Issuu on Google+

19 GET TO

FRIDAY, AUGUST 16, 2013 VOLUME XIX, ISSUE 19

THE POINT THE

NEWSLETTER

OF THE

NCCC

ATLANTIC REGION

ISSUE 19 19 Tips for Life After AmeriCorps


CONTENTS

IN THIS

ISSUE 03

Gallery Images from Round 4 projects

05

Bulletin Board Update of Independent Service Hours & Team Reminders

I’m a member of the National Civilian Community Corps, an AmeriCorps Program.

06 ↑ Raven 2 member

Life After AmeriCorps 19 Tips for Life After AmeriCorps:

Travis Hanes poses

Selected online resources and

in front of a school

excerpts from AmeriCorps Alums

bulletin board

that can improve your transition

while working with the Reaching the

N-Triple-C members are 18 to 24 and spend 10 months getting things done for America while developing their own leadership. We

Summit Community Service Initiative in

08

Alumni Spotlight

West Virginia last

Katie Manchester, Class XVII

month.

Corps Member, Class XVIII Support Team Leader, North

serve on teams to help communities

Central Region

prepare for and respond to disasters, build homes, and help the environment.

10

Community Relations

To learn more, visit NationalService.gov or call 1.800.942.2677

11

Shout Outs

12

Team Project Map

CONNECT WITH AMERICORPS NCCC ATLANTIC REGION Sam McKenzie, Community Relations Specialist (CRS) Phone: 410.642.2411 Ext. 6244 ● Email: smckenzie@cns.gov Mona Hillstrand, Assistant Community Relations Specialist (ACRS) Phone: 202.815.4259 ● Email: rhillstrand@cns.gov Ben Dillon, Community Relations Support Team Leader (CRSTL) Phone: 443.995.7940 ● Email: bedillon.guest@cns.gov

Facebook.com/NCCCAtlanticRegion @AmeriCorpsNCCC NationalService.gov

2

AUGUST 16, 2013 | GET TO THE POINT

About the cover To mark Class 19’s nineteenth issue of Get to the Point, we are presenting 19 tips for a successful transition to Life After AmeriCorps. Page 6.


G ALLERY

Friends of All Sizes ↑

Buffalo 3 member Wayne Sun examines an earthworm dug up while clearing emergency evacuation routes near Torrington, Conn.

→ Buffalo 1 member Alex McDonald examines a praying mantis he discovered while moving furniture at Creative City Public Charter School in Baltimore. ↓

Raven 5 member Chris May presents his teammates with a praying mantis found while removing invasive plants from Valley Forge National Historic Park in Pennsylvania.

GET TO THE POINT | AUGUST 16, 2013

3


G ALLERY

Moose 5 Team Leader Michelle Pinter-Petrillo uses a sawzall to shave a two-by-four while building a house with Habitat for Humanity of Greater Newburgh in New York.

→ Buffalo 4 member Kaitlyn Liafsha scrapes peeling paint from a gazebo platform while working on urban beatification projects with Baltimore City Bureau of Parks. ↓

4

Raven 1 member Bridget Kimbell paints a window sill at Phoenix Charter Academy in Lawrence, Mass.

AUGUST 16, 2013 | GET TO THE POINT


BULLETI N B O ARD

There are fewer than 100 days remaining in the service term! Finish your ISPs and make time with your team count!

the first unit to The race to become Once again, finish ISPs continues! lled into the the Raven Unit has pu Unit is still falo Buf lead, but the els! he its nipping at urs Complete Percentage of ISP Ho Raven: 81.20 Buffalo: 78.25 Moose: 76.12

“To find joy in work is to discover the fountain of youth.� - Pearl S. Buck

GET TO THE POINT | AUGUST 16, 2013

5


19 LI FE AFTE R AME RI CORP S

REVIEW YOUR RESUME “While we hope that everyone knows AmeriCorps, your accomplishments need to stand on their own regardless of how much the employer knows about national service. Ask someone to review your resume who doesn’t know about AmeriCorps or what you did during your service to make sure that it is clearly articulated. Since many employers will look at a resume first (and in some cases, only look at your resume) be sure to include under your address a note that you will be relocating to X city by X date.” Excerpt from Ask the Career Coach: How to Relocate for an Out-of-State Job on the AmeriCorps Alums Blog NETWORK ONLINE Enhance your professional network by joining the AmeriCorps Alums LinkedIn Group. If you’re new to LinkedIn, watch the AmeriCorps Alums webinar on how to get started.

