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 ADVANCING NEUROLOGY. ADVANCING YOU.

2018 ANNUAL MEETING

}Registration } }Advance } Program }Housing }


AAN 70

th Anniversary Celebration

Join Us in Celebrating 70 Years of the AAN Sunday, April 22 • 7:00 p.m.–11:00 p.m. at

LIMITED QUANTITY OF FREE TICKETS AVAILABLE Hurry—this family friendly event is free only to the first 4,000 registered Annual Meeting attendees* who RSVP for the celebration. Reserve or purchase additional tickets for $115 before March 29.

Ticket includes: • Transportation to/from the event • Delicious food and beverages all evening • Rides and studio tour

*Limit one free ticket per registered Annual Meeting Attendee.

Secure your ticket today at AAN.com/view/70Anniversary


Contents Introduction

Program Track Descriptions

What’s New ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������3 Registration����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������4 Experiential Learning Areas��������������������������������������������������������������6

Annual Meeting Schedules

Business of Neurology Track Overview . . . . . . . . . . 195 Neurohospitalist Track Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199 Spanish-language Track Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . 217

Science

Meeting-at-a-Glance Tear Out . . . . . . . . 13 Meeting Overview Saturday, April 21 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Sunday, April 22 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Monday, April 23 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Tuesday, April 24 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Wednesday, April 25 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Thursday, April 26 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Friday, April 27 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Plenary Sessions������������������������������������������������������������������������������29 Program Glossary�����������������������������������������������������������������������������30 Category Icons ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������30

Program Descriptions by Topic Aging, Dementia, Cognitive, and Behavioral Neurology . . . . 31 Cerebrovascular Disease and Interventional Neurology . . . . 44 Child Neurology and Developmental Neurology . . . . . . . 52 Epilepsy/Clinical Neurophysiology (EEG) . . . . . . . . . . 57 General Neurology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Global Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 Headache . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 Infectious Disease . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 Leadership University . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 Movement Disorders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease . . . . . . . . . . . . 122 Neuro Trauma, Critical Care, and Sports Neurology . . . . . 132 Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG) . . . . . 140 Neuro-oncology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153 Neuro-ophthalmology/ Neuro-otology . . . . . . . . . . . 158 Neuro-rehabilitation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166 Pain and Palliative Care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170 Practice, Policy, and Ethics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175 Research Methodology, Education, and History . . . . . . . 182 Sleep . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189

Preliminary Scientific Schedule ��������������������������������������������������� 222

Highlights and Features Experience Unique Opportunities for Students, Residents, and Fellows ������������������������������������������������������������������224 Connect at Social Events�������������������������������������������������������������� 226 2018 Annual Meeting On Demand ���������������������������������������������� 228

Annual Meeting Information General Information���������������������������������������������������������������������� 230 Hotel and Reservations����������������������������������������������������������������� 233 Choose your accommodations to match the Los Angeles you want to experience! . . . . . . . . . . . 234 Hotels and Amenities ������������������������������������������������������������������� 236 Travel Information������������������������������������������������������������������������� 238 Meeting Information and Contacts ��������������������������������������������� 239

The 70th AAN Annual Meeting Deadlines-At-A-Glance

Late January 2018 Abstract Notifications Available March 2, 2018 Annual Meeting Hotel Reservation Deadline March 29, 2018 Annual Meeting Early Registration Deadline

Location Los Angeles Convention Center

Headquarter Hotel JW Marriott Los Angeles L.A. LIVE

AAN.com/view/AM18 Current as of November 30, 2017. Program Subject to change


It’s with great excitement that I invite you to the 70th AAN Annual Meeting in Los Angeles, a city known for its universities, many tourist attractions, music venues, and theater stages. After all, what better place for neurology to take center stage and your career to be cast in the spotlight than at the world’s largest gathering of neurologists and neurology professionals? No matter at what stage you find yourself in your career or subspecialty area of interest, you will find your keys to success in Los Angeles this April. This year’s meeting will showcase 235 expert-led education courses and present the most groundbreaking research with a record-breaking 2,700+ contributed abstracts. In addition, you will find countless opportunities to enjoy, relax and rejuvenate your mind and body so that you can focus on doing what you do best: providing the best possible care, research, and support for patients with neurologic disease. To help you navigate the meeting and make the most of your week, we have added new tracks and other enhancements that are detailed on the facing page. These additions are just a sampling of what you can expect to find in 2018. I encourage you to visit AAN.com/view/AM18 to learn more about all the opportunities at this year’s meeting. I have no doubt that you will not easily find another venue combining choice and flexibility with great value. I look forward to seeing you in sunny California this April.

­—Stefan M. Pulst, MD, FAAN Chair, Meeting Management Committee


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  Career-Focused Tracks

Our new audience-based programming tracks will make navigating the meeting easier than ever, with focused programming geared specifically toward a variety of neurology professionals. }} Neurohospitalist Track For neurohospitalists, those whose primary focus is inpatient care, or for anyone who would like to learn more about the care of hospitalized patients. }} Business of Neurology Track For those starting a new practice, as well as anyone who wants to learn the fundamentals of neurology business. }} Foundations of Clinical Neurology Track For Advanced Practice Providers who are new to neurology, this track will help lay the foundation for success as a new care team member.

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  Specialty Tracks

If your schedule won’t allow you to stay for the whole meeting, maximize your time in Los Angeles and get the most out of a shorter trip with these specialty tracks that will take place on consecutive days. }} Child Neurology–Sunday to Tuesday }} Neuro-rehabilitation–Wednesday to Friday }} Neuro-infectious Disease– Wednesday to Friday }} Neuro-oncology –Tuesday to Thursday }} Pain and Palliative Care –Sunday to Tuesday }} Sleep—Sunday to Tuesday

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  Education Program Enhancements

If you’re looking to be further challenged and engaged, then these program innovations will provide even more opportunity for participation. “What Do I Do Now?”

}} Faculty will share a challenging real-life case before asking “What do I do now?” Audience members will be given the opportunity to weigh in on what they would do in a similar scenario before the panel explains how they actually handled the situation. Continuing the Conversation

}} At the conclusion of select courses, director and faculty will relocate to engage in small group conversations with interested audience members.

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  New E-poster Setup

Twelve semi-private viewing areas will allow for a more interactive and dynamic engagement and discussion with presenters. Look for 12 different E-posters each day!

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  Controversies in Neurology Plenary Session—Based on Member Suggestions! For the first time, AAN members will have a chance to weigh in on what they would like to see presented at this year’s Controversies in Neurology Plenary Session. You can submit your idea at AAN.com/view/AM18

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 Expanded Spanish-language Curriculum

We’re offering programming on a variety of topics in a variety of formats, including education courses and experiential learning areas—taught entirely in Spanish. }} MS Therapy }} CNS Infection and Tropical Medicine }} Epilepsy }} Stroke }} Annual Meeting Science Updates }} Neurological Exam Tips and Tricks }} More

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 70 th Anniversary Party

Join us on Sunday, April 22, from 7:00 p.m. to 11:00 p.m. at Universal Studios to celebrate 70 years of the AAN! A limited quantity of free tickets are available to the first 4,000 registered Annual Meeting attendees who sign up, and will include transportation to/ from the event, delicious food and beverages, and access to Universal Studios, including rides. Additional tickets for guests may be purchased through the registration process.

AAN.com/view/AM18

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Registration Plan Your Meeting Experience The 70th AAN Annual Meeting registration site makes planning your week as easy as 1-2-3:

1 2

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Register and book your hotel quickly and easily online—enjoy the convenience and value of the single registration rate. Use the handy Meeting-at-a-Glance starting on page 13 » of this book to plan your week, incorporating your favorite education programs, scientific sessions, and other Annual Meeting social and informational events. Show up and experience the excellence of the world’s largest and most vibrant gathering of neurologists!

Ways to Register

Registration Options

Online

Annual Meeting Registration

AAN.com/view/register

The single meeting registration fee is mandatory for all registrants and is determined by AAN member type at the time of the meeting, not at registration.

Telephone US/Canada: (800) 676-4226 International: (415) 979-2283

Registration Deadline: March 29, 2018 Registrations received after March 29, 2018, will be processed at a higher rate.

Hotel Reservation Deadline: March 2, 2018 For questions go to aanam.cmrushelp.com To obtain a registration form to pay by check, please contact CMR. Registration forms will only be accepted for check payments.

Ways to Save }} Renew your AAN membership or join the AAN for maximum registration savings. Visit AAN.com/view/membership. }} Register by the March 29, 2018, early registration deadline to avoid increased rates after this date.

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2018 AAN Annual Meeting Education Program

To qualify for the member registration rate, your 2018 membership dues must be paid by April 21, 2018. Failure to do so will result in a balance due.

Gold Registration Upgrade your meeting registration to include access to Annual Meeting On Demand.

Look for this seal to ensure you are booking through the AAN’s official housing vendor, CMR, and avoid fraudulent sites by only booking on sites where you see this seal.


Additional Information Cancelled or Closed Programs Programs may be closed due to reaching maximum capacity or cancelled due to insufficient enrollment. In the event of cancellation, registration for the cancelled course will be fully refunded for courses that have a separate registration fee. The AAN is not responsible for airfare, hotel, or other costs incurred by participants in the event of program or registration closure or cancellation.

Cancellations/Refunds of Registration Until March 29, 2018—Refund less $100 administrative fee March 30–April 14, 2018—Refund less $200 administrative fee After April 14, 2018—No refund •• All cancellations must be submitted in writing to aanam.cmrushelp.com or faxed to (415) 293-4071. •• No-shows will not receive a refund. •• Name substitutions are not permitted. •• No refunds will be processed for amounts of $20 or less.

Special Accommodations Deadline: March 29, 2018 The Los Angeles Convention Center and the AAN strive to accommodate all visitors. Information booths, designated parking, and assisted listening devices are available. If you require special accommodation to attend the Annual Meeting, submit your request while registering online or contact Laurie Dixon no later than March 29, 2018, at ldixon@aan.com or (612) 928-6154.

Kosher meals may be provided at any lunch and must be arranged on or before March 29, 2018, through the registration website or by contacting AAN Registration/CMR at aanam.cmrushelp.com, (800) 676-4226, or (415) 979-2283. There is a $50 surcharge per kosher meal. On-site requests cannot be accommodated. There are no refunds for kosher meals.

Group Registration Deadline: March 29, 2018 Group registrations are those in which 10 or more individuals’ fees are paid for with one check or credit card. Special registration instructions are available online at AAN.com/view/register or by contacting CMR’s Group Registration at (800) 676-4226 (US/Canada) or (415) 979-2283 (International) or aanam.cmrushelp.com. See page 233 » for housing information.

What Is Not Included with Annual Meeting Registration? While the single registration rate provides an exceptional value, some courses require pre-registration, may have a separate registration fee, and are subject to closure due to reaching maximum capacity. For information on pricing please visit AAN.com/view/register.

Registration Rates Note: All prices in US dollars Early Registration (Before March 29, 2018)

Late Registration (After March 29, 2018)

Early Gold Registration4 (Before March 29, 2018)

Late Gold Registration4 (After March 29, 2018)

Student

$0

$0

$199

$199

Senior/Honorary Member

$0

$0

$399

$399

Junior Member

$245

$335

$444

$534

$420

$570

$619

$769

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Non-neurologist Member Neurologist Member

2

$720

$980

$1,119

$1,379

Nonmember

$1,220

$1,660

$1,819

$2,259

1  Junior, Intern 2 Researcher, Advanced Practice Provider, Business Administrator

3 Neurologist, Physician Affiliate 4 Includes Access to Annual Meeting on Demand

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Fast and easy registration · AAN.com/view/AM18

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Experiential Learning Areas

We’re taking learning outside the traditional classroom, every day of the meeting, with dynamic and interactive areas that will offer a variety of real-world experiences to engage you intellectually, emotionally, and socially and offer you fresh ideas to help you personally and professionally. Advocacy to Action: Empowering Patients and Physicians Learn how to make your voice heard for you, your patients, and the future of neurology.

Maximize Your Value: Improve Your Neurology Practice Find out about the best business practices for neurology and leave with ready-to-apply strategies.

The Member Experience: Personalize Your Journey Connect and be recognized as a valued AAN member, and learn how to personalize your experience.

HeadTalks Discover and discuss non-traditional and at times controversial, neurology topics.

Navigating Your Career Receive comprehensive information regarding professional development at every career stage.

Live Well: Taking Care of Your Patients Starts with Taking Care of You! Get inspired about the importance of taking care of your mental and physical health.

Research Corner: Moving Neurology Forward See the importance of research on neurology’s future and its impact on patient care.

The Member Experience: Personalize Your Journey It is an exciting time to be a member of the AAN! We are making significant strides in the evolution of our members’ experiences, including a more personalized AAN.com, Synapse Online Communities, and many opportunities to participate in committees and AAN leadership programs to better adapt to the quickly changing landscape of our profession and technology alike. The Academy recognizes that each member has unique needs that are specific to their subspecialty, their practice setting, and career stage; and they are making it a priority to personalize each members’ experience. The Member Experience is an excellent way to help members of the Academy learn more about these exciting opportunities to get the most out of their membership. — Bert Vargas, MD, FAAN

The Member Experience area is your home to connect, engage, and be recognized as a valued AAN member. Join us to learn more about how you can personalize your member experience through the brand new AAN.com website, Synapse Online Communities, and many other opportunities both in person and virtually. Come have fun, update your AAN profile, elevate your membership status, and more, all while learning how to enhance your career through a variety of opportunities. The Member Experience area is your place to feel at home and get connected with your neurology community.

Visit AAN.com/view/ela for the most up-to-date topics and speakers.

The Member Experience : }} Experience the new aan website }} Elevate your membership status }} Personalize your member profile }} Find engagement opportuniyies

}} Check out the recognition walls }} Recognize your colleagues }} Win prime tech giveaways


Designed to inspire, motivate, and educate attendees about the importance of taking care of their mental and physical health, the Live Well Area gives attendees the opportunity to learn about the importance of interventions such as exercise and nutrition, for well-being and as part of a treatment program for patients.

Scheduled Presentations: Saturday, April 21

Monday, April 23

Tuesday, April 24

Wednesday, April 25

Thursday, April 26

7:00 a.m.–7:45 a.m. Yoga—Vinyasa

7:00 a.m.–7:45 a.m. Yoga—Vinyasa

7:00 a.m.–7:45 a.m. Yoga—Vinyasa

7:00 a.m.–7:45 a.m. Yoga—Vinyasa

7:00 a.m.–7:45 a.m. Yoga—Vinyasa

12:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m. Massage Chairs Intuitive Body Care Los Angeles, CA

12:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m. Massage Chairs Intuitive Body Care Los Angeles, CA

12:00 p.m.–12:45 p.m. Treatment of Neuropathy Symptoms With Medication Janice F. Wiesman, MD, FAAN

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. Acupuncture Demonstration— Auriculotherapy Jennifer Bickel, MD, FAAN

8:00 a.m..–8:45 a.m. Sleep and Performance in Elite Athletes Scott J. Kutscher, MD

3:00 p.m.–3:45 p.m. Acupuncture Demonstration—4 Gates Jennifer Bickel, MD, FAAN

1:00 p.m.–2:00 p.m. Perception Is Reality: Are Neurologists Helping Patients Live Well with Dementia? Daniel C. Potts, MD, FAAN; Neelum T. Aggarwal, MD

12:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m. Massage Chairs Intuitive Body Care Los Angeles, CA

12:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m. Massage Chairs Intuitive Body Care Los Angeles, CA

12:00 p.m.–12:45 p.m. The Purpose Checkup: Find Meaning, Live Longer, Better Richard Leider

1:00 p.m.–1:45 p.m. Complementary Therapies in Parkinson’s Disease Veronica E. Santini, MD

2:00 p.m.–2:45 p.m. Resiliency for the Neurologist Justin T. Jordan, MD, MPH

12:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m. Massage Chairs Intuitive Body Care Los Angeles, CA

Sunday, April 22 7:00 a.m.–7:45 a.m. Yoga—Vinyasa 8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. Mind Over Matter: Meditation for the Practicing Neurologist Sarah Mulukutla, MD 12:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m. Massage Chairs Intuitive Body Care Los Angeles, CA 3:00 p.m.–3:45 p.m. How Your Social Life Might Be Helping (or Harming) Your Brain Joel A. Salinas, MD

2:00 p.m.–2:45 p.m. Physical Exercise and Cognitive Training in Neurology–­Application in Aging and Neurodegenerative Disease Ergun Y. Uc, MD 3:00 p.m.–3:45 p.m. Introduction to Acupuncture 1– Conceptual Framework and Mechanism of Action Alexandra Dimitrova, MD, MA, MCR

2:00 p.m.–2:45 p.m. Dancing with Parkinson’s Diviya Kaul, MD 4:00 p.m.–4:45 p.m. The Sleep Mythbuster!: Illuminating the Facts and Fiction Towards Achieving the Sleep Healthy Neurologist Charlene Gamaldo, MD, FAAN

3:00 p.m.–3:45 p.m. Introduction to Acupuncture II–Evidence-based Applications for Acupuncture in the Treatment of Neurologic Conditions Alexandra Dimitrova, MD, MA, MCR 4:00 p.m.–4:45 p.m. Diets and Supplements in MS – What’s the Evidence thus Far? Vijayshree Yadav, MD, MCR, FANA

1:00 p.m.–1:45 p.m. Integrative Approach to the Management of Chronic Pain Syndromes Jessica Robinson-Papp, MD, FAAN

Friday, April 27 7:00 a.m.–7:45 a.m. Yoga—Vinyasa 12:00 p.m..–12:45 p.m. Outsmart Stress Marie Pasinski, MD

Program Schedule Current as of November 30, 2017

Don’t Miss }} Daily Yoga }} Chair Massages }} Guided Meditation

}} Annual Meeting Water Bottles }} Daily Step Challenge with Prizes }} Much More

Experiential Learning Areas

Live Well: Taking Care of Your Patients Starts with Taking Care of You


Experiential Learning Areas

HeadTalks The HeadTalks stage provides an unconventional platform where non-traditional neurology topics such as Neurological Exam Tips and Tricks, Gamification of Neurology, and Zombie Apocalypse! Neurology of the Undead can be discussed in an engaging format. These talks are topical, unique, and at times controversial, and will provide dynamic conversations on a variety of thought-provoking topics.

Scheduled Presentations: Saturday, April 21 12:00 p.m.–12:30 p.m. Navigating the Annual Meeting App and Convention Center Tour Carlayne E. Jackson, MD, FAAN 12:45 p.m.–1:45 p.m. Ask Us Anything: Expert Panel on Headache and Pain Peter Goadsby, MD, PhD; Todd D. Rozen, MD, FAAN 2:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. Rural Neurology Dario Beltran, MD, FAAN; Michael Stitzer, MD 3:15 p.m.–4:15 p.m. Successful Women in Neurology Panel Allison Brashear, MD, MBA, FAAN; Cynthia L. Comella, MD, FAAN; Helena C. Chui, MD; Merit E. Cudkowicz, MD, MSC; Mona Bahouth, MD; Barbara G. Vickrey, MD, MPH, FAAN

Sunday, April 22 12:00 p.m.–1:00 p.m. Neurology Pictionary Bert B. Vargas, MD, FAAN

3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m. Blind Spots: The Impact of Concious and Unconcious Biases Charles C. Flippen II, MD, FAAN; Jeffrey McClean II, MD, FAAN; Laraine Kaminsky

5:15 p.m.–6:15 p.m. Neurology of the 1970s Martin A. Samuels, MD, MACP, FAAN; Austin J. Sumner, MD, FAAN; Sandra F. Olson, MD, FAAN; Thomas D. Sabin, MD, FAAN; Thomas R. Swift, MD, FAAN

4:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. What is that Twitch? Leo Veshagen Metman, MD, PHD; Susan B. Bressman, MD, FAAN

Tuesday, April 24

Monday, April 23 12:00 p.m.–1:00 p.m. Is There a Neurologist on This Flight? Joseph I. Sirven, MD, FAAN 1:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m. Eminence–based Medicine vs Evidence–based Medicine Martin A. Samuels, MD, MACP, FAAN

12:00 p.m.–1:00 p.m. Neurology Game Show Localize the Lesion Luis F. Torres, MD 1:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m. Neurological Exam Tips and Tricks Christopher H. Hawkes, MD, Bsc, FRCP; Kapil D. Sethi, MD, FRCP (UK), FAAN; Thomas R. Swift, MD, FAAN 3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m. Biological and Chemical Neuroterroism and Neurowarfare Thomas P. Bleck, MD, FAAN

3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m. Publication Editors Tell All: Hits, Misses, and Tips Joseph Safdieh, MD, FAAN; Orly 4:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. Avitzur, MD, MBA, FAAN; Robert A. Zombie Apocalypse! The Gross, MD, PhD, FAAN Neuroscience of the Undead Bert B Vargas, MD, FAAN; 4:15 p.m.–5:00 p.m. From Member to Leader: How Constantine Moschonas, MD; Jennifer Bickel, MD, FAAN; Joseph to Engage with the AAN I. Sirven, MD, FAAN Jeffrey McClean II, MD, FAAN;

1:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m. Hall of Presidents: Neurology Through the Years Terrence L. Cascino, MD, FAAN; Ralph L. Sacco, MD, MS, FAHA, Christine E. Phelps, Deputy FAAN; Francis I. Kittredge Jr., MD, Executive Director, AANI FAAN; Roger N. Rosenberg, MD, FAAN; Stanley Fahn, MD, FAAN; Stephen M. Sergay MB BCh, FAAN; Terrence L. Cascino, MD, FAAN; Thomas R. Swift, MD, FAAN Robert C. Griggs, MD, FAAN

Wednesday, April 25 12:00 p.m.–1:00 p.m. Neurology Jeopardy Game Show Veronica E. Santini, MD; Laurice T. Yang, MD, MHA 1:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m. Ask Us Anything: Expert Panel on Parkinson’s Disease Cynthia L. Comella, MD, FAAN; Janis Miyasaki, MD, FAAN; Oksana Suchowersky, MD, FAAN 3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m. Health Care Disparities Amongst Underserved Populations Holly E. Hinson, MD, MCR; Charles C. Flippen, II, MD, FAAN; Lisa M. Shulman, MD, FAAN; Temitayo Oyegbile, MD, PhD 4:15 p.m.–5:00 p.m. Neurology of Voodoo Ann H. Tilton, MD, FAAN 5:15 p.m.–6:15 p.m. Neurology and Art David E. Thaler, MD, PhD

Thursday, April 26 12:00 p.m.–1:00 p.m. Who Wants to be a Millionaire Andrew James Westwood, MD; Jose H. Posas, MD 1:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m. Caring for Your Neurologic Patient for $500 or Less Donn Dexter, MD, FAAN

3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m. Neurological Exam Tips and Tricks: En Español Jose Biller, MD, FAAN, FACP, FAHA; Vladimir Hachinski, MD, PSc, FAAN 4:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. Neurology History and Wine Christopher Goetz, MD, FAAN

Friday, April 27 12:00 p.m.–1:00 p.m. Creativity and the Brain...at the Piano Phillip L. Pearl, MD, FAAN 1:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m. Live Intraoperative Monitoring Constantine Moschonas, MD 3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m. Ask Us Anything: Expert Panel on Stroke Bart M. Demaerschalk, MD, MSc, FRCPC; Jose Biller, MD, FAAN, FACP, FAHA; Natalia Sana Rost, MD, MPH, FAAN 4:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. Ask Us Anything: Expert Panel on Multiple Sclerosis John Corboy, MD, FAAN

Program Schedule Current as of November 30, 2017


Maximize Your Value and Advocacy To Action This year, these two Experiential Learning Areas are sharing one stage so that members can take full advantage of the speakers and expertise available. The Maximize Your Value Experiential Learning Area places members in contact with AAN tools and resources that help neurologists become more efficient practitioners who can offer higher quality, higher value care regardless of their practice level.

The Advocacy to Action Experiential Learning Area brings awareness of the state and federal advocacy the AAN does on behalf of its members to improve experiences for both neurologists and their patients, and provides pathways for AAN members to engage in their own advocacy.

Scheduled Presentations: Breaking Down Silos: Simulation-based Interprofessional Team Training to Enhance Clinical Outcomes in Neurology Barbara Dworetzky, MD, FAAN; Tracey Milligan, MD, FAAN; Ellen Bubrick, MD, Charles Pozner, MD Can Aviation Accidents Teach Neurologists Patient Safety and Error Management? Rohit Das, MD, FAAN, and Amy Sanders, MD, FAAN Enhancing Communications with Patients and Colleagues Through EHR Use Allan Wu, MD Growing Research in Medical Marijuana Anup Patel, MD, FAAN How to Pursue a Career in Clinical Informatics Allison Weathers, MD, FAAN; Eric Cheng, MD, MS, FAAN; Allan Wu, MD; Melissa Yu, MD

Knowing Your Value as a Female Neurologist: Negotiating Contracts Eva Ritzl, MD Managing Desktop Medicine (It’s Not All a Bad Thing) Melissa Yu, MD and Alan Wu, MD

Using Your Patients as Resources: Group Medical Visits for Improved Wellness and Efficiency Mary Rensel, MD and Nancy Isenberg, MD, MPH, FAAN

QPP: APM vs MIPS: Paths for Success Lyell Jones, MD, FAAN Quality and Safety Awards Anup Patel, MD, FAAN and Amy Sanders, MD, FAAN Streamlining Clinic Scheduling and Access Melissa Yu, MD and Radhika Sampat, DO Teleneurology: Questions for Your Own Practice Eric Anderson, MD, PhD Tip of the Iceberg: Ultra–High Cost Neurology Drugs Nicholas E. Johnson, MD

Featured programs include: }} Introduction to Telemedicine }} Improving Patient }} Succeed in Small/Solo }} Coding Audits: How to Engagement Non-Clinical Careers Succeed }} Prescribing Opioids }} Value of an EHR }} Using Axon Data for Quality }} Hiring an Advanced Practice }} Learn How to Advocate for Improvement Provider Yourself and Your Patients Additional Programs to be scheduled closer to the Annual Meeting.

