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GET TO

THURSDAY, JULY 11, 2013 VOLUME XIX, ISSUE 15

THE POINT THE

NEWSLETTER

A Test of Mind, Body & Heart

OF THE

NCCC

Life After AmeriCorps

Brittany Castellon, Moose 3

Learn about three well-

member, shares her vision of

established international

AmeriCorps. Page 6.

volunteer orgs. Page 9.

ATLANTIC REGION


CONTENTS

IN THIS

ISSUE 03

Gallery Images from Round 3 projects

05

Bulletin Board Update of Independent Service Hours & Team Reminders

I’m a member of the National Civilian Community Corps, an AmeriCorps Program.

↑ Phoenix 3 member

06

Silpa Sadhujan

Mind, Body & Heart. Brittany

clasps a small bird

Castellon, Moose 3 member,

in her hands while

shares about the rewards of

working with the

serving in the Corps.

Great Dismal

N-Triple-C members are 18 to 24 and spend 10 months getting things done for America

Feature

Swamp National Wildlife Refuge in Suffolk, Va., to

08

Health & Wellness

while developing their own leadership. We

band birds for

Health Facts & A Recipe for

serve on teams to help communities prepare

research and

Lentil Shepherd’s Pie

for and respond to disasters, build homes,

conservation.

and help the environment.

09

Life After... Considering a term as a Team Leader? Read more about the

To learn more, visit NationalService.gov or call 1.800.942.2677

responsibilities and benefits of wearing a green shirt

CONNECT WITH AMERICORPS NCCC ATLANTIC REGION Sam McKenzie, Community Relations Specialist (CRS) Phone: 410.642.2411 Ext. 6244 ● Email: smckenzie@cns.gov Mona Hillstrand, Assistant Community Relations Specialist (ACRS) Phone: 202.815.4259 ● Email: rhillstrand@cns.gov Ben Dillon, Community Relations Support Team Leader (CRSTL) Phone: 443.995.7940 ● Email: bedillon.guest@cns.gov

Facebook.com/NCCCAtlanticRegion @AmeriCorpsNCCC NationalService.gov

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JULY 11, 2013 | GET TO THE POINT

10

CAP/Media Reps.

11

Shout Outs

12

Team Project Map About the cover Moose 3 members set up scaffolding at a housing construction site while working with Habitat for Humanity in York, Pa. Team member Brittany Castellon shares her experience in the Corps on Page 6.


G ALLERY

Members of Phoenix 3, a team of certified wildland firefighters, use hand tools to cut a fire break at the Nature Conservancy’s Piney Grove Preserve in Sussex County, Va.

→ Moose 1 member Victoria Pridgen uses an impact driver to connect sections of a boardwalk at the Nature Conservancy’s Saco Heath Preserve in southern Maine. ↓

Raven 5 member Adriana Battle stains a shed at Bryant Pond 4H Camp in western Maine as camp participants play nearby.

GET TO THE POINT | JULY 11, 2013

3


G ALLERY

Raven 4 Team Leader Leah Goodman (foreground) and team member Gaby Gardose work to remove invasive plants from one of several gardens at Tanglewood 4H Camp in Lincolnville, Maine.

→ Members of Moose 5 pose next to canoes they used to traverse ponds while removing invasive plant species on land managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in eastern Massachusetts. ↓

4

Raven 2 members Bradley Gardner (left) and Travis Hanes (right) brighten up a park bench with a coat of green paint while working with the Armstrong Conservation District near Kittaning, Pa.

JULY 11, 2013 | GET TO THE POINT


BULLETI N B O ARD

“Remember that the happiest people are not those getting more, but those giving more.” –H. Jackson Brown, Jr.

Emily Tiffany, Moose Unit Support Team Leader, goes for a canoe outing while visiting Moose 3 in western Massachusetts.

in the service At the mid-way point has taken a year, the Raven unit the race to commanding lead in mber of nu m imu finish the min ject hours. Pro e vic Independent Ser urs Complete Percentage of ISP Ho 91% Raven: 71. Buffalo: 62.39% Moose: 55.51%

The Atlantic Region welcomes its first class of FEMA Corps Team Leaders!

Ben Dillon, Community Relations Support Team Leader, and Stephanie Ferguson, Raven Unit Support Team Leader, pose with a chalk mural dedicated to all Class XIX Support Team Leaders.

GET TO THE POINT | JULY 11, 2013

5


FE ATURE

mind body &heart by brittany castellon moose 3 member

M ↑ The Moose 3 mascot, Moosifer, travels with the team on all its projects. At top, Moose 3 member Jarvis Jones takes a breather after using a chainsaw to level the top of a splitlog bridge in western Massachusetts.

