warrior is firm and consistent in all areas of life. Others are like trees that sway whichever way the wind blows. “Whoever loves discipline, loves knowledge. And he who hates corrections is stupid.”

16. The warrior must be generous. The warrior is a servant and does whatever is necessary to be of service. A generous man will prosper. He who refreshes others will himself be refreshed.

11. The warrior is careful in the selection of his friends. The warrior understands the basic law of life that friends either do what the other does or they do without each other. The warrior understands that those who play in mud will get dirty, those who walk in rain will get wet and those who run with dogs will catch fleas. “A righteous man is careful in friendship, but the way of the wicked leads them astray.” “He who ignores discipline comes to poverty and shame, but whoever heeds correction is honored.”

17. The warrior is courageous, confident and strong. The warrior masters all fears, even the fear of death. The only fear the warrior possesses is the fear of God. Without fear, every move of the warrior is made in confidence and strength. The warrior knows there is no such thing as defeat. No challenge is too great, no task too large and no obstacle insurmountable. The warrior always finds a way to be victorious. 18. The warrior maintains his physical, mental and spiritual self through proper nourishment and exercise. The warrior must eat right and exercise regularly so the body is the slave of the spirit.

12. The warrior is humble. Pride and ego must not be rulers of the warrior’s actions or motives. The warrior is always preoccupied with the WE, not the I. The warrior is a servant and should never seek to forsake his position as a servant. “When pride comes then comes disgrace, but with humility comes wisdom.”

19. The warrior must be visionary. The warrior must envision prosperity that does not yet exist and work to actualize what he conceptualizes. With an accurate understanding of history and culture, the warrior crates a vision to make the community better. A people without a vision perish.

13. The warrior is a great manager of money but is not the slave of money. The warrior may use money to take care of his warrior responsibilities but the warrior is never chasing the dollar. The warrior controls money, money does not control the warrior. “Wealth is worthless in the day of wrath, but righteousness delivers from death.” “Whoever trust in high riches will fall, but righteous will thrive like a green leaf.”

20. The warrior is a thinker. 21. The warrior is a producer.

14. The warrior must surround himself with good counsel. At all times the warrior should have leaders who can provide sound advice. The warrior should seek advice before making any major moves. Guidance is necessary for all warriors. “For lack of guidance nations fall, but many advisors make victory sure.” Proverbs

African-American Male Teen Summit Handbook 7


Opening Ceremony Processional Order of Ceremony

Calling of the Drums Elders Take Positions Initiates enter, forming a 360 degree circle Adults take their places, forming an outer circle that surrounds the Initiates Presiding elder comes forth to begin libations. Libations conclusion

African-American Male Teen Summit

opening ceremony in detail Processional: Music can be sacred or secular with significant and appropriate inspirational content. Drums should be playing to call the Initiates. Once the ceremony begins, the audience must come to complete silence. This silence should be maintained with vigilance until the appropriate moments for expression. This ceremony is the gateway of the Initiate at the SOAAP African American Male Teen Summit. At the opening of the Summit, Initiates should be encouraged to have an open mind and a willingness to learn. To go back to their communities and become fodders; youth that will help their neighborhood, their people and families and not hurt them. Those who are ready to begin their passage into young lion hood will be presented to the Elders. However, some are not ready to go on and those who are not should not move on. Initiates: The Initiates should be present at the ceremony in traditional African clothing. They should all be seated together. All Initiates participating in the ceremony must have a quote/affirmation/or famous saying by which they will live their lives. It should be committed to memory. Leaders: The Leaders should be present at the ceremony in traditional African clothing. They should all be seated/standing in a complete circle around the Initiates, which means completeness, 360 degree, as centre. Elders: The Elders should be present at the ceremony in traditional African clothing. They should be seated/standing among the Leaders in a circle representing the four directions to bring the NEWS

8 Society of African-American Professionals

Boys & Girls Clubs of America


(North, East, West & South); also, their positions symbolize (Spring-Youth, Summer-Young Adult, FallAdult and Winter-Elder). The word Elder also means Wisdom. A large plant should be present; two vases of water will be needed.

Order of Ceremony The Ceremony begins by the calling of the drums. The Elders will take their position to cover the four directions. The Initiates will follow the sound of the drums and be ushered by African female dancers into the room to take their seat or form a 360 degree circle. The Adults will take their places form an outer circle that surrounds the Initiates. The Presiding Elder comes forth to begin libations.

Libations Presiding Elders: We pour this water into the dirt symbolizing that from which our bodies have been created and that to which our bodies will one day return. The water represents the faith and many lessons taught, the plant represents the youth that will grow and the soil represents family, people and community support. We pour for all those who have been mentioned. If they lived a righteous life, may their spirits and their examples guide us to live the same. If they died non-righteous lives, may their mistakes serve as lessons for all of us. May their lives teach us to be responsible for how we live. We thank the Creator for their presence in our lives and we promise them to live our lives righteously, showing them we have learned from and respect them. May God bless them. Leaders: We love, admire and respect all those who have made our existence today possible. We are thankful to those who gave their lives, their resources, their families, their people, their communities, their luxuries, their blood, their sweat, their thoughts and their commitments to the struggles of our people. We need

their courage, their love, their positive thinking and their commitment so we might continue the struggle with and for them. We will not dishonor them by not doing our part in the struggle of our people. We will fight. And all that agree say, Ache (people repeat), Ache (people repeat), Ache (people repeat).” This means you agree. The Presiding Elder will begin by pouring water into the dirt and saying a prayer that honors the Creator or God. All participates call upon their God. The Presiding Elder will pour water into the dirt and summon the Ancestors of all those present. All participates say the names of their Ancestors. The Presiding Elder will pour water into the dirt and call upon the Elders of those present. All participates say the names of their Elders. The Presiding Elder will pour water into the dirt and call upon their Parents of those present. All participates say the names of their Parents. The Presiding Elder will pour water into the dirt and call upon all men present (mentors, adults, teachers, etc.) All participates will call their names. The Presiding Elder will pour water into the dirt and call upon the Initiates peers; those who should be here with them. All participates will call their names. The Presiding Elder will pour water into the dirt and call upon the Initiates of those present. All participates say the names of their Elders. The Presiding Elder will say to the Initiates, “What say you?” All the Initiates say the word LITANY! Aloud! At the conclusion of the libations the Chief Warriors will come forth and ask, “May the Summit begin?” Chief Warriors: We love, admire and respect all those who have made our existence today possible. We are thankful to those who gave their lives, their love, their resources, their families, their luxuries, their blood, their sweat, their thoughts and their commitments to the struggle of our people. Ache; it is with this in mind we appear before you humbly asking your permission and receive blessing from you the Elders, our Ancestors and

African-American Male Teen Summit Handbook 9


the Creator to begin with the 7th Annual SOAAP African American Male Teen Summit. Presiding Elder: “You cannot embark on this journey alone; there is much work to be done. Who will help you with this Summit?” Chief Warriors will present to the Elders the young lions. Chief Warriors: We are the mature warriors/builders of the Afrikan family. We take the risks those older than we and those younger than we should not take. We use our energy and resources to build and produce for the Nation. We educate ourselves and our children to take power and to control the resources of our people. We study and teach what we learn. We listen to MBUTA and BAKULUNTU. We are spiritually healthy and have an Afrikan concept of Divinity. We now present before you the young lions our future warriors. The young lions will come forth. As they come forth the Elders ask:

Young Lions: We are beginning to learn the skills and acquire the tools we need in order to become warriors for our people. We are learning as we play. We are learning how to think as Afrikans. We are learning Afrikan languages. We are learning Martial Arts. We are learning science. We are learning math. We are learning music. We are learning dance. We are learning to live and do Maat. We respect our parents and their parents and their parent’s parents. We know their stories and their best work. We love, honor and respect Afrikan people. We learn about our Afikan Spirit and know we are Divine. We come before you seeking your permission to service as peer leaders of the SOAAP African American Male Teen Summit. Presiding Elder: This is acceptable. Now you have the young lions to assist you with the Summit; guide them, show them, teach them the ways of the warriors. “May the 7th Annual SOAAP African American Male Teen Summit begin with the blessings of our Creator, Ancestors and Elders.” Let the harvesting begin! Drums continue to playing in the form of celebration.

Presiding Elder: Where are these young lions? This concludes the opening ceremony. Young Lions: Elders we are here! Presiding Elder: What say you?

