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2013 CALENDAR

SHASTA COUNTY MASTER GARDENER


The average high in the month of January is 55 degrees while the average low is 36. Rains are recorded on average to be around 6”. Here’s a cool tip: Consider purchasing the Shasta College Master Gardener Journal for the purpose of creating a garden record of which varieties of flowers and vegetables do best and which do poorly in your garden.

WEATHER

“The most noteworthy thing about gardeners is that they are always optimistic, always enterprising, and never satisfied. They always look forward to doing something better than they have ever done before. ” -Vita Sackville-West

Cauliflower: To keep it snowy white, pull the leaves up over the head and tie them to block out the sun. Harvest when the buds are full and close together.

Broccoli: When broccoli buds are full and firm, cut the stalk with a knife.

Cabbage: To enjoy their sweet tender leaves, cut cabbages when they are rock-hard; if they feel springy, they need more time.

Many winter vegetables started in October or November are ready for harvest in January.

Harvesting winter vegetables

new ideas for this year’s garden.

• Spend some quality time with seed catalogs and checking interesting websites for

diseased.

• Inspect seeds you saved from last year’s garden. Discard any that are damp or

roots of nearby plants.

• Refrain from using salt on icy walks and driveways as salt runoff can burn the

• Keep snow brushed off shrubs and trees so branches are not damaged.

• Prune dormant fruit trees.

• Cut back ornamental grasses.

apricot, peach, and plum. Also, this is a great time to plant roses.

• This month is an excellent time to plant bare root fruit trees, such as cherry, apple,

Things to do this month

January


Sunday

21

20

27

14

13

28

MartinLuther King Day

7

6

Monday

8

1

29

22

15

New Year’s Day

Tuesday

9

2

30

23

16

Wednesday

Thursday

25

24

31

18

11

4

17

10

3

Friday

Saturday

26

19

12

5


In February , the average temperature is in the 50’s. The average high is in the mid to upper 50’s and the average low is around the high 30’s. The average precipitation is 9” given the average 9 rainy days per year around this time. Here’s a cool tip: To make sure your houseplants are growing well, check all five growing factors: light, temperature, nutrients, moisture, and humidity.

WEATHER

“Gardening is kind of a disease. It infects you. You cannot escape it. When you go visiting, your eyes rove about the garden; you interrupt the serious cocktail drinking because of an irresistible impulse to get up and pull a weed.” -Lewis Gannit

• Wait to prune camellias forsythia, lilac, quince, and other ornamental spring flowering shrubs until they finish blooming. (For more information about this, please visit the mastergardener.org website).

• Prune hydrangeas. Remove old canes, leaving young canes with flower buds attached. Hydrangeas bloom on the new year’s growth.

• Take care of your tools. A sharp, clean pruner will make clean cuts on plants, thus leaving less injury or risk of disease. Clean with mild bleach solution, sharpen the cutting edge, and wipe tools with mineral oil.

• Cut back woody shrubs. Encourage lush new growth on butterfly bush, fuchsia, and Mexican bush sage by cutting woody stems to within a few inches of the ground.

• Cut back citrus branches that touch the ground or other structures. Open up trees by trimming out crossing branches and anything that looks dead. These steps will help control scale and aphid infestations. (For more information about this, please visit the mastergardener.org website)

• Prune fall raspberries. Cut each cane to within a few inches from the ground.

• Pull those weeds now, being careful not to compact soil.

Things to do this month

February


President’s Day

Sunday

18

17

25

11

10

24

4

3

Monday

Tuesday

26

19

12

5

6

27

20

13

Wednesday

Valentine’s Day

Thursday

28

21

14

7

Friday

22

15

8

1

Saturday

23

16

9

2


The average temperature for March is in the 50‘s and like February the average high temperature is in the 60‘s. The average low temperature, however, is on average ten degrees high than February bringing it in the range of the 40’s. The average precipitation is 7” given the average 13 days out of this month. Here’s a cool tip: March may be a good month to note areas of poor drainage. Fill in low spots, holes, etc… in areas where water collects and pools.

WEATHER

“Your first job is to prepare the soil. The best tool for this is your neighbor’s garden tiller. If your neighbor does not own a garden tiller, suggest that he buy one.” -Dave Barry

• Sweet Woodruff (Zones 4-8) Whorled leaves, tiny fragrant blooms, spreading, 6” tall.

• Elegans Hosta (Zones 4-9) Large, frosty-blue leaves, mounded habit, 30” tall.

