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A J C A N N UA L R E P O R T 2 0 1 3


TA B L E O F CO N T E N T S 2

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FINDING COMMON GROUND

STANDING WITH ISRAEL

CONNECTING THE WORLD WITH ISRAEL

RIGHTING AN INJUSTICE

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PREVENTING A NUCLEAR IRAN

DEALING A MAJOR BLOW TO TERRORISM

COMBATING ANTI-SEMITISM

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REPAIRING THE WORLD

GOVERNANCE STRUCTURE

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REGIONAL OFFICES AND INTERNATIONAL PARTNERS

TREASURER’S REPORT

BUILDING STRATEGIC ALLIANCES

BOARD OF GOVERNORS

NATIONAL STAFF

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FINANCIAL REPORT

CHARITABLE BEQUESTS TO AJC AND IN MEMORIAM

AJC.ORG FACEBOOK.COM/AJCGLOBAL —

1 MILLION PEOPLE REACHED EACH MONTH

WEBSITE —

70,000 VIEWERS EACH MONTH

@AJCGLOBAL —

33,000 FOLLOWERS


F R O M L E F T, A J C P R E S I D E N T STA N L E Y M . B E R G M A N , U. S . A M B ASSA D O R TO T H E U N SA M A N T H A P OW E R , A J C E X E C U T I V E D I R E C TO R DAV I D H A R R I S .

Dear Friends, AJC’s unparalleled reach and impact were on full display in 2013. The following pages showcase AJC’s achievements during the past year. They also remind us that much work remains. Across the United States and around the world, AJC is there—enhancing the well-being of the Jewish people and Israel, and advancing human rights and democratic values. In 2013, we helped secure fairer treatment for Israel at the UN, both in New York and Geneva. Through our educational institute Project Interchange, we inspired a $2-billion high-tech park in Beersheva. And we played a key role in the European Union’s decision to label the “military wing” of Hezbollah, an Iranian proxy, a terrorist group. Moreover, AJC’s ability to raise public awareness through social media and traditional press outlets, coupled with our ongoing access to global leaders, position us to make a difference for years to come. AJC effects change worldwide because of our outstanding staff and lay leadership, and due to the trust and engagement of our supporters, who make AJC’s vision a reality. Thank you for being part of the AJC community,

Stanley M. Bergman AJC President

David Harris, AJC Executive Director Edward and Sandra Meyer Office of the Executive Director 1


F I N D I N G CO M M O N G R O U N D AJC IS THERE

The well-being of the Jewish people depends upon productive, long-term relations with all faith groups. For more than a century, AJC has built global interreligious coalitions that strengthen advocacy on issues of common concern.

GETTING TO KNOW THE NEW POPE AJC was part of Pope Francis’s first audience with Jewish leaders in June 2013. AJC’s leadership also met with him privately at the Vatican in February 2014. These papal visits underscore AJC’s decades-long role in advancing Catholic-Jewish relations. AJC has a true partner in the new pope, who has spoken out against the chilling increase in anti-Semitism in Europe, saying, “A Christian cannot be anti-Semitic! Let anti-Semitism be banished from the heart and life of every man and every woman!”

A PIONEER IN MUSLIM-JEWISH TIES AJC has spent more time in the Muslim world than any other Jewish organization. Through its ongoing diplomatic relationships across

North Africa, the Middle East and Asia, and through ACCESS, its young professionals division, AJC seeks to pave the way for a new era in Muslim-Jewish dialogue. ACCESS has a presence in 11 regions in the U.S., and in Israel. Cooperation between Muslims and Jews, a cornerstone of its work, was a main theme of the ACCESS Summit 2013, an annual gathering of 400 young Jewish activists. In cities such as Detroit, AJC is bringing the American Jewish and Muslim communities together. Through a generous grant from the Ravitz Foundation, AJC sponsored a survey that asked Muslims and Jews in the city about one another. The survey provided useful data that is helping to reshape intergroup dialogue in the area.

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UNIQUE ROLE IN SAUDI INITIATIVE AJC’s Rabbi David Rosen continued to serve on the Board of Directors of the KAICIID Dialogue Centre, established by King Abdullah of Saudi Arabia, together with Austria and Spain, and supported by the Holy See. Saudi Arabia does not have diplomatic relations with Israel. Rosen, however, is an Israeli citizen, making his unique role in this interfaith effort of strategic importance. PROMOTING UNDERSTANDING AJC’s annual Christian Leadership Initiative, held in partnership with the Shalom Hartman Institute and sponsored by the Berkman Charitable Trust, brings top American Christian scholars and leaders to Israel to study Jewish texts in the Jewish state.


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1 ACC E SS —A J C ’ S YO U N G P R O F E SS I O N A L S D I V I S I O N —A N D T H E A M E R I C A N I S L A M I C CO N G R E SS H O ST A N I N T E R FA I T H E V E N T I N B O STO N . 2 P O P E F R A N C I S I N CO N V E R SAT I O N AT T H E VAT I C A N W I T H A J C P R E S I D E N T STA N L E Y M . B E R G M A N . 3 E GY P T I A N H U M A N R I G H TS AC T I V I ST DA L I A Z I A DA AT T H E A J C G LO B A L F O R U M 2 0 1 3 .

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S TA N D I N G W I T H I S R A E L AJC IS THERE

PRO-ISRAEL ADVOCACY AT THE HIGHEST LEVEL Israel’s well-being remains at the top of AJC’s advocacy and diplomacy priorities. It was therefore no coincidence that U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry chose the AJC Global Forum to make his appeal to the American Jewish community to back renewed Israeli-Palestinian peace talks. His announcement at AJC’s renowned annual event underscored the agency’s global reach and ongoing commitment to a two-state solution. In dozens of meetings with presidents, prime ministers and foreign ministers at its annual Diplomatic Marathon—held during the opening of the UN General Assembly—AJC sought to advance Israel’s equal standing in the community of nations. Local AJC members reinforced the message in regional Diplomatic Marathons with the consular corps in Atlanta, Chicago, Houston and Los Angeles. In addition, influential leaders from around the world connected directly with Israel in all its richness and complexity via AJC’s educational institute Project Interchange.

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“AJC has been a partner and a pioneer in defining the relationship between American Jews and Israel, and a leader in strengthening that relationship. … You’ve built bridges during difficult times and hopeful ones alike.” U. S . S E C R E TA RY O F STAT E J O H N K E R RY AT T H E A J C G LO B A L F O R U M 2 0 1 3

A J C ’ S DAV I D H A R R I S W I T H TZ I P I L I V N I , I S R A E L I J U ST I C E M I N I ST E R A N D C H I E F P E AC E P R O C E SS N E G OT I ATO R , A N D U. S . S E C R E TA RY O F STAT E J O H N K E R RY AT T H E A J C G LO B A L F O R U M 2 0 1 3 .

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Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu with Project Interchange alumnus Marvin Suomi at the September 2013 ribbon-cutting for a $2-billion Advanced Technologies Park in Beersheva. The 20-building high-tech center, affiliated with Ben-Gurion University, is a direct outcome of a 2005 Project Interchange seminar. Suomi, CEO of KUD International LLC, which developed the park, said at the ceremony: “I clearly would not be here today if it hadn’t been for Project Interchange.” 6


C O N N E C T I N G T H E WO R L D W I T H I S R A E L AJC IS THERE

A look at AJC’s Project Interchange alumni demonstrates the program’s ability to identify emerging leaders, as well as its global reach and impact. Since 1982, Project Interchange has inspired more than 6,000 alumni from all 50 states and 85 countries.