10 Society of African-American Professionals

Boys & Girls Clubs of America


Closing Ceremony The Ten Steps Rites of Passage

Processional Calling of the Drums Elders Take Positions Initiates enter, forming a 360 degree circle Adults take their places, forming an outer circle that surrounds the Initiates Presiding elder comes forth to begin libations. Libations Conclusion

African-American Male Teen Summit

closing ceremony in detail Processional: Music can be sacred or secular with significant and appropriate inspirational content. Drums should be playing to call the Initiates. Once the ceremony begins the audience must come to complete silence. This silence should be maintained with vigilance until the appropriate moments for expression. This ceremony is the culmination of the Initiate at the SOAAP African American Male Teen Summit. At the completion of the Summit, Initiates should be encouraged to continue what they have learned. To go back to their communities and become fodders; youth that will help their neighborhood, their people and families and not hurt them. Those who are ready to continue their passage to adult-hood can take part in the ceremony. However, some are not ready to go on, and those who are not should not move on. Initiates: The Initiates should be present at the ceremony in traditional African clothing. They should all be seated together. All Initiates participating in the ceremony must have a quote/affirmation/or famous saying by which they will live their lives. It should be committed to memory. Leaders: The Leaders should be present at the ceremony in traditional African clothing. They should all be seated/standing in a complete circle around the Initiates, which means completeness, 360 degree, as centre. Elders: The Elders should be present at the ceremony in traditional African clothing. They should be seated/standing among the Leaders in a circle, representing the four directions (North, East, West & South); also, their positions symbolize (Spring-Youth,

African-American Male Teen Summit Handbook 11


Summer-Young Adult, Fall-Adult and Winter-Elder). The word Elder also means Wisdom. A large plant should be present; two vases of water will be needed.

Order of Ceremony

repeat), Ache (people repeat).” This means you agree. The presiding Elder will begin by pouring water into the dirt and saying a prayer that honors the Creator or God. The presiding Elder will pour water into the dirt and summon the Ancestors of all those present. All participates say the names of their Ancestors.

The Ceremony begins by the calling of the drums. The Initiates will follow the sound of the drums and be ushered into the room to take their seats or form a 360 degree circle. The Adults will take their places form an outer circle that surrounds the Initiates. The Elders will take their position to cover the four directions.

The presiding Elder will pour water into the dirt and call upon the Elders of those present. All participates say the names of their Elders. The presiding Elder will pour water into the dirt and call upon their Parents of those present. All participates say the names of their Parents. The presiding Elder will pour water into the dirt and call upon all men present (mentors, adults, teachers, etc.) All participates will call their names.

The Presiding Elder comes forth to begin libations

Libations

Presiding Elders: We pour this water into the dirt symbolizing that from which our bodies have been created and that to which our bodies will one day return. The water represents the faith and many lessons taught, the plant represents the youth that will grow and the soil represents family, people and community support. We pour for all those who have been mentioned. If they lived a righteous life may their spirits and their examples guide us to live the same. If they died non-righteous lives, may their mistakes serve as lessons for all of us. May their lives teach us to be responsible for how we live. We thank the Creator for their presence in our lives and we promise them to live our lives righteously, showing them we have learned from and respect them. May God bless them. Leaders: We love, admire and respect all those who have made our existence today possible. We are thankful to those who gave their lives, their resources, their families, their people, their communities, their luxuries, their blood, their sweat, their thoughts and their commitments to the struggles of our people. We need their courage their love, their positive thinking and their commitments so we might continue the struggle with and for them. We will not dishonor them by not doing our part in the struggle of our people. We will fight. And all that agree say, “Ache (people repeat), Ache (people

12 Society of African-American Professionals

The presiding Elder will pour water into the dirt and call upon the Initiates peers; those who should be here with them. All participates will call their names. The presiding Elder will pour water into the dirt and call upon the Initiates of those present. All participates say the names of their Elders. The presiding Elder will say to the Initiates, “What say you?” All the Initiates say the word LITANY! Aloud! Presiding Elder: Say to the Elders, “What say you to the voice of our Ancestor?” (One Elder selected by group or all speak together) Elders recite pledge “Black Family Reunion Pledge” Because we have forgotten our ancestors, our children no longer give us honor. Because we have lost the path our ancestors cleared kneeling in perilous undergrowth, our children cannot find their way. Because we have banished the God of our ancestor, our children cannot pray. Because the old wails of our ancestors have faded beyond our hearing, our children cannot hear us crying. Because we have abandoned our wisdom of mothering and fathering, our befuddled

Boys & Girls Clubs of America


children give birth to children they neither want nor understand. Because we have forgotten how to love, the adversary is within our gates and holds us up to the mirror of the world shouting, “Regard the loveless.” Therefore, we pledge to bind ourselves to one another, to embrace our lowliest, to keep company with our loneliest, to educate our illiterate, to feed our starving, to clothe our ragged, to do all good things, knowing that we are more than keepers of our brothers and sisters. We are our brothers and sisters. In honor of those who toiled and implored God with golden tongues, and in gratitude to the same God who brought us out of hopeless desolation. We make this pledge. Presiding Elder: Say to the Leaders, “What say you?” (One Leader selected by group or all speak together) We are the warriors of the village. The warriors of your families. We are the warriors of the Creators. We seek to be about our Elders business. We seek to guide the Initiates who come after us to the mantle of MANHOOD. We seek to be made part of the master’s grip to restore our people prominence.” Presiding Elder: “What say you to the Initiates?” The Initiates should respond to the Leaders. (One Leader selected by group or all speak together) Leader: You have been called out of childhood into adulthood. You are ready to begin your path of growing and understanding. Do you understand that adulthood is a life-long journey? You have an obligation to always seek to do more and to improve your station in life. Are you ready to be called? Initiates: Yes, I am. I accept my call to adulthood. The person I was, I will be no more. I will forever seek to better my life, to live to the full expectation of my ancestors. To do those things that will bring me a happy and fruitful life and to never participate in those activities that will bring danger or bad things into my life. Leader: You are not like everyone else. You are different. All are called to be adults but very few accept the challenge. It is not easy. Life is hard. Some of your friends will not like you anymore. You might be an outcast, you might be looked down upon and you may not be a part of the in crowd.

Initiates: I accept that the path I have chosen for my life is a righteous one and most people flee from righteousness. I am not a player. I am not a thug. I am not a weed smoker. I am not a drug or alcohol user. I am not a failure. I am a new creature. I am a King and I will live as such. All those who come in contact with me will know I am a King. Leader: You are moving into the first stage of adulthood. For the man it is to become a warrior. The warrior is a servant to the needs of his family, community, people and the world. You must live to always to be ready to help, pretest and uplift your family, community, people and the world no matter what. Even when you feel let down by your family, community, people and the world you must be strong and continue to do what you know is best for the group. In other words, the “I” means nothing and the “WE” means everything. Initiates: We are, therefore I am. I hold my family, my community and my people as a high value in my mind, heart and soul. I will help to strengthen them by my word, my actions and my thoughts. I understand that everything I do affects my family, community and people, therefore, I will always be sure to do my very best in all I do such that they may benefit from me and not suffer because of me. Leader: You are ready to start you journey. Be strong. Be courageous. Be good spirited. Be understanding. Be loving. Be compassionate. Be hard working. Be committed. Be who God has created you to be. Initiates: I will be strong. I will be courageous. I will be good spirited. I will be understanding. I will be loving. I will be compassionate. I will be hard working. I will be committed. I will be who God has created me to be. The Presiding Elder will say to the Initiates, “What say you?” All the Initiates say the word LITANY! Aloud! And all that agree say, “Ache.” Drums continue to playing in the form of celebration. This concludes the ceremony.

African-American Male Teen Summit Handbook 13


7th Annual Lou Dantzler Legacy Program African-American Male Teen Summit

SUMMIT AGENDA The Power of Knowledge “Building a Healthier Brotherhood”


African American  Male  Teen  Summit  

Planning Sheet  

U.S. Coast  Guard  Academy  

Thursday, June  June 20,  2013  20, 2013 Thursday, Time   1:00  pm  –  2:15  pm  

Activity Registration/Orientation  

2:30 P.M.  –  3:30  pm  

Campus Tour  

3:45 pm  –  4:00  pm   4:00  pm-­‐  4:30  pm   5:30  pm  –  6:45  pm  

Roll Call  /      USCGA  Welcome   Rear  Admiral  Sandra  Stosz   Dinner  

7:00 pm  –  7:45  pm  

Opening Ceremony  

8:00 pm  –  8:30  pm   8:30  pm  –  9:00  pm  

Jim Cox  &  Lou  Dantzler  Tribute   Group  Meetings:  Our  Mission  

9:00 pm  –  11:00  pm  

Recreation (Bowling,  Basketball,   swimming  etc.)   Return  to  Dorm/Lights  Out  

11:00 pm  –  12:00  pm  

Location Leamy  Hall   Lower  Level   Chase  Hall     Dimick  Hall     Chase  Hall   Ward  Room   Leamy  Hall   Ballroom   Dimick  Hall   Dimick  Hall         Chase  Hall  

Team Leader(s)   Larry  Lewis   Dan  Pinch   Larry  Lewis   Dan  Pinch   Larry  Lewis   Lincoln  Ellis    Larry  Lewis   Dan  Pinch     Larry   Lewis/Adrian   Thomas  