• Golden Corydalis (Zones 4-9) Bright yellow flowers, fern-like foliage 12” tall.

• Pink Turtlehead (Zones 3-9) Rose pink blooms in late summer, 3o”tall.

• The Rocket Lihulria (Zones 4-9) Yellow flower spikes 4” tall

Shade-loving plants

• Refrain from feeding azaleas and camellias until they are finished blooming.

• Refrain from feeding drought-tolerant natives as their growth slows before summer dormancy.

• Keep snails at bay by hand picking, trapping, baiting or using copper barriers.

• Keep aphids washed off plants using a strong blast of water.

• Wait to prune frost-damaged shrubs until new growth appears.

Things to do this month

March


Sunday

11

18

25

10

17

24

31

4

3

Monday

Tuesday

26

19

12

5

6

27

20

13

Wednesday

Thursday

28

21

14

7

Friday

29

22

15

8

1

Saturday

30

23

16

9

2


For the month of April, the average temperature is in the upper 50’s. The average high is in the low 70’s and the average low is in the lower 40’s. Precipitation begins to wane during this month; on average, rainfall amounts to 2”. For some parts of Shasta County the last day of frost occurs mid-month. Here’s a cool tip: Consider spring cleaning your houseplants during this month by removing dust from leaves.

WEATHER

April

“My green thumb came only as a result of the mistakes while learning to see things from the plant’s point of view.” -H. Fred Ale

• Add some color to empty beds with summer annuals like marigold, petunia, salvia, scabiosa, zinnia, and verbena. • For bouquets plants long-blooming perennials like coreopsis, daisies, lavender, purple coneflower, yarrow, statice, and alstromeria. • Plant heat-loving vegetables such as eggplant, corn, beans, melons, okra, peppers, melons, and tomatoes. • Clay pots are usually more attractive than plastic ones, but plastic ones retain moisture better. To get the best of both, slip a plastic pot into a slightly larger clay pot. You can even cover the rim of the plastic pot with dirt.

More To Consider

Composting is a great way to make food waste and unwanted garden materials into a treat for your soil and your plants. Just add your grass clippings, weeds, leaf piles, eggshells, sawdust, and pruning (do not add bones or animal fats). Keep evenly moist and turn often. Soon you will have great, well decomposed organic material to aerate and feed your soil.

Start a Compost Pile

• Fertilize roses as soon as they have a couple of inches of spring growth. • Think about staking plants now, before they really need it. • Earwigs are night feeders that hide in moist, tight places during the day. Control them by placing rolled-up damp newspaper in your garden in the evening, discard the trapped insects in the morning.

Things to do this month

April


Sunday

8

15

22

29

14

21

28

1

7

Monday

Tuesday

30

23

16

9

2

3

24

17

10

Wednesday

Thursday

25

18

11

4

Friday

26

19

12

5

Saturday

27

20

13

6


In the month of May, the average temperature is in the mid to upper 60’s. According to records, the average high is in the 80s and the average low is in the 50s. Average precipitation amounts to around 1”. In some areas of Shasta County, one may report frost; however, this is the time of year the chance of this occurring is very low. Here’s a cool tip: Get to know your neighbors! See what’s growing in their garden. Be inspired!

WEATHER

Leaving the roots of a nitrogen fixing legume crop from one season can serve

Crop rotation is a good practice for the benefit of soil quality and crop fertilizer needs.

Keeping up with removing weeds is important as the young plants will be competing for water and nutrients. When allowed to grow tall weeds will shade and rob young plants of available light and growing room. Weeds can also harbor pests and diseases. Using a hoe or digging up weeds before they flower and go to seed will help long term. While it is tempting to add green weeds to a compost bin, most home bins do not reach a high enough temperature to kill the seeds. Weeds are best disposed of by adding them to the green waste.

With the greatest danger of frost past and the soil achieving a sufficiently warm temperature, most seedlings can be planted and seeds can be sowed outside now except at higher elevations. Extend the harvest of row crops by “succession sowing”, planting a foot or two of seed every 7-10 days. Follow the recommendations for thinning seedlings to ensure crops such as carrots and beets will grow to a good size. Staggered planting will also improve the odds against being wiped out by a pest or disease.

Be prepared with support options for crops requiring them. Supports are more easily installed when plants are young. Fruit can be damaged or lost installing supports once plants are flowering or fruit is set.