Understanding the Axon Registry Lyell Jones, MD, FAAN

Program Schedule Current as of November 30, 2017


Experiential Learning Areas

Navigating Your Career The goal of the area is to offer comprehensive information regarding professional development at every career stage, including medical student, resident, fellow, junior faculty, senior faculty, and advanced practice provider. Advice and information is delivered in several formats including one-on-one 30-minute mentoring sessions, small group talks, and panel discussions. A Clinical Educator’s Academic Global Health Career: The Value of Design Thinking Nirali Vora, MD

Finding Your Niche in Neurology: Perspectives from an Epileptologist and Educator Chad Carlson, MD

Academic Career Panel: Find out How to Get Your Career Started Joseph E. Safdieh, MD, FAAN; Jennifer Molano, MD, FAAN

Foreign Medical Graduate Adjustment Skills Ehtesham Khalid, MBBS

Advancing Your Leadership Skill: Tips For The Successful Chief Resident Mona Bahouth, MD Being a Great Chief Resident Roy E. Strowd III, MD Being a Great Chief Resident Maisha T. Robinson, MD, MS; Gabriel C. De Luca, MD, PhD Career Development for Medical Educators Ralph F. Józefowicz, MD, FAAN Career Stories: Challenges for the Physician Scientist Mark Hallett, MD, FAAN Career Stories: Nuts and Bolts of Academic Leadership–Strategies I Have Learned in My Career Deborah Hall, MD, PhD, FAAN; Cynthia L. Comella, MD, FAAN Child Neurology–Staying on Track Warren D. Lo, MD Choosing a Career in Clinical Practice James C. Stevens, MD, FAAN Choosing a Career in Neurocritical Care Matthew B. Maas, MD Choosing a Neurohospitalist Career S. Andrew Josephson, MD, FAAN Choosing Teleneurology as a Career Eric Anderson, MD, PhD Clinical Research in the Area of Practice, Quality and Patient Safety Mona Bahouth, MD Effective Neurology Residency Program Ralph F. Józefowicz, MD, FAAN Everything You Wanted to Know About the Residents and Fellows Section of Neurology John J. Millichap, MD; Roy E. Strowd III, MD

How to be “Useful” on Rotations: Tips for Medical Students Ezgi Tiryaki, MD, FAAN How to Give Effective Feedback Laurice T. Yang, MD; Veronica E. Santini, MD Interviewing Skills Ralph F. Józefowicz, MD, FAAN

So You Want to Be a Residency Program Director? Neil E. Schwartz, MD, PhD Social Media for Clinicians Pearce Korb, MD Staying on an Academic Clinical Track John Probasco, MD Staying on Track: A Career as a Clinical Researcher Rebecca F. Gottesman, MD Subspecialty Sessions: IOM and cEEG Eva K. Ritzl, MD Subspecialty Sessions: Neuroimmunology and Neurological Infections David R. Benavides, MD, PhD

Interviewing Skills: Negotiation Allison Brashear, MD, MBA, FAAN Introduction to the Fascinating World of Movement Disorders Svjetlana Miocinovic, MD, PhD; Shilpa Chitnis, MD, PhD, FAAN, FANA Involving Students through a SIGN Chapter Raghav Govindarajan, MD Measuring Success: Quality Improvement 101 Justin P. Martello, MD Negotiation Skill: You Do Not Get What You Deserve, You Get What You Negotiate For Jonathan P. Hosey, MD, FAAN Neurohospitalists 2.0, How to Craft a Satisfying and Sustainable Career David J. Likosky, MD, SFHM, FAAN Neuroimaging Opportunities for the Practicing Neurologist Michael Hutchinson, MD, PhD Neurology in Resource Poor Settings: Focus on Haiti Mill Etienne, MD, MPH, FAAN Patient Centered Teaching Raghav Govindarajan, MD Pursuing a Career in Health Care Administration Laurice T. Yang, MD Research in Residency: How to Choose the Right Project Roy E. Strowd III, MD

Teaching During a Busy Clinic Raghav Govindarajan, MD Teaching History and Exam with Teleneurology Raghav Govindarajan, MD The Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education and You Jeffrey Dewey, MD; Kathryn S. Nevel, MD The Encompassing Value of the Patient-Physician Relationship Stephen M. Sergay, MB BCh, FAAN Transitioning From a Clinical Research Career to an Educational and Clinical Focused Career Chad Carlson, MD Transitioning From Private Practice to Academics Neil A. Busis, MD, FAAN Up Your Game as a Medical Educator in Neurology Rachel Marie E. Salas, MD Using the R&F Section of Neurology for your Residents and Residency John J. Millichap, MD; Roy E. Strowd III, MD What I Learned About Research–An Early Career Perspective Logan D. Schneider, MD Why Choose a Career in Neuro-oncology? Sylvia C. Eisele, MD Writing and Reviewing for the Residents and Fellows Section of Neurology John J. Millichap, MD; Roy E. Strowd III, MD

Program Schedule Current as of November 30, 2017


Research Corner: Moving Neurology Forward Do you know how important research is to the future of neurology? See how it’s making a significant impact on patient care and everyday neurology, and discover new and valuable resources to start a career in research, learn more about research opportunities, and move your research forward. The Research Corner: Moving Neurology Forward will feature themed days of programming throughout the Annual Meeting, including spotlighting the AAN Research Program and the 2018 AAN Award Recipients, highlighting the careers of women in research, and a collaboration with the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS). Attend select scientific platform sessions that will be featured in the area. Abstract presenters will discuss their recent research findings and 2018 scientific award winners will be recognized.

NEW! Office Hours are a great opportunity to have your questions answered by the leaders in your field! Stop in throughout the week for your

chance to work in a small group setting with leading researchers and mentors on these topics: }} Surviving as a Clinician Researcher }} Bridge Research Recommendations for Residents and Fellows }} Finding Collaborators }} Careers in Industry }} How to Successfully Publish Quality Improvement Projects }} Challenges in Clinicogenetic Correlations: One Gene–Many Phenotypes; One Phenotype –Many Genes }} Finding the Right Research Mentor }} How to Get a K−Award }} Recruiting Difficult and Underrepresented Populations in Research

}} Working with Epidemiologists and Statisticians }} Pathway to Become a Clinical Trialist }} How to Write and Publish Research Papers, Reviews, and Other Scientific Communications }} Role of Placebo in Neuromuscular Clinical Trials and in Management of Neuromuscular Disorders

Program Schedule Current as of November 30, 2017

Join us for Platform Sessions in: }} Pain and Palliative Care }} Autonomic Disorders }} Global Health }} History of Neurology }} Neuro-rehabilitation


BEGIN PLANNING YOUR 2018 ANNUAL MEETING EXPERIENCE NOW. Download the new AAN Conferences Mobile App now to put all the information you need for the 2018 Annual Meeting conveniently on your phone or tablet: • Access program details, speakers, and materials • Customize your program schedule • View the hotel map • Explore the Los Angeles City Guide • Find and connect with other conference attendees • Submit your evaluations and claim CME Available for iPhone ®, iPad ®, or Android ®

NEW AAN Conferences App

Sponsored by:

AAN.com/view/MobileApp

ADVANCING NEUROLOGY. ADVANCING YOU.


Meeting-at-a-Glance

Sat April 21

X  For more detailed information regarding the Experiential Learning Areas and their schedules, see pages 6–11 ». C = Educational Sessions

Sun April 22

Mon April 23

N = Neuroscience in the Clinic session S = Scientific Platform Session

Tue April 24

Wed April 25

Thur April 26

Fri April 27

6:00 a.m.

7:00 a.m.

8:00 a.m.

C1–4

7:00 a.m.– 9:00 a.m.

C5

7:00 a.m.– 12:30 p.m.

C6-7

7:00 a.m.– 4:00 p.m.

X

7:0010:00

X

C25–34

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

7:009:00

X

C60–68

7:007:45

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

S1

C96–104

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

S10

8:00 a.m.– 9:00 a.m.

Run/Walk for Brain Research

X

7:007:45

6:30 a.m.–8:30 a.m.

S18

8:00 a.m.– 9:00 a.m.

X

C133–143

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

7:009:00

S26

8:00 a.m.– 9:00 a.m.

X

C172-181

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

7:008:45

C216–223

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

S37

8:00 a.m.– 9:00 a.m.

S46

8:00 a.m.– 9:00 a.m.

X

8:00 a.m.– 9:00 a.m.

8:009:10

9:00 a.m.

Presidential Plenary Session

C8–14

10:00 a.m.

Contemporary Clinical Issues Plenary Session

9:15 a.m.–12:00 p.m.

9:30 a.m.– 11:30 a.m.

Clinical Trials Plenary Session

9:15 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Frontiers in Neuroscience Plenary Session

9:15 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Controversies in Neurology Plenary Session

9:15 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Neurology Year in Review Plenary Session

9:15 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

9:15 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

6:00 p.m.

Neurobowl®

8:00 p.m.

3:30 p.m.– 5:30 p.m.

S22

3:30 p.m.–4:20 p.m.

C160–171 N4 S33–35

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

5:30 p.m.

S32 3:30 p.m.– 4:15 p.m.

Exhibit Hall 11:30 a.m.–3:00 p.m.

5:00 p.m.

S36

4:30 p.m.– 5:30 p.m.

6:00 p.m.–9:00 p.m.

Industry Therapeutic Updates

7:00 p.m.– 10:00 p.m.

70th Anniversary Celebration 7:00 p.m.–11:00 p.m.

1:00 p.m.– 3:00 p.m.

C197–209 N6 S42–45 3:30 p.m.– 5:30 p.m.

1:00 p.m.– 3:00 p.m.

5:00 p.m.

C235–243 N7 S50–52 3:30 p.m.– 5:30 p.m.

Poster Session VI 11:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m.

C120–132 S23–25

1:00 p.m.– 3:00 p.m.

C224–233 C234 S47–49 1:00 p.m.–

Experiential Learning Areas 12:00 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

1:00 p.m.– 3:00 p.m.

C196

1:00 p.m.– 5:30 p.m.

Poster Session V 11:30 a.m.–7:00 p.m.

C84–95 N2 S15–17

Faculty and Trainee Reception

6:00 p.m.–8:00 p.m. 7:00 p.m.

5:30 p.m.

C182–195 S38 1:00 p.m.– N5 2:00 p.m. S39–41

Experiential Learning Areas 12:00 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

5:00 p.m.

4:15 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

4:00 p.m.

Experiential Learning Areas 12:00 p.m.–6:15 p.m.

Hot Topics Plenary Session

S6

3:30 p.m.– 4:30 p.m.

1:00 p.m.– 3:00 p.m.

C144–156 S27 C157–158 C159 1:00 p.m.–1:50 p.m. 1:00 p.m.– S28–31 1:00 p.m.–

Poster Session IV 11:30 a.m.–7:00 p.m.

4:00 p.m.

C50–59 N1 S7–9

5:30 p.m.

Experiential Learning Areas 12:00 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

5:00 p.m.

Poster Session III 11:30 a.m.–7:00 p.m.

AAN Business Meeting

1:00 p.m.– 3:00 p.m.

1:00 p.m.

C105–118 C119 N3 1:00 p.m.– S19–21 5:30 p.m.

Exhibit Hall 11:30 a.m.–4:00 p.m.

1:30 p.m.– 3:30 p.m.

C82–83

Experiential Learning Areas 12:00 p.m.–6:15 p.m.

C19–24

C69–80 C81 S11–14 1:00 p.m.–

Poster Session II 11:30 a.m.–7:00 p.m.

1:00 p.m.– 4:00 p.m.

C35–44 C45–46 C47–49 S2–5 1:00 p.m.– 1:00 p.m.

Exhibit Hall 11:30 a.m.–6:00 p.m.

3:00 p.m.

C18

Experiential Learning Areas 12:00 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

2:00 p.m.

12:00 p.m.– 4:00 p.m.

Poster Session I 11:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m.

1:00 p.m.

C15–17

Experiential Learning 12:00 p.m.–4:15 p.m.

12:00 p.m.

Exhibit Hall 11:30 a.m.–4:00 p.m.

11:00 a.m.

Closing Party Happy Hour

5:30 p.m.–7:00 p.m.

C210–215 Industry Therapeutic Updates

7:00 p.m.– 10:00 p.m.

Industry Therapeutic Updates

Industry Therapeutic Updates

7:00 p.m.– 10:00 p.m.

6:30 p.m.–9:30 p.m.

7:00 p.m.– 10:00 p.m.

9:00 p.m.

10:00 p.m. Current as of November 30, 2017. Program Subject to change

AAN.com/view/AM18 13


Meeting Overview Saturday, April 21 7:00 a.m.–7:45 a.m.

X

Yoga-Vinyasa

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C1 Mild Cognitive Impairment: Implications for

C2 C3 C4

Clinicians Functional Neurologic Disorders I: Movement, Seizures, and Multiple Sclerosis Emergency Room Neuro-ophthalmology Hyperkinetic Movement Disorders: Videodiagnosis and Treatment

7:00 a.m.–12:30 p.m. C5 Clerkship and Program Directors Conference: Demonstrating Your Impact as a Medical Educator

7:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m. C6 Neurology MOC Prep Course

3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

AAN Business Meeting 3:15 p.m.–4:15 p.m.

X

Successful Women in Neurology Panel

4:15 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Hot Topics Plenary Session Neurobowl

®

7:00 p.m.–10:00 p.m. Industry Therapeutic Updates

Sunday, April 22 7:00 a.m.–7:45 a.m.

X

Yoga-Vinyasa

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C25 Hot Topics and Controversies in Parkinson’s

8:00 a.m.–9:10 a.m.

C26

Challenges in Clinicogenetic Correlations: One Gene, Many Phenotypes; One Phenotype, Many Genes

9:20 a.m.–9:50 a.m.

X

How to Successfully Publish Quality Improvement Projects

9:30 a.m.–11:30 a.m. C8 Emergency Neurology: Evaluation of Coma,

C9 C10 C11 C12 C13

Meningitis, and Viral Encephalitis in the Emergency Room Evaluation and Management of Autonomic Disorders I: Autonomic Testing, Failure, and Peripheral Neuropathies More than Medicine: How to Access Home Care, Support Caregivers, and Discuss Complex Situations in Advanced Neurologic Disease Treatment of Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis in the Current Era Functional Neurologic Disorders II: Life Experiences and Management of Functional Disorders Neuroimaging Biomarkers Across the Dementia Spectrum Parkinson’s Disease Update

C14 12:00 p.m.–12:30 p.m.

X

Navigating the Annual Meeting App and Convention Center Tour

12:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m. C15 Resident Basic Science I: Neuropharmacology C16 L Leadership Challenges in Practice C17 Neurophysiologic Intraoperative Monitoring Skills Workshop $ (registration required)

12:45 p.m.–1:45 p.m.

X

Ask Us Anything: Expert Panel on Headache and Pain

1:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m. C18 L Educators’ Leadership Course (application required)

1:30 p.m.–3:30 p.m. C19 Pediatric Neuro-ophthalmology Update C20 The Neurology of Social Behavior C21 Evaluation and Management of Autonomic Disorders II: Diagnostic Approach and Treatments for Dysautonomia C22 Stroke in Young Adults and Women C23 Critical Care Consultations for Neurohospitalists C24 Diagnosis and Treatment of Functional Movement Disorders

2:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

X

Rural Neurology

3:00 p.m.–3:45 p.m.

X

Acupuncture Demonstration: 4 Gates

the Change?

C46 L The Most Important Tool in Your Black

Bag: Gallup StrengthsFinders™ Assessment

6:00 p.m.–8:00 p.m.

$ (registration required) C7 L Women in Leadership $ (registration required) X

S3 Movement Disorders Platform Session S4 Neuroepidemiology Platform Session S5 General Neurology Platform Session 1:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m. C45 L Being a Resilient Leader: How Do You Lead

C27 C28 C29 C30 C31 C32 C33 C34

Disease Neuro-ophthalmology I: Visual Loss, Optic Neuropathies, and Papilledema Neurological Intensive Care I: The Essentials Autism Spectrum Disorders What We Know and Where We Are Going Faculty Development: Enhancing Your Role in Student and Resident Training Controversies in Stroke Treatment and Prevention Peripheral Neuropathy I: Anatomical Basis and Acquired Demyelinating Neuropathies Treatments for Drug-resistant Epilepsy: Surgery, Devices, and Other Updates Clinicopathological Correlation Session in Dementia Multiple Sclerosis in the Trenches: Controversy and Consensus in Clinical Decision-Making

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

X

Mind Over Matter: Meditation for the Practicing Neurologist

$ (registration required)

1:00 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C47 Resident Basic Science II: Neuropathology C48 Genomic Neurology Skills Workshop:

X X X

C51 C52 C53 C54 C55

C57

C59 N1

S9

C37 C38 C39 C40 C41 C42 C43 C44 S2

Blind Spots: The Impact of Conscious and the Unconscious Biases

3:30 p.m.–4:10 p.m. S6 Pain and Palliative Care Platform Session 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C50 Low and High Pressure Headache: Clinical

Neurology Pictionary

C36

How Your Social Life Might Be Helping (or Harming) Your Brain

3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

S7

Medicine: Chalk Talk Clinical Neurology for Advanced Practice Providers I Nonmotor Manifestations of Parkinson’s Disease I Neurological Intensive Care II: Acute Brain and Spinal Cord Injury and Acute Neuromuscular Dysfunction Therapy in Neurology I: Headache and Stroke Autoimmune Neurology I Basics and Beyond: Autoimmune Encephalitis and Paraneoplastic Neurological Syndromes of the CNS and PNS Peripheral Neuropathy II: Diabetic and Inherited Neuropathies Acute and Chronic Clinical Epilepsy Update Explained in 6 Cases Developing the Treatments of Tomorrow I: Taking Molecules from Lab to Man Neuro-ophthalmology II: Optic Neuritis, Visual Fields, and Anisocoria Aging and Dementia Platform Session

Hall of Presidents: Neurology Through the Years

3:00 p.m.–3:45 p.m.

11:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m. P1 Poster Session I 12:00 p.m.–1:00 p.m. 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C35 Borderlands of Neurology and Internal

9:15 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Exhibit Hall

C58

X

Neurophysiology (EEG)

1:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Presidential Plenary Session

11:30 a.m.–1:00 p.m. Exhibit Hall Opening Luncheon

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. S10 “Best of” Session: Epilepsy/Clinical

Contemporary Clinical Issues Plenary Session

C56

Exhibit Hall

Simple Lessons that Apply to Everyday Problems C66 Update on Medical Management of Stroke C67 Video EEG: Name That Spell C68 Cognitive Impairment Due to Alzheimer’s Disease: Using Old Skills and New Tools for Diagnosis and Treatment

Developing Practical Knowledge of Tools and Concepts Through Case Studies C49 Neuromuscular Ultrasound Skills Workshop $ (registration required)

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. S1 “Best of” Session: Cerebrovascular Disease 9:15 a.m.–12:00 p.m. 11:30 a.m.–4:00 p.m.

C65 Clinical Pearls: Learning from Complex Cases

S8

Presentation and Approach to Evaluation and Management Clinical Neurology for Advanced Practice Providers II Nonmotor Manifestations of Parkinson’s Disease II Neurological Intensive Care III: Vascular Diseases Therapy in Neurology II: Epilepsy and Movement Disorders Autoimmune Neurology II Advanced: Autoimmune Encephalitis at the Frontiers of Neuroscience Peripheral Neuropathy III: Genetic Testing and Next Generation Sequencing Developing the Treatments of Tomorrow II: Clinical Trials in Neurology Neuro-ophthalmology III: Diplopia, Ocular Motility Disorders, and Nystagmus Simposio Español: Actualización Sobre el Tratamiento de la Esclerosis Múltiple Neuroscience in the Clinic: Autism Mythbusters MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease Platform Session Epilepsy/Clinical Neurophysiology (EEG) Platform Session Cerebrovascular Disease and Interventional Neurology Platform Session

4:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

X

What is that Twitch?

7:00 p.m.–11:00 p.m.

70th Anniversary Celebration

Monday, April 23 7:00 a.m.–7:45 a.m.

X

Yoga-Vinyasa

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C60 Balance and Gait Disorders C61 Starting a Practice From the Ground Up: A Guide for Early Career Neurologists

C62 Neuro-ophthalmology: Overview and Update C63 Therapy of Neuromuscular Disease: ALS,

Inflammatory Neuropathies and Myopathies, and Myasthenia Gravis C64 Child Neurology I: Pediatric Stroke, MS/ Autoimmune

11:30 a.m.–6:00 p.m. 4:30 p.m.–6:00 p.m. Exhibit Hall Networking Reception

11:30 a.m.–7:00 p.m. P2 Poster Session II 12:00 p.m.–1:00 p.m.

X

Is There a Neurologist on This Flight?

1:00 p.m.–2:00 p.m.

X

Perception Is Reality: Are Neurologists Helping Patients Live Well with Dementia?

3:00 p.m.–3:45 p.m.

X

3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

X

C85 C86 C87 C88 C89 C90 C91 C92 C93 C94 C95

C70 C71

N2

C72 C73 C74 C75 C76 C77 C78 C79 C80 S11 S12 S13 S14

1:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m. C81 L Mitigating the Impact of Unconscious Bias Workshop

1:00 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C82 Resident Basic Science III: Neuroanatomy: All the Lesions C83 Neuro-ophthalmology and Neurovestibular Exam Lab Skills Workshop $ (registration required)

1:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

X

Eminence-based Medicine vs Evidence-based Medicine

S15 S16 S17

Physical Exercise and Cognitive Training in Neurology: Application in Aging and Neurodegenerative Disease

Clinicians Therapy in Neurology IV: Autoimmune PNS Synaptic Disorders and Neuro-Oncology Child Neurology III: Headache, TBI/Postconcussion Neuro-rheumatology: Neurological Manifestations of Systemic Inflammatory and Autoimmune Disease II Core Concepts in Pain Management: Refractory Neuropathic Pain Practical Pharmacologics, Advances in Neuromodulation, and a Balanced Look at Cannabinoids Clinical Approach to Muscle Disease II: Inflammatory Myopathies and Muscle Pathology Comprehensive Migraine Education Program II: Behavioral and Psychological Approaches, and Preventive and Acute Treatment Advances Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: Update What Keeps You Up at Night? Addressing Mistakes and Injuries, In-n-Out-Patient Transition, and Building a Team to Support You Advances in Neurogenetics Hot Topics in Education Spanish Symposium: Update on CNS Infections and Tropical Medicine Neuroscience in the Clinic: Antisense Oligonucleotide (ASO) Therapy Sleep Disorders Platform Session Movement Disorders Platform Session Epilepsy/Clinical Neurophysiology (EEG) Platform Session

4:15 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

X

From Member to Leader: How to Engage with the AAN

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. S18 “Best of” Session: Headache 9:15 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Clinical Trials Plenary Session 11:30 a.m.–4:00 p.m.

Exhibit Hall 11:30 a.m.–7:00 p.m. P3 Poster Session III 12:00 p.m.–12:45 p.m.

X

X

Neurology of the 1970s

6:00 p.m.–9:00 p.m.

Faculty and Trainee Reception 7:00 p.m.–10:00 p.m. Industry Therapeutic Updates

Tuesday, April 24 6:30 a.m.–8:30 a.m.

2018 Run/Walk for Brain Research

$ (registration required)

7:00 a.m.–7:45 a.m.

X

Yoga-Vinyasa

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C96 Status Epilepticus C97 Vascular Cognitive Impairment and Dementia:

C98 C99 C100 C101 C102 C103 C104

Current Status and Future Multiple Sclerosis Overview I: Clinical Pearls Good Neurology in Challenging Conditions: Lessons from Military Neurology Basic Principles of Brain Tumors: For Practice and for Certification Approaching the Management of Common Sleep Disorders: Case-based Review for the Non-sleep Specialist Movement Disorders for the General Neurologist I: New Concepts in the Diagnosis and Management of Parkinson’s Disease Now You See It, Now You Know It: Pathognomonic Neuro-ophthalmology Examination Findings Sports Concussion Skills Workshop: Event Coverage Foundational Skills and Sport Specific Pearls $ (registration required)

Treatment of Neuropathy Symptoms Without Medication

12:00 p.m.–1:00 p.m.

X

Neurology Game Show: Localize the Lesion

1:00 p.m.–1:45 p.m.

X

Complementary Therapies in Parkinson’s Disease

C121 Introduction to Primary Headache Disorders

C122 C123 C124

C125 C126 C127

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C105 C106 C107 C108

C109 C110 C111 C112 C113

5:15 p.m.–6:15 p.m.

2:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

X

Publication Editors Tell All: Hits, Misses, and Tips

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C84 Evidence Based Neurology Foresights for Busy

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C69 L Continuing Your Leadership Journey:

Uncharted Waters (registration required) Evaluating Tremor in the Office Therapy in Neurology III: Neurological Infectious Diseases and Neuro-ophthalmologic Disorders Sports Neurology: Enhancing Athletic Performance Child Neurology II: Epilepsy and Neuromuscular Neuro-rheumatology: Neurological Manifestations of Systemic Inflammatory and Autoimmune Disease I Safe and Appropriate Opioid Prescribing in Neurology Clinical Approach to Muscle Disease I: Role of Antibodies, Muscle Imaging and Genetic Testing Epilepsy Surgery Update Therapeutic Temperature Modulation in the ICU Comprehensive Migraine Education Program I: Diagnosis, Risk Factors, and Neurobiology Present and Future Biomarkers in Dementia: A Case-based Approach MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease Platform Session Research Methodology and Education Platform Session Cerebrovascular Disease and Interventional Neurology Platform Session Neuro-ophthalmology/Neuro-otology Platform Session

Introduction to Acupuncture I: Conceptual Framework and Mechanism of Action

C114 C115 C116 C117 C118 N3 S19 S20

Invited Science: Movement Disorders L Mentoring…Growing the Next Generation of Neurologist $ (registration required) Critical Care EEG Monitoring What Do I Do Now?: Assessment and Management of Neuropsychiatric Symptoms in Neurocognitive Disorders Introduction to Primary Headache Disorders I: Migraine and Other Primary Headaches Including Tension-Type, Hypnic, Primary Stabbing and Nummular Headache Syndromes, Epicrania Fugax and Retinal Migraine Multiple Sclerosis Overview II: Clinical Advances Neurologic Complications in Adults with Down Syndrome Enhancing Your Career and Practice Through Neuropalliative Care Continuum ® Test Your Knowledge: A Multiplechoice Question Review I Sleep for the Practicing Neurologist I: Is it Narcolepsy or Something Else? Diagnostic and Management Challenges in the Central Disorders of Hypersomnolence Concussion: Pathogenesis, Fluid and Imaging Biomakers, Diagnosis, and Treatment of PostConcussion Headache Movement Disorders for the General Neurologist II: Tremor, Drug-induced Movement Disorders, RLS, and Ataxia Cerebrovascular Disease I: Prevention Introduction to Clinical Research and Methods L Leadership in the Era of Burnout: A Practical Approach to Becoming a True Physician Leader Neuroscience in the Clinic: Challenges in Genetic Diagnosis in Neurology Cerebrovascular Disease and Interventional Neurology Platform Session Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG) Platform Session Neuro-oncology Platform Session

S21 1:00 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C119 EMG Skills Workshop: Basic

$ (registration required)

1:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

XNeurological Exam Tips and Tricks 2:00 p.m.–2:45 p.m.