1 U. S . S U P R E M E CO U R T J U ST I C E 18 CABINET MEMBERS 3 4 U. S . R E P R E S E N TAT I V E S 63 U N I V E R S I T Y P R E S I D E N TS 93 D I P LO M ATS 4 5 8 J O U R N A L I STS 92 6 G OV E R N M E N T O F F I C I A L S

9 0 % O F P I PA R T I C I PA N TS SAY T H E I R S E M I N A R E N H A N C E D T H E I R U N D E R STA N D I N G O F I S R A E L . ( I N D E P E N D E N T Y E A R LO N G ASS E SS M E N T BY T H E AS P E N I N ST I T U T E )

politicians, among others. They learned of Israel’s contributions to their fields and shared best practices.

Project Interchange (PI) is an AJC educational institute that takes 25 delegations from diverse fields to Israel each year. The trips allow participants to experience Israel firsthand and engage with the country’s top leadership. These impassioned alumni then go on to develop on-the-ground initiatives, influence policy and share accurate information.

These trips also serve as an antidote—perhaps even a preventive measure—to attempts to isolate and delegitimize the Jewish state. During the inaugural seminar in Israel for U.S. university provosts, all the participating educational institutions spoke out against academic boycotts of Israel, as did many other PI alumni who lead academic institutions.

In 2013 alone, PI hosted its 21st delegation of U.S. Latino leaders, as well as groups of African influentials, Rhodes Scholars, university presidents and Brazilian

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“Madeleine Albright and I passed the AJC ad around the room of European Union ministers—that’s how it all started.” RICHARD C. HOLBROOKE, U. S . A M B ASSA D O R TO T H E U N ( 1 9 9 9 - 2 0 0 1 )

A CO M P E L L I N G A DV E R T I S E M E N T S E R I E S A J C P L AC E D I N T H E N E W YO R K T I M E S H I G H L I G H T E D A M U LT I Y E A R C A M PA I G N TO A DVA N C E I S R A E L’ S E Q UA L T R E AT M E N T AT T H E U N .

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RIGHTING AN INJUSTICE AJC IS THERE

I S R A E L I A M B ASSA D O R TO T H E U N R O N P R O S O R S P E A KS B E F O R E T H E U N G E N E R A L ASS E M B LY.

FAIRER UN TREATMENT FOR ISRAEL European and Others Group (WEOG) in New York. Israel was invited to join WEOG in 2000 in part because AJC, in the words of The New York Times, “led the campaign on behalf of Israel through quiet diplomacy at the United Nations and European capitals,” including a powerful ad series in the paper.

In advocating the equal treatment of all memberstates both large and small—the original intent of the UN Charter—AJC has changed history. For far too long, Israel was denied fair treatment in the UN system, stigmatized as the only nation excluded from any of the five all-powerful regional blocs.

Another wrong was corrected in 2013 when Israel was invited to join WEOG in Geneva, home to the UN Human Rights Council. Now, Israel and its allies face one less impediment in curbing the council’s outsized obsession with Israel and refocusing its attention on human rights abuses worldwide.

Due in large measure to two decades of AJC’s patient diplomacy, two crucial changes occurred in 2013: First, Israel announced its bid for a seat on the UN Security Council for 2019-20. This would have been impossible if not for Israel’s inclusion in the Western

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LATINO-JEWISH RELATIONS On the regional level, AJC deepens intergroup relationships through programs such as an AJC Los Angeles trip that brought more than 25 local faith leaders to the U.S.-Mexico border to grasp firsthand the challenges of immigration reform.

Through its pioneering Latino and Latin American Institute, AJC strengthens Latino-Jewish ties. Both Latinos—the largest and fastest-growing ethnic group in the United States—and Jews have rich immigrant legacies and are natural allies in achieving a fair and inclusive society.

These coalition-building efforts also enable AJC to seek the support of the Latino community on other priority issues, including Israel’s quest for peace and security, and the global threat posed by a nuclear Iran.

To achieve meaningful results, AJC conducts national initiatives such as the Bridging America Project, funded by the Ford Foundation. The project raises awareness and builds support for comprehensive immigration reform, a crucial civil rights issue.

1 AT A N A J C LO S A N G E L E S E V E N T AT S I N A I T E M P L E , L AT I N O S A N D J E WS J O I N TO C E L E B R AT E T H E J E W I S H H O L I DAY O F S U K KOT. 2 A J C C H I C AG O D I R E C TO R A M Y STO K E N D I S C U SS E S C H I N A- I S R A E L R E L AT I O N S AT T H E O P E N I N G O F AN EXHIBIT ABOUT THE JEWISH REFUGEES OF SHANGHAI. 3 F R O M L E F T, A R C H B I S H O P D E M E T R I O S , L E A D E R O F T H E G R E E K O R T H O D OX C H U R C H I N A M E R I C A , CO N V E R S E S W I T H A J C ’ S DAV I D H A R R I S A N D R A B B I N OA M M A R A N S I N N E W YO R K .

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B U I L D I N G S T R AT E G I C A L L I A N C E S AJC IS THERE

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AJC forges relationships with diverse ethnic communities across the United States and around the globe to bolster advocacy on areas of mutual interest and share best practices. Through these efforts, AJC helps create a better world for all.

ASIAN-JEWISH RELATIONS

GREEK-JEWISH RELATIONS

In 2013, AJC’s revitalized Asia Pacific Institute (API) engaged in extensive outreach to the region and deepened connections with Asian-American groups. Such crucial activity could not be timelier given the growth of this ethnic community in the United States and Washington’s geopolitical pivot to Asia.

For decades, the relationship of Cyprus and Greece with Israel was remote and at times hostile. Yet AJC understood that Cyprus, Greece, Israel and the United States were natural partners. AJC got to work, beginning in the United States, to bring local Greek and Jewish communities together.

AJC, through its U.S. regional offices and API, forged partnerships with leading Asian-American organizations and the U.S.-based diplomatic representatives of key Asian countries. AJC San Francisco, in particular, engaged the Bay Area Chinese community and the Chinese diplomatic corps. Meanwhile, AJC Los Angeles reached out to the region’s Korean American leaders to work on common concerns, such as the nuclear threats posed by Iran and North Korea.

Today, it is clear that these efforts have made a difference. Globally, AJC diplomats meet regularly with Greek leaders, beginning with the prime minister, who has courageously cracked down on the neo-Nazi Golden Dawn party. Nationally, AJC helped launch the congressional Hellenic-Israeli alliance. And locally, AJC’s regional offices, particularly in Boston and Chicago, sponsored impressive cultural events that brought together hundreds of Greeks, Cypriots and Jews.

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PREVENTING A NUCLEAR IRAN AJC IS THERE

A J C ’ S JAS O N I SAAC S O N S P E A KS I N O M A N W I T H S H E I K H A B D U L L A H B I N M O H A M M E D A L SA L I M I , T H E N AT I O N ’ S M I N I ST E R O F AWQ A F A N D R E L I G I O U S A F FA I R S .

GLOBAL THREAT REMAINS

HUMAN RIGHTS IN IR AN

For more than 15 years, in every diplomatic encounter across the United States and around the globe, AJC has warned of the perils posed by an Iran with nuclear weapons capability.

In its diplomacy, advocacy and media campaigns, AJC draws attention to Iran’s heinous human rights violations, support for the Assad regime’s atrocities in Syria and sponsorship of international terrorism via proxy groups such as Hezbollah.

A nuclear Iran would endanger its neighbors and destabilize the region, precipitate a nuclear arms race by other nearby states and gravely threaten Israel.

On Capitol Hill and through its Jacob Blaustein Institute for the Advancement of Human Rights (JBI), AJC advocates for international attention to extensive human rights abuses in Iran.

AJC supports a diplomatic resolution to Iran’s nuclearweapons quest, and applauds efforts by the United States and other nations to negotiate a satisfactory deal. At the same time, AJC backs the preparation of intensified economic sanctions to push Iranian leaders to meet their international obligations.

