Page 40

The dealership family: Malcolm’s wife, Joyce, his son, Alexander, and his daughter, Ashley.

road racing. In this ISDT, riders must maintain their own race bikes over the course of a torturous multi-day event, turning Malcolm’s tuning skills into an advantage. Malcolm agreed to test the bike. “We went up to Nevada State Mountain, unloaded the bike, and I did one lap on the course and came in and said, ‘You’ve hired yourself a rider,’” Malcolm says. “The bike was that much better. That Saturday, there was a big race, and I got third overall on the little 250, and that was when 650s were the norm in the desert. The key was the average speed. The next weekend I won the overall.” He was impressed enough to become a Husqvarna dealer, buying the bikes from Dye, putting them on the dealership sales floor, and splitting the profits with McDonald. Malcolm bought a Dodge van, put in some

40

AmericanMotorcyclist.com

shelves, and every weekend at the races he would sell parts before and after the races, and race in-between. Eventually, the time came for the ISDT, which was held in Sweden. Dye bought Malcolm a plane ticket to Stockholm, and lined up a VW van for him to drive to Oslo for the race. “The only problem was that he didn’t know what color the van was, or where it was parked at the airport,” Malcolm says. “He just gave me the keys and told me to keep trying vans until I found it. Well, I got there at 2:30 in the morning, in the rain, and do you know how many different VW vans were in the parking lot?” He eventually found the van and made it to the race. Unfortunately, it didn’t go as well as he would have liked. “I was too over-

enthusiastic,” Malcolm says. “I hit the ground a lot. I broke my throttle cable, so I held the throttle wide open and tried to ride using the kill switch. I was carrying a cable, and if I had stopped right away and put it in, I would have stayed in contention.” Still, he was hooked. “I loved it,” Malcolm says. “I loved that the rider was the only one who could take care of the motorcycle, and I’ve always been intrigued by flying up over a blind rise or around a corner and not knowing what’s coming, but having to deal with it. I really loved calculating all you needed to do in those surprise situations.” The next year, Malcolm broke his leg a second time, and again swore off motorcycles. Of course, that second vow didn’t last, and he was soon back racing.

American Motorcyclist 07 2010 Preview Version  

The Journal of the AMA Preview Version

American Motorcyclist 07 2010 Preview Version  

The Journal of the AMA Preview Version