May

Birds are welcome visitors to the garden when they are eating insect pests but not so much when our fruits and berries are consumed. Nets must be ready to be applied to crops subject to bird damage.

To get the maximum result for the effort of planning, planting and tending a garden include some plants to attract beneficials and pollinators. Bees, butterflies and hummingbirds will greatly contribute to the success of any garden.

May

A planting of root crops which have a low requirement for nitrogen would be a third season option. The soil is not so vulnerable for being depleted of nutrients if crops are rotated.

the needs of a subsequent crop of brassicas. Brassicas as group include bok choy, broccoli, brussels sprouts, cabbages, kale and turnips. As a group these plants are subject to many of the same pests and diseases. The risk of an infestation is reduced by not planting the same varieties in the same plot season after season.

May


Mother’s Day

Sunday

27

26

Memorial Day

20

13

12

19

6

5

Monday

Tuesday

28

21

14

7

8

1

29

22

15

Wednesday

Thursday

30

23

16

9

2

Friday

31

24

17

10

3

Saturday

25

18

11

4


June is typically a month of mild but changing weather gives way to early summer heat by the end of the month. In Redding, the average daily high temperature on June 1st is 84°F increasing to 93°F by June 30th. Similarly, average overnight low temperatures range from about 60°F on June 1st to 66°F by June 30th. Light spring rain or thunderstorms average monthly precipitation is less than 1”.

WE AT H ER

• • • • •

• •

Check your irrigation system (sprinklers, bubblers and drip systems) and make repairs Prune dead, damaged, or diseased wood in trees and shrubs; also prune hedges after the spring growth spurt Prune for fire blight in apple and pear trees Clean weeds from around woody plants Place about 2” of mulch around, but not against, the trunks of trees and woody plants Be on the lookout for garden insect pests, snails and slugs, and diseased plants Turn your compost pile and don’t let it dry out

June

Time to replace cool season flowering annuals as well as crop; and plant your remaining warm season vegetables before the month ends Stake your tomatoes and pinch out sucker growth Feed tomatoes with low-nitrogen fertilizer when fruit starts to develop

Maintenance

• •

It is also time to prepare for the coming summer heat. Soil moisture must be closely watched and regulated this month to avoid under- or over-watering as the weather changes. Spread mulch and compost to help retain soil moisture.

It is time to finish sowing your warm season vegetable garden seed (e.g., lima beans, corn, cucumbers, eggplant, squash and melons). Plant seeds directly into the garden in small amounts over 10-14 day intervals to expand your harvest period. There is also still time to plant slips or transplants of heat-resistant varieties of sweet potatoes and tomato plants. Stake or trellis your tomatoes and vegetable vines.

Gardening in June is a busy time. Everything is growing rapidly under peak conditions. Cool season annuals need to be replaced with warm season plants. Remove germinating weeds as they begin to sprout to reduce more labor intensive weeding later. Prune excess spring growth and remove any dead or damaged woody plant limbs. Deadhead roses to extend their flowering period and spring flowering perennials like rhododendron when they look messy.

Things to do this month

June


Father’s Day

Sunday

17

16

30

24

10

9

23

3

2

Monday

Tuesday

25

18

11

4

5

26

19

12

Wednesday

Thursday

27

20

13

6

Friday

28

21

14

7

Saturday

29

22

15

8

1


July is the hottest month of the year in Redding. The average daily highs range from 95°F to 100°F over the course of the month with average daily lows of about 67°F. A meager 0.05 inches of precipitation from infrequent showers can be expected. There is negligible cloud cover over the course of the month. Wind speeds typically vary from 0 to 14 mph (calm to moderate breeze).

WEATHER

Plant a pot or two of red, white, and blue annuals and perennials for 4th of July. There’s still time to get beans, corn, cucumbers, eggplant, peppers, pumpkins, summer squash, and tomatoes in the ground. Deadhead faded blooms, including the part where the and seed forms. For plants such as marguerite santolina that produce masses of flowers, save time by pruning with hedge or grass clippers. Mow wild grasses and weeds, leaving a wide swath around your property. Remember fire safety. Trim dead growth from shrubs and trees, and prune any branches that overhang the eaves. If your geraniums, nicotiana, penstemons, and petunias appear healthy but have no flowers, budworms are probably the culprits. Spray plants every 7 to 10 days with Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt). If your lawn or flowerbeds are plagued with nutsedge or crabgrass then chances are you are watering too often. Get rid of these weeds by pulling or using an herbicide, but change your watering regime too.