In 2013, JBI played a key role in international campaigns to extend the term of the UN special rapporteur for human rights in Iran, secure the release of Nasrin Sotoudeh, a women’s rights lawyer and European Parliament Sakharov Prize-winner, and focus on Iran’s systematic persecution of members of the Baha’i faith.

In 2013, AJC also deepened its existing ties with countries throughout the Arab world that share AJC’s view that Iran is a threat to regional stability.

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I R A N ’ S R E VO LU T I O N A RY G UA R D D I S P L AYS A M I SS I L E I N F R O N T O F A N I M AG E O F AYATO L L A H A L I K H A M E N E I .


D E A L I N G A M A J O R B LOW TO T E R R O R I S M AJC IS THERE

THE EU AND HEZBOLL AH resources to urge the EU to act. AJC mobilized its offices worldwide and, in scores of meetings and through global media outlets, brought the issue to the attention of European leaders and the U.S. government.

AJC played a part in the European Union’s unanimous 2013 decision to designate the “military wing” of Hezbollah a terrorist organization. The designation will hinder the group’s ability to raise funds, recruit members and transport operatives across the continent.

The EU’s designation was a critical victory, but so long as Hezbollah continues to fuel terror and violence in the Middle East, AJC’s work continues.

After Hezbollah bombed a bus of Israeli tourists in July 2012 in Bulgaria, AJC drew upon its global

LEBANON

ARGENTINA

B U LG A R I A

HEZBOLLAH, A GLOBAL TERRORIST

HEZBOLLAH BOMBED THE ISRAELI

IN JULY 2012, A HEZBOLLAH OPERA-

ORGANIZATION AND IRANIAN PROXY,

EMBASSY IN BUENOS AIRES IN 1992

TIVE TARGETED A TOURIST BUS, KILL-

FIRST INTRODUCED SUICIDE BOMB-

AND THE AMIA BUILDING THERE IN

ING FIVE ISRAELIS AND THEIR BUL-

ING TO THE MIDDLE EAST. IT CARRIED

1994, TOGETHER KILLING 114 CIVIL-

GARIAN DRIVER. AJC’S DAVID HARRIS

OUT THE 1983 BOMBINGS OF THE U.S.

IANS. IMMEDIATELY AFTER THE AMIA

IMMEDIATELY CONTACTED THE BUL-

EMBASSY IN BEIRUT AND THE MAS-

BOMBING, AN AJC DELEGATION FLEW

GARIAN FOREIGN MINISTER TO OFFER

SACRE OF HUNDREDS OF AMERICAN

TO BUENOS AIRES TO EXPRESS SOLI-

CONDOLENCES AND SUPPORT, THE

AND FRENCH MARINES STATIONED IN

DARITY. AJC HAS STAYED IN CLOSE

FIRST STEP IN WHAT TURNED INTO

LEBANON.

TOUCH EVER SINCE.

A FULL-THROTTLED AJC ADVOCACY CAMPAIGN.

A FATA L AT TAC K I N B U R G AS

T H E A F T E R M AT H O F T H E AMIA BOMBING

H E Z B O L L A H F O L LOW E R S MARCH

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MEMORIALIZING THE SIX VICTIMS


T H E E U B L AC K L I STS H E Z B O L L A H

AJC HELPS SHAPE PUBLIC OPINION

F R E N C H F O R E I G N M I N I ST E R L AU R E N T FA B I U S W I T H A J C ’ S DAV I D H A R R I S

U N IT E D STAT E S

FRANCE

BRUSSELS

AJC LED THE CHARGE IN THE U.S.

WHEN FRANCE INITIALLY HESITATED

AT THE CENTER OF THIS WINNING

CONGRESS, SPEARHEADING SEVERAL

TO PLACE HEZBOLLAH ON THE EU

ADVOCACY CAMPAIGN WAS AJC’S

LETTERS TO EU PARLIAMENTARIANS

LIST OF TERRORIST ORGANIZATIONS,

BRUSSELS-BASED TRANSATLAN-

THAT LED TO SUCCESSFUL RESOLU-

AJC PARIS INITIATED A PARLIAMEN-

TIC INSTITUTE. THROUGH THE

TIONS. IN ADDITION, AJC’S REGIONAL

TARY LETTER TO FRENCH PRESIDENT

INSTITUTE AND AJC’S OFFICES IN

OFFICES HELD DOZENS OF MEETINGS

FRANÇOIS HOLLANDE, URGING HIM

BERLIN, PARIS AND ROME, AJC

WITH EUROPEAN DIPLOMATS ACROSS

TO RECONSIDER THE COUNTRY’S

WAS ABLE TO TAILOR ITS ADVO-

THE UNITED STATES AND PUBLISHED

POSITION.

CACY MESSAGES TO THE UNIQUE

ARTICLES IN MAJOR NEWS OUTLETS.

CONCERNS OF EACH OF THE 28 EU MEMBER-STATES.

“After talks with representatives of AJC and security experts, German Interior Minister Hans-Peter Friedrich said he favored banning the group in Europe.” DER SPIEGEL, A N I N F LU E N T I A L G E R M A N N E WSW E E K LY

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C O M B AT I N G A N T I - S E M I T I S M AJC IS THERE

62%

B E LG I U M — 6 2 % O F J E WS F E E L T H AT T H E Y A R E BLAMED FOR DECISIONS M A D E BY T H E I S R A E L I G OV E R N M E N T.

60%

42%

91%

50%

FRANCE —

GERMANY — 4 2 % O F J E WS H E A R D A L L E G AT I O N S T H AT J E WS E X P LO I T H O LO C AU ST VICTIMHOOD FOR THEIR OW N P U R P O S E S .

H U N G A RY — 9 1 % O F J E WS F E E L T H AT A N T I S E M I T I S M H AS I N C R E AS E D I N T H E PAST F I V E Y E A R S .

SW E D E N —

6 0 % O F J E WS WO R RY A B O U T B E I N G P H YS I C A L LY AT TAC K E D B E C AU S E T H E Y A R E J E WS .

5 0 % O F J E WS AVO I D W E A R I N G ITEMS IN PUBLIC IDENTIFYING THEM AS J E W I S H .

T H E E U ’ S AG E N CY F O R F U N DA M E N TA L R I G H TS 2 0 1 3 R E P O R T O N J E W I S H E X P E R I E N C E S I N E I G H T E U R O P E A N N AT I O N S

“The EU’s report [on anti-Semitism] is a wake-up call. Sleeping through it, or pretending not to hear it, is not an option.” A J C ’ S DAV I D H A R R I S I N H I S M O N T H LY CO LU M N I N E L PA Í S , S PA I N ’ S L E A D I N G DA I LY N E WS PA P E R

alumnus of Project Interchange, AJC’s educational institute that brings global leaders to Israel.

Anti-Semitism has spiked across Europe in nations such as Belgium, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary and Sweden. To combat this scourge, AJC meets with key government officials, raises awareness in the media and challenges specific anti-Semitic actions.

AJC Berlin, which celebrated its 15th anniversary in 2013, achieved several remarkable successes. It helped initiate a parliamentary resolution on anti-Semitism, played a major role in defeating attempts to ban ritual circumcision, and filed a successful complaint with the German Press Council regarding an anti-Israel cartoon in a leading newspaper.

“Physical attacks and threats directed toward [Jewish] persons and property are now a part of daily life,” AJC’s Rabbi Andrew Baker testified in February 2013 before the U.S. Congress. Since 2009, Baker has also served as the Personal Representative on Combating Anti-Semitism for the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe.

As a result of its close relationship with top Greek officials, AJC was attacked by the neo-Nazi Golden Dawn party in a series of anti-Semitic statements and cartoons. In a September address to AJC in New York, Greek Prime Minister Antonis Samaras pledged to crack down on the extremist party, and did so soon thereafter.