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JULY 11, 2013 | GET TO THE POINT

any people use the expression, “there’s more than meets the eye.” Well, there’s no exception for that in regards to AmeriCorps National Civilian Community Corps (NCCC). I can sit here and try to tell you what’s expected, like how this is a 10-month program in which we work for different non-profit organizations for six to eight weeks at a time, and how we’re all granted a $5,500 education award for our 1700 hours of service, but I’d rather not. If you want to know about the surface level of this program, you can easily find that information. I’d like to tell you what it’s like from the inside, through the eyes of a Corps Member. First off, I’d like to say that anyone who joins this program is brave and has a heart big enough to beat for two. I say this because, although this is a program of national community service, it is also a test of one’s body, mind and heart. Body, because we work to get things done no matter what the stakes are. I’m talking about living situations: not having the luxury of eating what you’re used to eating and making diet adjustments (sometimes), pushing through conditions many would surely walk away from, working 10-hour days and having to wake up the next day, sore and all.


FE ATURE

Mind, because AmeriCorps is a melting pot of people who come here for vastly different reasons but somehow all leave on the same page. The moment you step on campus you have to check yourself mentally and remind yourself that it is not about you anymore—it’s about what you and your team can accomplish for others. Not only is your brain adjusting to such drastic changes, it’s also learning. That is a beautiful thing to me. It’s great to think that you can come to this place thinking you’re this hotshot young adult with nothing more to learn and find that your mind can take a turn for the best. I can truly say I’ve learned so much from everyone around me, and I’m sure others can say the same. Having to live with 10 people can really teach you something. It teaches you to be open to change, to be flexible and to realize how you can enrich your life by sharing it with others. Although it may seem like we are senseless for signing up for something as intense as this, I can assure you we have the minds and willpower to ensure that the future is not bleak. Heart, because it is the core of each

person, has brought us all here. I believe many of us have our own ideal vision of AmeriCorps and what we’re doing here, but I’m convinced that what we’re doing is bigger than all of us. What many Corps Members may not realize is that we are creating a ripple effect. We, the Corps, are creating ripples of hope, belief and inspiration throughout the Atlantic Region. Every time we pick up a tool, break a sweat, rev that chainsaw engine or put on that 100-degree Tyvek suit (even though we really don’t want to), we are setting the standard for all young adults wanting to make a difference on this planet. With every ripple, we are getting closer and closer to the splash of change we are looking for. This is my vision of AmeriCorps. I want to thank my fellow Corps Members for hanging in there. You are all the most amazing people I’ve ever encountered and I hope you choose to live your life making as many ripples as you can. We need it.

“With every ripple, we are getting closer and closer to the splash of change we are looking for.”

← Moose 3 members Tyler Reyes and Brittany Castellon while working with Habitat for Humanity in York, Pa. ← Jarvis Jones, left, and Andy Phongphiou construct a footbridge in western Massachusetts.

GET TO THE POINT | JULY 11, 2013

7


HE ALTH & WELLNE SS

Health Facts Exercising within two hours of bedtime can decrease your ability to fall asleep. People who get enough Vitamin D are an average of 16 pounds lighter than those who don’t.

Lentil Shepherd’s Pie SERVINGS: 6-8

in the rosemary, lentils, bay leaf, and

TIME: 20 min. preparation, 1½ hours cooking

enough water to cover the lentils by 3 inches. Bring the pot to a boil over high

INGREDIENTS

heat. Reduce the heat to medium and

1 large yellow onion, peeled and diced

1 large carrot, peeled and diced

2. Preheat the oven to 350°F.

2 stalks celery, diced

3. Add the tomato paste to the saucepan and

1 cup frozen peas

cook for another 15 minutes, or until the

2 cloves garlic, peeled and minced

lentils are tender. Season with salt and

1 sprig rosemary

pepper. Remove from the heat, discard the

1½ cup green lentils, rinsed

bay leaf and rosemary sprig, and pour the

1 bay leaf

3 tablespoons tomato paste

Salt and freshly ground black

to a medium saucepan and add enough

pepper to taste

water to cover. Bring the pot to a boil over

8 medium red-skin potatoes, peeled and

high heat. Reduce the heat to medium and

chopped

cook, covered, until the vegetables are

4 parsnips, peeled and chopped

tender, about 15 minutes.

cook, covered, for 30 minutes.

lentils into a 9 × 13-inch baking dish. 4. Meanwhile, add the potatoes and parsnips

5. Remove the potatoes and parsnips from the DIRECTIONS

heat and drain all but ½ cup of the water.