• •

• • •

July

Set out bearded irises. Plant in full sun (or light afternoon shade in hottest climates) and fast‐draining soil. Set 1 to 2 feet apart, and plant so the tops will be barely covered with soil.

Things to do this month

July


Sunday

8

15

22

29

14

21

28

1

7

Monday

Tuesday

30

23

16

9

2

3

31

24

17

10

Independence Day

Wednesday

Thursday

25

18

11

4

Friday

26

19

12

5

Saturday

27

20

13

6


August in Redding is characterized by sizzling temperatures slowly falling from average daily highs of 98°F on August 1st to 93°F on August 31st and corresponding average daily low temperatures of 67°F to 63°F. August is also the second driest month of the year with only 0.22 inches of rainfall on average. The relative humidity typically ranges from 18% (dry) to 65% (mildly humid).

WEATHER

Before fall planting, amend soil with worn castings, compost and soil conditioner. Now is also a good time to start a worm bin, which will provide castings for spring soil amending.

August

Apricots and olives should be pruned after fruiting to reduce future disease problems. Summer pruning of peaches, plums, and nectarines is also recommended for backyard orchards, where you are trying to keep the trees short so that fruit is within easy reach.

Keep warm‐season annuals blooming through the end of summer and into fall by water and fertilize them regularly with fish emulsion or other fertilizer.

For late‐season color in lower elevations include aster, mums, coreopsis, daylily, gaillardia, gaura, lavatera, Nemesia fruticans, rudbeckia, Russian sage, summer phlox, and verbena.

Watering is still the most critical job of all this month. Mulch beds to conserve water in the landscape.

Plant a fast‐maturing potato such as 'French Fingerling' or 'Russian Banana' for a crop by Christmas.

Sow seeds for fall and winter harvest indoors or in shade. Plant beets, carrots, turnips, Chinese cabbage, kale, lettuce, or green onions.

Things to do this month

August


Sunday

5

12

19

26

4

11

18

25

Monday

Tuesday

27

20

13

6

7

28

21

14

Wednesday

Thursday

29

22

15

8

1

Friday

30

23

16

9

2

Saturday

31

24

17

10

3


The average high in the month of September is 90 degrees while the average low is 58 degrees. Rains are recorded on average to be around 2/3rd of an inch. Here’s a cool tip: Count the number of chirps in 14 seconds and add 40 to get the temperature in Fahrenheit at the location of the cricket.

WEATHER

“Beauty never slumbers; all is in her name; but the rose remembers the dust from which it came.” -Edna St. Vincent Millay

September

Soon these beautiful orange fruits will start ripening. In addition to providing fruit, the persimmon tree is a nicely sized landscape tree that grows to about 25 feet tall and wide. The tree drops its leaves quickly in the fall for easy cleanup, allowing the sun to warm the garden and nearby walls during the winter months. Persimmons come in two types-astringent until soft (Hachiya type) or non-astringent when still crisp (Fuya type). Both have their uses and provide great fall color with the fruit on bare trees as they ripen. The fruit must be cut off the trees as you will damage them if you pull. To learn more about the varieties, take a look at some excellent information at the California Rare Fruit Growers website as suggested by our Statewide Master Gardener Website.

Persimmons

Continue to enjoy the ebbing and flowing of your rose blooms all through September! To stimulate new growth, you may prune new blooms to fragrance your home or spend buds to tidy up your garden. To prune your roses, make your cuts above a growth node at a fiveleaflet leaf pointing outward at a mid-way point on the cane. Clean up all dropped petals and leaves from the ground as a good practice of promoting optimal rose hygiene. Feed lightly with an organic or all purpose fertilizer and water deeply. Repeat after each bloom cycle to keep roses flowering for months to come.

Roses

Get out and enjoy the beautiful display of tree foliage in cooler mountain areas!

Blackberry and raspberry canes that bore fruits this year can be cut to the ground.

Fall-planted trees, shrubs, and perennials should not be fertilized at planting time as this promotes fresh new growth that will freeze.

Things to do this month

September


Sunday

9

16

23

30

15

22

29

Labor Day

2

8

1

Monday

Tuesday

24

17

10

3

4

25

18

11

Wednesday

Thursday

26

19

12

5

Friday

27

20

13

6

Saturday

28

21

14

7


The days are still warm, in the 70’s and 80’s, but the nights are really starting to cool down. The average highs are in the mid- to high-70’s, while the lows are averaging in the mid-40’s. The first substantial rains often hit in October, dropping anywhere from 1”, on a dry year, to 5” in a wet one. The wind also makes an appearance, with breezy days helping the trees to lose their leaves.