In France, home to Europe’s largest Jewish community, AJC Paris works closely with Prime Minister Manuel Valls, who has addressed the chilling uptick in anti-Semitism in that country. Notably, Valls is an

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1 T H E G R E E K N E O - N A Z I PA R T Y G O L D E N DAW N U S E S A N A N T I - S E M I T I C C A R TO O N TO D E M O N I Z E A J C ’ S C LO S E R E L AT I O N S H I P W I T H T H E G R E E K P R I M E M I N I ST E R . 2 D E M O N ST R ATO R S I N PA R I S C H A N T, “J E W, F R A N C E I S N OT YO U R S .” 3 A J C B E R L I N CO N V I N C E S T H E G E R M A N P R E SS CO U N C I L TO R E S P O N D TO A N E WS PA P E R C A R TO O N D E P I C T I N G I S R A E L AS A M O N ST E R . 4 A S U P P O R T E R I N B U DA P E ST O F T H E A N T I - S E M I T I C J O B B I K PA R T Y. 5 N A Z I SY M B O L S S C R AW L E D O N A F R E N C H M E M O R I A L TO J E W I S H S O L D I E R S .

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A J C S U P P O R T P R OV I D E D E SS E N T I A L I T E M S A N D C A R E TO SY R I A N C I V I L WA R R E F U G E E S F LO O D I N G I N TO J O R DA N .

“Through its humanitarian aid contributions, AJC demonstrates its commitment to help the victims of disaster and dislocation, crossing geographical, religious and ethnic boundaries while uniting a divided world with compassion.� U. S . A M B ASSA D O R TO T H E H O LY S E E K E N N E T H H AC K E T T, F O R M E R P R E S I D E N T A N D C E O O F C AT H O L I C R E L I E F S E RV I C E S , W H I L E M E E T I N G I N F E B R UA RY 2 0 1 4 W I T H A N A J C D E L E G AT I O N I N R O M E

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R E PA I R I N G T H E WO R L D AJC IS THERE

A F T E R A D E VASTAT I N G T Y P H O O N I N T H E P H I L I P P I N E S , A N A J C G R A N T TO T H E R E L I E F O R G A N I Z AT I O N I S R AA I D H E L P E D D I S PATC H M E D I C A L A N D T R AU M A E X P E R TS .

HUMANITARIAN AID

HUMAN RIGHTS

AJC’s mission extends beyond the well-being of Jewish communities. As in years past, it helped during times of crisis in 2013, especially in the aftermath of natural disasters.

AJC pursues human rights through its Jacob Blaustein Institute (JBI). In 2013, on the 20th anniversary of the creation of the UN’s top human rights position, JBI released a groundbreaking volume on the subject, The United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights: Conscience for the World.

When Typhoon Haiyan, one of the most powerful and destructive storms in history, struck the Philippines, AJC announced a major grant to IsraAID, a leading Israeli nongovernmental organization. IsraAID dispatched a team of medical, trauma and relief professionals to deliver humanitarian assistance.

The volume includes 20 in-depth chapters by human rights experts that evaluate how past UN high commissioners have responded to events in China, Russia and North Korea, among other countries, and makes recommendations for future action.

“It should be the duty of all people of goodwill to assist in relief efforts. We are one human family,” said Shira Loewenberg, director of AJC’s Asia Pacific Institute, which works throughout Asia and with Asian-American leaders.

In announcing the publication, JBI also called for greater protection for victims of abuse in Syria, South Sudan, Central African Republic and elsewhere, as well as measures to strengthen the UN’s response to human rights violations.

As Syrian refugees continued to stream into Jordan, AJC contributed funds to IsraAID to provide food, hygiene packages and other necessities.

In 2013, JBI also helped change the international climate on human rights abuses in North Korea by successfully pressing key leaders and countries to establish a UN Commission of Inquiry to investigate the grave violations of human rights in the country.

AJC has previously partnered with IsraAID on humanitarian relief missions, including in Sri Lanka, Peru and Haiti.

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GOVERNANCE STRUCTURE PRESIDENT

VICE PRESIDENTS

CO M M IT T E E S A N D TA S K FO R C E S

P R OJ E C T I N T E R C H A N G E

Stanley M. Bergman

Roberta Baruch

E N E R GY CO M M IT T E E

Robert S. Peckar, Chair

Henry W. Dubinsky, Chair

Harriet P. Schleifer, Vice Chair

C H A I R , B OA R D O F G OV E R N O R S

Marion J. Bergman

Richard L. Berkman

Gail A. Binderman

G OV E R N A N C E CO M M IT T E E

T H A N K S TO S C A N D I N AV I A

C H A I R , B OA R D O F T R U S T E E S

Casey Cogut

Joel R. Mogy, Chair

John M. Shapiro

Michael M. Davis

I M M I G R ATI O N TA S K FO R C E

Laurie Netter Sprayregen, President

A S S O C I AT E C H A I R , B OA R D O F T R U S T E E S

Bonnie Corwin Fuller

Roberta Baruch, Co-Chair

Karen M. Levy

H. Benjamin Samuels, Co-Chair

Roy J. Zuckerberg CHAIR, PROGRAM CO O R D I N ATI N G CO M M IT T E E

Marvin Israelow CHAIR, LEADERSHIP D E V E LO P M E N T

Kim J. Pimley

Lee I. Miller

R I S K OV E R S I G H T

Kim J. Pimley, Chair

Martin D. Krall, Chair

Richard H. Davimos

Jerome R. Goldstein

Ned Dubilo

Brindell Gottlieb

René-Pierre Azria Roberta Baruch Matthew Bronfman Michael Gould Martin D. Krall Kenneth R. Levine Linda Mirels Joel R. Mogy Harriet P. Schleifer H O N O R A RY P R E S I D E N T S

Robert H. Elman Howard I. Friedman

Leonard Greenberg Barbara B. Hirschhorn Charlotte Holstein Gershon Kekst Edward H. Meyer Walter Nathan Morris W. Offit

