Page 1


Produced at Open Studio in Rhinebeck, N.Y., a non-profit facility for individual artists & independent publishers, funded in part by grants from the National Endowment for the Arts & the New York State Council on the Arts.

Copyright Š 1981 by Richard C. Higgins. All rights reserved. Manufactured in the United States of America.

ISBN 0-914162-55-1 applies to this book.


2

3 2) This array is a gamut. Each movement uses only the tones given in its gamut; these may be transposed up or down an octave, but usually are played as written. The tones may be played in any order, any sequence. Patterns may be developed — one

per

line—

or

they

may

be

avoided.

Any

number of notes may be played in each line, but — 3) only as suggested by the photograph. The violinist produces timbres, densities, and so on, Instructions for Performance

according to any consistent and personal criteria. Volumes are determined in the same way, as are

This piece is to be played on violin and harp-

the use of mutes, special bowing techniques and

sichord; an organ or chimes could be substituted

the degrees or absence of vibrato. Each line lasts

for the harpsichord, but if an organ is used, only

about eight seconds, and the lines and movements

short sounds should be produced and these in a

are played in the sequence given. 4) Each movement should sound quite different

variety of timbres.

from each other movement, bounded only by what There are ten movements, each lasting eighty

is suggested by the photograph. One movement

seconds. Instructions for playing the harpsichord

might be quite dense and fast, another quite slow

part are printed on page 15.

and solemn, another quite light. Each movement should employ its own system. Thus the degree of

The rules for playing the violin part (printed on pages 5 through 14) are as follows:

darkness in one photograph might determine lots of bow

action

in

one

movement,

deep

pitches

in

another, and soft rich timbres in a third, etc. Or 1) Note that each movement is printed on a

loudness might be determined in some movement

separate page, each consists of ten staves printed

by subject matter, such as the distance in a given

over a photograph, and each has an array of notes

line to the male figure as the violinist's eye travels

listed at the top of the page.

left to right along each line—

maximum volume


4 when

playing

playing

at

the

over ends

the

figure,

of the

minimum

line

away

when

from

the

figure. However, the systems may be repeated from performance to performance; there is no need to work up a new set of systems for each separate performance situation. There should be about ten seconds of silence between each movement.

Barrytown, New York August 18, 1980

First Movement


r

Fourth Movement j

J

"r

>-K

\ d?.:?■

É

-fc& J

É

; < .'«•

xW


10


^

Eighth Movement

J I, J i?lJ^p!;p

:.g"

12

13


15

Harpsichord Instructions

The harpsichord part is to vary from movement to movement, performance to performance. The harpsichordist plays twenty sounds in each of the ten movements. These may come together or they may come quite separately, though this latter is mostly preferable. They should surprise the violinist, both in timbre, in harmonic texture and in timing. They may be diatonic, chromatic or dissonant, they may or may not form patterns, progressions, melodies or rhythms. Most of the sounds should be relatively loud. But they should be inconsistent. The sounds should be sounds associated with traditional music, i.e., the musician should not slap or scrape the side of the instrument, for example. If another instrument than a harpsichord is used, maximum variety should be a prime objective. For instance, a piano, organ, percussion, carillon or synthesizer would all be suitable substitutes, whereas a clarinet would not.


ISBN 0-914162-55-1

$10.00

Other musical publications by Dick Higgins include: Piano Album:

Short Piano Pieces, 1962-

1984; $10.00 TWenty-Six

Mountains

for Mewing

the

Sunset From (for three dancers, four singers, two percussionists,

piano,

prepared

piano, two violins and cello), $12.00

Please write for our complete catalog: Printed Editions Post Office Box 27 Station Hill Road Barrytown, New York 12507

Higgins ten ways of looking at a bird  
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