WEATHER

Maintenance Change watering schedules in accord with rainfall predictions Clean & sharpen garden tools Gather leaves from gutters and landscape into pile to make leaf mold compost Make room in the compost area for the summer vegetable garden plants Add well-rotted manure or finished compost to empty beds, then plant a cover crop, unless winter vegetables will be planted Repair any irrigation issues experienced during the summer Divide lemongrass Monitor and turn compost if the temp rises above 160°F or below 90°F, or at least once a month, to keep it composting.

What to Plant Garlic, Shallots, Onions & Leeks Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage, Cauliflower Celery Hardy herbs: rosemary, parsley Greens: Chard, Kale, Lettuce, Mizuna, Mustard

Bed Prep & Cleanup Beds that are going to be kept fallow for the season should be raked clean of last season’s plants and mulch. Planting a cover crop is recommended, unless following a treatment plan for a pest or disease. For a winter vegetable garden, rake clean all of last season’s growth & mulch. Lay down an inch or two of compost and fix any irrigation issues to prepare for the new crops.

Things to Do This Month

Leaves may be starting to turn and fall, which means gutters and garden beds will need to be cleaned out before rain comes.

Tender herbs are still producing, but let some go to seed so that seeds can be saved.

Even though the first frost isn’t due until next month, many north state gardeners start taking out their summer vegetable crops, but there’s plenty of tomatoes, cucumbers, peppers, and eggplants to be harvested yet. Keep up with the harvesting, though, so a sudden frost won’t get the most of the produce. Make sure to save seeds from your favorite fruits and vegetables, from these final harvests.

Garden Activities

October


Sunday

21

28

20

27

14

13

Columbus Day

7

6

Monday

Tuesday

29

22

15

8

1

9

2

30

23

16

Wednesday

Halloween

Thursday

31

24

17

10

3

Friday

25

18

11

4

Saturday

26

19

12

5


The average high in the month of November is 63 degrees while the average low is 41 degrees. Rains are recorded on average to be around 4.5”. Here’s a cool tip: Do a final cleanup of lilies and other perennials before winter sets in. Try your hand at saving some seeds and creating new and interestingly-colored flowers.

WEATHER

Plant spring blooming bulbs now Mulch citrus; use compost for added moisture and nutrition during cold months; Mulch unused soil plots to keep healthy; Although it important to keep plants moist, do not water on the night of frost; Prune dead or diseased wood on citrus and make sure to sterilize your shears/ loppers in a bucket with 10% bleach sand water between use; Planting native plants now will help them establish, thus requiring less water in summer; The local Native Plant Society can help with selecting appropriate plants to incorporate into your garden.

• • • •

• • •

Plan projects now! Your local nursery and Master Gardener community can offer your help and advise; Cover compost piles: assure bottom drainage; Growing fungal mycella for compost teas will need additional warmth until spring. Insulate outside worm bins or bring small bins inside. Consider using a safe heating device (e.g. A heat rope can be purchased at pet stores); Make greenhouse repairs now; Check all external water pipes for leaks and add insulation if needed; Check irrigation system; Inventory frost cloths, row covers and blankets; also consider frost covers for chicory, endive, tomatoes, melons or any frost tender plants still growing during this month; Look for bugs! Pest problems can be easier controlled in cool seasons.

Preparation

• • • • •

Things to do this month

November


Sunday

18

25

17

24

11

10

Veteran’s Day

4

3

Monday

Tuesday

26

19

12

5

6

27

20

13

Wednesday

28

21

14

7

Thanksgiving Day

Thursday

Friday

29

22

15

8

1

Saturday

30

23

16

9

2


The average high in the month of December is 55 degrees while the average low is 36. Rains are recorded on average to be around 6.25”. Here’s a cool tip: After Christmas, place your live tree outside after your remove all of the ornaments. When outside, decorate it with with garlands of popcorn and berries. Fruits can be secured on the tree and consider covering a few of the fruits with peanut butter and birdseeds.