Bruce M. Ramer Robert S. Rifkind Richard J. Sideman Harold Tanner

Martin D. Krall, Chair

N O M I N ATI N G CO M M IT T E E

F I N A N C E CO M M IT T E E S

Harriet P. Schleifer, Chair

AU D IT

R E G I O N A L O F F I C E S CO M M IT T E E

Henry W. Dubinsky, Chair

Michael L. Tichnor, Chair

Belinda Morris, Vice Chair

Larry Adelman, Vice Chair

BUDGET

R U S S I A N J E W I S H A F FA I R S

Suzanne D. Jaffe, Chair

Daniel Igor Branovan, Co-Chair

Frank E. Linde, Vice Chair

Cheryl Fishbein, Co-Chair

INVESTMENT

S T R AT E G I C P O L I C Y G R O U P

Andrew J. Melnick, Chair

Peter R. Rosenblatt, Chair

David R. Pedowitz, Vice Chair

Louis Perlmutter

I N S TIT U T E S

R E A L E S TAT E

Elaine Petschek

A F R I C A I N S TIT U T E

Martin D. Krall, Chair

S. Stephen Selig III Harold T. Shapiro

Marion Bergman, Chair

R E TI R E M E N T P L A N

A J C PA R I S

Stephen Weinstein, Chair

René-Pierre Azria, Chair

Carol B. Siegler

A S I A PAC I F I C I N S TIT U T E

Morton A. Siegler

Gary N. Jacobs, Chair

Richard S. Volpert

D O R OT H Y A N D J U L I U S KO P P E L M A N I N S TIT U T E O N AMERICAN JEWISH -ISRAELI R E L ATI O N S

Bernard S. Wallerstein H O N O R A RY C H A I R , B OA R D O F G OV E R N O R S

Jack Lapin

Harold T. Shapiro, Chair

CO M M I S S I O N S

JACO B B L AU S T E I N I N S TIT U T E FO R T H E A DVA N C E M E N T O F HUMAN RIGHTS

E. Robert Goodkind Alfred H. Moses

HUMAN RESOURCES

N ATI O N A L L E A D E R S H I P D E V E LO P M E N T CO M M IT T E E

T R E A S U R E R /S E C R E TA RY

AT- L A R G E O F F I C E R S

A D M I N I S T R ATI V E CO M M IT T E E S

Robert A. Belfer

Alan Melamed

Michael L. Tichnor

Robert H. Elman, Vice Chair

Matthew J. Coen, Vice Chair

Stuart E. Eizenstat

CHAIR, REGIONAL OFFICES

Harold Tanner, Chair

Rhoda Baruch

Howard A. Gilbert

Suzanne D. Jaffe

Alan Melamed, Chair

H O N O R A RY V I C E P R E S I D E N T S

C H A I R , M A R K E TI N G A N D CO M M U N I C ATI O N S

A S S O C I AT E T R E A S U R E R / C H A I R , B U D G E T CO M M IT T E E

M A R K E TI N G A N D CO M M U N I C ATI O N S CO M M IT T E E

Netanel Saidoff

T R A N SAT L A N TI C I N S TIT U T E

CO N T E M P O R A RY J E W I S H L I F E

E. Robert Goodkind, Chair

Dov S. Zakheim, Chair Jerome Ostrov, Vice Chair

L ATI N O A N D L ATI N A M E R I C A N I N S TIT U T E

I N T E R N ATI O N A L R E L ATI O N S

Thomas S. Kahn, Chair

Allan J. Reich, Chair

L AW R E N C E & L E E R A M E R I N S TIT U T E O N G E R M A N -J E W I S H R E L ATI O N S

Andrew H. Marks, Vice Chair I N T E R R E L I G I O U S A F FA I R S

Anthony E. Meyer, Co-Chair

David W. Inlander, Chair

Steven J. Wisch, Co-Chair

Mont S. Levy, Vice Chair

Professor Dr. Rita Sussmuth, Co-Chair

N ATI O N A L P O L I C Y

Carol S. Gown, Chair Robert E. Lapin, Vice Chair

20

D E V E LO P M E N T CO M M IT T E E S B OA R D O F T R U S T E E S

John M. Shapiro, Chair Roy J. Zuckerberg, Associate Chair N ATI O N A L P L A N N E D G I V I N G

Suzanne D. Jaffe, Chair WO M E N ’ S L E A D E R S H I P B OA R D

Cori L. Berger, Chair (as of January 2014)


BOARD OF GOVERNORS Lawrence M. Adelman

Cheryl Fishbein

Harris L. Kempner

Kara T. Newmark*

Jane Silverman

Stanford M. Adelstein

Samuel A. Fishman

Bernita M. King

Robert L. Newmark

Donald E. Simon Morton J. Simon, Jr.*

Honey K. Amado

Martine Fleishman

Philip Kirsh

Daniel S. Och

RenĂŠ-Pierre Azria

Lois Frank

Samuel C. Klagsbrun

Morris W. Offit

Richard S. Sokolov

Jeremiah Baronberg**

Gerald E. Franks

Martin D. Krall

Jerry Ostrov

James H. M. Sprayregen

Rhoda Baruch

Amy Reisen Freundlich*

Marjorie Kuhn

Beth H. Paradies

David F. Squire

Roberta Baruch

Lawrence J. Freundlich

Stephen Kurzman

Robert S. Peckar

Michael D. Srulovitz

Julie Baskes

Beatrice Friedman

Richard J. Lampen

David Pedowitz

Paul E. Stanzler

Janine Behrman

Howard Friedman

Bruce S. Lane

Barbara Perlmutter

John M. Stein

Robert A. Belfer

Bonnie Corwin Fuller

David B. Lang

Louis Perlmutter

Tracy F. Stein

Marion J. Bergman

Beth Furman

Ruth Lapidus

Kenneth Peskin

Carlyn J. Steiner*

Stanley M. Bergman

Laurence Geller

Robert E. Lapin

Elaine Petschek

Sylvia S. Steiner

Richard L. Berkman

Suzanne Lasky Gerard

Jack S. Levin

Kim J. Pimley

Alfred Stern Jeffrey E. Stone

Roger M. Bernstein

Howard A. Gilbert

H. Fred Levine

Daniel Pincus

David R. Berz*

Stuart S. Ginsberg*

Kenneth R. Levine

Ben A. Plotkin

Harold Tanner

Gary Betensky*

Lawrence D. Ginsburg

Karen M. Levy

Bonnie L. Podolsky

Michael L. Tichnor

Jerry H. Biederman

Naomi Gitlin

Mont S. Levy

Fred Pressner

Madeline Unterberg

Gail A. Binderman

Dorian Goldman

Sally S. Levy

Nancy Weil Price*

Thomas I. Unterberg

Francine J. Blum

Clifford Goldstein*

Steven D. Levy

Stanley A. Rabin

Anne Virag*

Daniel Igor Branovan

Jerome R. Goldstein

Kenneth Lewis

Bruce M. Ramer

Richard S. Volpert

Seth P. Briskin*

Todd Goodglick

Eva F. Lichtenberg

Fred M. Rawicz

Bernard S. Wallerstein

Matthew Bronfman

E. Robert Goodkind

Frank E. Linde

Bonnie Rechler

Leonard Weinberg Robert Weinberger

Howard S. Brown*

Brindell Gottlieb

Peggy Lowenstein

Allan J. Reich

Marcia Burnam

Candy Gould

Carol Lowenthal

Guy A. Reiss

Sherry A. Weinman

David Chaifetz

Leon D. Gould

Stephen Lowey

Barbara F. Resnek

Margaret E. Weinstock

Leslie Chatzinoff

Michael Gould

Dolly L. Maass

Stephen Robert

Ellen R. Werther

Reeve Chudd

Carol S. Gown

Kenneth D. Makovsky

Deborah Rosen

Leonard A. Wien, Jr.*

Matthew J. Coen

Eugene M. Grant

Fred R. Mardell

Peter R. Rosenblatt

Steven J. Wisch

Casey Cogut

Leonard Greenberg

Jesse Margolin

Lawrence Ruben

Allan J. Zachariah

Estelle Comay

Lauren G. Grien*

Andrew H. Marks

Kenneth Ruby

Helene W. Zadok*

Milton F. Cooper

Robert D. Gries

Bertram Massing

A. James Rudin

Dov S. Zakheim

Betty Cotton*

Leonard E. Grossman

Thomas J. Meier

David Rudman*

Steven L. Zelkowitz

Alan Dana

Marshall B. Grossman

Alan Melamed

Jacques Safra

Marshall S. Zolla Roy J. Zuckerberg

Richard H. Davimos

Andrew Hall

Andrew J. Melnick

Debra Smith Saidoff

Michael M. Davis

Joseph E. Harari

Donald Meltzer

Netanel Saidoff

Ned Dubilo

Leonard M. Harlan

Anthony E. Meyer

H. Benjamin Samuels

Stephen V. Dubin

David Harris

Edward H. Meyer

Harriet P. Schleifer

Henry W. Dubinsky

Frances A. Hess

Anne L. Meyers

Harry J. Seigle*

Gary Eisenstat*

Robert Hexter

Rick Michelman*

Linda Selig

Stuart E. Eizenstat

Barbara B. Hirschhorn

Edward J. Miller

S. Stephen Selig

Robert H. Elman

Harriet Hochman

James A. Miller

Walter Shapero

Michael S. Ettinger*

Charlotte Holstein

Lee I. Miller

Harold T. Shapiro

Bryan Ezralow

David W. Inlander

Barbara Mines

John M. Shapiro

Patricia Falkenberg

Marvin Israelow

Linda Mirels

Lawrence A. Shelley

David Farber

Gary N. Jacobs

Joel R. Mogy

Melvin Shuman* Richard Sideman

Jack Farber

Suzanne D. Jaffe

Belinda Morris

Joseph Farcus

Thomas S. Kahn

Alfred H. Moses

Benjamin Sigel**

Michael D. Feldstein*

Arthur Karafin

Iris Mushin

William D. Siegel

Jerrold Fine

Judi Kaufman

Walter Nathan

Carol B. Siegler

Jo Renee Fine

Gershon Kekst

Lawrence A. Neubauer

Morton A. Siegler

21

(as of January 2014) *AJC Regional Office President **Global ACCESS Steering Committee Chair