X

Dancing with Parkinson’s

3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

X

Biological and Chemical Neuroterrorism and Neurowarfare

3:30 p.m.–4:20 p.m. S22 Autonomic Disorders Platform Session 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C120 Lumbar Radiculopathy, Lumbar Spinal

Stenosis, Low Back Pain, and Failed Back Syndrome

C128 C129 C130 C131 C132 S23 S24

II: Trigeminal Autonomic Cephalalgias and Other Primary Headaches Including New Daily Persistent Headache, Cough, Exercise, and Thunderclap Headaches Multiple Sclerosis Overview III: The Pathogenesis of Multiple Sclerosis and Mechanism of Action of Treatments for MS Child Neurology: A Case-based Approach The Palliative Care Guide in Neurology: Best Practice in Communication, Advance Care Planning, and End-of-life Care of Patients with Brain Tumors and Other Life-limiting Neurological Disorders Continuum ® Test Your Knowledge: A Multiplechoice Question Review II Sleep for the Practicing Neurologist II: Night Fighting: Sleep Related Hypermotor Epilepsy, Sleepwalking, and Dream Enactment Concussion Management: Chronic Sequelae and Symptom Targeted Treatment in the Acute, Subacute and Chronic Phase After Concussion Movement Disorders for the General Neurologist III: Chorea, Dystonia, Myoclonus, Stereotypies, and Tics Cerebrovascular Disease II: Update on Guidance-Based Diagnosis and Management of Hemorrhagic Stroke Disorders of Motor Programming: The Apraxias and Action-Intentional Disorders Chalk Talk Introduction to Integrative Neurology Actualización Científica en Español Durante el Congreso Anual I MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease Platform Session Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG) Platform Session Movement Disorders Platform Session

S25 4:00 p.m.–4:45 p.m.

X

The Sleep Mythbuster!: Illuminating the Facts and Fiction Towards Achieving the Sleep Healthy Neurologist

4:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

X

Zombie Apocalypse! The Neuroscience of the Undead

7:00 p.m.–10:00 p.m. Industry Therapeutic Updates

Wednesday, April 25 7:00 a.m.–7:45 a.m.

X

Yoga-Vinyasa

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C133 Higher Cortical Visual Disorders: Case-based

C134 C135 C136 C137 C138 C139 C140 C141 C142 C143

Review Tuberculosis of the Central Nervous System Neurocognitive Assessment for Neurologists Multiple Sclerosis Therapy: Disease-modifying Treatment I What Do I Do Now?: Emergency and Inpatient Management of Migraine and Other Headache Disorders Clinical EEG I: Normal EEG, Normal Variants, and How to Avoid The Common Pitfall of Overreading Neurologic Case Studies in Pregnancy Paroxysmal Movement Disorders Integrating Sleep Medicine Concepts into Your Child Neurology Practice Mastering EMG Waveform Recognition Skills in Just Two Hours! Evaluation and Treatment of Common Spine Disorders

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

X

Acupuncture Demonstration: Auriculotherapy

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. S26 “Best of” Session: Movement Disorders

Current as of November 30, 2017. Program Subject to change

8:00 a.m.–9:10 a.m.

X

How to Write and Publish Research Papers, Reviews and Other Scientific Communications

9:15 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Frontiers in Neuroscience Plenary Session 11:30 a.m.–3:00 p.m.

Exhibit Hall 11:30 a.m.–7:00 p.m. P4 Poster Session IV 12:00 p.m.–1:00 p.m.

X

Neurology Jeopardy Game Show

1:00 p.m.–1:50 p.m. S27 Practice, Policy, and Ethics Platform Session 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C144 Neurology Update I: Epilepsy, Behavioral

C145 C146 C147 C148 C149 C150 C151 C152 C153 C154 C155 C156 S28 S29 S30

Neurology, and Neurologic Infections Severe TBI: From ICU to Rehabilitation Non-Alzheimer’s Dementia I: Frontotemporal Dementias Multiple Sclerosis Therapy: Disease-modifying Treatment II LGBTQI Health in Neurology What Do I Do Now?: Neurologic Consultations in Cancer Patients I Where is the Lesion? A History of Neurological Investigations Part I Cerebrovascular Disease III: Update on Neuroimaging Modalities and Endovascular Therapies for Acute Ischemic Stroke Nystagmus and Saccadic Intrusions Made Simple Circadian Rhythm Disorders: Implications for Neurology The Global Burden of Neurologic Diseases Small Fiber Neuropathies: Sensory, Autonomic, and Both I: Focus on Autonomic Nervous System Clinical EEG II: Focal, Diffuse, and Epileptiform Abnormalities in Adults Child Neurology and Developmental Neurology Platform Session Movement Disorders Platform Session Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG) Platform Session Headache Platform Session

S31 1:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m. C157 L Advanced Leadership Training:

Preparing for Your Career’s Insurmountable Opportunities C158 L Leadership Strengths in Neurology: The Data, Tools and Practical Application of Strengths for Leadership, Team Building, and Personal Development $ (registration required)

1:00 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C159 Clinical Uses of Botulinum Toxin for Dystonia Skills Workshop $ (registration required)

1:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

X

Ask Us Anything: Expert Panel on Parkinson’s Disease

2:00 p.m.–2:45 p.m.

X

Resiliency for the Neurologist

3:00 p.m.–3:45 p.m.

X

Introduction to Acupuncture II: Evidence-based Applications for Acupuncture in the Treatment of Neurologic Conditions

3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

X

Health Care Disparities Among Underserved Populations

3:30 p.m.–4:00 p.m. S32 Global Health Platform Session

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

C160 C161 C162 C163 C164 C165 C166 C167 C168 C169 C170 C171 N4 S33 S34 S35

Invited Science Session: Sleep Neurology Update II: Movement Disorders, Spine Disorders, and Sleep Disorders Non-Alzheimer’s Dementia II: Lewy Body Dementias and Other Parkinsonian Dementias Multiple Sclerosis Therapy: Symptom Management How to Run a Practice: Business Strategies for Neurology Private Practices, Academic Centers, and the Future What Do I Do Now?: Neurologic Consultations in Cancer Patients II Where is the Lesion? A History of Neurological Investigation Part II Cerebrovascular Disease IV: Telestroke Eye Movement Disorders: A Systematic Approach to the Evaluation of Diplopia CNS Toxicities Small Fiber Neuropathies: Sensory, Autonomic, and Both II: Focus on Sensory Nervous System Clinical EEG III: Neonatal and Pediatric Spanish Symposium: Update on Epilepsy Therapy for Pharmaco-resistant Epilepsy Neuroscience in the Clinic: Opioid Use and Abuse: The Overlapping Neurobiology of Pain and Addiction, and the Path Toward Better Treatments Behavioral Neurology Platform Session Child Neurology and Developmental Neurology Platform Session MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease Platform Session

4:00 p.m.–4:45 p.m. Diets and Supplements in MS: What’s the Evidence Thus Far?

X

4:15 p.m.–5:00 p.m. The Neurology of Voodoo

X

4:30 p.m.–5:10 p.m. S36 Neuro-rehabilitation Platform Session 5:15 p.m.–6:15 p.m. Neurology and Art

X

7:00 p.m.–10:00 p.m. Industry Therapeutic Updates

Thursday, April 26 7:00 a.m.–7:45 a.m. Yoga-Vinyasa

X

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C172 Clinical Epilepsy I: Basics C173 Using Sleep Medicine to Help Solve Difficult

C174 C175 C176 C177 C178 C179 C180 C181

Neurologic Cases Rehabilitation in Neurology Clinical Pearls in Autoimmune Neurology: Real World Cases The Dystonia: Diagnosis, Treatment and Update on Etiologies So You’ve Diagnosed Your Patient with a Neuroinfectious Disease, Now What? Practical Pearls in the Treatment and Management of Neuroinfectious Diseases Neuro-oncology in 2018: Navigating Current Trends Clinical EMG I: Principles and Practice of NCS and Needle EMG Principles of Genomic Medicine: Clinical Exome Sequencing in Neurologic Disease Preventive Neurology: How Neurologists Can Improve Outcomes That Matter to Patients

8:00 a.m.–8:45 a.m.

X

Sleep and Performance in Elite Athletes

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. S37 “Best of” Session: Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG)

14 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

9:15 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Controversies in Neurology Plenary Session 11:30 a.m.–7:00 p.m. P5 Poster Session V 12:00 p.m.–12:45 p.m.

X

The Purpose Checkup: Find Meaning, Live Longer, Better

12:00 p.m.–1:00 p.m.

X

Who Wants to be a Millionaire

1:00 p.m.–1:45 p.m.

X

Integrative Approach to the Management of Chronic Pain Syndromes

1:00 p.m.–2:00 p.m. S38 History of Neurology Platform Session 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C182 Clinical Epilepsy II: Considerations Across the

C183 C184 C185 C186 C187 C188 C189 C190 C191 C192 C193 C194 C195 N5 S39

Age Span Pediatrics, Pregnancy, and Elderly Hot Topics in Sleep Neurology Behavioral Neurology I: Network Anatomy of Behavior and Language Neurology Update III: Neuromuscular, Headache, and Stroke Myelopathies I: Recognizing and Evaluating Myelopathic Patients for Inflammatory and Vascular Causes Cerebellar and Afferent Ataxias: Diagnosis and Management Neuroimaging for the General Neurologist I: Spine and Peripheral Nerve Business Strategies for Payer Negotiations and/or How to Go off the Grid Neuro-oncologic Predicaments in the Hospital Setting Neuro-otology I: The Common Peripheral Vestibular Disorders Clinical EMG II: Neuromuscular Junction Testing and Quantitative EMG Assessment of Rapidly Progressive Dementias I: Overview, Prion Diseases, and AntibodyMediated Rapidly Progressive Dementia Spanish Symposium: Update on Stroke Therapy Practical Training in Injection Techniques in the Treatment of Headache Disorders Skills Workshop $ (registration required) Neuroscience in the Clinic: Treatment of Progressive Multiple Sclerosis Cerebrovascular Disease and Interventional Neurology Platform Session Infectious Disease Platform Session Neurocritical Care Platform Session

S40 S41 1:00 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C196 Brain Death Skills Workshop: How to

Perform a Brain Death Evaluation, Avoid Pitfalls and Convey the News to the Family $ (registration required)

1:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

X

Caring for Your Neurologic Patient for $500 or Less

3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

X

Neurological Exam Tips and Tricks: En Español

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. Invited Science Session: Neuro Trauma

C197 Clinical Epilepsy III: Advanced (Status, Beyond AED, Video EEG)

C198 Behavioral Neurology II: Memory and Attention

C199 Neurology Update IV: Multiple Sclerosis,

Neuro-ophthalmology, and Autoimmune Encephalopathies C200 Myelopathies II: Approaches to Rehabilitation and Psychosocial Challenges C201 Differential Diagnosis of Neurologic Infections C202 Neuroimaging for the General Neurologist II: Spine and Peripheral Nerve

C203 Endovascular Treatment of Acute Stroke and

Cerebrovascular Disease C204 Making Sure You Get Paid Under the New Health Care Laws C205 Neuro-otology II: Diagnosis and Treatment of Nuanced Causes of Dizziness C206 Clinical EMG III: Nerve Conduction Criteria and Electrodiagnostic Approaches C207 Mitochondrial Disorders in Neurology C208 Assessment of Rapidly Progressive Dementias II: Neurodegenerative Diseases and Infections Presenting as Rapidly Progressive Dementia C209 Clinical Usefulness of Botulinum Toxin for Spasticity Skills Workshop $ (registration required) N6 Neuroscience in the Clinic: Neurologic Complications of Cancer Immunotherapy: A New Frontier in Neuro-Inflammation S42 Headache Platform Session S43 MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease Platform Session S44 Movement Disorders Platform Session S45 Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG) Platform Session

4:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

X

Neurology History and Wine

6:30 p.m.–9:30 p.m. C210 Case Studies: Unusual Diagnostic and

C211 C212 C213 C214 C215

Management of Cases in Neuromuscular Disease Case Studies in the ICU Case Studies: Test Your Knowledge: A Casebased Approach to Neuroimaging Case Studies: Unusual Movement Disorders Case Studies: Challenging Headache Cases Case Studies in Behavioral Neurology: Focus on Frontotemporal Degeneration

Friday, April 27 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C216 Neuroendocrine Update: Nuts and Bolts of What You Need to Know

C217 Current Management of Incidental and

Asymptomatic Cerebrovascular Lesions

C218 Infections of the Nervous System I: Diagnostic Testing of Neurological Infections

C219 The Early-Onset Dementias C220 Drugs and Toxin-induced Neurologic Emergencies

C221 REM Sleep Behavior Disorder C222 Therapy of Movement Disorders: A Casebased Approach

C223 The Burden of Epilepsy: Managing Comorbidities and Quality of Life

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. S46 “Best of” Session: MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease

8:00 a.m.–9:10 a.m.

X

Role of Placebo in Neuromuscular Clinical Trials and in Management of NM Disorders

9:15 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Neurology Year in Review Plenary Session 11:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m. P6 Poster Session VI 12:00 p.m.–12:45 p.m.

X

Outsmart Stress

12:00 p.m.–1:00 p.m.

X

Creativity and the Brain…at the Piano

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C224 Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorders C225 Neuromuscular Junction Disorders I: Myasthenia Gravis, Ocular, and MuSK Myasthenia

C226 Infections of the Nervous System II: Neuro-ID Emergencies

C227 Behavioral Neurology: A Case-based Approach C228 Neuroimaging for the General Neurologist I: Brain

C229 Deep Brain Stimulation I: Basic Principles and Programming in Movement Disorders

C230 Neurologic Complications of Medical and Surgical Therapies

C231 ICD-10-CM: How to Optimize for Accurate Diagnosis and Reimbursement

C232 Hot Topics in Headaches and Related

Disorders I: Migraine Pathophysiology, Brain Imaging, and Therapeutic Advances C233 Simposio Español: Actualización Científica Durante el Congreso Anual II S47 Aging and Dementia Platform Session S48 Neuro Trauma and Sports Neurology Platform Session S49 General Neurology Platform Session

1:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m. C234 Epilepsy Skills Workshop: Focus on Treatment

$ (registration required)

1:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

X

Live Intraoperative Monitoring

3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

X

Ask Us Anything: Expert Panel on Stroke

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C235 Neck Pain, Cervical Spinal Stenosis, Cervical

Radiculopathy, and Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy C236 Neuromuscular Junction Disorders II: Toxins, Lambert-Eaton Syndrome and Less Common Disorders of Neuromuscular Transmission C237 Neurologic Complications of Medical Disease C238 Memory Disorders: A Case-based Approach C239 Infections of the Nervous System III: Advanced Topics in Infectious Neurology C240 Neuroimaging for the General Neurologist II: Brain C241 Deep Brain Stimulation II: Advanced Management in Movement Disorders and Applications Beyond Movement Disorders C242 Coding 101: It’s Not Your Father’s Oldsmobile C243 Hot Topics in Headaches and Related Disorders II: Unusual Headaches, Childhood Headaches, and Concussion Management N7 Neuroscience in the Clinic: REM Sleep Behavior Disorder: Past, Present, Future S50 MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease Platform Session S51 Epilepsy/Clinical Neurophysiology (EEG) Platform Session S52 Cerebrovascular Disease and Interventional Neurology Platform SessionX

4:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

X

Ask Us Anything: Expert Panel on Multiple Sclerosis

5:30 p.m.–7:00 p.m.

Closing Party Happy Hour


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July 27, 2018

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Saturday, April 21 7:00 a.m.–7:45 a.m. X Yoga-Vinyasa 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C1 C2 C3 C4

Mild Cognitive Impairment: Implications for Clinicians . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Functional Neurologic Disorders I: Movement, Seizures, and Multiple Sclerosis . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Emergency Room Neuro-ophthalmology . . . . . . . 159 Hyperkinetic Movement Disorders: Videodiagnosis and Treatment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111

7:00 a.m.–12:30 p.m. C5

Clerkship and Program Directors Conference: Demonstrating Your Impact as a Medical Educator . . 183

7:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m. C6 C7

Neurology MOC Prep Course $ (registration required) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 L Women in Leadership $ (registration required) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104

C17 Neurophysiologic Intraoperative Monitoring Skills

Workshop $ (registration required) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58

12:45 p.m.–1:45 p.m. X Ask Us Anything: Expert Panel on Headache and Pain . . 94 1:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m. C18 L Educators' Leadership Course

(application required) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105

1:30 p.m.–3:30 p.m. C19 Pediatric Neuro-ophthalmology Update . . . . . . . 159 C20 The Neurology of Social Behavior . . . . . . . . . . 32 C21 Evaluation and Management of Autonomic Disorders II: Diagnostic Approach and Treatments for Dysautonomia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141 C22 Stroke in Young Adults and Women . . . . . . . . . 45 C23 Critical Care Consultations for Neurohospitalists . . . 133 C24 Diagnosis and Treatment of Functional Movement Disorders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111

9:20 a.m.–9:50 a.m. X How to Successfully Publish Quality

2:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. X Rural Neurology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70

9:30 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

3:00 p.m.–3:45 p.m. X Acupuncture Demonstration: 4 Gates . . . . . . . . 71

Improvement Projects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183

C8 C9 C10 C11 C12 C13 C14

Emergency Neurology: Evaluation of Coma, Meningitis, and Viral Encephalitis in the Emergency Room . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133 Evaluation and Management of Autonomic Disorders I: Autonomic Testing, Failure, and Peripheral Neuropathies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141 More than Medicine: How to Access Home Care, Support Caregivers, and Discuss Complex Situations in Advanced Neurologic Disease . . . . . . . . . . 171 Treatment of Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis in the Current Era . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123 Functional Neurologic Disorders II: Life Experiences and Management of Functional Disorders . . . . . . . 70 Neuroimaging Biomarkers Across the Dementia Spectrum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Parkinson’s Disease Update . . . . . . . . . . . . 111

12:00 p.m.–12:30 p.m. X Navigating the Annual Meeting App and

Convention Center Tour . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70

12:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m. C15 Resident Basic Science I:

Neuropharmacology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183 C16 L Leadership Challenges in Practice . . . . . . . . 104

18 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

AAN Business Meeting

3:15 p.m.–4:15 p.m. X Successful Women in Neurology Panel . . . . . . . . 71 4:15 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Hot Topics Plenary Session . . . . . . . . . . . 29

6:00 p.m.–8:00 p.m.

Neurobowl® . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

7:00 p.m.–10:00 p.m. Industry Therapeutic Updates

226


Sunday, April 22 7:00 a.m.–7:45 a.m. X Yoga-Vinyasa

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. X Mind Over Matter: Meditation for the Practicing

Neurologist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C25 Hot Topics and Controversies in Parkinson’s Disease . . 112 C26 Neuro-ophthalmology I: Visual Loss, Optic

8:00 a.m.–9:10 a.m. X Challenges in Clinicogenetic Correlations: One Gene,

C27 C28

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

C29 C30 C31 C32 C33 C34

Neuropathies, and Papilledema . . . . . . . . . . 160 Neurological Intensive Care I: The Essentials . . . . . 134 Autism Spectrum Disorders What We Know and Where We Are Going . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Faculty Development: Enhancing Your Role in Student and Resident Training . . . . . . . . . . . 184 Controversies in Stroke Treatment and Prevention . . . 45 Peripheral Neuropathy I: Anatomical Basis and Acquired Demyelinating Neuropathies . . . . . . . . 141 Treatments for Drug-resistant Epilepsy: Surgery, Devices, and Other Updates . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Clinicopathological Correlation Session in Dementia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Multiple Sclerosis in the Trenches: Controversy and Consensus in Clinical Decision-Making . . . . . . . 123

Many Phenotypes; One Phenotype, Many Genes . . . 112

S1

“Best of” Session: Cerebrovascular Disease . . . . . . 45

9:15 a.m.–12:00 p.m.

Presidential Plenary Session . . . . . . . . .

29

11:30 a.m.–4:00 p.m.

Exhibit Hall

11:30 a.m.–1:00 p.m. Exhibit Hall Opening Luncheon . . . . . . . . . . . 226

11:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m. P1

Poster Session I

CESC: 18AM NeuroBowl Ad—Half Page Horizontal Placed in 2018 Annual Meeting Education Preview book 8.25 x 5.25 +0.125 bleed, 4C

NEW NIGHT

Saturday Night 6:00 p.m.–8:00 p.m. ■

Kicking off the Annual Meeting Free Event! Food and beverages provided!

Neurobowl: Kick-off Celebration ®

Who Will Win This Year’s Coveted Neurobowl® Trophy?

Come find out during this exciting Annual Meeting event, hosted by AAN former president Thomas R. Swift, MD, FAAN, along with Kapil D. Sethi, MD, FRCP, FAAN, and Bert B. Vargas, MD, FAAN. Enjoy delicious food and beverages as the best and brightest in neurology compete for the coveted Neurobowl trophy in an entertaining game-show format.


Sunday, April 22 12:00 p.m.–1:00 p.m. X Neurology Pictionary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C35 Borderlands of Neurology and Internal Medicine: C36 C37 C38 C39 C40 C41 C42 C43 C44 S2 S3 S4 S5

Chalk Talk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 Clinical Neurology for Advanced Practice Providers I . . 176 Nonmotor Manifestations of Parkinson’s Disease I . . . 113 Neurological Intensive Care II: Acute Brain and Spinal Cord Injury and Acute Neuromuscular Dysfunction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134 Therapy in Neurology I: Headache and Stroke . . . . . 72 Autoimmune Neurology I Basics and Beyond: Autoimmune Encephalitis and Paraneoplastic Neurological Syndromes of the CNS and PNS . . . . . 72 Peripheral Neuropathy II: Diabetic and Inherited Neuropathies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142 Acute and Chronic Clinical Epilepsy Update Explained in 6 Cases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Developing the Treatments of Tomorrow I: Taking Molecules from Lab to Man . . . . . . . . . . . . 184 Neuro-ophthalmology II: Optic Neuritis, Visual Fields, and Anisocoria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160 Aging and Dementia Platform Session . . . . . . . . 33 Movement Disorders Platform Session . . . . . . . . 112 Neuroepidemiology Platform Session . . . . . . . . 71 General Neurology Platform Session . . . . . . . . . 71

1:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m. C45 L Being a Resilient Leader: How Do You Lead the

Change? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105

C46 L The Most Important Tool in Your Black Bag:

Gallup StrengthsFinders™ Assessment $ (registration required) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106

1:00 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C47 Resident Basic Science II: Neuropathology . . . . . . 185 C48 Genomic Neurology Skills Workshop: Developing

Practical Knowledge of Tools and Concepts Through Case Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 C49 Neuromuscular Ultrasound Skills Workshop $ (registration required) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143

1:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m. X Hall of Presidents: Neurology Through the Years . . . 185 3:00 p.m.–3:45 p.m.

20 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

X

How Your Social Life Might Be Helping (or Harming) Your Brain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73

3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m. X Blind Spots: The Impact of Conscious and the

Unconscious Biases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74

3:30 p.m.–4:10 p.m. S6

Pain and Palliative Care Platform Session . . . . . . 171

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C50 Low and High Pressure Headache: Clinical C51 C52 C53 C54 C55 C56 C57 C58 C59 N1 S7 S8 S9

Presentation and Approach to Evaluation and Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 Clinical Neurology for Advanced Practice Providers II . . 176 Nonmotor Manifestations of Parkinson’s Disease II . . 113 Neurological Intensive Care III: Vascular Diseases . . . 135 Therapy in Neurology II: Epilepsy and Movement Disorders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 Autoimmune Neurology II Advanced: Autoimmune Encephalitis at the Frontiers of Neuroscience . . . . . 74 Peripheral Neuropathy III: Genetic Testing and Next Generation Sequencing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143 Developing the Treatments of Tomorrow II: Clinical Trials in Neurology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185 Neuro-ophthalmology III: Diplopia, Ocular Motility Disorders, and Nystagmus . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161 Simposio Español: Actualización Sobre el Tratamiento de la Esclerosis Múltiple . . . . . . . . 124 Neuroscience in the Clinic: Autism Mythbusters . . . . 54 MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease Platform Session . 124 Epilepsy/Clinical Neurophysiology (EEG) Platform Session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Cerebrovascular Disease and Interventional Neurology Platform Session . . . . . . . . . . . . 45

4:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. X What is that Twitch? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 7:00 p.m.–11:00 p.m.

70th Anniversary Celebration . . . . . . . . .

226


Monday, April 23 7:00 a.m.–7:45 a.m. X Yoga-Vinyasa

C72 Sports Neurology: Enhancing Athletic Performance . . 135 C73 Child Neurology II: Epilepsy and Neuromuscular . . . . 55 C74 Neuro-rheumatology: Neurological Manifestations

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

of Systemic Inflammatory and Autoimmune Disease I . 124

C60 Balance and Gait Disorders . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 C61 Starting a Practice From the Ground Up: A Guide for

C75 Safe and Appropriate Opioid Prescribing in Neurology . 171 C76 Clinical Approach to Muscle Disease I: Role of

C62 C63

C77 Epilepsy Surgery Update . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 C78 Therapeutic Temperature Modulation in the ICU . . . . 46 C79 Comprehensive Migraine Education Program I:

C64 C65 C66 C67 C68

Early Career Neurologists . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177 Neuro-ophthalmology: Overview and Update . . . . . 161 Therapy of Neuromuscular Disease: ALS, Inflammatory Neuropathies and Myopathies, and Myasthenia Gravis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144 Child Neurology I: Pediatric Stroke, MS/Autoimmune . . 54 Clinical Pearls: Learning from Complex Cases Simple Lessons that Apply to Everyday Problems . . . . . . . 75 Update on Medical Management of Stroke . . . . . . 46 Video EEG: Name That Spell . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Cognitive Impairment Due to Alzheimer’s Disease: Using Old Skills and New Tools for Diagnosis and Treatment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. Neurophysiology (EEG) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60

S11 S12 S13 S14

based Approach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease Platform Session . 124 Research Methodology and Education Platform Session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186 Cerebrovascular Disease and Interventional Neurology Platform Session . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Neuro-ophthalmology/Neuro-otology Platform Session 162

Workshop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107

1:00 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

9:15 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

C82 Resident Basic Science III: Neuroanatomy: All the 29

11:30 a.m.–6:00 p.m.