WEATHER

“As one grows older, one should grow more expert at finding beauty in unexpected places, in desert and even in towns, in ordinary human faces and among wild weeds” -C. C. Vyvyan

The flowers on Christmas cactus begin as buds set in autumn for blooming around Christmas. Unfortunately, the name cactus may be misleading. This plant is not from the desert sands. It is an epiphyte (tree-perching plant) native to humid jungle coastal areas in Brazil. It is at its best in quick draining soil that is kept barely moist during the summer growing season. The buds begin to form as autumn nights become longer and cooler. The problem is that as a houseplant, cool weather means heated rooms, resulting in hot, dry air that can destroy the buds. Find a cool spot to keep your plant at night during the budding and flowering period.

Christmas cactus

When repotting, be sure to go up one pot size at a time. Moving a small plant to significantly larger pot may kill it.

When feeding a plant, be sure to water a dry plant first, then fertilize a day or two later.

Cut back on watering. To prevent pots from sitting directly in water, set pots on pebble trays for drainage.

House plants appreciate an occasional shower to clean of dust and to flush salts out of potting soil.

Instead of using leaf shine, simply wipe house dust off leaves.

Tips on caring for houseplants through the winter

December


Sunday 2

9

16

23

30

1

8

15

22

29

Monday

Christmas Day

Tuesday

18

17

31

25

11

10

24

4

3

Wednesday

Thursday

20

27

26

13

6

19

12

5

Friday

Saturday

28

21

14

7


August Light sprinkling of water is harmful, because it encourages root development near the soil surface. Shallow root systems require frequent watering to keep the surface wet, which creates an ideal environment for weeds and diseases. Therefore, water consistently and deeply. Encouraging deep root growth by infrequent heavy irrigation maximizes water use and turfgrass quality. Avoid runoff and puddling

Lawns: "Grass cycling" is when the lawn mower mulches the grass clippings, helping to fertilize the lawn with nitrogen. Aerate the lawn (twice a year) and other compacted soils. Multi-trajectory, rotating streams apply water more slowly and uniformly to your landscape, encouraging healthy plant growth. If you properly direct water flow with this system, you will use 20% less water than conventional spray heads. Perform "water audits" to ensure the even distribution of the right amount of water.

November Reduce yard waste by using the right plant in the right place, pruning selectively and properly, and water and fertilize judiciously. Excessive nitrogen fertilization and water can lead to vigorous growth that will eventually need to be pruned and disposed of.

Composting also improves soil structure and tilth, which helps absorb and infiltrate onsite water. Compost benefits clay soils by increasing aeration and water infiltration. Sandy soils benefit with compost by increasing water holding capacity and holding onto nutrients. Composting will decrease the use of synthetic fertilizers and pesticides. Non-organic mulch provides many of the same benefits as compost.

October Cover the soil around flower beds, shrubs, and trees with two to four inches of compost in the Fall and Spring. Compost protects the soil from the rain, decreases runoff and erosion, adds nutrients to the soil, conserves soil moisture in the summer, evens out soil temperatures for less stress on plant roots thus promoting root growth, reduces annual weeds, and promotes beneficial soil organisms.

September Since Fall is usually the best time to plant groundcover, perennials, shrubs, and trees, plan your garden now. Landscape for the local climate and conditions. Assess site conditions and select plants that thrive under those conditions (think native or Mediterranean plants). Select plants whose ultimate size and shape fit your needs. Select and group plants with similar water needs (the same hydrozone) and are naturally found together. Avoid invasive plants. A good example is a grouping of drought tolerant, native plants. Consider minimizing turf. Lawns require up to twice the water of landscape plants.

Use deciduous trees to: Shade west and east side of the home to block summer sunlight before it enters the windows, shade air conditioner, and shade paved areas. In winter the trees drop their leaves and allow the sun to warm your home.

Prevent wind and sun damage by wrapping or painting with a dilute latex paint the tree trunks. Keep suckers cut back. July Integrated Pest Management (IPM) is a strategy to prevent and suppress pest problems with minimum adverse impacts on human health, the environment, and non-target organisms. IPM will attract and protect your beneficial insects. Get to know what your beneficial insects look like and therefore protect them. Relying on predators to control insect pests can greatly reduce or eliminate the use of pesticides.

as much as possible. The best time of day to water a lawn is early morning (2 AM to 8 AM), when evaporation is minimal, making water-use efficiency optimal. Early evening or night watering is not recommended because during cool nights wet blades and thatch are highly susceptible to disease development. (From the Master Gardener Handbook)

June Trees: Trees can reduce air temperatures as much as 9째F . Temperatures directly under trees can be as much as 25째F cooler than air temperatures above nearby blacktop. About 40 percent of the unwanted heat that builds up in your house comes in through windows.