NATIONAL STAFF E DWA R D A N D SA N D R A M E Y E R O F F I C E O F T H E E X E C U TI V E D I R E C TO R

David Harris, Executive Director Victoria E. Schonfeld, Associate Executive Director/Chief Operating Officer Julie Schair, Associate Executive Director Jason Isaacson, Assistant Executive Director Daniel Elbaum, Assistant Executive Director Ellisa Sagor, Assistant Executive Director Janet Becker, Director, Strategic Implementation and Director, Human Resources Joey Resnick, Senior Assistant to the Executive Director Sarah Reinheimer, Deputy to the Chief Operating Officer R E S O U R C E D E V E LO P M E N T

Julie Schair, National Director Cathy Bezozo, National Associate Director Amy Cooper, Senior Development Director Michael Gilbert, Director of Regional Office Advancement Jeannette Krauss, Development Associate Michelle Kroll, Manager of Donor Recognition Societies Alexandra Lipner, Development Officer Leonard Myron, Senior Development Director Lilli Platt, Senior Development Director and Director, AJC Women’s Leadership Board Debra Rubenstein, National Director, Planned Giving Gary Spruch, Director, Development Communications Susan Tanenbaum, Senior Development Director L E A D E R S H I P D E V E LO P M E N T A N D B OA R D E N G AG E M E N T

Nadine Greenfield-Binstock, Director Joanna Lieberman, Assistant Director Anna Voremberg, Coordinator A J C ACC E S S

Alexis Frankel, Director, ACCESS Global Danielle Cohen, Director, ACCESS NY Sara Aeder, Assistant Director and Campus Strategist N ATI O N A L E V E N T S

Leslie Klion, Director Danielle Traub, Coordinator

D E PA R T M E N T O F REGIONAL OFFICES

A J C A F R I C A I N S TIT U T E

Eliseo Neuman, Director

Daniel Elbaum, Director Kim Kamen, Associate Director Melanie Pell, Assistant Director and Director of Regional Engagement Eli Lipmen, Communications and Advocacy Campaign Strategist Amanda Mishler, Coordinator

A J C A S I A PAC I F I C I N S TIT U T E

Shira Loewenberg, Director Neil Sandberg, Consultant/Director Emeritus Nissim Reuben, Assistant Director Yael Amit, AJC Southeast Asia Representative

M A R K E TI N G A N D S T R AT E G I C CO M M U N I C ATI O N S

A J C L ATI N O A N D L ATI N A M E R I C A N I N S TIT U T E

Ellisa Sagor, Director Jonathan Schweitzer, Director of Public Affairs Lisa Hoff, National Director, Direct Mail and Membership David Marks, Director of Web Strategies and Online Giving Linda Krieg, Art Director Sharon Gelb, Print Production Manager Kylie Brust, Marketing Coordinator

Dina Siegel Vann, Director Stephanie Guiloff, Associate Director, Global Programs Juan Dircie, Associate Director, Latino Task Forces Ann Schaffer, Director, Belfer Center for American Pluralism Ellen Carmell, Director, Bridging America Project A J C J E R U SA L E M

Avital Leibovich, Director Keren Naveh, Director of External Relations Olga Tripp, Director, Seminars, Missions and Delegations Yael Avnon, Sr. Assistant Director, Seminars, Missions and Delegations Arnona Shir-On, Assistant Director, Seminars, Missions and Delegations Dorit Nuriel, Assistant Director, Seminars, Missions and Delegations

M E D I A R E L ATI O N S

Kenneth Bandler, Director P U B L I C ATI O N S

Lawrence Grossman, Director A R C H I V E S A N D R E CO R D S C E N T E R

Charlotte Bonelli, Director O F F I C E O F G OV E R N M E N T A N D I N T E R N ATI O N A L A F FA I R S

Jason Isaacson, Director of Government and International Affairs Aaron Jacob, Associate Director, International Affairs

A J C B E R L I N R A M E R I N S TIT U T E

Deidre Berger, Director Fabian WeiĂ&#x;barth, Public Affairs Officer

Andrew Baker, Director, International Jewish Affairs Richard Foltin, Director, National and Legislative Affairs Julie Fishman, Director of Political Outreach Chelsea Hanson, Assistant Director for Immigration Policy Aliyah Dash, Diplomatic Outreach Coordinator Lauren Kimmel, International Affairs Advocacy and Research Coordinator Sonya Weisburd, Assistant Director, International Jewish Affairs Joseph Dubroff, Assistant to the Associate COO Jack Patterson, Office Manager

A J C T R A N SAT L A N TI C I N S TIT U T E

Daniel Schwammenthal, Director Joshua Goodman, Communications Director A J C PA R I S

Simone Rodan-Benzaquen, Director Vincent Zappia, Coordinator JACO B B L AU S T E I N I N S TIT U T E FO R T H E A DVA N C E M E N T O F HUMAN RIGHTS

Felice Gaer, Director Christen Broecker, Associate Director Marra Guttenplan, Advocacy/ Editorial Officer CO U N T RY R E P R E S E N TATI V E S

A J C P R OJ E C T I N T E R C H A N G E

Muriel Asseraf, Brazil Lisa Palmieri-Billig, Italy and the Holy See

Robin Levenston, Director Nisha Abkarian, Deputy Director Myra Clark-Siegel, Director of Communications and Senior Strategic Counsel Miriam Ganem Rosen, Assistant Director, International Programs Allison Tenenbaum, Assistant Director, U.S. Programs Christopher Townsend, Operations/ Office Manager

RUSSIAN JEWISH CO M M U N IT Y A F FA I R S

Samuel Kliger, Director T H A N K S TO S C A N D I N AV I A

Kelly Ramot, Executive Director

22

WILLIAM PETSCHEK CO N T E M P O R A RY J E W I S H L I F E D E PA R T M E N T

Steven Bayme, Director I N T E R N ATI O N A L I N T E R R E L I G I O U S A F FA I R S

David Rosen, Director James Rudin, Sr. Consultant INTERRELIGIOUS AND I N T E R G R O U P R E L ATI O N S

Noam Marans, Director Emily Soloff, Associate Director Ephraim Gabbai, Assistant Director LEGAL

Marc Stern, General Counsel Betty Robbins, Special Counsel Avital Blanchard, Assistant General Counsel F I N A N C E , IT, FAC I L ITI E S , A N D C A M PA I G N R E CO R D S

Richard Hyne, Chief Financial Officer Daniel Goldwater, Controller Ann Chung, Deputy Controller Jeffrey Gass, Finance Manager Romeo Dapito, Senior Accountant Jane Sia, Senior Accountant Valerie Blair, Accountant Carolina Segovia, Account/Systems Coordinator Sharon Chiu, Payroll Administrator Abby Kulawitz, Deputy to the Chief Financial Officer Ruth Harenchar, Chief Information Officer Candice Price, IT Infrastructure Engineer Adam Sundel, IT Infrastructure Administrator Derrick Shearer, Senior Business Analyst Mark Wilson, Business Analyst Simcha M. Druck, RE Application Analyst Amy Magdalin, Director, Facilities Daniel Metzger, Assistant Director, Facilities Michael Picozzo, Mailroom/Printshop Manager HUMAN RESOURCES