18

TAP INTO BIG RESOURCES Look for job postings by umbrella organizations. “Examples include professional associations like The Center For Association Leadership, Government Associations, United Way chapters, HandsOn Network Volunteer Action Centers, Net Impact Chapters, community foundations and local nonprofit associations.”

17

Excerpt from Ask the Career Coach: How to Relocate for an Out-of-State Job on the AmeriCorps Alums Blog

6

AUGUST 16, 2013 | GET TO THE POINT

TIPS FOR LIFE AFTER AMERICORPS

T

o mark the nineteenth issue of Get to the Point, we’re presenting 19 tips for making a successful transition to Life After AmeriCorps. Whether you choose to further your education, start a career, or continue full-time community service, these tips can help you take advantage of opportunities and maximize the experience you’ve gained as a Corps Member. In addition to selected online resources, we have included excerpts from the website of AmeriCorps Alums, a national network of AmeriCorps alumni established by Points of Light. For more information, or to become a member, visit AmeriCorpsAlums.org

16 13

PLAN TO RELOCATE “FindYourSpot.com is a fun website to help you think through factors that matter in a new geographic location. If you can afford it, plan a visit now and set up as many networking meetings as possible.”

Excerpt from Ask the Career Coach: How to Relocate for an Out-of-State Job on the AmeriCorps Alums Blog PARTICIPATE IN WEBINARS Each month, AmeriCorps Alums conducts a career webinar that aims to improve your knowledge around a variety of career topics. Topics include a wide array of subjects, ranging from leadership and resume assistance to career panels and graduate school planning.

15

FIND A FLEXIBLE TRANSITION JOB Look for jobs that allow you to telecommute or keep a flexible schedule while transitioning between locations after AmeriCorps. Websites like FlexJobs.com are reliable resources for flexible, entry-level jobs in several career fields.

14

LOOK FOR STEPPINGSTONES Denise Riebman, Career Coach Columnist for AmeriCorps Alums: “Explore positions at organizations which are working on a broad range of issues so that you could land a position based on your current experience and transition into other projects and roles within the same place. I worked with a student who accepted a position within the Department of Education that was not in her preferred area. However, once she was settled into her role, she offered to assist with additional projects beyond her initial scope of work that extended into her ideal area of interest. She built her experience and reputation for this area until she eventually transitioned into a new role within the agency.” Excerpt from Ask the Career Coach: Shifting Career Fields on the AmeriCorps Alums Blog RESEARCH NON-PROFITS If you’re interested in working in the non-profit field, GuideStar.org is a great resource for finding organizations that do the work you are passionate about.

12


11

EXPAND CAREER SKILLS THROUGH ALUMS CHAPTER LEADERSHIP Dhri Pandya, co-president, North Texas Chapter of AmeriCorps Alums: “In just a year, it has been a tremendously enriching experience. From creating a media strategy to engage more alumni to working with local AmeriCorps programs to form the North Texas AmeriCorps Alliance, the position as Chapter Leader has allowed me to hone professional skills in ways I never would have imagined of a volunteer position. In addition, I have been able to develop knowledge in the areas of public relations, marketing, and communications. These additional skills have allowed me to take more initiative in areas of my “day job” not normally within my scope of work. Not only that, it has been wonderful getting to know my local AmeriCorps peers and work with AmeriCorps Alumni who have become not only professional connections but dear friends.” Excerpt from the AmeriCorps Alums Career Newsletter, May 2013 CONSIDER TEACHING For anyone interested in teaching or working in the field of education, TeachForAmerica.org has an amazing list of resources and domestic education programs.

10

TALK TO STAFF MEMBERS Atlantic Region staff members have a wealth of knowledge, experience, and professional networks. Take some time to talk to staff members, whether in person or via email, about their career paths and how their service experience has shaped their professions.

9

TALK TO THE CORPS Your fellow Corps Members are some of your best resources. Some members have taught or served abroad, earned bachelor’s or master’s degrees, gone on missions trips, or spent time in the professional world. Ask around. You may be surprised at what opportunities you find.

8

4

LI FE AFTE R AME RI CORP S

7 LOOK FOR AMERICORPS POSITIONS IN YOUR AREA OF INTEREST “After my year in NCCC, I had come a little closer to identifying a few professional goals. My interests pointed me towards Higher Education and I began to look for a way to connect this field with civic engagement. Along came an AmeriCorps VISTA position that fit like a glove. I applied for and was hired as the AmeriCorps VISTA in the Office of Service-Learning at Gannon University in Erie, PA where I am currently finishing my year of service. The position is part of a collaborative project called Lake Effect Leaders which is made up of 4 colleges and 12 non-profit organizations in the region. It was the diverse experiences that I had in NCCC that made my resume stand out. Not only did my projects provide the extra “wow factor” that my supervisor was looking for, but they provided me with endless stories to tell during the interview.” Jennifer Schadd, Class 18 Alumna, Southwest Region SEARCH USAJOBS FOR OPEN POSITIONS WITH CNCS The Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS) regularly posts job openings on USAJobs.gov, the Federal Government’s official job site.