Friday,  June  21,  2013   Friday, June 21, 2013 Time   6:30  am  –  7:00  am  

Activity Morning  Workout/Roll  Call  

7:00 am  –  8:30  am  

Breakfast

9:00 am  –  10:20  am  

Keynote Speaker:       Jim  Clark  CEO  BGCA    Team  Break  Out  Sessions       Northwest  Indiana     Kansas  City  &  Champaign  

10:30 am  –  11:00  am  

EOC &  Hartford  

11:00 am    –  11:15  am   Morning  Break  

Location Chase  Hall   Parade  Field   Chase  Hall   Ward  Room   Dimick  Hall       Dimick  Hall   Smith  Hall     Room  117     Smith  Hall   Room  119        

Team Leader(s)   Laraj  Thomas   Dan  Pinch/Robert   Howard   Larry  Lewis/Mark   Bryant     Orlando  Drummond   Darryl  Anderson   Larry  Lewis/Bennie   Drake   Antonio  Gholston/  Joe   Bumpers   Larry  Lewis    

African-American Male Teen Summit Handbook 15


African American  Male  Teen  Summit  

Friday, June 21, 2013 11:15 am  –  12:00  pm  

Planning Sheet  

Break Out  Sessions       Social  Media   CUBS     How  money  works   YOUNG  LIONS   Conflict  Resolution   LIONS  

12:00 pm  –  1:10  pm  

Lunch Break  

1:25  pm  –  2:15  pm  

Break  Out  Sessions       Social  Media   LIONS     How  money  works   CUBS   Conflict  Resolution   YOUNG  LIONS  

2:15 pm  –  2:30  pm   2:30  pm  –  3:20  pm  

3:25 pm  –  4:20pm   4:30pm-­‐5:00pm       6:30  pm  –  7:15  pm    

Afternoon Break   Break  Out  Sessions       Social  Media   YOUNG  LIONS     How  money  works   LIONS   Conflict  Resolution   CUBS   Health  &  Wellness   General  Session   Tony  Hawes    Commander       Networking  Session    

U.S. Coast  Guard  Academy  

continued from previous page Dimick  Hall  

AdrianThomas/Antonio   Gholston  

Smith Hall   Room  117     Smith  Hall   Room  119  

Robert Howard  

Chase Hall   Ward  Room       Dimick  Hall  

Smith Hall   Room  117   Smith  Hall   Room  119       Dimick  Hall  

Smith Hall   Room  117   Smith  Hall   Room  119   Dimick  Hall  

Yeaton Hall       Yeaton  Hall       7:15  pm  –  8:45  pm   Formal  Dinner   Yeaton  Hall   Keynote:    Captain  Rob  Smith     Officers  Club   African  American  Male  Teen  Summit   Planning  Sheet     8:45  pm  –  9:15  pm   Break   Chase  Hall   9:15  pm  –  11:00  pm   Recreation:  Movie>  Amistad       11:00  pm-­‐12:00am   Lights  Out   Chase  Hall           Saturday,  June  22,  2013  

16 Society of African-American Professionals Time 6:30  am  –  7:00  am  

Activity Morning  Workout/Roll  Call  

Joe Bumpers/Rob   Clay/Orlando   Drummond             Adrian   Thomas/Antonio   Gholston   Robert    Howard   Joe  Bumpers/Rob   Clay/Orlando   Drummond         Adrian   Thomas/Antonio   Gholston   Bob  Howard   Joe  Bumpers/Orlando   Drummond   Michael  Williams/Larry   Lewis   Adrian  Thomas   Dan  Pinch  

Dan Pinch   U.S.  Coast  Guard  Academy     Dan  Pinch      

Boys & Girls Clubs of America Location   Chase  Hall  

Team Leader(s)   Laraj  Thomas  


9:15 pm  –  11:00  pm   Recreation:  Movie>  Amistad   11:00  pm-­‐12:00am   Lights  Out   11:00   p m-­‐12:00am   Lights   Out           African   American  Male  Teen  Summit   Planning  Sheet     Saturday,  June  22,  2013   Saturday, June 22, 2013 Saturday,  June  22,  2013   8:45  am  –Time    9:45  am   Post  Test   Activity   Activity  Call   6:30  am  –Time    7:00  am   Morning  Workout/Roll   10:00   a m   –   1 2:00   p m   Closing   C eremony   6:30  am  –  7:00  am   Morning  Workout/Roll  Call   7:00  am  –  8:30  am   Breakfast   12:00   pm   1:00   pm   Lunch   Break   7:00  am   –  –8  :30   am   Breakfast   9:00  am  –  10:30  am   1:00   m  ––    130:30   :00  pam   9:00  apm   m   10:30  am  –  10:45  am     am    ––  1 10:30   10:45    10:45   1:30  aam   m   10:45  am    –  11:30  am  

11:45 am  –  12:30  pm   11:45  am  –  12:30  pm   12:30  pm  –  1:00  pm   12:30   m   1:00   m   1:00  pp m   –  –5  :00   pp m   1:00  pm  –  5:00  pm  

 Chase  Hall   Chase   Hall      

Key Note  Speaker   Check   O &  Departure   Key   Note   Speaker   Calvin   Mut   ackey   Calvin   Mackey   Morning   Break     Morning   Break  &    AAMTS  Alumni  Panel   College  Youth   College   Youth   &  AAMTS  CAity   lumni  Panel   Cameron   Jones/Kansas   Cameron   Jones/Kansas   City   QueJuan  M iller/Milwaukee   QueJuan   Miller/Milwaukee   USCGA  Cadet   USCGA   Cadet      Box  Lunches:  TBD   Box  Lunches:  TBD   Travel  Preparation   Travel   Preparation   Field  Trip   /  Battle    Chapel  @  Yale   Field  Trip  /    BLattle    Charf@   hapel  @  Yale   University,   ong  W New   University,   Wharf@   New   Heaven  CT.      LFong   reedom   Schooner@   Heaven   CT.    Freedom  Schooner@   Long  Island   Long  Island   during  field  trip   Presentation   Presentation  during  field  trip   Dinner   Dinner   Recreation   Recreation   Lights  Out   Lights  Out  

30 minutes  History  of   30   minutes  History  of   USCGA   USCGA   6:00  pm  –  7:00  pm   6:00   pp m   7:30  pm  –  7 1:00   1:30   m   7:30  pm  –  11:30  pm   11:30  pm  –  12:00  am   11:30   pm  –  12:00  am       Sunday,  June  23,  2013   Sunday,  June  June 23,  2013   Sunday, 23, 2013 Time   Activity   6:30  am  –Time    7:00  am   Wake  Up/Clean  Activity   Up/Pack  Up   6:30  am  –  7:00  am   Wake  Up/Clean  Up/Pack  Up   7:00   am  A–merican    8:30  am  Male  Teen   Breakfast   African   Summit   Planning  Sheet   7:00  am  –  8:30  am   Breakfast   8:45  am  –  9:45  am  

Post Test  

10:00 am  –  12:00  pm  

Closing Ceremony  

12:00 pm  –  1:00  pm  

Lunch Break  

1:00 pm  –  3:00  pm  

Check Out  &  Departure  

Dan Pinch         U.S.  Coast  Guard  Academy  

Waesche Hall   Location   rd 3   F loor   Location   Chase   Hall   Leamy   all   Chase   Parade  HHFall   ield   Ballroom   Parade   ield   Chase  HFall   Chase   H all   Chase   H all   Ward  Room   Ward   R oom   Ward   RH oom   Dimick   all   Chase   H all   Dimick   H all        

Carter avage   Team  LSeader(s)   Team  TLhomas   eader(s)   Laraj   Lincoln   Ellis   Laraj  Thomas   Dan  Pinch    Dan     Pinch   Larry  Lewis   Larry   Larry  LLewis   ewis      Adrian  Thomas   Adrian  Thomas  

     Chase  Hall   Chase   Hall      

Dan Pinch   Dan  Pinch        Larry     Lewis   Larry  Lewis  

       TBD   TBD   Chase  Hall   Chase  Hall  

Dan Pinch   Dan  Pinch            

Dimick  Hall   Dimick  Hall  

Location Team  Leader(s)   Location   Team  LLewis/   eader(s)   Chase   Hall   Larry   Chase   H all   Larry   L ewis/     Adrian  Thomas    Chase  Hall  U.S.  Coast  GAdrian   homas     uard  ATcademy   Chase   all     Ward  RHoom   Ward  Room   Waesche  Hall   Carter  Savage   3rd  Floor   Leamy  Hall   Lincoln  Ellis   Ballroom   Chase  Hall       Ward  Room     Lewis   Chase  Hall   Larry      

African-American Male Teen Summit Handbook 17


18 Society of African-American Professionals

• Clinic

16. MAIN GATE 17. McALLISTER HALL 18. MICHEL HALL

• Bowling Alley • Dry Dock Restaurant • Leamy Auditorium

30

T

4

R

Q

P

14

O

26

S

8

N

35

• Soccer Field • Softball Field • Track and Field Complex

19

B

3

21. 22. 23. 24.