Janet Becker, Director Shifra Sharbat, Human Resources and Employee Relations Manager Sala Schmigelski, Human Resources and Benefits Manager Sarah Page, Human Resources and Benefits Associate (as of March 2014)


REGIONAL OFFICES AND INTERNATIONAL PARTNERS H E A D Q UA R T E R S

H O U S TO N

S T. LO U I S

CO LO M B I A

Jacob Blaustein Building 165 East 56 Street New York, NY 10022

Helene Zadok, President Randall Czarlinsky, Regional Director Matthew Kahn, Assistant Regional Director

Kara Newmark, President Nancy Lisker, Regional Director

Centro Israelita de Bogota

REGIONAL OFFICES A R I ZO N A

Tim Eckstein, Chair AT L A N TA

Lauren G. Grien, President Dov Wilker, Regional Director Lindsay Hirsch, Assistant Regional Director Erica Rabhan, Development Director Kenny Blank, Executive Director, Atlanta Jewish Film Festival Brad Pilcher, Assistant Director, Atlanta Jewish Film Festival Lesli Greenberg, Director of Development, Atlanta Jewish Film Festival B A LTI M O R E

Howard Rosenbloom, Chair B O S TO N

Mel Shuman, President Rob Leikind, Regional Director Rebecca Keys, Assistant Regional Director and Chief of Staff Diane Lieberman, Assistant Regional Director Jonathan Kappel, Development Director C H I C AG O

Harry Seigle, President Amy Stoken, Regional Director Jane Charney, Assistant Regional Director Stephanie Pritzker, Development Director Anna Glazer, Assistant Development Director C I N C I N N ATI

Rick Michelman, President Barbara Glueck, Regional Director CLEVELAND

Seth Briskin, President Lee C. Shapiro, Regional Director Jennifer Kaplan, Program and Development Assistant CO LO R A D O

Roberta Klein, Chair DA L L A S

Gary Eisenstat, President Anna Popp, Regional Director Diane Calmenson, Assistant Regional Director D E T R O IT

Howard Brown, President Kari Alterman, Regional Director

SA N F R A N C I S CO

Nancy Weil Price, President Mervyn Danker, Regional Director Lynn Simon, Development Director

K A N SA S C IT Y

David T. Rudman, MD, President Marvin Szneler, Regional Director

S E AT T L E

LO N G I S L A N D

Carlyn Steiner, President

Michael Ettinger, President Robert Socolof, Regional Director

WA S H I N G TO N , D.C .

David Berz, President Alan Ronkin, Regional Director Susan Sloan, Assistant Regional Director Laura Milstein, Development Director

LO S A N G E L E S

Clifford P. Goldstein, President Mark Diamond, Regional Director Marla Abraham, Development Director Gosia Weiss, Assistant Regional Director Michael Aurit, Assistant Regional Director Sanaz Meshkinfam, Assistant Regional Director Janice Pitler, Assistant Development Director

W E S TC H E S T E R

Stuart Ginsberg, President Scott Richman, Regional Director Jill Friedman, Associate Regional Director Vicki Kline, Development Director

M I A M I A N D B R OWA R D CO U N T Y

Andrew C. Hall, President Brian Siegal, Regional Director Michael Winograd, Assistant Regional Director Mark Kram, Development Director

Karen Hochberg, Director Susan Simons, Director of Youth Programming Sarah Shotland, Director of Marketing and Communications OREGON AREA J E W I S H CO M M IT T E E

Joanne Van Ness Menashe, Director I N T E R N ATI O N A L PA R T N E R S A R G E N TI N A

Asociación Mutual Israelita Argentina (AMIA) AU S T R A L I A

O R A N G E CO U N T Y

Australia/Israel and Jewish Affairs Council (AIJAC) Australasian Union of Jewish Students (AUJS)

Susan Glass, Chair

B U LG A R I A

PA L M B E AC H CO U N T Y

Shalom

Gary Walk, President Rachel Miller, Regional Director/ Development Director

C A N A DA

P H I L A D E L P H I A /S O U T H E R N N E W JERSEY

CHILE

Canadian Federation of Jewish Students (CFJS) Comité Representativo de Entidades Judías Chile (CREJ)

Frederick D. Strober, President Marcia Bronstein, Regional Director Judy Browngoehl, Assistant Regional Director Stefanie Tapper, Assistant Development Director

E L SA LVA D O R

Comunidad Israelita de El Salvador E S TO N I A

Jewish Community of Estonia EUROPE

Euro-Asian Jewish Congress (EAJC) European Union of Jewish Students (EUJS) GREECE

Central Board of Jewish Communities in Greece (KIS) G UAT E M A L A

Comunidad Judia de Guatemala L AT V I A

Jewish Community of Latvia Tribuna Israelita

P IT T S B U R G H A R E A J E W I S H CO M M IT T E E

Betty Cotton, President Michael Schmidt, Regional Director Alex Bronzo, Associate Regional Director

The Federation of Jewish Communities

M E X I CO

Harriet McKinney, Director

N E W YO R K

CZECH REPUBLIC

Ann Virag, President Brian Lipton, Regional Director/ Development Director

M I LWAU K E E A R E A J E W I S H CO M M IT T E E

Michael Feldstein, President, Central New Jersey Amy Reisen Freundlich, President, Metro New Jersey John Rosen, Regional Director Amy Hollander, Assistant Regional Director Allison Sachs Klein, Assistant Development Director Ilana Greenbaum, Assistant Regional Director

Centro Israelita Sionista

W E S T COA S T F LO R I DA

I N D E P E N D E N T A F F I L I AT E S

NEW JERSEY

CO S TA R I C A

M O R O CCO

Conseil des Communautés Israélites du Maroc PA N A M A

Consejo Ejecutivo de la Comunidad Judia de Panamá PERU

Asociación Judía del Perú POLAND

Union of Jewish Religious Communities PORTUGAL

Comunidade Israelita de Lisboa (CIL) ROMANIA

Federation of Jewish Communities S LOVA K R E P U B L I C

Union of Jewish Religious Communities SOUTH AFRICA

South African Union of Jewish Students (SAUJS) S PA I N

Federación de Communidades Israelitas de España S W IT Z E R L A N D

Fédération Suisse des Communautés Israélites TUNISIA

Communaute Juive de Tunisie TURKEY

Turkish Jewish Community (TJC) VENEZUELA

Confederación de Asociaciones Israelitas de Venezuela (CAIV) WO R L DW I D E

World Union of Jewish Students (WUJS)

23

(as of March 2014)


TREASURER ’S REPORT As the Treasurer of AJC, I am pleased to submit this report of AJC’s financial condition and its financial activity for 2013. Through generous support from donors and the dedicated stewardship of its staff and lay leaders, AJC has achieved a strong financial standing by which the organization can continue to grow and further its mission. We are very grateful to all those who helped AJC continue its important work in 2013. AJC’s unrestricted contributions, membership dues, and legacies and bequests in 2013 reached a total of $38.3 million, an increase of $2.0 million over 2012, which, together with continued tight control over operating expenses, resulted in an operating surplus of $6.9 million. Additionally, a $6.2-million non-operating credit was recorded to reduce the underfunded pension and other benefits liabilities recorded in the financial statements. The reduction in these benefits liabilities resulted primarily from the combination of strong investment returns on the pension plan assets, an IRS-required contribution to the underfunded pension plan, and rising interest rates used to calculate the future pension and other benefit obligations. AJC’s temporarily restricted contributions in 2013 of $11.5 million increased by $3.7 million as compared to 2012. AJC also benefited in 2013 from very strong investment returns of $11.9 million on its endowment and other investments. Net assets released from restrictions in support of AJC’s operations totaled $10.4 million. The operating surplus, the gains on investments, and the pension and other benefits adjustment were primarily responsible for the increase in AJC’s net assets of $27.8 million to $130.7 million at December 31, 2013. The Balance Sheet continues to show that AJC is a financially sound organization in the short and longterm. AJC’s total assets of $156.7 million exceeded total liabilities of $26.0 million, which resulted in the total net assets of $130.7 million. Current assets of $46.6 million exceeded current liabilities of $10.0 million by $36.6 million, indicating a favorable liquidity position. AJC remains steadfast in pursuing revenue growth from all sources, which will further enhance its financial stability and allow for expansion of the many impactful programs that AJC has consistently provided. AJC will continue to act in a fiscally responsible manner to safeguard all of its assets. We thank you for your support of the vital work of AJC. AJC is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization, tax ID # 13-5563393.