6

UTILIZE LIFE AFTER AMERICORPS DAYS With hurricane season and the end of the service term nearing, remember to use your LAA days to polish your resume, apply to jobs or schools, or simply do research on possible service opportunities.

5

USE YOUR EDUCATION AWARD FOR SPECIAL INTEREST PROGRAMS “Some alums have been able to use their Ed Award to pay for special interests classes, including EMT training, SCUBA lessons, photography courses, and sewing classes. Some of these courses eventually turned a hobby into a career path for our alums! Other alums were able to enroll in study abroad programs, even after graduating from school. Check with your institution to make sure that the Ed Award is accepted in its programs.” Excerpt from Using Your Segal Education Award in the New Year from the AmeriCorps Alums Blog ASK FOR REFERENCES IN ADVANCE If you want to use your Team Leader, Unit Leader, or another NCCC staff member as a reference, make sure to ask them before applying for a job. They will appreciate your pro-activeness and will have more time to prepare a well-written reference letter.

3

BUILD RAPPORT WITH PROJECT SPONSORS It’s not uncommon for AmeriCorps alumni to land jobs with previous project sponsors. Take advantage of the fact that you already have your foot in the door with employees of several non-profit organizations. Talk to them about your career interests and keep in touch with them about position openings.

2

PREPARE FOR LIFE AFTER AMERICORPS DAY The Atlantic Region Life After AmeriCorps Day will include guest panels on international and domestic service opportunities, as well additional AmeriCorps opportunities, and a resource fair with representatives from several non-profit organizations and colleges. Once the list of attending organizations is finalized, you should tailor your resume to your areas of interest and come prepared to speak with representatives about your experience.

1

GET TO THE POINT | AUGUST 16, 2013

7


ALUM NI SPOTLI GHT

KATIE MANCHESTER

INTERVIEW BY STEPHANIE FERGUSON

Why did you join NCCC? An opportunity to serve our country and to assist those in need. What was your favorite aspect of NCCC? The variety of service projects. What was your most interesting project? I really can’t pick just one. My team had the opportunity to serve on seven projects throughout the year with three of those being disaster projects. The disaster projects provided variety, having assisted in three different capacities; needs assessment, shelter operations, and mucking and gutting.

8

AUGUST 16, 2013 | GET TO THE POINT

NCCC REGION: North Central (Iowa) SERVICE TERMS: Class XVII Corps Member; Class XVIII Support Team Leader CURRENT RESIDENCE: Nantucket, Mass. CURRENT OCCUPATION: Office Manager, Madaket Marine; Founder, Volunteer Nantucket (Non-Profit)

What was the most challenging aspect? Getting used to living with a team of nine and not having much time to myself. Can you tell us a story in which you learned something about yourself through service? I learned that I am capable of going with the flow. As someone who plans and likes to follow a plan, I experienced many situations that didn’t always go as planned. Having been pulled for three disaster assignments, my team and I had to adapt to the ever-changing tasks and environments.


ALUM NI SPOTLI GHT

What skills did you gain as a Corps Member and Team Leader? Patience and delegation. With supervising close to 100 members as the POSTL, I had to put my delegation skills to use. As someone who struggles with delegation, I had to remember that I could do things myself, but by me doing them, what are the CMs learning? What advice would you give to current Corps Members? You can do anything for 10 months (and it’s worth it). The skills and experiences that you have through NCCC are unlike any other. You may not realize it at the moment, but after completing your term of service, reflect on it and you’ll realize it.

How did AmeriCorps affect your life path? Volunteering has always been an important part of my life. AmeriCorps NCCC steered me in the path of founding Volunteer Nantucket to promote volunteerism and help others find volunteer opportunities on the island that they are interested in. How have you continued to serve? After completing my TL year I founded an organization in my hometown (Nantucket) that connects volunteers with the current opportunities on the island. In what spare time that I do have I usually find myself volunteering for many of the opportunities that my organization lists.

“The skills and experiences that you have through NCCC are unlike any other.”

GET TO THE POINT | AUGUST 16, 2013

9


COMM UNI TY RE LATI ONS

Weekly Updates for Media/CAP Reps. Shout Outs

Media Reminders

Thanks to Greg Starling (M5) for his quick turn-around on emailing a potential applicant and his assigned alumni contact on the same day of our request!