NORTH GATE PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE PINE HALL ROBERT CROWN PARK

COAST GUARD MEMORIAL CHAPEL DESHON GATE DIMICK HALL FLAGPOLE HAMILTON HALL JOHNSON HALL 19. MUNRO HALL • The Exchange 20. NELSON W. NITCHMAN FIELD • Baseball Field 15. LEAMY HALL

9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14.

• Cadet Barracks • Ward Room

ALUMNI CENTER BARQUE EAGLE BEAR PLAZA BERTHOLF PLAZA BILLARD HALL CADET MEMORIAL FIELD CAPTAIN HOPLEY YEATON MEMORIAL 8. CHASE HALL

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

BUILDINGS

21

34

11

10 Hu nt e r Li gg et tD r

U

32 te u Ro

Boys & Girls Clubs of America

12

15

16

18

22

13

20

I

A

L

25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33.

M

C

17

36

32

31

6

D

33

9

G

H

7

5

ROLAND HALL ROWING CENTER / CREW SAIL LOFT SAILING CENTER / JACOB’S ROCK SATTERLEE HALL SMITH HALL THE GUNS THE HILL THE OFFICERS CLUB

29

K

1

F

27

23

24

J

Telephone: 800-883-8724

New London, Connecticut

• LDC

35. WASHINGTON PARADE FIELD 36. YEATON HALL

• Admissions • Coast Guard Museum • Library

34. WAESCHE HALL

PARKING HANDICAPPED PARKING

25

2

31 Mohegan Avenue | New London, CT 06320

Email: admission@uscga.edu | Web: www.uscga.edu

E

28


THE PAST But Not Forgotten

19


About Lou Dantzler Ask my youngsters that participate in Challengers’ activities what they want to be when they grow up and they will say, “I want to be like Lou.” They don’t realize “Lou” worked many hours to get where he was in his life before his passing — President/CEO of Challengers Boys & Girls Club in Los Angeles, California. Born in Cameron, South Carolina to Narvis and Arthur Dantzler, Lou was the youngest of 22 children. His parents were sharecroppers. He attended public school in Cameron and graduated from St. John High School. After four and a half years of military duty, Lou was honorably discharged from the United States Air Force in 1960 where he received training as a Communication Specialist. Lou realized there was a need for positive, male role models for the neighborhood kids whom he says loved to run his gardening vacuum on the sidewalks, ride in back of his pick-up truck, go to the park, eat hot dogs and drink soda — things he didn’t get to do as a child. The majority of the youth came form single-family homes with no father in the picture.

Lou dantzler Lifelong Youth Advocate

“These children have a place in this society, regardless of their background. Everyone has the capacity to do something positive with their lives, to make a contribution. I’m just thankful that I’ve been able to do my part to have a positive impact on this community.”

In 1970, an article appeared in the Los Angeles Times, highlighting Lou’s efforts. It told of how the back of his pick-up truck was the setting of the recreation program. During his appearance on the then-popular television show, “Truth of Consequences,” Lou won a brand new station wagon. The television show also provided him with further exposure. With the support of the community, corporations, foundations and friends, Challengers is proud to look back on 35 years of service and realize the result and resilience of a dream and a dreamer.

Lou received numerous awards and accolades for his service to mankind, including an appointment by President George Bush to the National Commission of America’s Urban Families. He also received numerous certificates, proclamations and awards from such organizations as Boys & Girls Clubs of America; Rotary Club; Zoe Christian Leadership; NAACP; Brotherhood Crusade and Crenshaw United Methodist Church. Even with all the energy he put into Challengers, Lou still found time for community involvement including membership with the Greater Los Angeles Consortium, Challengers Active Alumni, Los Angeles Educational Alliance for Restructuring Now (LEARN) and lifetime membership with the Parent/Teacher Association (PTA) Lou Dantzler was a compassionate, humorous and loyal friend, father, husband, role model and businessman that embodied the aims for which Challengers Boys & Girls Club was founded and the ideas toward which it aspires.

20 Society of African-American Professionals

Boys & Girls Clubs of America


The Lou Dantzler The Lou Dantzler Boys & Girls Clubs Legacy Boys & Girls Clubs Legacy

Among the top few most effective Boys & Girls Clubs executives ever, Lou Dantzler utilized hard work, creativeness and high standards along with an abundant selflessness to change the face of his community. As a movement, we are greatly indebted and called to continue and build on his Among the top few most effective Boys & Girls Clubs executives ever, Lou Dantzler utilized hard work, amazing legacy demonstrated over almost 40 years, positively touching over 30,000 youth. Lou’s creativeness and high standards along with an abundant selflessness to change the face of his community. As unfinished vision for the entire movement is reflected in the building blocks below, when a movement, we are greatly indebted and called to continue and build on his amazing legacy demonstrated successfully implemented, will provide the guidance, love and positive development for all youth over almost 40 years, positively touching over 30,000 youth. Lou’s unfinished vision for the entire movement andischildren, was his lifelong and pursuit. reflected inwhich the building blocks below,purpose when successfully implemented, will provide the guidance, love and positive development for all youth and children, which was his lifelong purpose and pursuit.

SOAAP African American Young Male Initiative 

Through SOAAP, a commitment to reverse the crisis that continues to take the lives of these youth

Programs & Services

Professional Development

Assure African American professionals’ contributions in the movement are maximized as we enter the second century of service to America’s youth

Notable exemplary African American professional leader/ administrator to facilitate SOAAP  Education/training of professionals movement wide regarding Lou’s philosophies and practices 

Programs & Services

African American  Youth Development Male Teen Summit Professional (AAMTS) Seminar  Summit Planning  Management Manual Professional  “Back Home” Seminar Community Action  Executive Manual Leadership  Lessons Learned Conference Seminars 

Lou Dantzler Chair

Parent Involvement Initiative

Role Leadership and management of the Lou Dantzler Legacy Programs  Secure adequate funds for the sustainability of programs and services 

Based on Lou’s philosophy and model, promote and facilitate implementation of this critically-needed strategy across the movement

Programs & Services Parent Involvement Seminar  Challengers Way Manual 

African-American Male Teen Summit Handbook 21


In Memory

James D. Cox Senior Strategist, Boys & Girls Clubs of America As Senior Strategist, James Cox provided critical thinking, direction and information for Boys & Girls Clubs of America’s Program & Youth Development Services through ongoing trend analysis and program forecasting. He was also responsible for the leadership of Youth for Unity, Boys & Girls Clubs of America’s Diversity Program Initiative; Passport To Manhood, a character program and provided internal consultation as the resident content expert in urban services, diversity, youth violence, families and other areas of expertise. James also provided consultation and technical assistance to local Clubs and their communities. He served as the liaison from Boys & Girls Clubs of America’s Program & Youth Development Services to external organizations and audiences.

James D. Cox 1947 - 2011

The James D. Cox Memorial Scholarship Fund has been established to highlight the work of Club professionals in areas that Jim pioneered and uniquely championed as Boys & Girls Clubs of America’s Vice President of Urban Services.

James, a former Club member himself, had an extensive background in developing and overseeing initiatives in such areas as diversity, community relations, character & civility, family support, urban demographics, substance abuse, teen pregnancy, crisis resolution and violence and gang prevention. His work attracted the attention of both national and international news media, resulting in interviews with print and broadcast media. In addition, James served on numerous national task forces, coalitions and planning groups. He served on the governing board for the National Fatherhood Initiative and was also a member of the Board of Directors of the Center for Work Life Policy. He formerly served on the executive committee of public broadcasting’s National Campaign to Reduce Youth Violence, as well as the steering committee of “By Our Own Hands,” a substance abuse prevention media campaign for urban African American youth. Before joining the national staff of Boys & Girls Clubs of America in 1989, James served as Director of Greater Milwaukee’s Hillside Boys & Girls Club, located in one of the community’s public housing developments. Prior to his work at the Club, he directed an educational program for migrant and seasonal farm workers at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

James earned a Master of Science degrees in administrative leadership and secondary education, both from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. He completed the coursework in the doctoral program in urban education at the same institution. In 1999, James was awarded the prestigious Herman S. Prescott Award, which is given annually to a Boys & Girls Clubs professional who exemplifies dedicated service for the justice and equality of all people. In 2003, he was presented with the Lou Dantzler Award from the Society of African American Professionals for outstanding commitment and dedication to the professional advancement of African American youth in the Boys & Girls Clubs Movement.

22 Society of African-American Professionals

Boys & Girls Clubs of America


THE present

23


Lincoln D. Ellis Society of African-American Professionals

Lincoln Douglas Ellis has over thirty years of social service experience in staff supervision and development, budget management, federal, state, and city grant management, and resource development. His management experiences include working in both the profit and non-profit arenas, as well as in government. A native of Stockton, California, on May 1, 2013, Mr. Ellis assumed the position of President/Chief Professional Officer for the Boys & Girls Clubs of Stanislaus County. A graduate of the University of California at Davis, Mr. Ellis’ youth development experience includes: serving ten years as President and Chief Executive Officer of Boys & Girls Clubs of Northwest Indiana annually serving over 10,000 youth in six municipalities and twelve school districts. Four plus years as the Executive Director of the Jackie Joyner-Kersee Foundation, East St. Louis, Illinois; and ten years as President/CEO of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Stockton, Stockton, California.