Ned Dubilo Treasurer

24


FINANCIAL REPORT AJC, INSTITUTE OF HUMAN RELATIONS, THANKS TO SCANDINAVIA, AND TRANSATLANTIC INSTITUTE C O N S O L I DAT E D B A L A N C E S H E E T S , DECEMBER 3 1 , 2013 AND 2012 (in thousands)

C O N S O L I DAT E D S TAT E M E N T S O F AC T I V I T I E S , YE ARS ENDED DECEMBER 3 1 , 2013 AND 2012 (in thousands)

A S S E T S 2013 2012

CHANGES IN UNRESTRICTED

2013

2012

NET ASSETS

Cash and cash equivalents $18,984 $ 14,673 Contributions receivable, net 12,891 11,221 Investments, at fair value1 111,048 99,411 Prepaid expenses and other assets 813 707 Beneficial interest in third party trusts 5,827 2,646 Fixed assets, net 7,155 6,662 Total assets $156,718 2 $ 135,320

Contributions and special events, net $ 36,180 $ 33,987 Membership dues 1,566 1,848 Legacies and bequests 587 504 Investment income and net gains on investments 79 131 Other income 2,085 1,437 Net assets released from restrictions 10,430 10,402 Total operating revenue 50,927 48,309

LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS

Accounts payable and accrued expenses 5,518 5,593 Accrued pension and other benefit obligations 18,576 24,793 Liability under split-interest agreements 1,934 2,025 Total liabilities 26,028 2 32,411

Program services (33,153) (33,938) Supporting services (10,841) (10,462) Total operating expenses (43,994) (44,400) Excess of operating revenue over operating expenses 6,933 3,909

Decrease/(increase) in accrued pension and other benefit obligations 6,186 Increase (decrease) in unrestricted net assets 13,119

NET ASSETS

Unrestricted

19,639

6,520

Temporarily restricted3 50,563 37,592 Permanently restricted (corpus) 60,488 58,797 Total net assets 130,690 102,909 Total liabilities and net assets $ 156,718 $ 135,320

(5,578) (1,669)

C H A N G E S I N T E M P O R A R I LY RESTRICTED NET ASSETS

Contributions 11,525 7,857 Investment return 11,876 7,514 Net assets released from restrictions (10,430) (10,402) Other - (737) Increase in temporarily restricted net assets 12,971 4,232

1 Includes investment funds that invest in 1-3 year U.S. Treasury index funds. 2 Current assets of $46,607 exceed current liabilities of $9,986 by $36,621. 3 Includes accumulated appreciation on corpus of permanently restricted funds.

C O M B I N E D E X P E N S E A L LO C AT I O N S , YE AR ENDED DECEMBER 3 1 , 2013 (in thousands)

C H A N G E S I N P E R M A N E N T LY RESTRICTED NET ASSETS

Contributions 2,241 6 Other (550) Increase in corpus of permanently restricted net assets 1,691 6

T O TA L

T O TA L

PROGRAM

EXPENSES

SERVICES

$43,994

$33,153

SU M MARY OF N ET ASSETS

Increase in net assets 27,781 2,569 Net assets at beginning of year 102,909 100,340 Net assets at end of year $ 130,690 $ 102,909 75% Total Program Services 16% Fundraising 9% Management

39% Regional Offices/

Local Advocacy

39% International Relations 9% Strategic Communications

and General

and Public Relations

7% Interreligious and

Intergroup Relations

3% National Policy 2% Contemporary Jewish Life 1% Other

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IN MEMORIAM

CHARITABLE BEQUESTS TO AJC* AJC honors the memory of our donors whose planned gifts and bequests were realized in 2013. We deeply appreciate their decision to include AJC as part of their legacies, which allows their support for AJC’s mission to continue beyond their lifetimes. Charles and Frances Bay Los Angeles, CA Bernice Berkenfield Dayton, OH Louise Blosten Crystal Lake, IL Sol Blumenthal Atlanta, GA Claire Chasnov New York, NY Herbert S. Denenberg Philadelphia, PA Harold Goldmann Haddonfield, NJ John Ignatz Los Angeles, CA Albert M. Kane Harrisburg, PA Lewis M. Krohn New York, NY

AJC remembers with respect and appreciation the outstanding leaders whose commitment will be cherished for years to come. WILSON R . K APLEN

Wilson R. Kaplen, widely known as Bill, was a World War II veteran, consummate humanist, committed philanthropist and advocate for the Jewish people and the community at large. A real estate executive with generosity of spirit, Bill had a passion for Israel and the Jewish Diaspora that informed the giving of The Kaplen Foundation, a longtime supporter of AJC. Bill was an extraordinary man with a profound commitment to helping Jewish and secular organizations. His heart of gold and deep passion will be missed. FLORENCE LEVITT

Florence Levitt, a teacher of public speaking and theater arts, served on AJC’s Board of Governors, as well as the on the West Coast Florida Regional Board. In 2000, she led the AJC campaign that resulted in a warning posted on the Barnes and Noble website about the fraudulent and hateful character of the anti-Semitic forgery The Protocols of the Elders of Zion. Florence and her late husband, Irving, are deeply missed, and their longtime support of AJC will be forever cherished.

Lillian Lebofsky Longboat Key, FL Irving F. and Florence C. Levitt Sarasota, FL Oscar Peretz New York, NY James Solomon Reiner Hackensack, NJ Lillian Rosenfeld New York, NY Robert Rosenthal Sarasota, FL

*There were numerous donors whose estates and trusts provided charitable bequests to AJC in 2013, however, AJC was not provided with the legal authorization to publish their names.

EL AINE L . WISHNER

Elaine Wishner, teacher, administrator and consultant for a variety of Jewish and general childhood programs, was a longtime member of AJC’s Board of Governors. As a past President of AJC Chicago, she founded and facilitated the Chicago Jewish Women’s Interfaith Dialogue, and chaired the Chicago Ethnic Women’s Coalition and the Polish American-Jewish American Dialogue. Elaine received many awards from Jewish philanthropies in Chicago. She and her late husband, Maynard Wishner, former AJC President, dedicated years of their lives to AJC, and for that we are grateful. AJC also remembers the following leaders: Bernard Abrams, Howard Borowick, Matthew Bucksbaum, Richard England, Senator Frank Lautenberg, Stuart Nelkin, Charles Petschek*, Robert Rosenthal*, Albert Shasha and Allen & Connie Skolnick. May their memory always be for a blessing. *Charles Petschek and Robert Rosenthal, who passed away in 2013, were profiled in the 2012 Annual Report’s “In Memoriam” section.

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AJC’S MISSION To enhance the well-being of the Jewish people and Israel, and to advance human rights and democratic values in the United States and around the world.

JACOB BLAUSTEIN BUILDING 165 EAST 56 STREET NEW YORK, NY 10022 WWW.AJC.ORG

Profile for American Jewish Committee

AJC Annual Report 2013  

AJC Annual Report 2013  

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