Distribute Press Releases by August 19

Thanks to B1, M4, R1, R2 and R5 for submitting tweets early in the round! Refer to the glide path (at right) to stay on track with tweets. You can submit them via email, text or WPR.

Thanks to everyone who submitted Round 4 press releases on time! We were especially happy to see solid quotes from project sponsors in the releases.

Round 4 GTTP Articles: Buffalo 4 — August 18 Moose 4 — August 25 Raven 4 — Sept. 1 Phoenix 4 — Sept. 8

Glide Path for Tweets: 4 by August 19 6 by August 26 8 by September 2 10 by September 12

Submit a yearbook photo of each member of your team by the end of the round. All members should wear formal shirts for the photos.

Media Reps have the option to complete a Team Leader spotlight article to count as 2 media hits! Ask the CRSTL for more information.

TEAM

MEDIA

CAP

ALUMNI

APPS

BUFFALO 1 BUFFALO 3

6

BUFFALO 4

18

1 3 (251)

2

MOOSE 1

1

MOOSE 2

CAP Reminders

MOOSE 3 MOOSE 4

Each team has been assigned at least one alumni contact for the round. Email your contact to inquire about a possible day of service, social event, or conference call

Events at Historic Black Colleges or Universities and Native American organizations will count as 2 events for your team

CAP Reps have the option to complete a spotlight article on an NCCC applicant to count toward your goals.

11 1 (1)

MOOSE 5 RAVEN 1 RAVEN 2

9 1

RAVEN 3

1 (14)

RAVEN 4 RAVEN 5

TOTAL

10

50

AUGUST 16, 2013 | GET TO THE POINT

5 (266)

4

1


SHOUTS OUTS

Out of Baltimore. Mass, here we come!

We’re not lost, we’re on an adventure!

BUFFALO 3

BUFFALO 1

Shout out to Megan Racine out there in California. We miss you a lot. It’s not the same without you and Courtney says, “it’s purple.” Happy b-day to our own Shannon Herr as of August 12. We hope the rest of the teams are enjoying their projects!

Stay safe, Erin!

RAVEN 4

BUFFALO 4

We have the best Team Leader EVERRR!

Shout Outs?

Shouts Outs are short messages submitted by teams each week to share with the rest of the Corps. Whatever it may be, a Shout Out is one little way to keep the Corps connected throughout the service term.

Moose Force wishes Snax and P4 the best of luck in Cali! Snax, safeguard those palm trees, and then climb one for RyGuy! It’s kind of like how Mulan climbed that pole, but different. For more information, call your revered Team Leader. Also, are you growing your hair out yet?

MOOSE 1

MOOSE 4

Shout out to our Cat Lady, Laura Mahoney, who is out on wildfire in Cali. Get that In and Out Burger, girl!

MOOSE 5

GET TO THE POINT | AUGUST 16, 2013

11


Where in the Atlantic Region Are They?

Round 4, Week 4

For Round 4, Atlantic Region teams will complete 19 projects across nine states. Currently, five teams are doing environmental stewardship projects, five teams are doing community improvement projects in rural and urban areas, three teams are doing disaster recovery projects, and one team is on-call for disaster response.

RAVEN 1 Chelsea, Mass. Phoenix Charter Academy Urban & Rural Development RAVEN 2 Hackensack, N.J. Volunteer Center of Bergen County Disaster Services BUFFALO 1

MOOSE 1

MOOSE 4

RAVEN 3

Russell, Mass. Appalachian Mountain Club Environmental Stewardship

Elk Township, Pa. The Nature Conservancy Environmental Stewardship

Rockaway, N.Y. St. Bernard Project Environmental Stewardship

Queens, N.Y. Respond & Rebuild Disaster Services

BUFFALO 3

MOOSE 2

MOOSE 5

RAVEN 4

Torrington, Conn. Torrington AHD/MRC Urban & Rural Development

Toms River, N.J. Jersey Cares Disaster Services

Newburgh, N.Y. Habitat for Humanity Newburgh Urban and Rural Development

Baltimore, Md. Baltimore County Reforestation Environmental Stewardship

BUFFALO 4

MOOSE 3

PHOENIX 4

RAVEN 5

Baltimore, Md. Baltimore City Bureau of Parks Urban & Rural Development

Burlington, Vt. → Portland, Maine Charity Treks Urban & Rural Development

Sawyers Bar, Calif. U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Disaster Services

King of Prussia, Pa. Valley Forge Environmental Stewardship


Get to the Point, Volume XIX, Issue 19