Lincoln D. Ellis President/ Chief Professional Officer, Boys & Girls Clubs of Stanislaus County

Mr. Ellis has decades of youth development experience. He currently serves as President and CPO for Boys & Girls Clubs of Stanislaus County, is a National Trainer for Boys & Girls Clubs of America and is a member of its Government Relations Committee. He was honored by Boys & Girls Clubs of America into the prestigious Masters & Mentors group.

Active in the youth development profession, Mr. Ellis currently serves as a National Trainer for Boys & Girls Clubs of America and a member of its Government Relations Committee. For the past six years Mr. Ellis also serves as the Dean of the Society of African American Professionals (SOAAP), a national organization with the purpose of recruitment, retention, and upward mobility of African American professionals in the Boys & Girls Clubs Movement. His community involvement is extensive and includes numerous state and local boards and commissions. An accomplished public speaker and workshop facilitator, Mr. Ellis has been a featured presenter at numerous local, regional and national workshops and conferences. In May of 2010 in New York City, he was honored by Boys & Girls Clubs of America by being inducted into the very prestigious group known as Masters & Mentors – renowned for recognizing youth development professionals and their legacy to the Boys & Girls Clubs Movement.

24 Society of African-American Professionals

Boys & Girls Clubs of America


Incoming Dean Corey Dantzler

Corey dantzler

Dean, Society of African-American Professionals

Vice President of Operations for Challengers Boys & Girls Club

The son of Challengers founder L.E. “Lou” Dantzler, Corey literally grew up at Challengers Boys & Girls Club. In fact, at 14 years old, his first job was as a junior staff member, in 1982, a position he held until he graduated from Pasadena’s Marshall High School in 1986. He then attended Cal Poly Pomona, where he majored in Physical Education, and competed on the college basketball team. While in college, he was a staff member of the Boys & Girls Club of Inland Empire, until he graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in 1992, when he became Program Director of Challengers. Under the tutelage of then Unit Director Carl Reed, Corey helped the Club transition as it underwent its largest expansion since its inception. When Reed moved on to become Director of another Boys & Girls Club, Corey was promoted to Unit Director in 1995 and then Director of Operations in 1998. In this role, Corey assumed even greater responsibility, putting him on the leadership track to eventually become the Club’s chief executive when his father retired.

Mr. Dantzler received the Boys & Girls Clubs highly prestigious Professional of the Year Award, as well as its Distinguished Level of Management Professionals Award. Corey also holds the title of President of the Professionals Association of the Boys & Girls Clubs of America.

However, the sudden death of founder Lou Dantzler in 2006 propelled Corey to the forefront much sooner than expected. Despite the pain of his own personal tragedy, he was able to smoothly transition into the role of President and CEO, which Challengers’ board unanimously approved in the weeks that followed his father’s death.

Corey’s success at the Club has not only been noticed by the parents and members of the Club, but also by the greater National Boys & Girls Club movement. In 2003, the year after he became Vice President of Operations for Challengers, Corey received the Boys & Girls Clubs highly prestigious Professional of the Year Award, as well as its Distinguished Level of Management Professionals Award. Corey also holds the title of President of the Professionals Association of the Boys & Girls Clubs of America, and is a member of the Society of African American Professionals of the Boys & Girls Clubs of America. In his spare time, Corey enjoys playing golf and spending time with his two young sons.

African-American Male Teen Summit Handbook 25


Robert Howard Lou Dantzler Legacy Program Chair Society of African American Professionals (SOAAP)

Robert Howard Robert Howard’s passion for Boys & Girls Clubs began when he walked into a Club as a young boy growing up on Chicago’s south side. The guidance of caring adult professionals at the Club, coupled with fun activities, instilled in him the values of teamwork and service which made an indelible impression on him.

Lou Dantzler Legacy Program Chair

These same values contributed to Bob’s 30 years of leadership at national retail chains including Payless Shoe Source and Sav-On Drugs, a division of Osco Drug. As the Division Senior Vice President of Payless Shoe Source, Bob was responsible for $600 million in sales and 1,200 stores. During his tenure, he increased the retail footwear’s market share in 20 states, executed cost savings acquisitions and led the company’s diversity initiatives. He retired from the for-profit business community in November 2001. Currently Bob is retired from Boys & Girls Clubs of Chicago where he served as President & CEO. In his first year as President, his business acumen and positive leadership reenergized the organization despite a substantial restructuring to cut costs. He enhanced employee morale during challenging times, improved relations with Boys & Girls Clubs of Chicago stakeholders and restored financial stability. His creative and decisive leadership for the last four years helped propel the organization for a better-than-ever financial performance, as well as, revitalized Boys & Girls Clubs of Chicago’s volunteer leadership. Prior to his appointment as President & CEO, Bob served as President of the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Boys & Girls Club Board of Directors on Chicago’s west side and was a member of the Corporate Board of Boys & Girls Clubs of Chicago. Bob served in the United States Air Force and is a graduate of the University of Illinois at Chicago. He also holds a Masters of Business Administration from Harvard Business School and a Masters of Arts from Roosevelt University. He has been an active member of several civic institutions including the Capital Improvement Advisory Committee of the City of Chicago, the Board of Directors of Harvard Business School Club of Chicago and the Foundation Board of Directors of Chicago State University.

26 Society of African-American Professionals

Boys & Girls Clubs of America


Carter Julian Savage, Ed.D. Writer, Historian, Professor & Consultant

Carter Julian

Dr. Carter Julian Savage is a Visiting Scholar at Morehouse College and an Savage, Ed.D. Associate at the W.E.B. DuBois Institute for African and African American Writer, Historian, Professor & Consultant Research at Harvard University. In these roles, Carter both teaches and researches issues facing African American males. As a professor, he teaches a course in History and Theories of Leadership to undergraduates at the allmale, historically black, Morehouse College. As a researcher, Carter is currently documenting the history of youth services provided to African American males in the first half of the 20th century. Specifically, he is completing two manuscripts entitled, “‘In the Interest Colored Boys:’ C.J. Atkinson, William T. Coleman and The Extension of Boys’ Club Service into the African American Community, 1906-1931” and “Experiences of the Elders: Selected Life Histories of African American Professionals in the Boys & Girls Clubs Movement.” Carter has published several scholarly articles, book chapters, book reviews and magazine articles on the history of education for African Americans, the social context of education for African American males, the theoretical framework of after-school programs and the development of after-school education programs. Co-edited with Dr. V.P. Franklin, Carter’s first book, Cultural Capital and Black Education: African American Communities and the Funding of Black Schooling, 1865 to the Present, was published in December 2005. In addition to his teaching and research, Carter is the Chief Idea Officer of I-AM Consulting. I-AM is a research and development firm that develops leadership and creates program opportunities that transform the lives of “disconnected youth,” especially African American youth, through the renewal of their minds. Through the work of this firm, Carter seeks to create a multi-ethnic community which firmly believes “disconnected” youth can mature into adults who can lead and positively transform the world. Involved in the field of youth development for 20 years, Carter began working part time for the Boys & Girls Clubs of Middle Tennessee in Nashville, Tennessee as a sophomore in college. In 1989, he joined the Middle Tennessee organization full time as an Education Program Director. Later that year, Carter opened a new Club in Franklin, Tennessee and served as its Director. Carter was promoted to Associate Executive of the Middle Tennessee organization and in 1999, moved to Atlanta to become the Senior Director, Education Programs for Boys & Girls Clubs of America (BGCA). Two years later, he was promoted to Vice President, Program & Youth Development Services for BGCA. In this role, Carter had oversight of the development and dissemination of education, program planning and evaluation, technology, arts and physical education programs to the more than 4,000 local Boys & Girls Clubs in the United States and on military bases in Europe and Asia. Carter holds a Doctorate degree in Education and a Master’s in Public Policy (Program Development and Program Evaluation) from Peabody College of Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee. He is also a three-year graduate from Vanderbilt University with a Bachelor’s degree in Mathematics.

African-American Male Teen Summit Handbook 27


Gregory L. Doss Director of Organizational Development For Military & Outreach Services

Gregory L. Doss is the Director of Health and Life Skills for Boys & Girls Clubs of America (BGCA), a National Youth Development Agency located in Atlanta, Georgia. Greg has worked with the Youth of America program for over ten years, serving as youth mentor and advocate.