Exhibit Hall

4:30 p.m.–6:00 p.m. Exhibit Hall Networking Reception . . . . . . . . . 226

11:30 a.m.–7:00 p.m. P2

Diagnosis, Risk Factors, and Neurobiology . . . . . . . 94

C80 Present and Future Biomarkers in Dementia: A Case-

1:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m. C81 L Mitigating the Impact of Unconscious Bias

S10 “Best of” Session: Epilepsy/Clinical

Contemporary Clinical Issues Plenary Session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Antibodies, Muscle Imaging and Genetic Testing . . . 144

Poster Session II

12:00 p.m.–1:00 p.m. X Is There a Neurologist on This Flight? . . . . . . . . . 75 1:00 p.m.–2:00 p.m. X Perception Is Reality: Are Neurologists Helping

Lesions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186

C83 Neuro-ophthalmology and Neurovestibular Exam

Lab Skills Workshop $ (registration required) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162

1:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m. X Eminence-based Medicine vs

Evidence-based Medicine . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76

2:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. X Physical Exercise and Cognitive Training

in Neurology: Application in Aging and Neurodegenerative Disease . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

3:00 p.m.–3:45 p.m. X Introduction to Acupuncture I: Conceptual

Framework and Mechanism of Action . . . . . . . . 76

Patients Live Well with Dementia? . . . . . . . . . . 34

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C69 L Continuing Your Leadership Journey:

Uncharted Waters (registration required) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 C70 Evaluating Tremor in the Office . . . . . . . . . . . 114 C71 Therapy in Neurology III: Neurological Infectious Diseases and Neuro-ophthalmologic Disorders . . . . . 75

AAN.com/view/AM18 21


Monday, April 23 3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m. X Publication Editors Tell All: Hits, Misses, and Tips . . . 76 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C84 Evidence Based Neurology Foresights for Busy

Clinicians . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77

C85 Therapy in Neurology IV: Autoimmune PNS Synaptic C86 C87 C88

C89 C90 C91 C92 C93 C94

Disorders and Neuro-Oncology . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Child Neurology III: Headache, TBI/Post-concussion . . . 55 Neuro-rheumatology: Neurological Manifestations of Systemic Inflammatory and Autoimmune Disease II . 125 Core Concepts in Pain Management: Refractory Neuropathic Pain Practical Pharmacologics, Advances in Neuromodulation, and a Balanced Look at Cannabinoids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172 Clinical Approach to Muscle Disease II: Inflammatory Myopathies, and Muscle Pathology . . . . . . . . . 145 Comprehensive Migraine Education Program II: Behavioral and Psychological Approaches, and Preventive and Acute Treatment Advances . . . . . . 95 Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: Update . . . . . . 35 What Keeps You Up at Night? Addressing Mistakes and Injuries, In-n-Out-Patient Transition, and Building a Team to Support You . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177 Advances in Neurogenetics . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Hot Topics in Education

22 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

C95 Spanish Symposium: Update on CNS Infections and

Tropical Medicine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 N2 Neuroscience in the Clinic: Antisense Oligonucleotide (ASO) Therapy . . . . . . . . . . . 145 S15 Sleep Disorders Platform Session . . . . . . . . . . 189 S16 Movement Disorders Platform Session . . . . . . . . 115 S17 Epilepsy/Clinical Neurophysiology (EEG) Platform Session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60

4:15 p.m.–5:00 p.m. X From Member to Leader: How to Engage with the AAN 107 5:15 p.m.–6:15 p.m. X Neurology of the 1970s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186 6:00 p.m.–9:00 p.m.

Faculty and Trainee Reception . . . . . . . . 224

7:00 p.m.–10:00 p.m. Industry Therapeutic Updates


Tuesday, April 24 6:30 a.m.–8:30 a.m.

2018 Run/Walk for Brain Research . $ (registration required)

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. . . . . 226

7:00 a.m.–7:45 a.m. X Yoga-Vinyasa

C105 C106 C107

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C96 Status Epilepticus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 C97 Vascular Cognitive Impairment and Dementia:

C108

C98 Multiple Sclerosis Overview I: Clinical Pearls . . . . . 125 C99 Good Neurology in Challenging Conditions: Lessons

C109 C110 C111

Current Status and Future . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

C100 C101 C102 C103 C104

from Military Neurology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 Basic Principles of Brain Tumors: For Practice and for Certification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153 Approaching the Management of Common Sleep Disorders: Case-based Review for the Non-sleep Specialist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189 Movement Disorders for the General Neurologist I: New Concepts in the Diagnosis and Management of Parkinson’s Disease . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 Now You See It, Now You Know It: Pathognomonic Neuro-ophthalmology Examination Findings . . . . . 162 Sports Concussion Skills Workshop: Event Coverage Foundational Skills and Sport Specific Pearls $ (registration required) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. S18 “Best of” Session: Headache . . . . . . . . . . . . 95

9:15 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Clinical Trials Plenary Session . . . . . . . .

29

11:30 a.m.–4:00 p.m.

Exhibit Hall

11:30 a.m.–7:00 p.m. P3

Poster Session III

12:00 p.m.–12:45 p.m. X Treatment of Neuropathy Symptoms

Without Medication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146

12:00 p.m.–1:00 p.m. X Neurology Game Show: Localize the Lesion . . . . . . 78 1:00 p.m.–1:45 p.m. X Complementary Therapies in Parkinson’s Disease . . . 115

C112 C113

C114 C115 C116 C117 C118 N3 S19 S20 S21

Invited Science: Movement Disorders . . . . . . . . 116 L Mentoring…Growing the Next Generation of Neurologist $ (registration required) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 Critical Care EEG Monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 What Do I Do Now?: Assessment and Management of Neuropsychiatric Symptoms in Neurocognitive Disorders . 36 Introduction to Primary Headache Disorders I: Migraine and Other Primary Headaches Including Tension-Type, Hypnic, Primary Stabbing and Nummular Headache Syndromes, Epicrania Fugax and Retinal Migraine . . . . 95 Multiple Sclerosis Overview II: Clinical Advances . . . 126 Neurologic Complications in Adults with Down Syndrome 55 Enhancing Your Career and Practice Through Neuropalliative Care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172 Continuum ® Test Your Knowledge: A Multiplechoice Question Review I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 Sleep for the Practicing Neurologist I: Is it Narcolepsy or Something Else? Diagnostic and Management Challenges in the Central Disorders of Hypersomnolence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190 Concussion: Pathogenesis, Fluid and Imaging Biomakers, Diagnosis, and Treatment of PostConcussion Headache . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136 Movement Disorders for the General Neurologist II: Tremor, Drug-induced Movement Disorders, RLS, and Ataxia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 Cerebrovascular Disease I: Prevention . . . . . . . . 47 Introduction to Clinical Research and Methods . . . . 186 L Leadership in the Era of Burnout: A Practical Approach to Becoming a True Physician Leader . . . . 108 Neuroscience in the Clinic: Challenges in Genetic Diagnosis in Neurology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Cerebrovascular Disease and Interventional Neurology Platform Session . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG) Platform Session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146 Neuro-oncology Platform Session . . . . . . . . . 154

1:00 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C119 EMG Skills Workshop: Basic

$ (registration required) .

. . . . . . . . . . . . 146

1:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m. XNeurological Exam Tips and Tricks . . . . . . . . . . . . 79

2:00 p.m.–2:45 p.m. X Dancing with Parkinson’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116 3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m. X Biological and Chemical Neuroterrorism

and Neurowarfare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79

AAN.com/view/AM18 23


Tuesday, April 24

Wednesday, April 25

3:30 p.m.–4:20 p.m.

7:00 a.m.–7:45 a.m. X Yoga-Vinyasa

S22 Autonomic Disorders Platform Session . . . . . . . 146

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C120 Lumbar Radiculopathy, Lumbar Spinal Stenosis, Low C121

C122 C123 C124

C125 C126 C127 C128 C129 C130 C131 C132 S23 S24 S25

Back Pain, and Failed Back Syndrome . . . . . . . . 173 Introduction to Primary Headache Disorders II: Trigeminal Autonomic Cephalalgias and Other Primary Headaches Including New Daily Persistent Headache, Cough, Exercise, and Thunderclap Headaches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 Multiple Sclerosis Overview III: The Pathogenesis of Multiple Sclerosis and Mechanism of Action of Treatments for MS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127 Child Neurology: A Case-based Approach . . . . . . . 56 The Palliative Care Guide in Neurology: Best Practice in Communication, Advance Care Planning, and Endof-life Care of Patients with Brain Tumors and Other Life-limiting Neurological Disorders . . . . . . . . . 154 Continuum ® Test Your Knowledge: A Multiplechoice Question Review II . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Sleep for the Practicing Neurologist II: Night Fighting: Sleep Related Hypermotor Epilepsy, Sleepwalking, and Dream Enactment . . . . . . . . 190 Concussion Management: Chronic Sequelae and Symptom Targeted Treatment in the Acute, Subacute and Chronic Phase After Concussion . . . . 137 Movement Disorders for the General Neurologist III: Chorea, Dystonia, Myoclonus, Stereotypies, and Tics . . 117 Cerebrovascular Disease II: Update on GuidanceBased Diagnosis and Management of Hemorrhagic Stroke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Disorders of Motor Programming: The Apraxias and Action-Intentional Disorders Chalk Talk . . . . . . . . 37 Introduction to Integrative Neurology . . . . . . . . . 80 Actualización Científica en Español Durante el Congreso Anual I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease Platform Session . 126 Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG) Platform Session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146 Movement Disorders Platform Session . . . . . . . . 116

4:00 p.m.–4:45 p.m. X The Sleep Mythbuster!: Illuminating the Facts

and Fiction Towards Achieving the Sleep Healthy Neurologist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191

4:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. X Zombie Apocalypse! The Neuroscience of the Undead . 81 7:00 p.m.–10:00 p.m. Industry Therapeutic Updates

24 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C133 Higher Cortical Visual Disorders: Case-based Review . 163 C134 Tuberculosis of the Central Nervous System . . . . . 100 C135 Neurocognitive Assessment for Neurologists . . . . . 37 C136 Multiple Sclerosis Therapy: Disease-modifying Treatment I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127

C137 What Do I Do Now?: Emergency and Inpatient

Management of Migraine and Other Headache Disorders . 96

C138 Clinical EEG I: Normal EEG, Normal Variants, and

How to Avoid The Common Pitfall of Over-reading . . . 61 C139 Neurologic Case Studies in Pregnancy . . . . . . . . 81 C140 Paroxysmal Movement Disorders . . . . . . . . . . 117 C141 Integrating Sleep Medicine Concepts into Your Child Neurology Practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191 C142 Mastering EMG Waveform Recognition Skills in Just Two Hours! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147 C143 Evaluation and Treatment of Common Spine Disorders . 166

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. X Acupuncture Demonstration: Auriculotherapy . . . . . 82 8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. S26 “Best of” Session: Movement Disorders . . . . . . . 117

8:00 a.m.–9:10 a.m. X How to Write and Publish Research Papers, Reviews

and Other Scientific Communications . . . . . . . . 187

9:15 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Frontiers in Neuroscience Plenary Session .

29

11:30 a.m.–3:00 p.m.

Exhibit Hall

11:30 a.m.–7:00 p.m. P4

Poster Session IV

12:00 p.m.–1:00 p.m. X Neurology Jeopardy Game Show . . . . . . . . . . 82 1:00 p.m.–1:50 p.m. S27 Practice, Policy, and Ethics Platform Session . . . . . 178

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C144 Neurology Update I: Epilepsy, Behavioral Neurology,

and Neurologic Infections . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82

C145 Severe TBI: From ICU to Rehabilitation . . . . . . . . 167 C146 Non-Alzheimer’s Dementia I: Frontotemporal Dementias . 38


C147 Multiple Sclerosis Therapy: Disease-modifying C148 C149 C150 C151 C152 C153 C154 C155 C156 S28 S29 S30 S31

Treatment II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128 LGBTQI Health in Neurology . . . . . . . . . . . . 178 What Do I Do Now?: Neurologic Consultations in Cancer Patients I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155 Where is the Lesion? A History of Neurological Investigations Part I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187 Cerebrovascular Disease III: Update on Neuroimaging Modalities and Endovascular Therapies for Acute Ischemic Stroke . . . . . . . . . 47 Nystagmus and Saccadic Intrusions Made Simple . . . 163 Circadian Rhythm Disorders: Implications for Neurology 192 The Global Burden of Neurologic Diseases . . . . . . 92 Small Fiber Neuropathies: Sensory, Autonomic, and Both I: Focus on Autonomic Nervous System . . . . . 147 Clinical EEG II: Focal, Diffuse, and Epileptiform Abnormalities in Adults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Child Neurology and Developmental Neurology Platform Session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Movement Disorders Platform Session . . . . . . . . 117 Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG) Platform Session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147 Headache Platform Session . . . . . . . . . . . . 97

1:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m. C157 L Advanced Leadership Training: Preparing for Your

Career’s Insurmountable Opportunities . . . . . . . 108

C158 L Leadership Strengths in Neurology: The Data,

Tools and Practical Application of Strengths for Leadership, Team Building, and Personal Development $ (registration required) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109

1:00 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C159 Clinical Uses of Botulinum Toxin for Dystonia

Skills Workshop $ (registration required) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118

1:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m. X Ask Us Anything: Expert Panel on

Parkinson’s Disease . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118

3:30 p.m.–4:00 p.m. S32 Global Health Platform Session . . . . . . . . . . . 92

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

C160 C161 C162 C163 C164 C165 C166 C167 C168 C169 C170 C171 N4 S33 S34 S35

Invited Science Session: Sleep . . . . . . . . . . . 192 Neurology Update II: Movement Disorders, Spine Disorders, and Sleep Disorders . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Non-Alzheimer’s Dementia II: Lewy Body Dementias and Other Parkinsonian Dementias . . . . . . . . . . 39 Multiple Sclerosis Therapy: Symptom Management . . 128 How to Run a Practice: Business Strategies for Neurology Private Practices, Academic Centers, and the Future . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179 What Do I Do Now?: Neurologic Consultations in Cancer Patients II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155 Where is the Lesion? A History of Neurological Investigation Part II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188 Cerebrovascular Disease IV: Telestroke . . . . . . . . 48 Eye Movement Disorders: A Systematic Approach to the Evaluation of Diplopia . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164 CNS Toxicities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 Small Fiber Neuropathies: Sensory, Autonomic, and Both II: Focus on Sensory Nervous System . . . . . . 148 Clinical EEG III: Neonatal and Pediatric . . . . . . . . 62 Spanish Symposium: Update on Epilepsy Therapy for Pharmaco-resistant Epilepsy . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Neuroscience in the Clinic: Opioid Use and Abuse: The Overlapping Neurobiology of Pain and Addiction, and the Path Toward Better Treatments . . . . . . . 173 Behavioral Neurology Platform Session . . . . . . . . 39 Child Neurology and Developmental Neurology Platform Session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease Platform Session . 128

4:00 p.m.–4:45 p.m. X Diets and Supplements in MS: What’s the

Evidence Thus Far? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129

4:15 p.m.–5:00 p.m. X The Neurology of Voodoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84

2:00 p.m.–2:45 p.m. X Resiliency for the Neurologist . . . . . . . . . . . . 83

4:30 p.m.–5:10 p.m.

3:00 p.m.–3:45 p.m. X Introduction to Acupuncture II: Evidence-based

5:15 p.m.–6:15 p.m. X Neurology and Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84

Applications for Acupuncture in the Treatment of Neurologic Conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83

3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m. X Health Care Disparities Among

S36 Neuro-rehabilitation Platform Session . . . . . . . . 168

7:00 p.m.–10:00 p.m. Industry Therapeutic Updates

Underserved Populations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83

AAN.com/view/AM18 25


Thursday, April 26 7:00 a.m.–7:45 a.m. X Yoga-Vinyasa

1:00 p.m.–2:00 p.m.

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

S38 History of Neurology Platform Session . . . . . . . 188

C172 Clinical Epilepsy I: Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 C173 Using Sleep Medicine to Help Solve Difficult C174 C175 C176 C177

C178 C179 C180 C181

Neurologic Cases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193 Rehabilitation in Neurology . . . . . . . . . . . . 168 Clinical Pearls in Autoimmune Neurology: Real World Cases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129 The Dystonia: Diagnosis, Treatment and Update on Etiologies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 So You’ve Diagnosed Your Patient with a Neuroinfectious Disease, Now What? Practical Pearls in the Treatment and Management of Neuroinfectious Diseases . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 Neuro-oncology in 2018: Navigating Current Trends . . 156 Clinical EMG I: Principles and Practice of NCS and Needle EMG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148 Principles of Genomic Medicine: Clinical Exome Sequencing in Neurologic Disease . . . . . . . . . . 85 Preventive Neurology: How Neurologists Can Improve Outcomes That Matter to Patients . . . . . . 39

8:00 a.m.–8:45 a.m. X Sleep and Performance in Elite Athletes . . . . . . . 193 8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. S37 “Best of” Session: Neuromuscular and Clinical

Neurophysiology (EMG) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149

9:15 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Controversies in Neurology Plenary Session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

29

12:00 p.m.–12:45 p.m. X The Purpose Checkup: Find Meaning,

and Stroke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85

C186 Myelopathies I: Recognizing and Evaluating C187 C188 C189 C190 C191 C192 C193 C194 C195

S39

Myelopathic Patients for Inflammatory and Vascular Causes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168 Cerebellar and Afferent Ataxias: Diagnosis and Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119 Neuroimaging for the General Neurologist I: Spine and Peripheral Nerve . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 Business Strategies for Payer Negotiations and/or How to Go off the Grid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179 Neuro-oncologic Predicaments in the Hospital Setting . 156 Neuro-otology I: The Common Peripheral Vestibular Disorders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164 Clinical EMG II: Neuromuscular Junction Testing and Quantitative EMG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149 Assessment of Rapidly Progressive Dementias I: Overview, Prion Diseases, and Antibody-Mediated Rapidly Progressive Dementia . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Spanish Symposium: Update on Stroke Therapy . . . . 49 Practical Training in Injection Techniques in the Treatment of Headache Disorders Skills Workshop $ (registration required) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Neuroscience in the Clinic: Treatment of Progressive Multiple Sclerosis . . . . . . . . . . . 129 Cerebrovascular Disease and Interventional Neurology Platform Session . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Infectious Disease Platform Session . . . . . . . . 101 Neurocritical Care Platform Session . . . . . . . . . 137

1:00 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Live Longer, Better . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85

12:00 p.m.–1:00 p.m. X Who Wants to be a Millionaire . . . . . . . . . . . 85

Chronic Pain Syndromes . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Behavior and Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40

C185 Neurology Update III: Neuromuscular, Headache,

S40 S41

Poster Session V

1:00 p.m.–1:45 p.m. X Integrative Approach to the Management of

Span Pediatrics, Pregnancy, and Elderly . . . . . . . . 64

C183 Hot Topics in Sleep Neurology . . . . . . . . . . . 193 C184 Behavioral Neurology I: Network Anatomy of

N5

11:30 a.m.–7:00 p.m. P5

C182 Clinical Epilepsy II: Considerations Across the Age

174

C196 Brain Death Skills Workshop: How to Perform a

Brain Death Evaluation, Avoid Pitfalls and Convey the News to the Family $ (registration required) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137

1:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m. X Caring for Your Neurologic Patient for $500 or Less . . 180 3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m. X Neurological Exam Tips and Tricks:

En Español . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86

26 2018 AAN Annual Meeting


3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Invited Science Session: Neuro Trauma . . . . . . . 138 C197 Clinical Epilepsy III: Advanced (Status, Beyond AED, Video EEG) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 C198 Behavioral Neurology II: Memory and Attention . . . . 41 C199 Neurology Update IV: Multiple Sclerosis, Neuroophthalmology, and Autoimmune Encephalopathies . . . 87 C200 Myelopathies II: Approaches to Rehabilitation and Psychosocial Challenges . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169 C201 Differential Diagnosis of Neurologic Infections . . . . 101 C202 Neuroimaging for the General Neurologist II: Spine and Peripheral Nerve . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 C203 Endovascular Treatment of Acute Stroke and Cerebrovascular Disease . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 C204 Making Sure You Get Paid Under the New Health Care Laws . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180 C205 Neuro-otology II: Diagnosis and Treatment of Nuanced Causes of Dizziness . . . . . . . . . . . 165 C206 Clinical EMG III: Nerve Conduction Criteria and Electrodiagnostic Approaches . . . . . . . . . . . 149 C207 Mitochondrial Disorders in Neurology . . . . . . . . 87 C208 Assessment of Rapidly Progressive Dementias II: Neurodegenerative Diseases and Infections Presenting as Rapidly Progressive Dementia . . . . . . 41 C209 Clinical Usefulness of Botulinum Toxin for Spasticity Skills Workshop $ (registration required) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119 N6 Neuroscience in the Clinic: Neurologic Complications of Cancer Immunotherapy: A New Frontier in Neuro-Inflammation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157 S42 Headache Platform Session . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 S43 MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease Platform Session . 130 S44 Movement Disorders Platform Session . . . . . . . . 119 S45 Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG) Platform Session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149

4:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. X Neurology History and Wine . . . . . . . . . . . . 188 6:30 p.m.–9:30 p.m. C210 Case Studies: Unusual Diagnostic and Management C211 C212 C213 C214 C215

of Cases in Neuromuscular Disease . . . . . . . . . 150 Case Studies in the ICU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138 Case Studies: Test Your Knowledge: A Case-based Approach to Neuroimaging . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 Case Studies: Unusual Movement Disorders . . . . . 120 Case Studies: Challenging Headache Cases . . . . . . 97 Case Studies in Behavioral Neurology: Focus on Frontotemporal Degeneration . . . . . . . . . . . . 42

Join Neurology’s Global Conversation! Connect with neurologists and neuroscience professionals in your area of interest. Get started at AAN.com/Synapse


Friday, April 27 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

C233 Simposio Español: Actualización Científica

C216 Neuroendocrine Update: Nuts and Bolts of What

You Need to Know . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 C217 Current Management of Incidental and Asymptomatic Cerebrovascular Lesions . . . . . . . . 50 C218 Infections of the Nervous System I: Diagnostic Testing of Neurological Infections . . . . . . . . . 101 C219 The Early-Onset Dementias . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 C220 Drugs and Toxin-induced Neurologic Emergencies . . . 89 C221 REM Sleep Behavior Disorder . . . . . . . . . . . 194 C222 Therapy of Movement Disorders: A Case-based Approach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120 C223 The Burden of Epilepsy: Managing Comorbidities and Quality of Life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. S46 “Best of” Session: MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease . 130

in Management of NM Disorders . . . . . . . . . . 150

9:15 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

29

11:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m. P6

Poster Session VI

12:00 p.m.–12:45 p.m. X Outsmart Stress . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 12:00 p.m.–1:00 p.m. X Creativity and the Brain…at the Piano . . . . . . . . 89 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C224 Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorders . . . . . . 130 C225 Neuromuscular Junction Disorders I: Myasthenia

Gravis, Ocular, and MuSK Myasthenia . . . . . . . . 150 C226 Infections of the Nervous System II: Neuro-ID Emergencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 C227 Behavioral Neurology: A Case-based Approach . . . . 43 C228 Neuroimaging for the General Neurologist I: Brain . . . 89 C229 Deep Brain Stimulation I: Basic Principles and Programming in Movement Disorders . . . . . . . . 121 C230 Neurologic Complications of Medical and Surgical Therapies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 C231 ICD-10-CM: How to Optimize for Accurate Diagnosis and Reimbursement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180 C232 Hot Topics in Headaches and Related Disorders I: Migraine Pathophysiology, Brain Imaging, and Therapeutic Advances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 28 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

1:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m. C234 Epilepsy Skills Workshop: Focus on Treatment

$ (registration required) .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . 65

1:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m. X Live Intraoperative Monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . 66 3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m. X Ask Us Anything: Expert Panel on Stroke . . . . . . . 50 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C235 Neck Pain, Cervical Spinal Stenosis, Cervical

8:00 a.m.–9:10 a.m. X Role of Placebo in Neuromuscular Clinical Trials and

Neurology Year in Review Plenary Session .

Durante el Congreso Anual II . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 S47 Aging and Dementia Platform Session . . . . . . . . 43 S48 Neuro Trauma and Sports Neurology Platform Session . 138 S49 General Neurology Platform Session . . . . . . . . . 89

Radiculopathy, and Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy . 169 C236 Neuromuscular Junction Disorders II: Toxins, Lambert-Eaton Syndrome and Less Common Disorders of Neuromuscular Transmission . . . . . . 151 C237 Neurologic Complications of Medical Disease . . . . . 90 C238 Memory Disorders: A Case-based Approach . . . . . . 43 C239 Infections of the Nervous System III: Advanced Topics in Infectious Neurology . . . . . . . . . . . 102 C240 Neuroimaging for the General Neurologist II: Brain . . . 91 C241 Deep Brain Stimulation II: Advanced Management in Movement Disorders and Applications Beyond Movement Disorders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 C242 Coding 101: It’s Not Your Father’s Oldsmobile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181 C243 Hot Topics in Headaches and Related Disorders II: Unusual Headaches, Childhood Headaches, and Concussion Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 N7 Neuroscience in the Clinic: REM Sleep Behavior Disorder: Past, Present, Future . . . . . . . . . . . 194 S50 MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease Platform Session . 130 S51 Epilepsy/Clinical Neurophysiology (EEG) Platform Session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 S52 Cerebrovascular Disease and Interventional Neurology Platform Session . . . . . . . . . . . . 50

4:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. X Ask Us Anything: Expert Panel on Multiple Sclerosis . . 130 5:30 p.m.–7:00 p.m.

Closing Party Happy Hour . . . . . . . . . . . 226


Plenary Sessions Look for seven plenary sessions, one each day beginning on Saturday evening. Hear from more than 40 leading researchers presenting the latest advances in neuroscience.

HOT TOPICS PLENARY SESSION Saturday, April 21

4:15 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Features translational research related to clinical issues of importance. Four outstanding physician-scientists provide summaries of their recent research findings and describe the clinical implications of the results.

PRESIDENTIAL PLENARY SESSION Sunday, April 22

9:15 a.m.–12:00 p.m.