1. Place the onion, carrot, peas, and celery in

Mash the vegetables until smooth and

a large saucepan and sauté over medium

creamy, then season with additional salt

heat for 10 minutes. Add water 1 to 2

and spread the mixture evenly over the

tablespoons at a time to keep the vegetables from sticking to the pan. Add the garlic and cook for another minute. Stir

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JULY 11, 2013 | GET TO THE POINT

lentils. 6. Bake the casserole for 25 minutes, or until bubbly. Let sit for 10 minutes before serving.

Studies have shown that your life expectancy could increase by up to two hours for every hour you walk. Burning Calories. Every half hour, you burn:  450 calories when running  371 calories when rock climbing  360 calories when swimming (depending on the stroke)  300–400 calories when cycling Lentils contain high levels of soluble fiber and help reduce your blood cholesterol. Lowering your cholesterol levels reduces your risk of heart disease and stroke by keeping your arteries clean.


LI FE AFTE R AME RI CORPS

Volunteering Abroad There are countless international volunteering opportunities out there, each with different costs, benefits, durations, structures, locations, and expectations, so it can be very difficult to narrow down the possibilities. Ultimately, the right program depends on the person and what he or she wants to get out of it or lend to it. Here are just a few of the more established programs offering international volunteer experiences.

PEACE CORPS | WWW.PEACECORPS.GOV Established: 1961 Length of Term: 27 months Length of Placement Process: 9 months (on average) Age Requirement: 18+ Locations: Africa, Latin America, Eastern Europe, Asia, the Caribbean, the Middle East, and the Pacific Islands Service Focus: Education, Health, Economic Development, Environment, Youth, Agriculture Benefits: Healthcare, Transportation, Food, Lodging, Modest Living Allowance, Transition Stipend Upon Completion

JESUIT VOLUNTEER CORPS | WWW.JESUITVOLUNTEERS.ORG

7 Things to Consider 1. Learn coping mechanisms for culture shock prior to leaving. Read about culture shock and discuss it with those who have experienced it. It may seem like you can just deal with it when you arrive, but once culture shock sets in, it may be too difficult to cope without a strategy. 2. Manage your expectations. You’re not going to singlehandedly change the world. Set small goals and focus on building meaningful relationships. 3. Immerse yourself in the local community. It can be easy to insulate yourself with people who have the same backgrounds, but volunteering abroad is about new experiences.

Established: 1956 Length of Term: 2 years (international programs) Length of Placement Process: 3-5 months Age Requirement: 21+ Locations: Belize, Chile, Micronesia, Nicaragua, Peru, Tanzania Service Focus: Education, Health, Poverty Benefits: Healthcare, Transportation, Food, Lodging, Modest Living Allowance Costs: Must fundraise at least $3,000

4. If you are paying for your volunteer experience, make sure you know what you’re paying for. Look for detailed explanations of expenses and fees on program websites. 5. Keep a journal. This is one of the easiest ways to process, reflect on, and remember your experience.

UNITED NATIONS VOLUNTEERS | WWW.UNV.ORG Established: 1971 Length of Term: 1 year Length of Placement Process: Varies Age Requirement: 25+ Locations: Placements have been made in 130 countries Service Focus: Agriculture, Health, Human Rights & More Benefits: Healthcare, Transportation, Lodging, Modest Living Allowance, Resettlement Allowance upon completion

6. Over-budget. Don’t expect to make money once you go abroad. Save enough money to live on for the duration of your volunteer term. 7. Be flexible. If you’ve learned anything in AmeriCorps, it’s that things will unexpectedly change. Be prepared.

GET TO THE POINT | JULY 11, 2013

9


COMM UNI TY RE LATI ONS

Weekly Updates for Media/CAP Reps. Ben (CRSTL) will be in West Virginia to assist with CAP and Media efforts from July 14–26. He will be the point of contact for all CAP and Media Reps participating in The Initiative. For all other CAP and Media Reps, Sam (CRS) will be the point of contact until July 27. Sam can be reached by email at smckenzie@cns.gov or by phone at 410.642.2411 ext. 6244

TEAM

MEDIA

BUFFALO 1

180

CAP

ALUMNI

APPS

Media Reps. 

When sending tweets about the West Virginia Initiative, use the twitter handle @RTSCI to refer to Reaching the Summit Community Service Initiative and @CCCWV to refer to the Citizens Conservation Corps of West Virginia.

Glide path for tweets: 6 tweets by July 14 and10 tweets by July 21.

Upcoming newsletter articles due: Raven 3 on July 14 and Phoenix 3 on July 21.