Best Garden Sustainability Practices


April Start a compost pile: Composting is a great way to turn food waste and unwanted garden materials into a treat for your soil and your plants. Just add your grass clippings (if you do not "grass cycle"), weeds, leaf

March Spring plant sales are around the corner. Use native plants whenever possible. They are best adapted to local conditions. There are a great variety of species for all conditions, although sometimes a challenge to find. Natives provide better food and cover for wildlife, and require less care and maintenance.

Where feasible: Use hand tools rather than power, electric tools rather than gas tools, 4-cycle engines rather than 2-cycle, and keep power tools well-tuned.

February Take care of your tools. A sharp, clean pruner will make clean cuts on plants, thus leaving less injury or risk of disease. Clean with mild bleach solution (10%), sharpen the cutting edge, and wipe tools with mineral oil.

January This is the wettest month in Redding so prevent water runoff. You can create your own "wetland garden" or "infiltration basin" by mimicking natural wetlands. Divert storm water runoff from your roof to an area planted with wetland species. You can also plant wetland species in any area that naturally collects water in your yard. The vegetation in the bottom of the basin should tolerate wetter conditions. Or the infiltration basin can mimic a dry creek bed filled with river rock. Also prevent water runoff by mulching, planting trees and other vegetation, and using pervious surfaces.

Consider fire-safe landscaping as you ready your property this time of year for the upcoming fire season.

December Create and protect wildlife habitat. Choose native plants and diverse plantings; restore wildlife corridors by vertical layering; provide water (the most important), cover, food, and space.

Check out the website http://shrb.blogspot.com/ for links to information and plants lists for fire-safe landscaping as well as much more information on sustainable gardening and horticulture in general.

It's important to remember that new plants need time to adapt. Until their roots are established they need regular, supplemental watering. Remove moisture-robbing weeds and mulch heavily.

Irrigate established plants deeply and infrequently. Avoid watering every day. Water a few inches below the current root system during each watering to encourage deep rooting. Every serious gardener should have a soil sampling tube or another method to measure the water content of the soil.

May Think about efficient irrigation systems as the dry Mediterranean summer begins. Apply water only as needed according to soil, conditions, and plant type. Water cycling may be necessary to avoid runoff, allowing the water to seep into the soil. Divide the total amount of water required per day into 2-4 cycles. Apply water as close to initial event as possible before soil dries out. Adjust the irrigation controller at least quarterly. "Smart irrigation controllers" are the most efficient systems and will likely be the future of home garden irrigation.

Yard wastes in California are the largest component of municipal waste. Grass clippings = about half the yard trimmings deposited in state landfills.

piles, eggshells, sawdust, and prunings (do not add bones or animal fats). Keep evenly moist and turn often. Soon you will have great, well-decomposed organic material to aerate and feed your soil.


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This vegetable garden planting schedule provided below is designed for Shasta County gardens in USDA Hardiness Zone 9. This would include gardens in most parts of Anderson, Cottonwood, Redding and Shasta Lake.

April 15th is the date many local gardeners use as a “rule of thumb� for the last spring frost of the year, but late frosts do occur. If your garden is at a higher elevation, or has a colder microclimate, then you need to adjust your vegetable garden planting schedule to account for late spring and early fall frost. Because conditions in Shasta County are so diverse, the suggested planting dates are only approximate. Contact experienced gardeners and neighbors in your local community and experiment in your own garden to establish more precise planting dates.

Vegetable Planting Schedule


1-2 inches; well-drained, moist

Begonia:

3 inches; well-drained, moist and fertile

Crocus:

Daffodil:

Dahlia:

1-2 inches; well-drained

2-3 inches; well-drained, moist and fertile

Elephant's Ears:

Grape Hyacinth:

2 inches; well-drained

4 inches; well-drained, moist and sandy

6 inches; well-drained, fertile

2 inches; well-drained, moist

Shamrock:

Snowflake:

Tulips:

Windflower:

Ornamental Onion: 3-4 inches; well-drained, moist and fertile

4 inches; well-drained

Dutch iris:

2-4 inches; well-drained, moist and fertile

6 inches; well-drained, moist and fertile

1-2 inches; neutral-alkaline

Christmas Rose:

4-6 inches; well-drained, moist and fertile

Amaryllis:

Fall bulb planting depth

Bulb Planting Schedule


Shasta College Community Teaching Garden Shasta Community College 11555 Old Oregon Trail • P.O. Box 496006 Redding, CA 96049-6006

Website: www.ipm.ucdavis.edu

UC Davis- Integrated Pest Management Website Insect and Disease Management Information for Agriculture and Home Gardeners

Website: ucanr.org/sites/Shasta_College_Master_Gardener Hotline office: 530.242.2219 Hotline E-mail: mastergardener @shastacollege.edu

University of California Shasta County Master Gardeners Monthly meeting held the 2nd Thursday of each month (except July, August, December) 6:30 – 7:30 PM at Shasta College Health Sciences and University Center (1400 Market Street; Room 8220 Redding, CA 96007)

Website: ceshasta.ucdavis.edu

1851 Hartnell Avenue Redding, CA 96002-2217 Phone: 530.224.4900

University of California Cooperative Extension Gardening and Master Gardening 4H Programs Forestry Livestock and Range Management Nutrition, Family and Consumer Science

Phone: 1-800-TURTLEBAY 530.243.8850

800.887.8532 or

McConnell Arboretum and Botanical Gardens at Turtle Bay Street Address: (1335 Arboretum Drive Redding, CA 96001) Mailing Address: (840 Sundial Bridge Drive Redding, CA 96003)

Shasta Horticultural Resource Bulletin - SHRB Calendar of local gardening events and organizations Website: shrb.blogspot.com

Shasta Iris Society Ann Hass – President E-mail: AnnHass@yahoo.com

Website: www.shastacnps.org

California Native Plant Society Monthly meeting held the 3rd Thursday of each month (except July, August, December) 7:00 – 8:00 PM at Shasta College Health Sciences and University Center (1400 Market Street; Room 8220 Redding, CA 96007)

Website: www.shastarosesociety.org

Shasta Rose Society Monthly meeting held the 3rd Wednesday of each month (except July, August, December) 7:00-8:00 PM at City of Redding Corporation Yard (2055 Viking Way, Bldg. 4, Room 401 Redding, CA)

Phone: 530.242.7500 Website: www.shastacollege.edu/teachinggarden

Resources

Healthy Shasta 2660 Breslauer Way Redding, CA 96001 Phone: (530) 229-8428 Website: w w w. h e a l t h y s h a s t a . o r g / farmersmarkets.htm

Happy Valley Farm Trail Phone: (530) 357-2416 Website: www.happyvalleyfarmtrail.com

Phone: (530) 226-7100

Shasta Growers Association- Farmers Market Locations Redding Certified Farmers Market P.O. Box 990187 Redding, CA 96099-0187

Phone: (530) 752-4880 Website: www.arboretum.ucdavis.edu

UC Davis Arboretum 1 Shields Avenue Davis, CA 95616 Headquarters: Valley Oak Cottage (TB-32) LaRue Road, UC Davis

Phone: (530) 235-4740 Website: www.dunsmuirbotanicalgardens.org

Dunsmuir Botanical Gardens P.O. Box 242 Dunsmuir, CA 96025

Website: www.turtlebay.org/gardens


Let’s all share in the appreciation for the Master Gardener’s who have provided their time and expertise in putting together this calendar. The information shared in these pages offer inspiration and sound gardening wisdom. May the photographic images, provided by Douglas Jernberg, inspire deep reflection on the beauty of your garden...

Gratitude…

Shasta County Master Gardener Shasta County Master Gardener The Master Gardener Program is a community service organization, designed to relay research-based horticulture information to the home gardener. This program was developed by the University of California Cooperative Extension to train interested people to help local gardeners diagnose plant problems and to assist home horticulturists in keeping their plants healthy. Certified Master Gardeners staff informational booths at county fairs and local farmer’s markets, host plant clinics at community centers, appear on public access television, conduct workshops at garden clubs and elementary schools, and develop community gardens. Our information office is at Shasta College where Master Gardener volunteers answer phones and do the research necessary to provide answers to all sorts of horticultural and related questions. If they do not have an immediate answer, they will know where to get one based on the latest scientific research. This project, is a fund-raiser for our association. The money earned will be used to fund various community projects throughout our area.

© Shasta County Master Gardener Monthly Calendar 2012-2013

2013 MG Calendar  

Well it is here! The 2013 MG Calendar is available to grace the lovely walls of your home, greenhouse or garden shop. Included in this calen...

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