Features the AAN’s premier lecture awards for clinically relevant research and a presentation by a leading lecturer. Top researchers speak on some of the most significant findings in neurology in 2018. Moderator Natalia S. Rost, MD, FAAN Chair, AAN Science Committee Presidential Lecture Francis S. Collins, MD, PhD Director, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD California Dreaming: BRAIN and Precision Medicine in 2018 Sidney Carter Award in Child Neurology Richard S. Finkel, MD Nemours Children’s Hospital, Orlando, FL Spinal Muscular Atrophy Is a Treatable Neurodegenerative Disease George C. Cotzias Lecture Tallie Z. Baram, MD, PhD University of California-Irvine, Irvine, CA How Early-life Experiences Sculpt Your Brain: From Molecules to Circuits

CONTEMPORARY CLINICAL ISSUES PLENARY SESSION Monday, April 23

9:15 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Highlights issues most critical to practicing neurologists, including abstracts related to new therapeutic developments, clinical applications of basic and translational research, and innovative technical developments. Commentary and discussion follow each presentation.

CLINICAL TRIALS PLENARY SESSION Tuesday, April 24

9:15 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Covers important clinical topics identified from other society meetings that affect patient care. The latest updates within several clinical trials conducted over the course of the last year will be presented.

FRONTIERS IN NEUROSCIENCE PLENARY SESSION Wednesday, April 25 9:15 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Features basic and translational research related to clinical issues of importance. Six outstanding physician-scientists provide summaries of their recent research findings and describe the clinical implications of the results.

Combining Patient-derived Cell and Animal Models to Uncover Epilepsy Mechanisms and Precision Therapies Jack M. Parent, MD University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI BigBrain: A High Resolution 3D Digital Human Brain Atlas Alan Evans, PhD McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada Pediatric MS: A Unique Window into Environmental and Genetic Risk Factors for MS Emmanuelle Waubant, MD, FAAN University of San Francisco-California, San Francisco, CA

CONTROVERSIES IN NEUROLOGY PLENARY SESSION Thursday, April 26 9:15 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Features experts discussing the most current and controversial issues in neuroscience. The session follows a debate-style format in which two speakers argue one side of a single topic, followed by a rebuttal.

For the first time, AAN members will have a chance to weigh in on what they would like to see presented at this year’s Controversies in Neurology Plenary Session. Submit your idea The Dynamics of the Unconscious Brain Under at AAN.com/view/AM18 General Anesthesia NEUROLOGY YEAR IN REVIEW Emery N. Brown, MD, PhD PLENARY SESSION Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA Moderator Paul M. George, MD, PhD, MSE Member, Science Committee

Robert Wartenberg Lecture Lisa M. DeAngelis, MD Does Connectomics Make Sense? Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Jeff Lichtman, MD, PhD New York, NY Harvard University, Boston, MA Neuro-Oncology: How Cancer and the Nervous System Interact

Biology of Bedtime: Understanding Circadian Rhythms and Sleep Amita Sehgal, PhD University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA

Friday, April 27 9:15 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Features six speakers, each focusing on the latest research that has happened in the last year within a specific subspecialty topic.

AAN.com/view/AM18 29


Program Glossary Use this handy glossary to help you navigate the variety of programming throughout the week and assist you in your planning.

Course An education program using one or more teaching methods, including didactic, interactive, and case‐based.

Experiential Learning Area An interactive new way of learning that will engage you intellectually, emotionally, and socially and offer you fresh ideas to help you personally and professionally.

Invited Science Session An AAN platform session featuring authors giving encore presentations of top abstracts previously presented at a subspecialty meeting.

Neuroscience in the Clinic Session A two‐hour session featuring a mix of scientists and clinicians actively engaged in lively case discussion to integrate scientific research with clinical application. Scientists will introduce and provide background on a case and clinicians will apply the case to a patent. Sessions will feature abstract presentations related to the topic. Sessions end with a panel discussion.

Plenary Session

Scientific Session A group of abstracts covering a similar topic presented in an oral format. Presentations are eight minutes in length with four minutes of question and answer. Each session concludes with 25 minutes of a discussant bringing additional context to one or more abstracts.

Skills Workshop An interactive, hands‐on program involving breakout sessions.

A premiere general session highlighting the latest advances in neuroscience.

Category Icons Look for these icons to help you navigate individual programs. While exploring the meeting for different formats and program types, these icons will help to identify what you might be looking for.

H D J A

= Advocacy = Career = Clinical Knowledge = Edutainment

B E F G

= History = Personal Development = Practice Management = Research

$ = Additional Fee Required L = Leadership University

K I C

= Spanish Language = Technology = Wellness


Aging and Dementia

Aging, Dementia, Cognitive, and Behavioral Neurology Overview

T

he Annual Meeting offers countless opportunities to learn high-level overviews or deep dives into complex cases of aging, dementia, cognitive, and behavioral neurology. Look for education and science covering the gamut of topics, and don’t miss the Frontiers in Neuroscience Plenary Session on connectomics and the Neuroscience in the Clinic session on challenges in genetic diagnosis in neurology. Saturday, April 21

Tuesday, April 24

Thursday, April 26

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C1  Mild Cognitive Impairment: Implications for Clinicians

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C97  Vascular Cognitive Impairment and Dementia: Current Status and Future

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C181  Preventive Neurology: How Neurologists Can Improve Outcomes That Matter to Patients

9:30 a.m.–11:30 a.m. C10  More than Medicine: How to Access Home Care, Support Caregivers, and Discuss Complex Situations in Advanced Neurologic Disease

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. N3  Neuroscience in the Clinic: Challenges in Genetic Diagnosis in Neurology

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C184  Behavioral Neurology I: Network Anatomy of Behavior and Language

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C107  What Do I Do Now?: Assessment and Management of Neuropsychiatric Symptoms in Neurocognitive Disorders

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C193  Assessment of Rapidly Progressive Dementias I: Overview, Prion Diseases, and Antibody-Mediated Rapidly Progressive Dementia

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C110  Neurologic Complications in Adults with Down Syndrome

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C198  Behavioral Neurology II: Memory and Attention

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C130  Disorders of Motor Programming: The Apraxias and Action-Intentional Disorders Chalk Talk

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C208  Assessment of Rapidly Progressive Dementias II: Neurodegenerative Diseases and Infections Presenting as Rapidly Progressive Dementia

9:30 a.m.–11:30 a.m. C13  Neuroimaging Biomarkers Across the Dementia Spectrum 1:30 p.m.–3:30 p.m. C20  The Neurology of Social Behavior

Sunday, April 22 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C33  Clinicopathological Correlation Session in Dementia 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. S2  Aging and Dementia Platform Session

Monday, April 23 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C68  Cognitive Impairment Due to Alzheimer’s Disease: Using Old Skills and New Tools for Diagnosis and Treatment 1:00 p.m.–2:00 p.m. Perception Is Reality: Are Neurologists Helping Patients Live Well with Dementia? 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C80  Present and Future Biomarkers in Dementia: A Case-based Approach 2:00 p.m.–2:45 p.m. X Physical Exercise and Cognitive Training in Neurology: Application in Aging and Neurodegenerative Disease 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C91  Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: Update

Wednesday, April 25 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C133  Higher Cortical Visual Disorders: Casebased Review 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C135  Neurocognitive Assessment for Neurologists 9:35 a.m.–9:55 a.m. Frontiers in Neuroscience Plenary Session: Does Connectomics Make Sense? 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C144  Neurology Update I: Epilepsy, Behavioral Neurology, and Neurologic Infections 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C145  Severe TBI: From ICU to Rehabilitation 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C146  Non-Alzheimer’s Dementia I: Frontotemporal Dementias

6:30 p.m.–9:30 p.m. C215  Case Studies in Behavioral Neurology: Focus on Frontotemporal Degeneration

Friday, April 27 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C219  The Early-Onset Dementias 12:00 p.m.–12:45 p.m. X Outsmart Stress 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. S47  Aging and Dementia Platform Session 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C227  Behavioral Neurology: A Case-based Approach 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C238  Memory Disorders: A Case-based Approach

3:00 p.m.–5:30 p.m. S33  Behavioral Neurology Platform Session 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C161  Non-Alzheimer’s Dementia II: Lewy Body Dementias and Other Parkinsonian Dementias

AAN.com/view/AM18 31


Program Descriptions

Aging, Dementia, Cognitive, and Behavioral Neurology

Course

Course

Saturday, April 21, 2018

C1

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Mild Cognitive Impairment: Implications for Clinicians

Saturday, April 21, 2018

C13

9:30 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Neuroimaging Biomarkers Across the Dementia Spectrum

Topic: Aging, Dementia, Cognitive, and Behavioral Neurology Director: Ronald C. Petersen, PhD, MD, FAAN, Rochester, MN

Topic: Aging, Dementia, Cognitive, and Behavioral Neurology Director: Liana Apostolova, MD, FAAN, Indianapolis, IN

Program Description: The diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) often represents prodromal Alzheimer’s disease or other forms of dementia, but exceptions exist. However, diagnosis, prediction of outcome, and treatment of patients with mild cognitive impairment presents many challenges. Faculty will address the diagnosis, pathophysiology, role of biomarkers, and treatment of mild cognitive impairment. The upcoming revision of the AAN Practice Parameter for MCI will be reviewed and a number of cases will be presented to illustrate controversies and management issues.

CME Credits:  2

Program Description: Advances in molecular genetics have greatly impacted the practice of clinicians dealing with pediatric neuromuscular disease. Through presentations of common and more challenging cases, faculty will facilitate a discussion with the audience of differential diagnosis and laboratory evaluation. Each case will be followed by an overview and update on the topic. Upon Completion: Participants should become familiar with the differential diagnoses and work-up, including genetic testing of common and uncommon neuromuscular diseases presenting in childhood, and get an update on new breakthroughs in the field. Lecture/Faculty: }} Updates on the Clinical and Research Use of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Neurodegenerative Disorders Liana Apostolova, MD, FAAN, Indianapolis, IN }} The Role of Functional Neuroimaging in the Evaluation of Patients with Cognitive/Behavioral Impairment or Dementia Bradford Dickerson, MD, Charlestown, MA }} Towards Molecular Diagnosis: Clinical Applications of Amyloid and Tau PET Imaging Gil Dan Rabinovici, MD, San Francisco, CA Core Competencies:  Patient Care, Systems-Based Practice, Medical Knowledge

Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

CME Credits:  2

J

Upon Completion: Participants should be able to understand the diagnostic criteria and basic biology of MCI and be familiar with the recommended diagnostic guidelines, appropriate use of biomarkers, and management of patients with MCI. Lecture/Faculty: }} Overview of MCI Ronald C. Petersen, PhD, MD, FAAN, Rochester, MN }} Treatment and Management of MCI David J. Gill, MD, FAAN, Rochester, NY Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, PracticeBased Learning and Improvement Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic

Course Saturday, April 21, 2018

C10

Teaching Style:  Didactic Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, Seminar

Course

9:30 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

More than Medicine: How to Access Home Care, Support Caregivers, and Discuss Complex Situations in Advanced Neurologic Disease

Topics:

Pain and Palliative Care; Aging, Dementia, Cognitive, and Behavioral Neurology Director: Farrah N. Daly, MD, MBA, Leesburg, VA

J

See complete course description on page 171 »

32 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

J

Saturday, April 21, 2018

C20

1:30 p.m.–3:30 p.m.

The Neurology of Social Behavior

Topic: Aging, Dementia, Cognitive, and Behavioral Neurology Director: Bradford Dickerson, MD, Charlestown, MA

J

Program Description: Over the past decade, we have seen remarkable advances in our knowledge of social cognitive and affective neuroscience. Our understanding of the neural circuits underpinning socioemotional behaviors such as empathy, self-awareness, warmth, and reading others' intentions is more precise than ever before. Faculty will


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

provide an overview of how specific neural networks normally function to support social behavior, and will show how this new information can improve our ability to understand the kinds of neurologically based behavioral dysfunction that result from disease and injury. Disturbances of socioemotional behavior in clinical neurology will be discussed using data from patients with diseases that particularly impair social functions, such as frontotemporal dementia, autism, ADHD, sociopathy, and Williams syndrome. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to understand that social behavior and cognition rely on specific neurologic systems in the brain, have a sense of the basic organization and general neuroanatomy of social behavior, and be aware of specific neurologic conditions that particularly impair social functioning. Lecture/Faculty: }} Social Cognitive and Affective Function: Behavior and Brain Systems Bradford Dickerson, MD, Charlestown, MA }} Social Cognition and Behavior in Neuropsychiatric Disorders Elizabeth Finger, MD, FAAN, London, ON, Canada }} Case Discussions Faculty Core Competencies:  Patient Care, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement, Medical Knowledge

knowledge of clinical-pathological associations in dementia syndromes, and understand the principles of interpretation of molecular imaging results based on clinicopathological associations in dementia. Lecture/Faculty: }} Primary Progressive Aphasia M. Marsel Mesulam, MD, FAAN, Chicago, IL }} Lewy Body Disorders James B. Leverenz, MD, FAAN, Cleveland, OH }} Alzheimer’s Disease and Aging Julie A. Schneider, MD, MS, Chicago, IL }} Interactive Case Presentations Julie A. Schneider, MD, MS, Chicago, IL David Irwin, MD, Philadelphia, PA James B. Leverenz, MD, FAAN, Cleveland, OH M. Marsel Mesulam, MD, FAAN, Chicago, IL Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Scientific Platform Session

Teaching Style:  Didactic, Interactive, Case-Based

Sunday, April 22, 2018

CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

S2

Topic:

Aging and Dementia Platform Session Aging, Dementia, Cognitive, and Behavioral Neurology

G

Course Sunday, April 22, 2018

C33

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Clinicopathological Correlation Session in Dementia

Topic: Aging, Dementia, Cognitive, and Behavioral Neurology Director: David Irwin, MD, Philadelphia, PA

J

Program Description: This program will consist of didactic session from experts in the field of neurodegenerative disease. This will include an overview of clinicopathological associations in Alzheimer’s disease and healthy aging, dementia with Lewy bodies, behavioral-variant frontotemporal dementia, and primary progressive aphasia. Gross brain autopsy images and photomicrographs of microscopic findings for each major class of neurodegenerative disease (i.e., Alzheimer’s disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, Frontotemporal degeneration with tauopathy, and Frontotemporal degeneration with TDP-43 proteinopathy) will be reviewed and discussion of the most frequent clinical syndromes associated for each of these proteinopathies included. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to obtain familiarity with main neuropathological diagnoses underlying dementia, gain in-depth

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Course Monday, April 23, 2018

C68

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Cognitive Impairment Due to Alzheimer’s Disease: Using Old Skills and New Tools for Diagnosis and Treatment

Topic: Aging, Dementia, Cognitive, and Behavioral Neurology Director: David S. Knopman, MD, FAAN, Rochester, MN

J

Program Description: This program will focus on important topics in the diagnosis of cognitive impairment due to Alzheimer’s disease. We will discuss the basics of the clinical diagnosis, the role of genetics in diagnosis and information for patients and families, the role of clinical and experimental imaging in the diagnosis of AD, and where we stand with treatment for AD. This program complements C80: Present and Future Biomarkers in Dementia: A Case-based Approach and C91: Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: Update, but covers independent topics. AAN.com/view/AM18 33

Aging and Dementia

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University


Program Descriptions Upon Completion: Participants should be able to describe the continuum of cognitive function in the Alzheimer spectrum, understand the major and minor genetic influences on AD, describe the evolving biomarker diagnostic process for defining AD as a pathophysiology, and describe the appropriate indications for cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine. Lecture/Faculty: }} The Clinical Diagnosis of MCI and Dementia Due to AD Richard J. Caselli, MD, FAAN, Scottsdale, AZ }} Biomarkers for the Etiological Diagnosis of AD David S. Knopman, MD, FAAN, Rochester, MN }} The Role for Genetics in AD Diagnosis and Management Richard J. Caselli, MD, FAAN, Scottsdale, AZ }} Therapeutics in AD for 2018 David S. Knopman, MD, FAAN, Rochester, MN Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Experiential Learning Area Monday, April 23, 2018

1:00 p.m.–2:00 p.m.

Perception Is Reality: Are Neurologists Helping Patients Live Well with Dementia? Topic: Aging, Dementia, Cognitive, and Behavioral Neurology Speakers: Daniel C. Potts, MD, FAAN, Tuscaloosa, AL Neelum T. Aggarwal, MD, Chicago, IL Experiential Learning Area: Live Well

CEDJ

Program Description: Many persons living with dementia report the negative impact of their interactions with neurologists, especially when receiving their diagnosis. These interactions are often characterized as lacking empathy and compassion, with poor communication of available resources, and a general lack of effort or concern to help patients live well with their diagnosis. Interactions such as these may have far-reaching consequences, including negatively impacting patients' perceived selfworth and caregiver well-being, undermining trust in the physician-patient relationship, and adversely impacting treatment compliance. Contributing factors may include physician burn-out, challenges in breaking bad news, implicit bias against persons living with dementia, failure of the built practice environment to support high quality person-centered care, etc. This 1-hour offering will include a panel discussion with persons living with dementia, a virtual dementia simulation, a discussion of the changing demographics, genetics and neuroethics of Alzheimer’s and other dementias, and a time for audience questions and comments.

34 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

Aging, Dementia, Cognitive, and Behavioral Neurology

Course Monday, April 23, 2018

C80

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Present and Future Biomarkers in Dementia: A Case-based Approach

Topic: Aging, Dementia, Cognitive, and Behavioral Neurology Director: Jonathan Graff-Radford, MD, Rochester, MN

J

Program Description: Biomarkers are currently used clinically, for diagnostic criteria, in therapeutic trials, and for research in dementias. Biomarkers have become increasingly important to understanding the pathophysiology across dementias. Through presentations of common and more challenging dementia cases, faculty will facilitate a discussion with the audience of differential diagnosis of dementia with the aid of biomarkers. This program complements C68: Cognitive Impairment Due to Alzheimer’s Disease: Using Old Skills and New Tools for Diagnosis and Treatment and C91: Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: Update, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should become familiar with biomarkers currently available for the differential diagnoses and work-up dementias, and be updated on breakthroughs in the field. Lecture/Faculty: }} Biomarkers in the Diagnosis of Dementia I Gregory S. Day, MD, MSc, St. Louis, MO }} Biomarkers in the Diagnosis of Dementia II Jonathan Graff-Radford, MD, Rochester, MN }} Case Vignette I Gregory S. Day, MD, MSc, St. Louis, MO }} Case Vignette II Jonathan Graff-Radford, MD, Rochester, MN Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

Experiential Learning Area Monday, April 23, 2018

2:00 p.m.–2:45 p.m.

Physical Exercise and Cognitive Training in Neurology: Application in Aging and Neurodegenerative Disease Topic: Aging, Dementia, Cognitive, and Behavioral Neurology Speaker: Ergun Y. Uc, MD, Iowa City, IA Experiential Learning Area: Live Well

JEC

Program Description: The aging talk will review recent available large-scale studies on the effects of physical exercise to enhance mobility and cognitive wellness in aged people. Methods and results of landmark studies such as the LIFE (physical exercise) and ACTIVE (cognitive training) will be presented and mechanisms of effect will be reviewed. The neurodegenerative disease talk will summarize individual studies and systematic reviews on the effects physical exercise and cognitive training in dementia and Parkinson’s disease.

Course Monday, April 23, 2018

C91

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: Update

Topic: Aging, Dementia, Cognitive, and Behavioral Neurology Director: Andrew E. Budson, MD, Boston, MA

J

Program Description: Chronic traumatic encephalopathy is increasingly recognized as a cause of memory loss in addition to mood and behavior issues. Faculty will present up-to-date information regarding epidemiological, clinical, cognitive, pathological, and imaging aspects of this disorder. This program complements C68: Cognitive Impairment due to Alzheimer’s Disease: Using Old Skills and New Tools for Diagnosis and Treatment and C80: Present and Future Biomarkers in Dementia: A Case-based Approach, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to identify patients in their practice with chronic traumatic encephalopathy; the changes in cognition, mood, and behavior that result; and understand the underlying pathology and its imaging correlates.

}} Current Clinical Research in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy Robert Stern, PhD, Boston, MA Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Course Tuesday, April 24, 2018

C97

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Vascular Cognitive Impairment and Dementia: Current Status and Future

Topic: Aging, Dementia, Cognitive, and Behavioral Neurology Director: Larry B. Goldstein, MD, FAAN, FAHA, Lexington, KY

J

Program Description: Faculty will provide an overview of the evolving clinical science related to vascular cognitive impairment and dementia. An introduction to the overall status and challenges in the field will be followed by a review of current diagnostic strategies and treatment and potential future approaches. This program will conclude with a general summary and, time-permitting, case discussions. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to discuss diagnostic challenges, and current and possible future approaches to VCI/dementia. Lecture/Faculty: }} Vascular Cognitive Impairment/Dementia: Setting the Stage Larry B. Goldstein, MD, FAAN, FAHA, Lexington, KY }} Assessment and Diagnosis of Patients with Suspected VCI/ Dementia David S. Knopman, MD, FAAN, Rochester, MN }} Current and Future Management of Patients with VCI/ Dementia Gregory A. Jicha, MD, PhD, Lexington, KY Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, PracticeBased Learning and Improvement Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Lecture/Faculty: }} Pathology of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy Ann C. McKee, MD, Boston, MA }} Clinical Aspects of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy Andrew E. Budson, MD, Boston, MA

AAN.com/view/AM18 35

Aging and Dementia

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University


Program Descriptions

Aging, Dementia, Cognitive, and Behavioral Neurology

Neuroscience in the Clinic Session Tuesday, April 24, 2018

N3

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Neuroscience in the Clinic: Challenges in Genetic Diagnosis in Neurology

Topics:

Aging, Dementia, Cognitive, and Behavioral Neurology; General Neurology Directors: Guy A. Rouleau, MD, PhD, Montreal, QC, Canada Massimo Pandolfo, MD, FAAN, Brussels, Belgium

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Program Description: Genetic testing is becoming increasingly prevalent and their interpretation sometimes difficult. The program will consist of a presentation of a complex case, followed by discussion that will illustrate the science that led to the current state of the art, where it is expected to move, how this impacted practice, and what are the unmet needs in the clinic. Upon Completion: Participants should become familiar with the issues involved in the interpretation of genetic testing results, including the assessment of the potential pathogenicity of the identified genetic variants and their correlation with phenotype. Lecture/Faculty: }} Case Presentation Stefan M. Pulst, MD, FAAN, Salt Lake City, UT }} Clinical Discussion Stefan M. Pulst, MD, FAAN, Salt Lake City, UT }} Scientific Follow Up Brent L. Fogel, MD, PhD, FAAN, Los Angeles, CA }} Abstract Presentations: (Selected in February 2018) }} Panel Discussion Faculty Core Competencies:  Patient Care, Medical Knowledge Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Interactive, Panel Discussion CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

36 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

Course Tuesday, April 24, 2018

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C107 What Do I Do Now?: Assessment and

Management of Neuropsychiatric Symptoms in Neurocognitive Disorders

Topic: Aging, Dementia, Cognitive, and Behavioral Neurology Director: Daniel Kaufer, MD, FAAN, Chapel Hill, NC

J

Program Description: This course will outline practical, systematic approaches to assessing and managing neuropsychiatric symptoms in neurocognitive disorders. Neuropsychiatric symptoms reflect cerebral dysfunction across a wide range of cortical and subcortical networks. They represent core features of dementia with Lewy bodies and behavioral variant frontotemporal degeneration, and are often clinically significant co-morbidities in Alzheimer’s disease and other neurocognitive disorders. This year’s course will follow the "What Do I Do Now?" format, including cases that illustrate common management decision points and using ARS to facilitate audience participation. Audience members will be invited to submit challenging cases prior to the course. Faculty will review the spectrum of neuropsychiatric disturbances seen in neurocognitive disorders, discuss practical clinical assessment techniques based on informant report, and outline a systematic approach to management including pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to efficiently identify and assess common neuropsychiatric symptoms; develop a systematic approach to formulating a flexible, comprehensive treatment plan; select appropriate pharmacological therapies for specific target symptoms to ensure safety, improve quality of life, and minimize patient and caregiver distress; better understand possible iatrogenicity and minimize risks associated with polypharmacy; and become familiar with behavioral modification techniques and use community resources for caregiver education and support. Lecture/Faculty: }} Neuropsychiatric Assessment Daniel Kaufer, MD, FAAN, Chapel Hill, NC }} Case 1 Daniel Kaufer, MD, FAAN, Chapel Hill, NC }} Neuropsychiatric Symptom Management Douglas W. Scharre, MD, Columbus, OH }} Case 2 Douglas W. Scharre, MD, Columbus, OH }} Case Presentations Daniel Kaufer, MD, FAAN, Chapel Hill, NC Douglas W. Scharre, MD, Columbus, OH Core Competencies:  Practice-Based Learning and Improvement, Professionalism, Systems-Based Practice, Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Medical Knowledge, Patient Care


A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Course Tuesday, April 24, 2018

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C110 Neurologic Complications in Adults with

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

Lecture/Faculty: }} Disorders of Motor Programming: The Apraxias and ActionIntentional Disorders Kenneth M. Heilman, MD, FAAN, Gainesville, FL Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, Neurospychologist, Occupational and Physical Therapist, Psychiatrist

Down Syndrome

Topics:

Child Neurology and Developmental Neurology; Aging, Dementia, Cognitive, and Behavioral Neurology Director: Andrea L. Gropman, MD, Washington, DC

J

See complete course description on page 55 »

Course Tuesday, April 24, 2018

Apraxias and Action-Intentional Disorders Chalk Talk

Topic: Aging, Dementia, Cognitive, and Behavioral Neurology Director: Kenneth M. Heilman, MD, FAAN, Gainesville, FL

J

Program Description: In humans the corticospinal motor system, together with the motor units, can mediate an almost infinite number of movements. For humans to successfully interact and make alterations, these motor neurons need to be guided by instructions or programs. There are two major types of motor programs. The praxic programs provide the corticospinal system with the knowledge of "how" to perform purposeful skilled movements and the action-intentional programs provide the corticospinal system with information about "when" to move. Many neurological disorders impair the networks that mediate praxis and intention. In this course we will discuss these intentional and praxis systems, including the means by which they can be assessed, the clinical subtypes of apraxia and intentional disorders, the diseases that can cause these disorders, as well as their pathophysiology. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to know how to examine patients for the different forms of apraxia and action-intentional disorders; be able to classify the type of apraxic disorder (ideomotor, limbkinetic, ideational, conceptual, conduction, and disassociation); be able to classify intention disorders including disorders of action initiation (akinesia), persistence (impersistence), response inhibition, action termination (perseveration); as well as understand the pathophysiology of these disorders and the diseases that can cause these disorders.