Gregory L. Doss Director of Organizational Development For Military & Outreach Services

As Director of Health and Life Skills, Greg assists in the overall implementation of health-related programs. These programs help develop young peoples’ capacity to engage in positive behaviors that nurture their own well being, set personal goals and live successfully as self-sufficient adults. Previously, Greg served as Director of Programs for a non-profit organization to educate disenfranchised citizens of the State of Mississippi in areas of public policy, education reform and youth development. Greg has also worked as a Program Evaluator providing programmatic assistance to non-profit organizations whose primary focus is youth advocacy. This visionary trailblazer chartered new territory in many areas both personally and professionally. In keeping with Greg’s trailblazer spirit, he started the Mississippi Youth Leadership Academy, Inc. Among Greg’s other accomplishments include co-author of SWAT (Students Working Against Tobacco) learning curriculum and writer of three articles featured in BGCA’s Connections Magazine. Greg completed his coursework for a Masters of Public Policy and Administration degree from Jackson State University and a Bachelor of Science degree in Health Education and Administration from University of Southern Mississippi in Hattiesburg, Mississippi. A motivational speaker and group facilitator, Greg’s leadership qualities and scholarship have earned him several distinguished awards and honors: he was named Outstanding Freshman Male at the University of Southern Mississippi, listed in Who’s Who Among American Colleges and Universities and was recognized for work in youth development by the Mississippi Black Caucus. Currently he holds membership in the University of Southern Mississippi National Alumni Association and Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.

28 Society of African-American Professionals

Boys & Girls Clubs of America


Larry Lewis, Jr. Unit Director, Boys & Girls Club of Greater Kansas City

Larry Lewis, Jr. obtained a Bachelor of Science in Family Life and Community Services from Kansas State University. He went to work for the Boys & Girls Club of Greater Kansas City and has been with the organization for seven years. Currently Larry is the Unit Director at the John Thornberry Unit where he strives to inspire and enable youth to realize their full potential as productive, thoughtful and accountable citizens.

Larry Lewis, Jr. Unit Director Boys & Girls Club of Greater Kansas City

Through the Clubs, Larry organized and facilitated many youth programs dealing with issues ranging from team building, resume building, conflict resolution and leadership to address awareness and etiquette in order to teach youth their importance and role in their community. The past two years Larry has been heavily involved with the African American Male Teen Summit. Recently, he was appointed to the planning committee as Chief Warrior, permitting him to assist in all facets of the Summit. Awarded the Top 30 Under 30 Award for his efforts and hard work in the community, Larry continues to work diligently with youth and create partnerships with organizations that can influence and inspire children he comes in contact with daily. Larry’s hope is to leave his community a better place than he found it and provide youth every opportunity to be successful in life.

Robert A. Clay Consultant, Linshaell Group LLC

Robert (Rob) Clay, former Executive Director with the Southwest Missouri Boys and Girls Club, has more than 20+ years of experience working with “at risk” children. Robert is a founding member of the Society of African American Professionals.He chaired the Midwest Regional Diversity Advisory Board BGCA, and was a National Training Consultant for BGCA.

Robert A. Clay Consultant Linshaell Group LLC

Currently Robert is a Character Coach for Fellowship of Christian Athletes and Ordained Deacon. Robert resides in Nashville, TN with his wife Janice. He has two adult daughters and one grandson. Rob is a graduate of the Boys & Girls Clubs of American Management Program and the 1st Class of the Strom Thurman Advanced Executive Leadership Institute. He has served on numerous local and national boards including the BGCA Pension Committee and Midwest Regional Advisory Board where he served as President.

African-American Male Teen Summit Handbook 29


Adrian D. Thomas, Sr. Program Manager, Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Milwaukee

Adrian D. Thomas, Sr. has worked for the past 15 years implementing, developing, and monitoring programs that focus on at-risk youth. He is the co-founder of a signature program known as CJIP (Community Justice Adrian D. Thomas, Sr. Intervention Program) which is a partnership between the State of Wisconsin Program Manager Boys & Girls Clubs Public Defenders Office, the Milwaukee County District Attorney’s Office, and of Greater Milwaukee the Milwaukee County Circuit Courts. The program is designed to offer youth who have felony charges pending, intensive services, with the understanding that upon completion of the Court mandates, the felony charges would be reduced to a misdemeanor, or eliminated entirely — therefore offering them a second chance to maintain a good criminal record. In addition, Thomas has a wife and is the proud father of two children. He is also committed to working diligently to enhance the quality of life for youth and their families in the City of Milwaukee. Currently Thomas is employed by the Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Milwaukee and serves as a Program Manager in the Teen Services Department with an emphasis on Minority Male Mentoring, Youth Advocacy & Organizing, and Humanities. He is also an advocate for social change through education and empowerment, and firmly believes that although young people make up 1/3 of our worlds population, they are 100% of our future.

Judy Williams After School Matters Judy Williams feels a strong obligation to help youth reach their full potential. Her request for funding proposal was an integral part of the 2013 SOAAP African American Teen Male Summit. Judy has firsthand knowledge about the enabling benefits of strangers supplying youth with the tools and resources to succeed. Her published 2002 autobiography, With A Little Help from My Friends, outlines the childhood difficulties she overcame and acknowledges the assistance she received from strangers that enabled her to achieve her dream of her son graduating from a top university with a professional degree.

Judy Williams After School Matters

Judy worked at Boys & Girls Clubs of America’s national headquarters in Atlanta for over 12 years where she managed the office of the Senior Vice President of Services to Clubs. Upon relocating to Chicago in 2005, she supported the Chief Executive Officer of Boys & Girls Clubs of Chicago for 4 years. Her commitment to helping youth find their futures continues in her current role supporting the Chief Program Officer at After School Matters. Judy earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Organization Leadership from Mercer University in Atlanta, GA and a Master of Science in Communication from Northwestern University in Evanston, IL.

30 Society of African-American Professionals

Boys & Girls Clubs of America


Darryl J. Anderson Program Director, John Will Anderson Boys & Girls Club of Northwest Indiana

Darryl J. Anderson is a Gary, Ind. native. He attended Emerson School for the Visual and Performing Arts, where he used his creative skills in the arts in the areas of Technical Theatre and Visual Arts. As a teenager, Darryl was active in his community as a volunteer. He volunteered with Special Olympics, NAACP, community clean-ups, and at his church home (Embassies of Christ Kingdom Ministries Gary, Ind.).

Darryl J. Anderson Program Director John Will Anderson Boys & Girls Club of NWI

Darryl earned his Masters at Jackson State University, in Jackson, Miss., in Graphic Arts. During his studies he was a part of the JSU AD-FED Committee, sat on the student committee for the JSU Art Club, was an active team member of the JSU Honda Campus AllStar Team, and participated in a variety of community service events. Prior to working at the Boys and Girls Club, Darryl worked at the YMCA of Jackson Metropolitan MS. While there he used his innovative ideas to enhance programming for the organization, to benefit the children in the community, as a Membership Coordinator. Currently, Mr. Anderson is an employee of the Boys and Girls Clubs of Northwest Indiana, where he is a Rites of Passage Coordinator and conducts programming for African American at risk males ages 10-18. He has a wonderful three year old son, Jordan Anderson, whom he loves dearly.

Orlando A. Drummond Rites of Passage Coordinator, Hammond Boys & Girls Club

Orlando attended Eastern Illinois University and Chicago State University; where he earned his Bachelors degree. During his college years, he needed to be close to home to support his family. Orlando was very active as an undergraduate, delegating his time between his studies, Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, tutoring his peers, and community volunteer efforts.

Orlando A. Drummond Rites of Passage Coordinator Hammond Boys & Girls Club

Orlando volunteered at local youth clubs and after school programs, but as his programming abilities began to develop his mentor, Monique Cook-Bey, came calling. Monique created a position for Orlando. This position would utilize his drive to help young men and his ability to connect with these young men involved in the gritty streets of Chicago. Ultimately, Orlando became a program coordinator and then an athletic/program director during his tenure with Chicago Youth Programs. The next step in Orlando’s path was Boys and Girls Clubs of Northwest Indiana where he’s serves as a “Tens Steps Rites of Pas-sage” Coordinator at the Hammond Club. Orlando’s passion is still evident and his desire to impact lives can be seen daily. Orlando’s success is simple: hard work, positive outlook on life and setting short and long term goals.

African-American Male Teen Summit Handbook 31


Antonio Gholston Founder & President of AG Technology Consultants, Inc. Antonio Gholston is a person with a heart to serve others. He is a disciplined, focused and a results-driven individual. Antonio can attest to several personal and professional accomplishments—many of which were achieved before the age of 30. A committed Christian and man of faith, Antonio participates in several church ministries, such as the Ministry Team, which assists the Pastors and Mentorship Ministries for males ages 12- 17. This speaks to his passion and commitment to help build the minds, characters and spirits of those around him.

Antonio Gholston Founder & President of AG Technology Consultants, Inc.

Combining his desire to serve and his business acumen, Antonio is founder/president of AG Technology Consultants, Inc. AGTC is a technology and telecommunication company providing high quality service and support to businesses and nonprofit organizations. Antonio holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Computer Science and Business Administration. Antonio is Married to Jacinta and they have one daughter.