BUFFALO 3 BUFFALO 4

6 CAP Reps.

MOOSE 1 MOOSE 2

2 (31)

MOOSE 3

1 (150)

MOOSE 4

31

MOOSE 5

3

RAVEN 1

2 (31)

10

RAVEN 3

6

5 (73)

RAVEN 4

16

2 (34)

RAVEN 5

3

TOTAL

245

JULY 11, 2013 | GET TO THE POINT

12 (314)

One representative from each of the West Virginia teams has been selected to staff the NCCC information table for one day. The Atlantic and Southern Region CRSTLs will contact each person with more information regarding scheduling and transportation.

If you have received a request from the CRS/ CRSTL to follow up with a potential applicant via email, make sure to do so within one week and copy the CRS/CRSTL on the email. This will count as one event and one contact for your team.

2

5

RAVEN 2

1

3

0

← Event contact numbers are in parentheses. If your numbers are incorrect, contact the CRSTL.


SHOUTS OUTS

What Are Shout Outs? Shouts Outs are short messages submitted by teams each week to share with the rest of the Corps. Whatever it may be, a Shout Out is one little way to keep the Corps connected throughout the service term.

Has anyone seen my keys?

Buffalo 1

We hope everybody

We are excited to

had a safe, fun, and

reunite with Jeremy

exciting Fourth of July!

and move on to WV!

B3 would also like to Our adventurous project is coming to end. Get ready, we’re coming back.

Sasquatch 1

shout out to Frank Liquori for always being there to both relieve and create extreme discomfort.

Buffalo 3

Greg, we miss you, but you sure do look great in

Moose 4 is thankful for wonderful

long, blonde locks!

sponsors who bring us breakfast on

Moose 5 has had a fantastic time acquiring

Fridays, give us board games, and

our sea legs and

trained us to work with kids. Looking

gathering water chestnuts. We challenge

Raven 2

We’re ready to welcome back our teammates that are on Composite Teams. We miss you Tiffany, Ashley & Ian!

forward seeing to all the teams during

any team that dares to a

our next transition! Yay village housing!

canoe race. Bring it.

(Except for the upstairs; it’s like an oven)

Raven 3 Moose 5

Moose 4

Shout out to Silpa and Ross! Moose in Maine are a myth. A lie created so that tourists will ignore the massive mosquito and black fly infestation. Don’t compare our teamwork to the

Happy Independence Day everyone! We celebrated by going canoeing, getting some burgers at the camp

flowers that only bloom in winter. Instead, compare our teamwork to the rivers that flow forever.

grill out, participating in the Camp Tanglewood bonfire, and then running around with sparklers and shooting them off in the air with bottle rockets for a fantastic display for the campers.

Raven 5

Raven 4

GET TO THE POINT | JULY 11, 2013

11


Where in the Atlantic Region Are They?

Round 3, Week 3 MAINE

For Round 3, Class XIX teams are slated to complete 23 projects across nine states. Four projects will focus on hurricane recovery efforts in New Jersey and New York. Five projects will focus on environmental stewardship in recreational camps and conservation areas in three different states. Seven projects will assist low-income or underdeveloped urban and rural communities through housing and facilities improvements.

VERMONT

NEW HAMPSHIRE

NEW YORK

MASSACHUSETTS

CONN.

R.I.

PENNSYLVANIA

MARYLAND

NEW JERSEY

D.C.

WEST VIRGINIA

DELAWARE RAVEN 1 Toms River, N.J. Jersey Cares Disaster Services

VIRGINIA

RAVEN 2 Nicholas, W.V. Citizens Conservation Corps of W.V. Urban & Rural Development BUFFALO 1

MOOSE 1

MOOSE 4

RAVEN 3

Toms River, N.J. Jersey Cares Disaster Services

Fayette, W.V. Citizens Conservation Corps of W.V. Urban & Rural Development

Elkton, Md. Project Crossroad Urban & Rural Development

McDowell City, W.V. Citizens Conservation Corps of W.V. Urban & Rural Development

BUFFALO 3

MOOSE 2

MOOSE 5

RAVEN 4

New York, N.Y. World Care Centers Disaster Services

Bridgeport, Conn. Habitat for Humanity CFC Urban & Rural Development

Summers, W.V. Citizens Conservation Corps of W.V. Urban & Rural Development

Lincolnville, Maine University of Maine: Tanglewood Infrastructure Improvement

BUFFALO 4

MOOSE 3

PHOENIX 3

RAVEN 5

Queens, N.Y. Respond & Rebuild Disaster Services

Monroe, W.V. Citizens Conservation Corps of W.V. Urban & Rural Development

Suffolk, Va. U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Disaster Services

Wyoming, W.V. Citizens Conservation Corps of W.V. Urban & Rural Development

Get to the Point, Volume XIX, Issue 15  

AmeriCorps NCCC Atlantic Region Newsletter. In this Issue: A Test of Mind, Body & Heart: A Corps Member's Vision of Service. Also, learn abo...

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