Course Wednesday, April 25, 2018 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

C133 Higher Cortical Visual Disorders: Casebased Review

Topics:

Neuro-ophthalmology/Neuro-otology; Aging, Dementia, Cognitive, and Behavioral Neurology Director: Sashank Prasad, MD, Boston, MA

J

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

C130 Disorders of Motor Programming: The

I = Technology C = Wellness

See complete course description on page 163 »

Course Wednesday, April 25, 2018 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

C135 Neurocognitive Assessment for Neurologists

Topic: Aging, Dementia, Cognitive, and Behavioral Neurology Director: Mario F. Mendez, MD, PhD, FAAN, Los Angeles, CA

D

Program Description: The program is recommended for all neurologists and designed to improve participants' competence and performance in mental status assessment in neurology. The program will cover four important areas: Basic cognitive-brain relationships; the clinical assessment of neurocognition at the bedside and in clinic; the nature of mental status scales; and the relationship of neurocognitive testing and neuropsychological tests and assessment. Competence in neurocognitive assessment is important in the evaluation of all neurological patients as an integral part of the neurological examination. Attendees should derive greater confidence in how to perform a neurocognitive assessment and how to interpret it. The presentation will be didactic with clinical material. Audience participation is encouraged. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to discuss basic cognitive-brain relationships, know how to assess them in the clinic and bedside using neurocognitive techniques, know the nature and application of mental status scales, and know when to obtain neuropsychological tests and how to interpret the results or reports. AAN.com/view/AM18 37

Aging and Dementia

H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge


Program Descriptions Lecture/Faculty: }} Basic Principles of Mental Status Testing Mario F. Mendez, MD, PhD, FAAN, Los Angeles, CA }} Basics of Memory and Language Examination Bradford Dickerson, MD, Charlestown, MA Core Competencies:  Patient Care, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Plenary Session Wednesday, April 25, 2018 9:15 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Frontiers in Neuroscience Plenary Session Topics:

Sleep; MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease; Aging, Dementia, Cognitive, and Behavioral Neurology; General Neurology; Neuro-rehabilitation; Child Neurology and Developmental Neurology Moderator: Paul M. George, MD, PhD, MSE, Stanford, CA

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9:35 a.m.–9:55 a.m. }} Does Connectomics Make Sense? Jeff Lichtman, MD, PhD, Cambridge, MA

Course Wednesday, April 25, 2018 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C144 Neurology Update I: Epilepsy, Behavioral Neurology, and Neurologic Infections

Topics:

General Neurology; Aging, Dementia, Cognitive, and Behavioral Neurology; Epilepsy/Clinical Neurophysiology (EEG); Infectious Disease Director: Ralph F. Józefowicz, MD, FAAN, Rochester, NY

J

See complete course description on page 82 »

38 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

Aging, Dementia, Cognitive, and Behavioral Neurology

Course Wednesday, April 25, 2018 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C145 Severe TBI: From ICU to Rehabilitation Topics:

Neuro-rehabilitation; Aging, Dementia, Cognitive, and Behavioral Neurology; Neuro Trauma, Critical Care, and Sports Neurology Director: Susanne Muehlschlegel, MD, MPH, Worcester, MA

J

See complete course description on page 167 »

Course Wednesday, April 25, 2018 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C146 Non-Alzheimer’s Dementia I: Frontotemporal Dementias

Topic: Aging, Dementia, Cognitive, and Behavioral Neurology Director: Gil Dan Rabinovici, MD, San Francisco, CA

J

Program Description: Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) defines a family of disorders that are characterized clinically by progressive changes in social-emotional function (behavioral-variant, bvFTD) or language (non-fluent/agrammatic or semantic variants of primary progressive aphasia, PPA), in the setting of degeneration of the frontal and anterior temporal lobes. FTD is as common as Alzheimer’s disease (AD) in patients presenting with an early-onset dementia (under age 65), and familiarity with the syndromes can help neurologists advise on heritability, prognosis and appropriate treatment. Faculty will present a case-based approach to introduce the diverse clinical presentations of these disorders, and provide an update on biomarker development and advances in understanding the genetic and molecular underpinnings of these disorders. This program complements C161: Non-Alzheimer’s Dementia II: Lewy Body Dementias and Other Parkinsonian Dementias, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to apply up-to-date clinical criteria and diagnostic tools to classify the different subtypes of bvFTD and PPA, and differentiate these disorders from atypical presentations of AD. Improving clinical diagnosis and in vivo prediction of molecular pathology is critical in preparation for emerging disease-specific therapies for these disorders. Lecture/Faculty: }} Behavioral-Variant Frontotemporal Dementia Gil Dan Rabinovici, MD, San Francisco, CA }} Primary Progressive Aphasia Faculty Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, Psychiatrist

Scientific Platform Session

Teaching Style:  Didactic, Interactive, Case-Based, Audience Participation CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, Psychiatrist, Geriatrician

Wednesday, April 25, 2018 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

S33

Topic:

Behavioral Neurology Platform Session Aging, Dementia, Cognitive, and Behavioral Neurology

G

Course Wednesday, April 25, 2018 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

C161 Non-Alzheimer’s Dementia II: Lewy

Body Dementias and Other Parkinsonian Dementias

Topic: Aging, Dementia, Cognitive, and Behavioral Neurology Director: Gil Dan Rabinovici, MD, San Francisco, CA

J

Program Description: Occasionally lumped as "Parkinson’s Plus" syndromes, Lewy bodydisease (DLB), multiple systems atrophy (MSA), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), and corticobasal syndrome (CBS) are associated with distinct clinical and pathological features, differential responses to dopamine therapy, and differential sensitivity to neuroleptics and other agents. Furthermore, in addition to the movement disorder, all these diseases are associated with cognitive, behavioral, and systemic symptoms that provide unique challenges for clinicians and caregivers. Faculty will provide a case-based approach to introduce the clinical characteristics of these disorders and provide up-to-date recommendations on clinical management, as well as an update on biomarker development and advances in unraveling the pathophysiology and developing diseasespecific therapeutics. This program complements C146: Non-Alzheimer’s Dementia I: Frontotemporal Dementias, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to apply up-to-date clinical criteria and current evidence to diagnose and treat DLB, MSA, PSP, and CBS. Lecture/Faculty: }} Alpha-synucleinopathies: Parkinson’s, Lewy Body, and Multiple System Atrophy Bradley F. Boeve, MD, Rochester, MN }} Tauopathies: Progressive Supranuclear Palsy and Corticobasal Degeneration Anthony E. Lang, MD, FAAN, Toronto, ON, Canada Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care

Course Thursday, April 26, 2018

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

C181 Preventive Neurology: How Neurologists Can Improve Outcomes That Matter to Patients

Topic: Aging, Dementia, Cognitive, and Behavioral Neurology Director: Joel Armando Salinas, MD, Boston, MA

J

Program Description: Age-related neurologic diseases, such as stroke and dementia, are commonly encountered in neurology practice. Faculty will provide a review of established risk and protective factors as well as an update regarding evidence-based organizational, social, and behavioral interventions that can modify these factors and potentially have favorable impact on patient’s quality of life, as well as long-term patient-centered disease outcomes, especially in chronic neurologic conditions where no therapeutic interventions exist. This course will feature practical tools for risk modification and novel recommendations for organizational and behavioral interventions at the individual and population level. Upon Completion: Participants will become familiar with current evidence-based recommendations for assessment of modifiable risk factors for age-related neurologic disease and established and proposed mechanisms by which these factors influence disease risk, independent functioning, and patient-centered outcomes such as quality of life; learn implementation strategies for managing risk factors at the individual level; understand recommendations and strategies for managing risk factors at the community or population level, including health policy implications and financial accountability; and identify research gaps and future directions. Lecture/Faculty: }} Introduction and Overview of Population-based Studies for the Evaluation of Primary Prevention of Neurologic Disease Joel Armando Salinas, MD, Boston, MA }} Modifiable Risk Factors for Age-related Neurologic Disease: Overview of Evidence Joel Armando Salinas, MD, Boston, MA }} Modifiable Risk Factors for Age-related Disease: Organizational Implementation Strategies Marie E. Pasinski, MD, Nahant, MA }} Social and Behavioral Interventions for Improved Brain Health Joel Armando Salinas, MD, Boston, MA

AAN.com/view/AM18 39

Aging and Dementia

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University


Program Descriptions Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, PracticeBased Learning and Improvement, Systems-Based Practice Teaching Style:  Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Course Thursday, April 26, 2018

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C184 Behavioral Neurology I: Network Anatomy of Behavior and Language

Topic: Aging, Dementia, Cognitive, and Behavioral Neurology Director: Maria Gorno Tempini, MD, PhD, San Francisco, CA

J

Program Description: Identification of structure-function relationships in the brain has been an important goal of behavioral neurology. Many new methodologies, studying both healthy controls and neurologically impaired individuals, have recently provided new insights into the networks of brain regions that underlie specific tasks or functions. Faculty will illustrate the contributions of a variety of modalities toward understanding the neural correlates of behavior and language functions. A cognitive neuroscience perspective will inform discussion of the component processes and brain systems subserving these behaviors. An efficient approach to the evaluation of patients with cognitive and behavioral disorders, including dementia and stroke, will be reviewed. This program complements C198: Behavioral Neurology II: Memory and Attention, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to describe strengths and weaknesses of a variety of approaches (e.g., neuroimaging methods) toward identifying structure-function relationships; be able to describe some recent insights into the neural bases of executive function, social behavior, speech, and language; be able to describe the component processes of these cognitive abilities using a contemporary cognitive neuroscience perspective; and increase their sophistication in understanding the neurobehavioral assessment of patients with behavioral and cognitive neurologic disorders, including dementias. Lecture/Faculty: }} Network Anatomy of Behavior and Emotion Virginia Sturm, PhD, San Francisco, CA }} Network Anatomy of Speech and Language Maria Gorno Tempini, MD, PhD, San Francisco, CA Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, PracticeBased Learning and Improvement Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic, Audience Participation CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee 40 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

Aging, Dementia, Cognitive, and Behavioral Neurology

Course Thursday, April 26, 2018

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C193 Assessment of Rapidly Progressive

Dementias I: Overview, Prion Diseases, and Antibody-Mediated Rapidly Progressive Dementia

Topic: Aging, Dementia, Cognitive, and Behavioral Neurology Director: Michael D. Geschwind, MD, PhD, San Francisco, CA

J

Program Description: Rapidly progressive dementia (RPD) can be challenging to diagnose. The differential diagnosis is broad and includes many potentially reversible conditions. As many RPD are treatable if addressed early, quick diagnosis is important. Through presentation of common and challenging cases, faculty will review the differential diagnosis of RPD, the approach, and management strategies. This session will focus on prion and antibody-mediated disorders. This program complements C208: Assessment of Rapidly Progressive Dementias II: Neurodegenerative and Infections Presenting as Rapidly Progressive Dementia, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be familiar with the differential diagnosis of prion and antibody-mediated causes of RPD and the clinical presentation and evaluation of the more common conditions. Lecture/Faculty: }} Assessment of Rapidly Progressive Dementias: Introduction and Prion Diseases Michael D. Geschwind, MD, PhD, San Francisco, CA }} Assessment of Rapidly Progressive Dementias: Antibodymediated Encephalopathies Steven Vernino, MD, PhD, FAAN, Dallas, TX Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

Course Thursday, April 26, 2018

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

C198 Behavioral Neurology II: Memory and Attention

Topic: Aging, Dementia, Cognitive, and Behavioral Neurology Director: Maria Gorno Tempini, MD, PhD, San Francisco, CA

J

Program Description: Identification of structure-function relationships in the brain has been an important goal of behavioral neurology. Many new methodologies, studying both healthy controls and neurologically impaired individuals, have recently provided new insights into the networks of brain regions that underlie specific tasks or functions. Faculty will illustrate the contributions of a variety of modalities toward understanding the neural correlates of memory and praxis. A cognitive neuroscience perspective will inform discussion of the component processes and brain systems subserving these behaviors. An efficient approach to the evaluation of patients with cognitive and behavioral disorders, including dementia, will be reviewed. This program complements C184: Behavioral Neurology I: Network Anatomy of Behavior and Language, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to describe strengths and weaknesses of a variety of approaches (e.g., neuroimaging methods) toward identifying structure-function relationships; be able to describe some recent insights into the neural bases of memory and praxis; be able to describe the component processes of these cognitive abilities using a contemporary cognitive neuroscience perspective; and increase their sophistication in understanding the neurobehavioral assessment of patients with behavioral and cognitive neurologic disorders, including dementias and stroke. Lecture/Faculty: }} Memory: Systems, Abilities, and Deficits Faculty }} Two Routes to Skilled Action in the Healthy and Damaged Brain Faculty Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Trainee, Specialist Neurologist, General Neurologist

Course Thursday, April 26, 2018

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

C208 Assessment of Rapidly Progressive

Dementias II: Neurodegenerative Diseases and Infections Presenting as Rapidly Progressive Dementia

Topic: Aging, Dementia, Cognitive, and Behavioral Neurology Director: Michael D. Geschwind, MD, PhD, San Francisco, CA

J

Program Description: Rapidly progressive dementia (RPD) can be challenging to diagnose. The differential diagnosis is broad and includes many potentially reversible conditions. As many RPD are treatable if addressed early, quick diagnosis is important. Through presentation of common and challenging cases, faculty will review the differential diagnosis of RPD, the approach, and management strategies. This session will focus on neurodegenerative disorders and infections (mostly subacute or chronic) that can present as RPD. This program complements C193: Assessment of Rapidly Progressive Dementias I: Overview, Prion Diseases, and AntibodyMediated Rapidly Progressive Dementia. Upon Completion: Participants should be familiar with the differential diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases and infectious causes of RPD and the clinical presentation and evaluation of the more common conditions. Lecture/Faculty: }} Neurodegenerative Diseases Presenting as Rapidly Progressive Dementia Bradley F. Boeve, MD, Rochester, MN }} Infectious Causes of Rapidly Progressive Dementia Allen J. Aksamit, Jr., MD, FAAN, Rochester, MN Core Competencies:  Practice-Based Learning and Improvement, Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Didactic, Interactive, Audience Participation, CaseBased, Panel Discussion CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Advanced Practice Provider, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

AAN.com/view/AM18 41

Aging and Dementia

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University


Program Descriptions

Aging, Dementia, Cognitive, and Behavioral Neurology

Course

Course

Thursday, April 26, 2018

6:30 p.m.–9:30 p.m.

C215 Case Studies in Behavioral Neurology:

Focus on Frontotemporal Degeneration

Friday, April 27, 2018

C219 The Early-Onset Dementias

Topic: Aging, Dementia, Cognitive, and Behavioral Neurology Director: Mario F. Mendez, MD, PhD, FAAN, Los Angeles, CA

Topic: Aging, Dementia, Cognitive, and Behavioral Neurology Director: Daniel Kaufer, MD, FAAN, Chapel Hill, NC

J

Program Description: Faculty will use case-based, didactic, and interactive teaching methods to illustrate a comprehensive approach to diagnosing and treating the spectrum of disorders associated with frontotemporal degeneration (FTD). Case studies will highlight the core features and differential diagnosis of FTD-spectrum disorders, and didactic material will support discussion of different pathophysiological substrates, associated movement disorders, brain imaging, genetic testing, and comprehensive management strategies. Upon Completion: Participants should enhance their expertise in recognizing and managing FTD-related disorders and improve clinical assessment skills in cognitive, behavioral, and motor areas; enhance knowledge regarding appropriate use of diagnostic brain imaging and genetic testing, when indicated; and be able to employ a comprehensive therapeutic strategy based on current empirical approaches and an understanding of potential future therapies. Lecture/Faculty: }} Overview / Cases of FTD-PPA Spectrum Daniel Kaufer, MD, FAAN, Chapel Hill, NC }} Overview / Cases of PSP-CBD Spectrum Irene Litvan, MD, FAAN, La Jolla, CA }} Overview / Cases of bvFTD Spectrum Faculty }} Case Presentations Daniel Kaufer, MD, FAAN, Chapel Hill, NC Irene Litvan, MD, FAAN, La Jolla, CA Howard J. Rosen, MD, San Francisco, CA Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, PracticeBased Learning and Improvement, Systems-Based Practice

J

Program Description: This program will cover current knowledge and recommended practice for early-onset dementias (EODs). The emphasis will be on how EODs differ from the usual late-onset dementias and why they need to be distinguished. There are a tremendous number of differences that need to be discussed and understood. One is the unexpected presentations of these disorders, often misdiagnosed with delays in proper management. For example, there are variant cognitive phenotypes of AD in early life; there are many variants of the FTD spectrum disorders, as well; many other cognitive and behavioral conditions must be considered, as well. This program will also cover the unique aspects of management of these disorders. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to recognize early-onset dementias and their variable presentations, formulate a differential diagnosis, know when to use and apply new biomarkers and genetic tests, and be able to apply management strategies applicable to early-onset dementias. Lecture/Faculty: }} Early-Onset Dementias and Alzheimer Variants Mario F. Mendez, MD, PhD, FAAN, Los Angeles, CA }} The Frontotemporal Degenerations Murray Grossman, MD, FAAN, Philadelphia, PA Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, PracticeBased Learning and Improvement Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  3 Recommended Audience:  Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Experiential Learning Area Friday, April 27, 2018

12:00 p.m.–12:45 p.m.

Outsmart Stress Topic: Aging, Dementia, Cognitive, and Behavioral Neurology Speaker: Marie E. Pasinski, MD, Nahant, MA Experiential Learning Area: Live Well

EC

Program Description: Evidence implicating social and behavioral influences, such as social isolation, with higher risk of stroke, cognitive dysfunction, and 42 2018 AAN Annual Meeting


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

accumulation of Alzheimer’s disease pathology suggests that healthy cognitive aging may be heavily influenced by social relationships, a largely unexplained modifiable risk factor that represents the combined effect of distinct functional (social support) and structural (social network) elements. We will examine the existing evidence supporting this association and discuss challenges and opportunities in its study.

Core Competencies:  Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Trainee

Scientific Platform Session Friday, April 27, 2018

S47

Topic:

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Aging and Dementia Platform Session Aging, Dementia, Cognitive, and Behavioral Neurology

G

Course Friday, April 27, 2018

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C227 Behavioral Neurology: A Case-based Approach

Topic: Aging, Dementia, Cognitive, and Behavioral Neurology Director: A. M. Barrett, MD, FAAN, West Orange, NJ

J

Program Description: Accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment in behavioral neurology requires the development of specialized localization skills, similar to other subspecialties in neurology. Clinical cases of cognitive and behavioral decline will be presented as though in the clinical setting using actual patient video, with course participants guiding the clinical history and focused exam, generating a differential diagnosis , reviewing relevant data, and formulating a treatment plan via the audience response system. Faculty will highlight salient features in the cases and describe important techniques in the history and exam to optimize time spent with similar patients. Current evidence regarding diagnostic tools, accuracy of diagnosis, and treatments will also be discussed. Cases will represent atypical, non-Alzheimer’s dementia and dementia accompanying other neurological disorders. Upon Completion: Participants should be familiar with evaluation and differential diagnosis in behavioral neurology, including bedside mental status screening, neuroimaging, and genetic testing in patients who present for evaluation of cognitive decline. Lecture/Faculty: }} Case I Presentation: Frontotemporal Degenerations Mario F. Mendez, MD, PhD, FAAN, Los Angeles, CA }} Case II Presentation Faculty

Course Friday, April 27, 2018

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

C238 Memory Disorders: A Case-based Approach Topic: Aging, Dementia, Cognitive, and Behavioral Neurology Director: David A. Wolk, MD, Philadelphia, PA

J

Program Description: Memory loss is almost certainly the most common presenting cognitive complaint encountered by neurologists and internists in clinical practice. However, the underlying cognitive impairment may be quite disparate, reflecting the multiple memory systems that can dysfunction. Even within a particular type of memory (e.g., episodic memory), qualitative differences in the nature of the impairment may be due to disruption of different underlying component processes. As these systems and subprocesses have unique functional neuroanatomical underpinnings, identification has localizing value which ultimately assists in determining the etiology. Faculty will present cases to highlight practical approaches to the history and examination to make these distinctions and discuss use of ancillary studies and available therapeutic interventions. Upon Completion: Participants should develop a framework for the evaluation of patients with memory disorders with a particular focus on discriminating different types of memory failures and their implication for the underlying brain "lesion" and diagnosis. Lecture/Faculty: }} Differential Diagnosis of Episodic Memory Failures: Case Presentations Andrew E. Budson, MD, Boston, MA }} Clinical Assessment of Memory Loss: Case Presentations David A. Wolk, MD, Philadelphia, PA Core Competencies:  Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Trainee

AAN.com/view/AM18 43

Aging and Dementia

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University


Cerebrovascular Disease and Interventional Neurology Overview

L

ook for countless opportunities to learn the very latest in the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of stroke and related diseases—from high-level overviews to more complex cases. The latest education and science will cover imaging, telestroke, lesions, and issues encountered in the ICU. A “Best Of” scientific session will highlight some of the top findings. Saturday, April 21

Wednesday, April 25

1:30 p.m.–3:30 p.m. C22  Stroke in Young Adults and Women

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C151  Cerebrovascular Disease III: Update on Neuroimaging Modalities and Endovascular Therapies for Acute Ischemic Stroke

Sunday, April 22 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C30  Controversies in Stroke Treatment and Prevention 8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. S1  “Best of” Session: Cerebrovascular Disease 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. S9  Cerebrovascular Disease and Interventional Neurology Platform Session

Monday, April 23 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C66  Update on Medical Management of Stroke 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. S13  Cerebrovascular Disease and Interventional Neurology Platform Session 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C78  Therapeutic Temperature Modulation in the ICU

Tuesday, April 24 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. S19  Cerebrovascular Disease and Interventional Neurology Platform Session 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C116  Cerebrovascular Disease I: Prevention 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C129  Cerebrovascular Disease II: Update on Guidance-Based Diagnosis and Management of Hemorrhagic Stroke

44 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C166  Cerebrovascular Disease IV: Telestroke

Thursday, April 26 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. S39  Cerebrovascular Disease and Interventional Neurology Platform Session 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C185  Neurology Update III: Neuromuscular, Headache, and Stroke 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C194  Spanish Symposium: Update on Stroke Therapy 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C203  Endovascular Treatment of Acute Stroke and Cerebrovascular Disease

Friday, April 27 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C217  Current Management of Incidental and Asymptomatic Cerebrovascular Lesions 3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m. X  Ask Us Anything: Expert Panel on Stroke 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. S52  Cerebrovascular Disease and Interventional Neurology Platform Session


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

Course Saturday, April 21, 2018

C22

1:30 p.m.–3:30 p.m.