Laraj Thomas Teen Reach Coordinator, James R. Jordan Boys & Girls Club of Chicago and Chicago Bulls Family Life Center. Laraj Thomas is the Teen Reach coordinator for the James R. Jordan Boys & Girls Club of Chicago and Chicago Bulls Family life center. He has dedicated over 10 years of his life to helping inner city youth progress to achieve goals that were seemingly a blur before.

Laraj Thomas Teen Reach Coordinator, James R. Jordan Boys & Girls Club of Chicago

Laraj has found successful results in some of Boys and Girls Clubs premiere programs including, Passport 2 Manhood, Torch Club, Keystone, Goals to Graduations, and Street S.M.A.R.T.S... Laraj provides services acting as the organizations resident Disk Jockey (DJ) for all special events. In 2010 Laraj received the challenge to make in impact at the Jordan Club as well as the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Boys and Girls Club as the area Teen Coordinator. Laraj is currently enrolled at Malcolm X College in search of his Bachelor’s Degree in Business as well as in Education. Laraj has attended 5 African American Male Teen Summits and had been an official member of the Society of African American Professionals since March 2009.

32 Society of African-American Professionals

Boys & Girls Clubs of America


2013 Guest speakers

African-American Male Teen Summit Handbook 33


Rear Admiral Sandra L. Stosz Superintendent, United States Coast Guard Academy

Rear Admiral Sandra L. Stosz assumed the duties of the 40th Superintendent of the U.S. Coast Guard Academy in New London, Connecticut, June 3, 2011. She reported to the Academy after serving as the Director of Reserve and Leadership at Coast Guard Headquarters in Washington, D.C. There she was responsible for developing policies to recruit, train and support approximately 8,100 Coast Guard Reservists. Rear Admiral Stosz is a surface operations officer with 12 years at sea, including command of two cutters – an icebreaking tug on the Great Lakes and a medium endurance cutter that patrolled North Atlantic and Caribbean waters. She and her crews executed many of the Coast Guard’s 11 missions such as drug and alien migrant interdiction, fisheries enforcement, search and rescue, polar and domestic icebreaking and ports and waterways security.

Rear Admiral Sandra L. Stosz Superintendent United States Coast Guard Academy

Between sea duty tours Rear Admiral Stosz specialized in personnel and resource management and program review. She served tours of duty as Chief of Officer Assignments and as Program Reviewer and Acquisition Funds Coordinator for Coast Guard major systems acquisitions, including the 225-foot buoy tenders and 87-foot coastal patrol boats. She broadened her experience as the Secretary of Transportation’s military assistant and years later as the Commandant’s executive assistant. She has served as Commanding Officer of the Coast Guard’s recruit training center in Cape May, New Jersey and as Director of Coast Guard Enterprise Strategic Management and Doctrine where she was responsible for aligning enterprise level strategic and management functions with the Commandant’s strategic intent. Rear Admiral Stosz graduated from the Coast Guard Academy in 1982 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Government. She was awarded a Master of Business Administration degree from Northwestern University’s J. L. Kellogg Graduate School of Management in 1994. In 2000 she completed an executive fellowship in national security through the MIT Seminar XXI program, and she earned a Master of National Security Strategy from the National War College in 2004. In 2009 she attended the Navy’s Executive Business Course at University of North Carolina’s Kenan-Flagler business school. Rear Admiral Stosz’s personal awards include three Legion of Merit Medals, four Meritorious Service Medals, two Coast Guard Commendation Medals and two Coast Guard Achievement Medals.

34 Society of African-American Professionals

Boys & Girls Clubs of America


Jim Clark President & CEO Boys & Girls Clubs of America

As the eleventh president and CEO of Boys & Girls Clubs of America (BGCA) since its founding in 1906, Jim Clark heads the nation’s largest youth development organization with a primary focus on creating great futures for young people who need Clubs most. He joined BGCA in January, 2012 after serving for eight years as president and CEO of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Milwaukee, one of the largest and most successful local BGCA affiliates.

Jim Clark President & CEO Boys & Girls Clubs of America

In Milwaukee, Clark led the development of a dynamic growth and impact agenda, launching innovative programs that drove outcomes in literacy, high school graduation, teen services and college preparation. He achieved seven consecutive years of revenue growth and added 17 new service locations. He also significantly increased average daily attendance and frequency, and more than doubled the staff. As a result of the organization’s work in literacy and its proven outcomes, he secured a $4.1 million Investing in Innovation (i3) grant from the U.S. Department of Education to take the literacy program to scale. Today the Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Milwaukee, with 700 full- and part-time employees and 300+ volunteers, comprise 40 Club locations serving some 35,000 young people annually. Jim also has for-profit experience in the publishing industry, where he served in senior leadership roles in distribution, sales/marketing and customer service operations. He led new business development, acquisitions and mergers as well as process improvement initiatives. For 10 years Jim was an active member of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Milwaukee Friends Board, and knows Boys & Girls Clubs thoroughly, from both board volunteer and executive leadership perspectives. Today Clark leads the largest network of facility-based youth development organizations in the world. Boys & Girls Clubs of America’s 1,100 local affiliates operate nearly 4,000 Club locations throughout the nation and in BGCA-affiliated Youth Centers on U.S. military installations worldwide. With a combined staff of more than 50,000 full- and part-time employees and some 200,000 board and program volunteers, the organization annually serves some 4 million children and teens through Club membership and community outreach. Club programs help young people achieve academic success and healthy lifestyles, develop good character, and engage in citizenship and public service. Jim and his wife Samantha have two sons, Chase, 9, and Grayson, 7. BGCA’s national office is headquartered in Atlanta.

African-American Male Teen Summit Handbook 35


Captain Robert L. Smith Director, Sexual Assault Prevention & Response Military Campaign Office, Washington, DC United States Coast Guard

Captain Rob Smith reported to his present duties as the Director of the U. S. Coast Guard Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Military Campaign Office in May 2013. In this role, he is responsible for the rapid implementation of near-term strategies that will create the processes, training regimens, measurements, and support system integrity that will best position the service to achieve the ultimate goal of eliminating sexual assault from the Coast Guard. In his previous assignment he served as the Executive Assistant to the Deputy Commandant for Mission Support, who is responsible for all facets of support for the Coast Guard’s diverse mission set through oversight of human capital, lifecycle engineering, acquisitions, telecommunications and information technology, service-wide training and performance technology, and thirteen support Bases around the Nation.

Captain Robert L. Smith Director, Sexual Assault Prevention & Response Military Campaign Office, Washington, DC United States Coast Guard

Prior assignments include Executive Officer of Base Alameda, CA; Commanding Officer of the Personnel Services and Support Unit, Alameda, CA; Ethnic Policy Advisor to the Commandant, Washington, DC; Chief, Personnel Support Division, Deployable Operations Group, Arlington, VA; Human Systems Integration Surface Training Lead Deepwater, Washington, DC, and Supervisor, Marine Safety Field Office Coram, New York. His personal awards include three Meritorious Service Medals, two Coast Guard Commendation Medals, and two Coast Guard Achievement Medals. Captain Smith is a 1991 graduate of U. S. Coast Guard Officer Candidate School, and assessed into the Coast Guard via the Minority Officer Recruiting Effort. He earned a Masters of Science in Industrial/Organizational Psychology, a Masters of Science in Instruction & Performance Technology, and is All-But-Dissertation in pursuit of a Ph.D. in Psychology. Captain Smith is a 2013 Boys and Girls Club of America Alumni Hall of Fame Inductee. He and his wife reside in Fredericksburg, VA with their three children.

36 Society of African-American Professionals

Boys & Girls Clubs of America


What do you want to be when you grow up? Written by Petty Officer 2nd Class Michael De Nyse

I

t’s a question we often class I skipped the eighth grade, ask children and invokes and went straight into ninth.” aspirations of top-level career His passion for learning started fields to provide a comfortable at Brooklyn’s Flatbush Boys Club living and lifestyle. But there is where Smith gained the confidence another, perhaps more important to dream big. A school counselor question we could be asking our introduced Smith to the club, youth: Who do you want to be knowing he would benefit from the when you grow up? safe supervision and positive male The caliber a person becomes role models. He thrived under the is dependent on many factors and guidance of a club tutor and loved influences. The choices a person to swim in the club’s pool. Those makes, the peers they keep and the memories stayed with Smith role models they emulate all play through his life. a large part in shaping the person Cmdr. Rob Smith gives an acceptance speech “The BGCA gave me the after being inducted into the Boys and Girls they see in the mirror every day. passion for learning, and it’s so Clubs of America National Hall of Fame. For one Coast Guardsman, it important because education is was the people at the Boys & Girls such a big part of a Coast Guard Clubs of America who provided him career,” said Smith. “We are with the life skills that crafted him into the man he is today. successful in this organization [Coast Guard] when you know Cmdr. Robert L. Smith was inducted into the BGCA how to learn on the fly, and the BCGA taught me that.” National Hall of Fame as part of their national BGCA conference Smith leveraged his BGCA experience to develop a lifein Orlando, Fla. Smith is only the second Coast Guardsman long passion for learning and a successful Coast Guard to receive this honor. He joined more than 150 other former career. He went on to earn his Bachelor of Science degree BGCA members who have been recognized as leaders in their in communications from West Virginia State College, his fields, including Denzel Washington, Jackie Joyner-Kersee, Master of Science in industrial/organizational psychology Michael Jordan and Coast Guard Capt. Daniel Travers. from Capella University and a Master of Science in “We are extremely proud of our alumni who have gone instructional and performance technology from Boise State on to achieve great things,” said Jim Clark, president and University. He has only the dissertation to complete for his CEO of BGCA. “Their stories are very different, but all start doctorate in psychology from Capella University. Smith is out the same – with life-changing programs, caring and currently a captain-select and is the first Minority Officer attentive staff and the fun and safety of a local BGCA.” Recruiting Effort candidate to be selected for promotion to Smith attributes much of his success in life today to his the rank of captain. partnership with the BGCA organization in Brooklyn, N.Y., “Smith is an excellent role model and clearly and is currently serving as the executive assistant to the demonstrates that with hard work, determination and deputy commandant for mission support. the safe and nurturing environment from a caring family, “I think the really big piece that I gained from the BGCA including the extended family in his local BGCA in Brooklyn, is the love for learning and the appreciation of what learning N.Y., kids can aspire to achieve great things,” said Capt. does,” said Smith. “When I first joined the BGCA I was not a Robert E. McKenna, commanding officer of the Coast Guard very good student. I was at the bottom of my class at school Community Services Command. “For Smith, his ‘being and not going anywhere. In three months after joining the great’ happens to be for the Coast Guard, and we are a better BGCA I was moved to the top class, and I did so well in the top organization because of it.”

African-American Male Teen Summit Handbook 37


Calvin Mackie, Ph.D. President and CEO, Channel ZerO Group, LLC Executive Vice President, Golden Leaf Energy

Dr. Calvin Mackie is an award winning mentor, a former engineering professor, an internationally renowned speaker, and a successful entrepreneur. His message as a mentor, speaker, and entrepreneur continues to transcend race, gender, ethnicity, religion, and time. After starting college in remedial reading because of weak SAT scores, Calvin Mackie earned a Bachelor of Mechanical Engineering from Georgia Tech and a B.S. in Mathematics from Morehouse College in 1990, a M.S. in 1992 and the Ph.D. in 1996 in Mechanical Engineering from Georgia Tech. He served on the Tulane University faculty from 1996-2007, where he received tenure and was promoted to Associate Professor in 2002. A professional speaker, in 1992 he founded the Channel ZerO Group LLC (CZG), an educational and motivational consulting company. Through his national and international travels and online mentoring presence, Mackie reaches millions of youths and professionals annually.

CALVIN MACKIE, Ph.D. President and CEO, Channel ZerO Group, LLC Executive Vice President, Golden Leaf Energy

A member of the Phi Beta Kappa, Pi Tau Sigma and Tau Beta Pi National Honor Societies, his passion for scholarship is well established. His leadership qualities and social justice advocacy are well documented. In 2005, former Louisiana Governor Kathleen Blanco appointed him to the Louisiana Recovery Authority (LRA), the guiding agency to lead the state’s rebuilding efforts following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. Possessing instant social, political, cultural, and technical credibility, Mackie was featured prominently in Spike Lee’s HBO Katrina documentary, When The Levees Broke: A Requiem in Four Parts (HBO 2006) and it’s successor If God Is Willing and Da Creek Don’t Rise (HBO 2010, and has appeared on numerous national and local news shows including the PBS News Hour with Jim Lehrer and the Tom Joyner Show. Mackie received international acclaim during and after a 2006 visit to the country of Kuwait as an ambassador of the LRA and the guest of the U.S. Embassy in Kuwait, appearing on Good Morning Kuwait and in numerous international Arab newspapers. In 2004, President Bush awarded him the 2003 Presidential Award for Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Mentoring in a White House Ceremony. Mackie has received numerous other awards including the Black Engineer of the Year Award for College Level Educators. In 1996, he received a patent on a device to retrofit luggage stowbins on 737 and 757 Boeing commercial airliners. In 2009, then Louisiana Lt. Governor Mitch Landrieu appointed Dr. Mackie to the Louisiana Council on the Social Status of Black Boys and Black Men and he is leading the state’s effort to create policy and programs to positively impact the quality of life of Black males and families in the state of Louisiana. Mackie is currently a partner in Golden Leaf Energy (GLE). GLE produces and distributes biodiesel from waste streams. He is the author of the books: best-selling “A View from the Roof: Lessons for Life and Business” and “Grandma’s Hands: Cherished Moments of Faith and Wisdom”, Dr. Mackie is a devoted husband to his wife, Tracy, and father to his two sons, Myles Ahmad which recently received a silver medal in the prestigious Living Now Book Awards.and Mason Amir.

38 Society of African-American Professionals

Boys & Girls Clubs of America


Michael W. Williams Executive Director of Aim for Tomorrow

Michael W. Williams, a doctoral student supported by a Ford Foundation Fellowship, studies Clinical Neuro-psychology at Wayne State University. He graduated with honors from Morehouse College in 2009 with a Bachelors of Science in Psychology and a minor in Neuroscience. Throughout his educational journey, he has continued to serve his community through various activities with mentoring being a key focus. One of his more notable experiences was serving as a mentor and resident assistant with the Leadership, Education, and Development (LEAD) Global Summer Institute at the University of Cape Town in Cape Town, South Af-rica. Michael attributes much of his success and exciting opportunities to his mother, mentors, and numerous

Michael W. Williams Executive Director, Aim for Tomorrow

LCDR Anthony Hawes Professor, Engineering Department U.S. Coast Guard Academy

After graduating from the Coast Guard Academy in 1999, LCDR Anthony Hawes served as a Deck Watch Officer and Law Enforcement Officer on USCGC Sweetbrier in Cordova, Alaska. During this tour, he maintained Aids to Navigation and enforced fisheries law in the vicinity of Prince William Sound, Alaska. After earning a Masters of Science in Electrical Engineering from the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California, LCDR Hawes served as the Chief of the Engineering Development Branch at the Coast Guard Loran Support Unit (LSU) in Wildwood, New Jersey. At LSU, he managed all engineering for a greatly improved version of the Loran navigation system, called e-Loran, before the termination of Loran entirely. LCDR Hawes was then assigned to Coast Guard Headquarters, where he managed large C4IT projects for Search and Rescue, Law Enforcement missions. In 2010, LCDR Hawes was assigned to teach Electrical Engineering at the Coast Guard Academy.

African-American Male Teen Summit Handbook 39


2013 Summit

committee

2013 Summit

peer leaders Mark Bryant Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Kansas City DeAndre Malone Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Milwaukee James Cotton Boys & Girls Clubs of Chicago Cameron Cooper Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Milwaukee Quejuan Miller Boys & Girls Clubs of Northwest Indiana Jhalen Ward Boys & Girls Clubs of Northwest Indiana 40 Society of African-American Professionals

Core Planning Committee Robert Howard, Lou Danzler Chair Larry Lewis, Chief Warrior Rob Clay, Linshaell Consultant Dr. Carter Savage, W.T. Coleman Chair Adrian Thomas, Warrior Orlando Drummond, Warrior, Northwest Indiana Laraj Thomas, Warrior, Chicago Darryl Anderson, Warrior, Northwest Indiana Joe Bumpers, Warrior, Hartford Program Rob Clay Robert Howard Schedule/Agenda Robert Howard Lincoln Ellis Rob Clay Supplies/Materials Julius Lott Dan Pinch LT. Plummer Robert Howard Rob Clay Finance Lincoln Ellis Robert Howard Dan Pinch LT. Plummer Pre-Summit Preparation Adrian Thomas Larry Lewis Robert Howard Lincoln Ellis Rob Clay Dr. Carter Savage Joe Bumpers Judy Williams Boys & Girls Clubs of America


Notes

Notes 0@<

'$'7)6 2(7'+$6*'+269>.9 Digital Marketing Seminar 2012

#> 

African-American Male Teen Summit Handbook 41


Notes 0@<

Notes 0@<

'$'7)6 2(7'+$6*'+269>.9 Digital Marketing Seminar 2012

#> 

'$'7)6 2(7'+$6*'+269>.9 Digital Marketing Seminar 2012

#> 

42 Society of African-American Professionals

Boys & Girls Clubs of America


African-American Male Teen Summit Handbook 43


African-American Male Teen Summit  

Program booklet for the 7th Annual Lou Dantzler Legacy Program titled African-American Male Teen Summit held at the U.S. Coast Guard Academy...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you