Stroke in Young Adults and Women

Topics:

Cerebrovascular Disease and Interventional Neurology; Child Neurology and Developmental Neurology Director: Aneesh B. Singhal, MD, FAAN, Boston, MA

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Program Description: Faculty will review the incidence, risk factors, mechanisms, outcomes, and long-term impact after stroke in young adults and women. The program will focus on ischemic stroke; cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, hemorrhagic strokes, and pediatric/neonatal stroke will not be addressed given time constraints. Special emphasis will be given to cerebral arteriopathies such as dissection, vasculitis, and the reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndromes, as well as hormonal risk factors. We will address the unique multi-disciplinary needs of young adults and women with stroke. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to promptly recognize stroke in the young, develop cost-effective diagnostic strategies, deliver appropriate evidence-based acute/preventive treatment, and effectively manage the long-term consequences of stroke in young adults and women. Lecture/Faculty: }} Arterial and Cardiac Causes Aneesh B. Singhal, MD, FAAN, Boston, MA }} Hormones and Hypercoagulable States Cheryl Bushnell, MD, MHS, Winston Salem, NC Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, SystemsBased Practice, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive

abreast of advances in the field is a challenge. Several recent clinical trials will have substantial impact on stroke therapy. However, in some areas, the published data are conflicting, and there are numerous remaining questions leading to controversy regarding optimal management. Faculty will present a succinct, up-to-date, evidence-based approach to the comprehensive management of acute cerebral infarction and long-term stroke risk reduction. When an approach is unclear or unproven, faculty will discuss their experience with particular strategies. Presentations will provide concise, useful information that may be directly applied to the participant’s practice. Discussions will include common yet challenging scenarios in stroke management. The session will provide ample opportunity for participants to ask questions or present their own cases to the faculty. Upon Completion: Participants should be knowledgeable about the optimal management of acute cerebral infarction, including patient selection for thrombolytic treatment, endovascular therapy, and surgical interventions; and develop a logical framework for implementing various long-term vascular risk reduction strategies, including selection of antithrombotic agents, lipid modifiers, antihypertensive therapies, closure of PFO, and revascularization procedures. Lecture/Faculty: }} Controversies in Acute Stroke Treatment Steven R. Messé, MD, FAAN, FAHA, Philadelphia, PA }} Controversies in Stroke Prevention Koto Ishida, MD, New York, NY Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, PracticeBased Learning and Improvement Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, Advanced Practice Provider

CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Course Sunday, April 22, 2018

C30

Controversies in Stroke Treatment and Prevention

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Program Description: The management of patients with acute ischemic stroke and strategies for stroke prevention continue to evolve rapidly. Keeping

Sunday, April 22, 2018

S1

Topic:

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

“Best of” Session: Cerebrovascular Disease Cerebrovascular Disease and Interventional Neurology

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7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Topic: Cerebrovascular Disease and Interventional Neurology Director: Steven R. Messé, MD, FAAN, FAHA, Philadelphia, PA

Scientific Platform Session

Scientific Platform Session Sunday, April 22, 2018

S9 Topic:

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Cerebrovascular Disease and Interventional Neurology Platform Session Cerebrovascular Disease and Interventional Neurology

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AAN.com/view/AM18 45

Cerebrovascular

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University


Program Descriptions

Cerebrovascular Disease and Interventional Neurology

Course

Scientific Platform Session

Monday, April 23, 2018

C66

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Update on Medical Management of Stroke

Topic: Cerebrovascular Disease and Interventional Neurology Director: Natalia Sana Rost, MD, MPH, FAAN, Boston, MA

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Program Description: For patients presenting with signs and symptoms of acute stroke, the window for diagnosis and intervention is narrow and treatment options are often limited. This program is designed to address the challenges in management of acute stroke and to provide attendees with the essential set of skills for rapid clinical decision-making that is based on the latest advances in cerebrovascular disease. Critical milestones in the management timeline of acute stroke and resources necessary to deliver best practices in stroke care will be outlined. Upon Completion: Participants should be familiar with the latest advances in medical management of acute stroke, including the best practices in selecting patients for thrombolytic and antithrombotic agent use; management of fluctuating neurological exam and hyperacute stroke complications; referral for early endovascular and surgical interventions; and resource utilization (such as TeleStroke and advanced neuroimaging) to guide precision-diagnosis and management options that are known to improve stroke outcomes. Lecture/Faculty: }} Hyperacute Stroke: All That On-Call Neurologists Need to Know Natalia Sana Rost, MD, MPH, FAAN, Boston, MA }} Beyond Thrombolytics: Medical Management of Acute Stroke and Its Early Complications Jose Biller, MD, FAAN, FACP, FAHA, Maywood, IL }} Difficult Decision-Making in Acute Stroke: Tools and Resources for Management of Unstable Patients Natalia Sana Rost, MD, MPH, FAAN, Boston, MA }} Special Cases in Acute Stroke: Challenging the Norm Jose Biller, MD, FAAN, FACP, FAHA, Maywood, IL Core Competencies:  Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Patient Care, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement Teaching Style:  Didactic, Audience Participation, Case-Based, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Monday, April 23, 2018

S13 Topic:

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Cerebrovascular Disease and Interventional Neurology Platform Session Cerebrovascular Disease and Interventional Neurology

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Course Monday, April 23, 2018

C78

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Therapeutic Temperature Modulation in the ICU

Topic: Cerebrovascular Disease and Interventional Neurology Director: Stephan A. Mayer, MD, Detroit, MI

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Program Description: Therapeutic temperature modulation (TTM) is an essential therapy for minimizing brain injury in the ICU. Faculty will review the latest technology, data, and protocols for TTM in the treatment of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury after cardiac arrest, elevated intracranial pressure, and neurogenic fever; explain how to minimize complications from TTM; and describe the implications of TTM on prognostication after severe brain injury. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to know when TTM is indicated and when it is not, employ ICU-based protocols and algorithms for the safe and efficient application of TTM, and understand the impact of TTM on neurological recovery and prognostication. Lecture/Faculty: }} How to Cool in the ICU Neeraj Badjatia, MD, Baltimore, MD }} TTM for Cardiac Arrest Stephan A. Mayer, MD, Detroit, MI }} TTM For Fever Control David M. Greer, MD, FAAN, Boston, MA }} TTM for Trauma and ICP Neeraj Badjatia, MD, Baltimore, MD }} Emerging Indications: Sepsis, Stroke, and Status David M. Greer, MD, FAAN, Boston, MA }} Prognostication in the Era of TTM Stephan A. Mayer, MD, Detroit, MI Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

46 2018 AAN Annual Meeting


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

Tuesday, April 24, 2018

S19 Topic:

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Cerebrovascular Disease and Interventional Neurology Platform Session Cerebrovascular Disease and Interventional Neurology

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Course Tuesday, April 24, 2018

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C116 Cerebrovascular Disease I: Prevention

Topic: Cerebrovascular Disease and Interventional Neurology Director: Larry B. Goldstein, MD, FAAN, FAHA, Lexington, KY

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Program Description: Faculty will cover specific, rotating topics related to the prevention of a first or recurrent stroke, including changing epidemiology and lifestyle modifications, platelet antiaggregants, and patent foramen ovale. There will be ample time for discussion and questions. This program complements C129: Cerebrovascular Disease II: Update on Guidance-Based Diagnosis and Management of Hemorrhagic Stroke, C151: Cerebrovascular Disease III: Update on Neuroimaging Modalities and Endovascular Therapies for Acute Ischemic Stroke, and C166: Cerebrovascular Disease IV: Telestroke. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to discuss recent changes in stroke epidemiology, recommend appropriate lifestyle changes for stroke prevention, understand the indications and choice of platelet antiaggregants, and discuss risks and benefits of closure of a patent foramen ovale in patients with cryptogenic stroke. Lecture/Faculty: }} Changing Epidemiology and Importance of Lifestyle Larry B. Goldstein, MD, FAAN, FAHA, Lexington, KY }} Platelet Antiaggregants for Stroke Prevention Larry B. Goldstein, MD, FAAN, FAHA, Lexington, KY }} Patent Foramen Ovale in the Setting of Cryptogenic Stroke Steven R. Messé, MD, FAAN, FAHA, Philadelphia, PA Core Competencies:  Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Patient Care, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement Teaching Style:  Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Course Tuesday, April 24, 2018

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

C129 Cerebrovascular Disease II: Update on

Guidance-Based Diagnosis and Management of Hemorrhagic Stroke

Topic: Cerebrovascular Disease and Interventional Neurology Director: Philip B. Gorelick, MD, MPH, FAAN, Grand Rapids, MI

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Program Description: Intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) is frequently encountered by neurologists in practice. Proper diagnostic and management skills are necessary as ICH is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. In this course a case-based approach to ICH will be emphasized. Two major types of ICH, subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and intraparenchymal hemorrhage (IPH), will be featured. A case presentation will be followed by guideline-based information regarding diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of SAH and IPH. This program complements C116: Cerebrovascular Disease I: Prevention, C151: Cerebrovascular Disease III: Update on Neuroimaging Modalities and Endovascular Therapies for Acute Ischemic Stroke, and C166: Cerebrovascular Disease IV: Telestroke, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to properly diagnose, manage, and prevent subarachnoid hemorrhage and intraparenchymal according to major guideline statements. New study data that may influence every day neurologic practice also will be discussed. Lecture/Faculty: }} Diagnosis and Management of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Venkatesh Aiyagari, MD, Dallas, TX }} Diagnosis and Management of Intraparenchymal Hemorrhage Andrew M. Naidech, MD, FAAN, Chicago, IL Core Competencies:  Patient Care, Medical Knowledge Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Trainee, Pharmacist, Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist

Course Wednesday, April 25, 2018 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C151 Cerebrovascular Disease III: Update on

Neuroimaging Modalities and Endovascular Therapies for Acute Ischemic Stroke

Topic: Cerebrovascular Disease and Interventional Neurology Director: Philip B. Gorelick, MD, MPH, FAAN, Grand Rapids, MI

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Cerebrovascular

Scientific Platform Session


Program Descriptions

Cerebrovascular Disease and Interventional Neurology

Program Description: Since the approval of intravenous (IV) alteplase and the clearance of mechanical clot retrieval devices for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke (AIS), stroke management has substantially changed. Through case-based presentations, faculty will facilitate discussion of indications for IV alteplase, how neuroimaging may help select patients for AIS therapies, and update the use of endovascular interventions.

and Management of Hemorrhagic Stroke, C151: Cerebrovascular Disease III: Update on Neuroimaging Modalities and Endovascular Therapies for Acute Ischemic Stroke.

This program complements C116: Cerebrovascular Disease I: Prevention, C129: Cerebrovascular Disease II: Update on Guidancebased Diagnosis and Management of Hemorrhagic Stroke, and C166: Cerebrovascular Disease IV: Telestroke, but covers independent topics.

Lecture/Faculty: }} Introduction: The Current State of Telestroke Eric Anderson, MD, PhD, Gulfport, FL }} Telestroke Quality, Integration, and Limitations Lawrence R. Wechsler, MD, FAAN, Pittsburgh, PA }} The Economics of Telestroke Bart M. Demaerschalk, MD, MSc, FRCPC, Phoenix, AZ Core Competencies:  Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement, Professionalism, Systems-Based Practice

Upon Completion: Participants should be able to identify indications for intravenous alteplase in acute ischemic stroke treatment, apply neuroimaging modalities to select patients for acute ischemic stroke treatment, and be familiar with indications for endovascular interventions. Lecture/Faculty: }} Indications for Intravenous Alteplase Philip B. Gorelick, MD, MPH, FAAN, Grand Rapids, MI }} Neuroimaging—the Precision Medicine of Acute Ischemic Stroke David S. Liebeskind, MD, FAAN, Los Angeles, CA }} Update on Endovascular Intervention for Acute Ischemic Stroke Tudor G. Jovin, MD, Pittsburgh, PA Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, Pharmacist

Upon Completion: Participants will understand the scope of technology employed in telestroke across the continuum, the economics that drive stroke care through telemedicine, as well as the concerns and limitations for the appropriate practice of remote stroke care.

Teaching Style:  Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Scientific Platform Session Thursday, April 26, 2018

S39 Topic:

Cerebrovascular Disease and Interventional Neurology Platform Session Cerebrovascular Disease and Interventional Neurology

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Course Wednesday, April 25, 2018 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

C166 Cerebrovascular Disease IV: Telestroke

Topic: Cerebrovascular Disease and Interventional Neurology Director: Eric Anderson, MD, PhD, Gulfport, FL

JI

Program Description: This course will provide a structured education towards the practical incorporation of telestroke into practice. Through case studies presented by physicians already using specific aspects of remote care technology in practice, we will cover the evidence for and clinical applicability of telestroke, telestroke across the care continuum, economics of telestroke, hospital contracting, and reimbursement/financial models. This program complements C116: Cerebrovascular Disease I, C129: Cerebrovascular Disease II: Update on Guidance-Based Diagnosis 48 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Course Thursday, April 26, 2018

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C185 Neurology Update III: Neuromuscular, Headache, and Stroke

Topics:

General Neurology; Cerebrovascular Disease and Interventional Neurology; Headache; Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG) Director: Adam Quick, MD, Columbus, OH

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See complete course description on page 85 »


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

Thursday, April 26, 2018

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C194 Spanish Symposium: Update on Stroke Therapy

Course Thursday, April 26, 2018

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

C203 Endovascular Treatment of Acute Stroke and Cerebrovascular Disease

Topic: Cerebrovascular Disease and Interventional Neurology Director: Carlos S. Kase, MD, FAAN, FAHA, Atlanta, GA

Topic: Cerebrovascular Disease and Interventional Neurology Director: Dileep R. Yavagal, MD, FAAN, Miami, FL

Program Description: Este programa educativo tiene por objeto presentar una actualización de la información sobre la terapia del ictus cerebrovascular. El formato incluye 2 presentaciones sobre el estado actual de la terapia del ictus isquémico y hemorrágico, seguidas por una sesión interactiva de discusión de casos seleccionados por los ponentes o por miembros de la audiencia. Este curso se presentará en español.

Program Description: Endovascular therapy is now the standard of care in conjunction with IV tPA for acute ischemic stroke. This course will discuss the scientific evidence, well as tested clinical protocols for stroke systems of care, and clinical case scenarios to drive home critical learning for the student and practitioner. Faculty will also review rapid advances that have occurred in endovascular therapy to aneurysms, AVMs, and dural AVFistulas. Most notably, faculty will review the most important data including meta-analysis and real-world registry data that have accrued since the landmark RCTs for endovascular mechanical thrombectomy in 2015. Furthermore, faculty will review the indications, safety, and efficacy of several new devices and recent clinical trial data available for endovascular treatment of hemorrhagic CVD. The latest consensus and ongoing trials in the controversial area of carotid stenting and intracranial stenting will also be discussed in detail.

JK

Upon Completion: Los participantes deben familiarizarse con el diagnóstico de la EM, sus imitadores comunes y diversos tratamientos modificadores de la enfermedadque sera presentada en español. Al completar el programa, los participantes debieran estar al día en los aspectos básicos de la terapia del ictus isquémico y hemorrágico, incluyendo la última información relacionada con el manejo neurointervencionista del ictus isquémico agudo, opciones para el tratamiento del ictus relacionado a la presencia de un foramen oval permeable, y manejo de la presión arterial en la etapa inicial del ictus hemorrágico intraparenquimatoso. Lecture/Faculty: }} Spanish: Update on Stroke Therapy Carlos S. Kase, MD, FAAN, FAHA, Atlanta, GA Enrique C. Leira, MD, MS, FAAN, Iowa City, IA Jose Gabriel Romano, MD, FAAN, Miami, FL Core Competencies:  Patient Care Teaching Style:  Didactic, Interactive, Audience Participation, CaseBased CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Neurohospitalist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist

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Upon Completion: Participants will be able to discuss the application of mechanical thrombectomy in AIS as the new standard of care. They will be able to review the latest endovascular techniques for aneurysms, AVMs, and dural AVFs; their indications for application in patients; and scientific evidence from the latest clinical trials. Participants will also be able to discuss how to tailor application of neuroendovascular therapies in individual case scenarios. Lecture/Faculty: }} Mechanical Thrombectomy with IV Thrombolysis: How to Most Effectively Implement the New Standard of Care for Acute LVO Stroke? Dileep R. Yavagal, MD, FAAN, Miami, FL }} Current Imaging Selection in Stroke: Within 6 Hours, Wake-up and Beyond David S. Liebeskind, MD, FAAN, Los Angeles, CA }} Advances in Endovascular Treatment of Brain Aneurysms, AVMs, and Dural AVFs Italo Linfante, MD, Miami, FL }} Current Indications for Carotid and Intracranial Stenting Dileep R. Yavagal, MD, FAAN, Miami, FL Core Competencies:  Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement, Professionalism, Systems-Based Practice Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive, Panel Discussion CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, Stroke, Interventional Neuology

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Cerebrovascular

Course


Program Descriptions

Cerebrovascular Disease and Interventional Neurology

Course

Experiential Learning Area

Friday, April 27, 2018

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

C217 Current Management of Incidental and

Asymptomatic Cerebrovascular Lesions

Topic: Cerebrovascular Disease and Interventional Neurology Director: Seemant Chaturvedi, MD, FAAN, FAHA, Miami, FL

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Program Description: In the past decade, the rate of neuroimaging has soared. Included in this category is both brain and neurovascular imaging. The increase in imaging has led to marked increase in the number of identified patients with asymptomatic or incidental neurovascular conditions. At the current time, there exists considerable controversy in the management of unruptured aneurysms and AVMs. In addition, the surgical treatment of asymptomatic carotid stenosis is receiving renewed scrutiny due to advances in medical therapy. Faculty will review the evaluation and management of these asymptomatic neurovascular conditions. Upon Completion: Participants should become aware of the most recent clinical trial and population-based data pertaining to asymptomatic neurovascular conditions, such as unruptured aneurysms and AVMs, and asymptomatic carotid stenosis; as well as gain an appreciation for which treatments are potentially cost-effective. Participants should also become familiar with recent clinical trials and guidelines related to these conditions. Lecture/Faculty: }} Approach to Unruptured AVMs and Aneurysms Roberta Novakovic, MD, Dallas, TX }} Approach to Asymptomatic Carotid Stenosis Seemant Chaturvedi, MD, FAAN, FAHA, Miami, FL Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

50 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

Friday, April 27, 2018

3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Ask Us Anything: Expert Panel on Stroke Topic: Cerebrovascular Disease and Interventional Neurology Speakers: Natalia Sana Rost, MD, MPH, FAAN, Boston, MA Bart M. Demaerschalk, MD, MSc, FRCPC, Phoenix, AZ Jose Biller, MD, FAAN, FACP, FAHA, Maywood, IL Experiential Learning Area: HeadTalks

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Program Description: This lively interactive session will feature renowned experts in the field of stroke. The audience will be able to ask questions regarding difficult cases or seek opinions on challenges facing stroke sub specialty today.

Scientific Platform Session Friday, April 27, 2018

S52 Topic:

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Cerebrovascular Disease and Interventional Neurology Platform Session Cerebrovascular Disease and Interventional Neurology

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Frontiers in Child Neurology: Cultivating Careers, Networking, and Exploring a Neurologic Disorder Through a Lifespan—Focus on Autism Sunday, April 22

12:30 p.m.–6:00 p.m.

This exciting afternoon starts with a luncheon for medical students, residents, and fellows who are new to the field of child neurology. Afterwards, join leaders in child neurology for a Neuroscience in the Clinic session focused on autism, with presentations covering hot topics in the field to help clinicians have more informed discussions with their patients regarding biomarkers, clinical trials/treatments, and genetics. End the day with a networking reception for child neurologists before heading to the Opening Party.

Highlights

:

Careers in Child Neurology Luncheon— Ask the Experts

Neuroscience in the Clinic: Autism Mythbusters

Co-chairs: Ann H. Tilton, MD, FAAN, and Rujuta Bhatt, MD

Directors: Shafali Jeste, MD, and Sarah Spence, MD, PhD

Medical students and residents who are considering a career as a child neurologist will get a unique opportunity to meet with the experts and have their questions answered regarding a career as a child neurologist. Items discussed will include how different fellowships work, strategies for child neurology research, research funding, careers in child neurology education, and a discussion regarding careers in child neurology in the community. This event is invite only.

Rapid advances in our understanding of the underlying neurobiology of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has prompted more accurate and informed diagnoses, detailed prognostication, and the development of targeted treatment trials. However, these scientific achievements often become overshadowed by community practices that lack evidence or a scientific foundation, leaving patients and caregivers uncertain about best practices. The goal of this

session is to provide neurologists with clinically relevant scientific updates on autism spectrum disorders (ASD), in order to facilitate more informed dialogues with their patients. We will begin with a representative clinical case, followed by three presentations with paired abstracts on key topics in the autism field, including prediction and diagnostic biomarkers, clinical trials and therapeutics, and advances in genetics. Networking Reception The program will conclude with a wine and cheese reception allowing attendees an opportunity to network and talk with presenters.

AAN.com/view/AM18 51


Child Neurology and Developmental Neurology Overview

I

f your schedule won’t allow you to stay for the whole meeting, maximize your time in Los Angeles and get the most out of a shorter trip with this Child Neurology specialty track, with core programming taking place Sunday to Tuesday. In addition, look for education and science covering the full gamut of child neurology topics, including a Presidential Plenary Session presentation on the new treatment for spinal muscular atrophy. And don’t miss the popular Frontiers in Child Neurology program on Sunday, April 22, which will combine scientific research with clinical application. See page 51 » for full details. The program also includes a luncheon for those considering a career in the field and a networking reception. The program was one initiative that developed from an ongoing collaboration between the AAN and the Child Neurology Society. Saturday, April 21

Tuesday, April 24

9:30 a.m.–11:30 a.m. C11  Treatment of Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis in the Current Era

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C110  Neurologic Complications in Adults with Down Syndrome

1:30 p.m.–3:30 p.m. C19  Pediatric Neuro-ophthalmology Update

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C123  Child Neurology: A Case-based Approach

1:30 p.m.–3:30 p.m. C22  Stroke in Young Adults and Women

Wednesday, April 25

Sunday, April 22 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C28  Autism Spectrum Disorders What We Know and Where We Are Going 10:45 a.m.–11:15 a.m. Presidential Plenary Session: Sidney Carter Award in Child Neurology: Spinal Muscular Atrophy Is a Treatable Neurodegenerative Disease 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. N1  Neuroscience in the Clinic: Autism Mythbusters

Monday, April 23 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C64  Child Neurology I: Pediatric Stroke, MS/Autoimmune 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C73  Child Neurology II: Epilepsy and Neuromuscular 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C86  Child Neurology III: Headache, TBI/Post-concussion

52 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C141  Integrating Sleep Medicine Concepts into Your Child Neurology Practice 10:55 a.m.–11:15 a.m. Frontiers in Neuroscience Plenary Session Pediatric MS: A Unique Window into Environmental and Genetic Risk Factors for MS 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. S28  Child Neurology and Developmental Neurology Platform Session 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. S34  Child Neurology and Developmental Neurology Platform Session


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

Course Saturday, April 21, 2018

C11

9:30 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Treatment of Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis in the Current Era

Topics:

MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease; Child Neurology and Developmental Neurology Director: Brenda Banwell, MD, FAAN, Philadelphia, PA

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See complete course description on page 123 »

Course Saturday, April 21, 2018

C19

1:30 p.m.–3:30 p.m.

Pediatric Neuro-ophthalmology Update

Topics:

Neuro-ophthalmology/Neuro-otology; Child Neurology and Developmental Neurology Director: Christopher Glisson, DO, Grand Rapids, MI

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See complete course description on page 159 »

Course Saturday, April 21, 2018

C22

1:30 p.m.–3:30 p.m.

Stroke in Young Adults and Women

Topics:

Cerebrovascular Disease and Interventional Neurology; Child Neurology and Developmental Neurology Director: Aneesh B. Singhal, MD, FAAN, Boston, MA

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See complete course description on page 45 »

Course Sunday, April 22, 2018

C28

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Autism Spectrum Disorders What We Know and Where We Are Going

Topic: Child Neurology and Developmental Neurology Director: Rujuta Rajiv Bhatt, MD, Los Angeles, CA

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Program Description: This program will review diagnosis and treatment of ASD and common medical co-morbidities in ASD. Faculty will emphasize the diagnosis and treatment of neurologic and psychiatric comorbidities. The program will also review recent clinical trials in

ASD and successes and failures of new treatments which are clinically applicable. In addition, faculty will review the utility and interpretation of genetic testing in ASD and recent research advances in the neurobiology of ASD. Faculty will use didactics and/ or case-based approaches for each topic. Each faculty member will highlight the latest research that happened in the last year in their topic of focus. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to better understand the accurate diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), diagnosis and treatment of common medical co-morbidities of ASD, recent clinical trials in ASD and application of new treatments to clinical care, and better understand genetic testing and interpretation in ASD, as well as advances in the neurobiology of ASD. In addition, participants will receive an update on breakthroughs in the field. Lecture/Faculty: }} Overview and Updates on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and Common Medical Comorbidities in ASD Rujuta Rajiv Bhatt, MD, Los Angeles, CA }} Clinical Trials in Autism Spectrum Disorder: Successes and Failures of New Treatments Shafali Jeste, MD, Los Angeles, CA }} Genetic Testing and Interpretation in ASD and Recent Research Advances in the Neurobiology of ASD Julian Martinez, Los Angeles, CA Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, Research Scientist

Plenary Session Sunday, April 22, 2018, 9:15 a.m.–12:00 p.m.

Presidential Plenary Session

Topics: Neuro-oncology; Epilepsy/Clinical Neurophysiology (EEG); Child Neurology and Developmental Neurology; General Neurology; Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG) Moderator: Natalia S. Rost, MD, MPH, FAAN, Boston, MA

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10:45 a.m.–11:15 a.m. }} Sidney Carter Award in Child Neurology: Spinal Muscular Atrophy Is a Treatable Neurodegenerative Disease Richard S. Finkel, MD, Orlando, FL

AAN.com/view/AM18 53

Child Neurology

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University


Program Descriptions

Child Neurology and Developmental Neurology

Neuroscience in the Clinic Session Sunday, April 22, 2018

N1

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Neuroscience in the Clinic: Autism Mythbusters

Topic: Child Neurology and Developmental Neurology Directors: Shafali Jeste, MD, Los Angeles, CA Sarah J. Spence, MD, PhD, Boston, MA

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Program Description: Rapid advances in our understanding of the underlying neurobiology of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has prompted more accurate and informed diagnoses, detailed prognostication, and the development of targeted treatment trials. However, these scientific achievements often become overshadowed by community practices that lack evidence or a scientific foundation, leaving patients and caregivers uncertain about best practices. The goal of this symposium is to provide neurologists with clinically relevant scientific updates on autism spectrum disorders (ASD), in order to facilitate more informed dialogues with their patients. We will begin with a representative clinical case, followed by three presentations with paired abstracts on key topics in the autism field, including prediction and diagnostic biomarkers, clinical trials and therapeutics, and advances in genetics. Upon Completion: Participants should become familiar with insights on early signs of ASD gained from studies of infants at risk for ASD; the definition of a biomarker and an understanding of the types of biomarkers investigated in ASD; challenges around clinical trial design and implementation in ASD; evidence around pharmacological interventions for ASD and updates from clinical drug trials; and updates on autism genetics, from recommended diagnostic practices to implications for management. Lecture/Faculty: }} Clinical Vignette: Autism Spectrum Disorders Sarah J. Spence, MD, PhD, Boston, MA }} Biomarkers of ASD: From Screening to Clinical Stratification to Quantitative Outcomes Shafali Jeste, MD, Los Angeles, CA }} Clinical Trials and Treatments in ASD: What Works and Why Trials Fail Evdokia Anagnastou, MD, Toronto, ON, Canada }} Updates in Autism Genetics: Clinical and Scientific Implications for Precision Medicine Faculty }} Abstract Presentations: (Selected in February 2018) }} Panel Discussion Faculty Core Competencies:  Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement, Professionalism Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee 54 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

Course Monday, April 23, 2018

C64

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Child Neurology I: Pediatric Stroke, MS/ Autoimmune

Topic: Child Neurology and Developmental Neurology Director: Marc C. Patterson, MD, FAAN, FRACP, Rochester, MN

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Program Description: This program focuses on disorders that are frequent and well recognized in adults, but which may be missed and undertreated in children. Stroke in neonates and children is less common than in adults, and its causes and presentations vary. Better diagnostic techniques and standardized treatment protocols have been developed, and will be described. Multiple sclerosis and other immune mediated disorders also occur in children; recent advances in understanding and management of these conditions will be reviewed. This program complements C73: Child Neurology II: Epilepsy and Neuromuscular, and C86: Child Neurology III: Headache, TBI/Postconcussion, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to recognize the presentations and etiology of stroke, MS, and autoimmune disorders throughout childhood, and recommend and interpret appropriate investigations and implement data-driven management strategies. Lecture/Faculty: }} Cardioembolic Stroke in Children and Young Adults: Open for Discussion or Closing Time? Catherine M. Amlie-Lefond, MD, Seattle, WA }} Multiple Sclerosis and Autoimmune Disorders Jan-Mendelt Tillema, MD, Rochester, MN }} Metabolic Mimics of Stroke and Immune-mediated Disorders Marc C. Patterson, MD, FAAN, FRACP, Rochester, MN Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

Monday, April 23, 2018

C73

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Child Neurology II: Epilepsy and Neuromuscular

Topic: Child Neurology and Developmental Neurology Director: Marc C. Patterson, MD, FAAN, FRACP, Rochester, MN

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Program Description: Epilepsy is a common cause of disability in children. Mechanisms of this family of disorders are being elucidated using molecular and electrophysiological tools and will be described, as will the application of these advances in improving diagnosis and offering new approaches to management. Similar approaches have likewise improved our understanding of neuromuscular disease in children, leading to improved diagnosis and management. Key advances will be presented. This program complements C64: Child Neurology I: Pediatric Stroke, MS/Autoimmune and C86: Child Neurology III: Headache, TBI/Postconcussion, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to describe current approaches to diagnosis and management of epilepsy and neuromuscular disease in children, and relate these to advances in basic science.

headache, is better defined. A broad range of treatment options are now available for children afflicted with headache and will be reviewed. Traumatic brain injury and concussion is increasingly recognized as a significant cause of disability in children and adults. The current understanding of these disorders and their management will be reviewed. This program complements C64: Child Neurology I: Pediatric Stroke, MS/Autoimmune, and C73: Child Neurology II: Epilepsy and Neuromuscular, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to diagnose and classify common and less frequent headaches and devices for effective management strategy. They should also be familiar with the current understanding of traumatic brain injury and concussion, and be comfortable managing these disorders in children and adolescents. Lecture/Faculty: }} Episodic Migraine and Episodic Syndromes Associated with Migraine Amy Gelfand, MD, San Francisco, CA }} Chronic Migraine and Other Daily Headache Disorders Kenneth J. Mack, MD, PhD, FAAN, Rochester, MN }} It’s Not Child’s Play: Traumatic Brain Injury and Concussion Christopher Giza, MD, Los Angeles, CA Core Competencies:  Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement

Lecture/Faculty: }} Epilepsy in Children and Adolescents Douglas R. Nordli, Jr., MD, Los Angeles, CA }} Neuromuscular Disease Peter B. Kang, MD, FAAN, Gainesville, FL Core Competencies:  Practice-Based Learning and Improvement, Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Medical Knowledge, Patient Care

Teaching Style:  Case-Based

Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic

C110 Neurologic Complications in Adults with

CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Trainee, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist

Course Monday, April 23, 2018

C86

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Child Neurology III: Headache, TBI/Postconcussion

Topic: Child Neurology and Developmental Neurology Director: Marc C. Patterson, MD, FAAN, FRACP, Rochester, MN

J

Program Description: Headache is one of the most frequent presenting complaints in neurologic and general pediatric practice. The physiological basis of headache is becoming better understood in line with advances in genomics. In parallel, the natural history of childhood headache, particularly chronic

CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Course Tuesday, April 24, 2018

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Down Syndrome

Topics:

Child Neurology and Developmental Neurology; Aging, Dementia, Cognitive, and Behavioral Neurology Director: Andrea L. Gropman, MD, Washington, DC

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Program Description: As individuals with chromosome-based disorders are surviving into adulthood, new challenges and neurological pathologies are being seen. Such is the case for individuals with Down Syndrome (DS). This program will bring together experts to discuss the changes and challenges seen as children with DS progress into adulthood. These changes include mood and cognitive disturbances, motor decline and other health complications that impact quality of life, activities of daily living, and family and community supports. However, there is interest in cognitive stabilization in individuals with developmental disabilities including DS, and updates regarding clinical trials will be discussed. Lastly, in an attempt correlate the clinical findings and biomarkers for trials, an understanding of the biology and pathology of the aging brain in DS will be presented. AAN.com/view/AM18 55

Child Neurology

Course


Program Descriptions

Child Neurology and Developmental Neurology

Upon Completion: Participants should become familiar with the effects of aging on the individual with DS and how that impacts clinical features and care. Participants will also have an appreciation of the biological basis of such changes and recent advances and updates in clinical trials and their effects on this population.

Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, Child Neurologist

Lecture/Faculty: }} Neurological Aspects of Aging in Down Syndrome: From Mouse to Man Andrea L. Gropman, MD, Washington, DC }} Cognitive Stabilizaton in DS and Clinical Trials Update Faculty }} Neuropsychiatric Complications in Adults with DS Ryan Uy, MD, Washington, DC Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care

C141 Integrating Sleep Medicine Concepts into

Teaching Style:  Didactic, Interactive

Course Wednesday, April 25, 2018 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Your Child Neurology Practice

Topics:

Sleep; Child Neurology and Developmental Neurology Director: Suresh Kotagal, MD, FAAN, Rochester, MN

J

See complete course description on page 191 »

Plenary Session

CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, Self Advocate, Family Member, Support Staff, DD Supervisor

Course Tuesday, April 24, 2018

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

C123 Child Neurology: A Case-based Approach Topics:

Child Neurology and Developmental Neurology; Movement Disorders Director: Elaine C. Wirrell, MD, FAAN, Rochester, MN

J

Program Description: The field of child neurology is changing rapidly. Faculty will provide an evidence-based update on recent advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology, diagnostic strategies, and therapies for various neurologic disorders in children, using cases to facilitate discussion. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to identify and implement new breakthroughs in the field of child neurology that impact day-to-day practice, and be able to locate and use new practice guidelines to inform medical decision-making. Lecture/Faculty: }} Cerebrovascular Conundrums Lori L. Billinghurst, MD, Philadelphia, PA }} Neuromuscular Mysteries Jean K. Mah, MD, FRCPC, FAAN, Calgary, AB, Canada }} Enigmas in Epilepsy Elaine C. Wirrell, MD, FAAN, Rochester, MN Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2

56 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

Wednesday, April 25, 2018 9:15 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Frontiers in Neuroscience Plenary Session

Topics: Sleep; MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease; Aging, Dementia, Cognitive, and Behavioral Neurology; General Neurology; Neuro-rehabilitation; Child Neurology and Developmental Neurology Moderator: Paul M. George, MD, PhD, MSE, Stanford, CA

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10:55 a.m.–11:15 a.m. }} Pediatric MS: A Unique Window into Environmental and Genetic Risk Factors for MS Emmanuelle Waubant, MD, FAAN, San Francisco, CA

Scientific Platform Session Wednesday, April 25, 2018 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

S28 Topic:

Child Neurology and Developmental Neurology Platform Session Child Neurology and Developmental Neurology

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Scientific Platform Session Wednesday, April 25, 2018 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

S34 Topic:

Child Neurology and Developmental Neurology Platform Session Child Neurology and Developmental Neurology

G


W

hether you want a high-level overview or a deep dive into complex cases and diagnoses, the Annual Meeting offers countless opportunities to learn the very latest in epilepsy and clinical neurophysiology (EEG). Look for education and science covering topics ranging from epilepsy during pregnancy and in the elderly to epilepsy surgery and treatments for drug-resistant epilepsy. Improve your EEG skills through several course offerings. New this year is a course on epilepsy therapy presented entirely in Spanish. And don’t miss the Presidential Plenary Session presentation on combining patient-derived cell and animal models to uncover epilepsy mechanisms and precision therapies. Saturday, April 21

Wednesday, April 25

12:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m. C17  Neurophysiologic Intraoperative Monitoring Skills Workshop

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C138  Clinical EEG I: Normal EEG, Normal Variants, and How to Avoid The Common Pitfall of Over-reading

Sunday, April 22 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C32  Treatments for Drug-resistant Epilepsy: Surgery, Devices, and Other Updates 10:15 a.m.–10:45 a.m. Presidential Plenary Session: George C. Cotzias Lecture: How Early-Life Experiences Sculpt Your Brain: From Molecules to Circuits 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C42  Acute and Chronic Clinical Epilepsy Update Explained in 6 Cases 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. S8  Epilepsy/Clinical Neurophysiology (EEG) Platform Session

Monday, April 23 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C67  Video EEG: Name That Spell 8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. S10  “Best of” Session: Epilepsy/Clinical Neurophysiology (EEG) Platform Session 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C77  Epilepsy Surgery Update 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. S17  Epilepsy/Clinical Neurophysiology (EEG) Platform Session

Tuesday, April 24 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C96  Status Epilepticus 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C106  Critical Care EEG Monitoring

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C144  Neurology Update I: Epilepsy, Behavioral Neurology, and Neurologic Interactions 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C156  Clinical EEG II: Focal, Diffuse, and Epileptiform Abnormalities in Adults 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C170  Clinical EEG III: Neonatal and Pediatric 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C171  Spanish Symposium: Update on Epilepsy Therapy for Pharmacoresistant Epilepsy

Thursday, April 26 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C172  Clinical Epilepsy I: Basics 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C182  Clinical Epilepsy II: Considerations Across the Age Span Pediatrics, Pregnancy, and Elderly 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C197  Clinical Epilepsy III: Advanced (Status, Beyond AED, Video EEG)

Friday, April 27 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C223  The Burden of Epilepsy: Managing Comorbidities and Quality of Life 1:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m. C234  Epilepsy Skills Workshop: Focus on Treatment 1:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m. X  Live Intraoperative Monitoring 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. S51  Epilepsy/Clinical Neurophysiology (EEG) Platform Session

AAN.com/view/AM18 57

Epilepsy

Epilepsy/Clinical Neurophysiology (EEG) Overview


Program Descriptions

Epilepsy/Clinical Neurophysiology (EEG)

Skills Workshop Saturday, April 21, 2018

C17

12:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Neurophysiologic Intraoperative Monitoring Skills Workshop $ (registration required)

Topic: Epilepsy/Clinical Neurophysiology (EEG) Director: Aatif M. Husain, MD, Durham, NC

J

Program Description: Neurophysiologic intraoperative monitoring (NIOM) uses evoked potentials (EP), electromyography (EMG), and electroencephalography (EEG) to reduce morbidity in many types of surgeries. In this skills workshop, live demonstrations and case presentations will provide participants with an understanding of how NIOM is performed and interpreted. The various stations of this workshop will focus on one type of NIOM modality. A demonstration of how that modality is obtained will be followed by an interactive case-based discussion that will cover interpretation and troubleshooting these modalities. Upon Completion: Participants should be knowledgeable about the types of NIOM that can be performed, technical limitations of monitoring, interpretation principles, and logistics of providing this service in their practice settings. Lecture/Faculty: }} EMG Demo and Cases Gloria Galloway, MD, FAAN, Columbus, OH }} SEP/MEP Demo and Cases Aatif M. Husain, MD, Durham, NC }} BAEP Demo and Cases Jaime R. Lopez, MD, Stanford, CA }} EEG Demo and Cases Marc R. Nuwer, MD, PhD, FAAN, Pacific Palisades, CA Core Competencies:  Practice-Based Learning and Improvement, Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Interactive CME Credits:  4 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, Technologists

Course Sunday, April 22, 2018

C32

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Treatments for Drug-resistant Epilepsy: Surgery, Devices, and Other Updates

Topic: Epilepsy/Clinical Neurophysiology (EEG) Director: Ellen Bubrick, MD, Boston, MA

JI

Program Description: Epilepsy is a common neurologic disorder, and up to a third of patients suffer from drug-resistant disease. This course will define this patient population using the most current classification system, and then focus on available treatment options including surgical resection, devices, and other non-pharmacologic approaches. The discussion of surgery will be broken down into indications for resection with and without invasive monitoring, intracranial monitoring techniques (e.g., subdural electrodes vs. stereo EEG), and the use of laser ablation. The devices section will cover good candidates for vagal nerve stimulators as well as when to consider responsive neuro-stimulation, and current data on the latter. Other available treatments, including data on diet therapies and cannabinoids, will briefly be discussed. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to identify patients with drug-resistant epilepsy, become familiar with current treatment options for this patient population, and know when to refer these patients for surgery or other treatment options. Lecture/Faculty: }} Drug-resistant Epilepsy: What is it? Who has it? How to Treat it? Ellen Bubrick, MD, Boston, MA }} Epilepsy Surgery: Selecting Candidates and Best Approaches for Best Outcomes Gregory D. Cascino, MD, FAAN, Rochester, MN }} Case Studies in Epilepsy Surgery Howard L. Weiner, MD, Houston, TX Core Competencies:  Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement, Professionalism, Systems-Based Practice Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

58 2018 AAN Annual Meeting


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

Sunday, April 22, 2018, 9:15 a.m.–12:00 p.m.

Presidential Plenary Session

Topics: Neuro-oncology; Epilepsy/Clinical Neurophysiology (EEG); Child Neurology and Developmental Neurology; General Neurology; Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG) Moderator: Natalia S. Rost, MD, MPH, FAAN, Boston, MA

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10:15 a.m.–10:45 a.m. }} George C. Cotzias Lecture: How Early-Life Experiences Sculpt Your Brain: From Molecules to Circuits Tallie Z. Baram, MD, PhD, Irvine, CA

Course Sunday, April 22, 2018

C42

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

J

Program Description: Faculty will use a "headline news" approach to highlight important epilepsy clinical information, and a rapid fire, multi-topic case-based approach with video to provide salient pithy updates on numerous epilepsy topics. Topics will include new treatments, and when to use them; how to manage seizure emergencies; the evidence base for the risks and benefits of cannabis in epilepsy patients; how to approach decisions on devices and diagnosing; and treating immune causes of epilepsy. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to list or identify all currently available medication and device treatments for epilepsy; understand the management of acute seizure emergencies; know when to consider immune-based diagnoses and treatments for epilepsy, as well as surgical interventions; know how to counsel on driving laws for epilepsy; and understand where current thought stands on cannabis for epilepsy. Lecture/Faculty: }} Case 1 Joseph I. Sirven, MD, FAAN, Scottsdale, AZ }} Case 2 Matthew T. Hoerth, MD, Phoenix, AZ }} Case 3 Faculty

Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Interactive, Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Pharmacist, Psychologist, Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Trainee

Scientific Platform Session Sunday, April 22, 2018

S8 Topic:

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Epilepsy/Clinical Neurophysiology (EEG) Platform Session Epilepsy/Clinical Neurophysiology (EEG)

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Acute and Chronic Clinical Epilepsy Update Explained in 6 Cases

Topic: Epilepsy/Clinical Neurophysiology (EEG) Director: Joseph I. Sirven, MD, FAAN, Scottsdale, AZ

}} Case 4 Faculty }} Case 5 Joseph I. Sirven, MD, FAAN, Scottsdale, AZ }} Case 6 Matthew T. Hoerth, MD, Phoenix, AZ Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care

Course Monday, April 23, 2018

C67

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Video EEG: Name That Spell

Topics:

Epilepsy/Clinical Neurophysiology (EEG); Movement Disorders Director: Amy Z. Crepeau, MD, Phoenix, AZ

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Program Description: Spells can be difficult to diagnosis in children and adults, as both epileptic and non-epileptic causes need to be considered. Video EEG is often necessary to provide a definitive diagnosis. This course will use a case-based approach to evaluating seizure semiology, and the differential diagnosis of seizure-like spells, using video EEG as a guide. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to identify indications for video EEG monitoring, review the complete differential diagnosis for spells that present in neurology clinic, recognize localizing value of seizure semiology, and consider the diagnosis for both pediatric and adult spells based upon video EEG monitoring. Lecture/Faculty: }} Seizure Semiology Cornelia Drees, MD, Aurora, CO }} Pediatric Spells in the Epilepsy Monitoring Unit Tobias Loddenkemper, MD, Boston, MA }} Adult Spells in the Epilepsy Monitoring Unit Amy Z. Crepeau, MD, Phoenix, AZ AAN.com/view/AM18 59

Epilepsy

Plenary Session


Program Descriptions

Epilepsy/Clinical Neurophysiology (EEG)

Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, PracticeBased Learning and Improvement

Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive

Teaching Style:  Didactic, Interactive, Video Examples, Audience Participation, Case-Based

Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

CME Credits:  2

CME Credits:  2

Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Trainee

Scientific Platform Session Monday, April 23, 2018

S10 Topic:

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

“Best of” Session: Epilepsy/Clinical Neurophysiology (EEG)

Monday, April 23, 2018

S17 Topic:

Epilepsy/Clinical Neurophysiology (EEG)

G

G

Monday, April 23, 2018

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Epilepsy Surgery Update

Topic: Epilepsy/Clinical Neurophysiology (EEG) Director: Stephan Schuele, MD, FAAN, Chicago, IL

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Program Description: Several novel techniques have revolutionized epilepsy surgery in the last five years. Minimal invasive methods of identifying the seizure focus have been paralleled by minimal invasive techniques to ablate or desynchronize the area from which seizures originate. These technologies have changed the landscape of epilepsy surgery offering help to patients who would otherwise not be amenable to surgery. The course will discuss a variety of novel techniques used in epilepsy surgery and discuss criteria in the clinical selection process. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to understand the principles underlying Stereo EEG and how to choose the appropriate method for an individual patient; discuss several approaches to minimally invasive epilepsy surgery; and understand the principles of different stimulation techniques in the treatment of epilepsy and choose the appropriate intervention for individual patients. Lecture/Faculty: }} Stereo EEG Stephan Schuele, MD, FAAN, Chicago, IL }} Minimal Invasive Surgery: Lasers, Gamma Knife, or Electrocoagulation William O. Tatum, IV, DO, FAAN, Jacksonville, FL }} Stimulation Therapy for Epilepsy: RNS, DBS, or VNS Jonathan C. Edwards, MD, Charleston, SC Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care

60 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Epilepsy/Clinical Neurophysiology (EEG) Platform Session

Epilepsy/Clinical Neurophysiology (EEG)

Course

C77

Scientific Platform Session

Course Tuesday, April 24, 2018

C96

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Status Epilepticus

Topic: Epilepsy/Clinical Neurophysiology (EEG) Director: Stephan Schuele, MD, FAAN, Chicago, IL

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Program Description: Status epilepticus (SE) is a true neurologic emergency. In recent years, there has been a wealth of new information changing our practice on the clinical diagnosis, use of EEG, etiology, and treatment for the various phases and forms of SE. This session will provide a comprehensive overview of the evaluation and treatment of SE and update on newest research and clinical trials. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to diagnose status epilepticus in urgent and unusual presentations; integrate clinical and EEG findings to make a correct diagnosis; recognize and treat cases of nonconvulsive status, avoiding both under-recognition and over-treatment; have a command of the utility and practicalities of EEG monitoring in the management of SE in very ill ICU patients; and utilize several more "aggressive" treatments effectively for the most refractory SE cases Lecture/Faculty: }} Classification and Etiology of Status Epilepticus Frank W. Drislane, MD, FAAN, Newton, MA }} Treatment of Early Status Epilepticus Thomas P. Bleck, MD, FAAN, Chicago, IL }} Quantitative EEG and Guidelines for ICU video-EEG Monitoring Lawrence J. Hirsch, MD, FAAN, New Haven, CT }} Treatment of Refractory Status Epilepticus Stephan Schuele, MD, FAAN, Chicago, IL Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

Course

CME Credits:  2

Course Tuesday, April 24, 2018

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C106 Critical Care EEG Monitoring

Wednesday, April 25, 2018 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

C138 Clinical EEG I: Normal EEG, Normal Variants, and How to Avoid The Common Pitfall of Over-reading

Topic: Epilepsy/Clinical Neurophysiology (EEG) Director: Selim R. Benbadis, MD, FAAN, Tampa, FL

J

Topics:

Epilepsy/Clinical Neurophysiology (EEG); Neuro Trauma, Critical Care, and Sports Neurology Director: Suzette M. LaRoche, MD, FAAN, Asheville, NC

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Program Description: This course will review important aspects of continuous EEG (cEEG) monitoring in critically ill patients. This will include a review of clinical indications as well as practical considerations for implementation of cEEG. Interpretation of cEEG in the critically ill presents unique challenges compared to routine EEG, so faculty will explain how to identify seizures and differentiate from other periodic and rhythmic patterns as well as artifacts. Quantitative EEG analysis is being increasingly used for detection of seizures and other acute changes but is relatively new to many neurologists, so faculty will review basic QEEG concepts and clinical use in critically ill patients. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to recognize appropriate patients who may benefit from cEEG monitoring, appreciate the nuanced interpretation of cEEG data and differentiate seizures from other periodic and rhythmic patterns as well as recognize the value and limitations of quantitative analysis of cEEG and apply this to their practice settings. Lecture/Faculty: }} Indications and Practical Aspects Faculty }} Interpretation of Raw EEG Patterns in the Critically Ill Faculty }} Quantitative EEG for Identification of Seizures and Other Acute Changes Sarah E. Schmitt, MD, Charleston, SC Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, PracticeBased Learning and Improvement

Program Description: Faculty will provide an overview of the principles underlying the practice of clinical EEG. The presentations will emphasize aspects that are crucial to reading EEGs in clinical practice. Specific topics will be common normal patterns, normal variants that are commonly over-interpreted, artifacts, and guidance on how to generate meaningful EEG reports. This program complements C156: Clinical EEG II: Focal, Diffuse, and Epileptiform Abnormalities in Adults and C170: Clinical EEG III: Neonatal and Pediatric, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to distinguish normal pattern form abnormalities; avoid common pitfalls, such as misinterpretation of artifacts and normal variants; and generate quality reports. Lecture/Faculty: }} Over-reading EEGs and the Myth of "Phase Reversals" Selim R. Benbadis, MD, FAAN, Tampa, FL }} Artifacts and How to Avoid Overcalling Them Susan T. Herman, MD, FAAN, Boston, MA }} Normal EEG and the Range of Normal John M. Stern, MD, FAAN, Los Angeles, CA }} How to Write EEG Reports Selim R. Benbadis, MD, FAAN, Tampa, FL Core Competencies:  Practice-Based Learning and Improvement, Patient Care, Medical Knowledge Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Trainee, EEG Technologists, General Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist

Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic, Audience Participation CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

AAN.com/view/AM18 61

Epilepsy

Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee


Program Tracks Course Wednesday, April 25, 2018 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C144 Neurology Update I: Epilepsy, Behavioral Neurology, and Neurologic Infections

Topics:

General Neurology; Aging, Dementia, Cognitive, and Behavioral Neurology; Epilepsy/Clinical Neurophysiology (EEG); Infectious Disease Director: Ralph F. Józefowicz, MD, FAAN, Rochester, NY

Epilepsy/Clinical Neurophysiology (EEG) }} EEG Quiz: Normal or Abnormal? Katherine H. Noe, MD, PhD, FAAN, Phoenix, AZ David C. Spencer, MD, FAAN, Portland, OR Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, PracticeBased Learning and Improvement Teaching Style:  Interactive, Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Neurohospitalist, Trainee, Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist

J

See complete course description on page 82 »

Course Wednesday, April 25, 2018 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C156 Clinical EEG II: Focal, Diffuse, and

Epileptiform Abnormalities in Adults

Topic: Epilepsy/Clinical Neurophysiology (EEG) Director: Katherine H. Noe, MD, PhD, FAAN, Phoenix, AZ

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Program Description: Misinterpretation of EEG, particularly of epileptiform activity, may be common in clinical practice and can lead to adverse clinical outcomes. This knowledge-building course will review common EEG abnormalities in adults with epilepsy, focal brain lesions, encephalopathy, dementia, coma, and other diffuse disorders using case-based teaching and EEG samples, and an interactive EEG quiz. Speakers will also address the optimal use of routine and prolonged EEG studies in the outpatient and inpatient settings for diagnosis and management of adults with seizures and altered mental status. This program complements C138: Clinical EEG I: Normal EEG, Normal Variants, and How to Avoid The Common Pitfall of Overreading and C170: Clinical EEG III: Neonatal and Pediatric, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to correctly recognize and intepret common EEG patterns encountered in adults with seizures and epilepsy (ictal and interictal) and in adults with focal and diffuse brain disorders. Participants should also be able to correctly select the most appropriate type of EEG for evaluation of adults with seizures or altered mental status in the outpatient, inpatient, and ICU setting. Lecture/Faculty: }} Focal and Diffuse Abnormalities in Adult EEG David C. Spencer, MD, FAAN, Portland, OR }} Interictal and Ictal Abnormalities in Adult EEG Katherine H. Noe, MD, PhD, FAAN, Phoenix, AZ

62 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

Course Wednesday, April 25, 2018 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

C170 Clinical EEG III: Neonatal and Pediatric Topic: Epilepsy/Clinical Neurophysiology (EEG) Director: Nicholas Scott Abend, MD, Philadelphia, PA

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Program Description: Pediatric and neonatal EEG interpretation is critically important for many aspects of epilepsy management, and many components differ from typical adult EEG interpretation. This course will focus on pediatric/neonatal EEG topics which are common, yet differ from adult EEG. This program complements C138: Clinical EEG I: Normal EEG, Normal Variants, and How to Avoid The Common Pitfall of Over-reading and C156: Clinical EEG II: Focal, Diffuse, and Epileptiform Abnormalities in Adults, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should become familiar with the interpretation of pediatric and neonatal EEG topics, including interpretation of neonatal EEG, use of EEG in the context of recent seizure classification systems, and interpretation of various forms of epileptic encephalopathy. Lecture/Faculty: }} Neonatal EEG Nicholas Scott Abend, MD, Philadelphia, PA }} Utility of EEG in the 2017 Revised ILAE Seizure Classification Dennis J. Dlugos, MD, Media, PA }} Epileptic Encephalopathy Fiona M. Baumer, MD, Palo Alto, CA Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, Electroencephalographer or EEG Technologists


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

Course

Course

Wednesday, April 25, 2018 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Thursday, April 26, 2018

C171 Spanish Symposium: Update on Epilepsy

C172 Clinical Epilepsy I: Basics

Topic: Epilepsy/Clinical Neurophysiology (EEG) Director: Andres M. Kanner, MD, FAAN, Miami, FL

JK

Program Description: Approximately 30% to 40% of patients with epilepsy fail to achieve seizure remission with antiepileptic drug therapy. In the last decade, there have been important innovations in pharmacologic, surgical and neuromodulation therapies. The aim of this program is to highlight the latest advances in the pharmacologic treatment with third generation AEDs, the new strategies of epilepsy surgery relying on less invasive techniques, such as laser ablation and the use of stereoencephalography for a more accurate localization of epileptogenic areas in non-lesional focal epilepsies and the use of neuromodulation techniques such as Responsive NeuroStimulation and Deep Brain Stimulation of thalamic nuclei. The program will be complemented with presentation of challenging cases that illustrate the use of these new pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic therapies. These cases will also be used to facilitate discussion among the faculty and with the audience. This program will be presented in Spanish. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to recognize the role of third generation AEDs in the management of epilepsy; decide on the use of various surgical strategies in the the presurgical evaluation and surgical management of non-lesional focal epilepsy; and have an understanding of when to chose one of the neurostimulation modalities (Response Neurostimulation System vs vagus nerve stimulation vs deep brain stimulation of anterior thalamic nuclei). Lecture/Faculty: }} Update in Pharmacologic Treatments of Epilepsy Faculty }} Update on Non-Pharmacologic Therapies in Epilepsy Andres M. Kanner, MD, FAAN, Miami, FL }} Challenging Cases of Treatment-Resistant Epilepsy: An Open Discussion Jose E. Cavazos, MD, PhD, FAAN, San Antonio, TX Core Competencies:  Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement, Professionalism, Systems-Based Practice

Topic: Epilepsy/Clinical Neurophysiology (EEG) Director: Tracey A. Milligan, MD, FAAN, Boston, MA

J

Program Description: Faculty will comprehensively cover aspects of diagnosing and managing patients with seizure disorders; review the 2017 ILAE classification scheme, Epilepsy Quality Measures, and the primary goals of accurate diagnosis and selection of appropriate first-line medications; address common psychiatric comorbidities; review the latest advances in each topic discussed; emphasize issues most useful to clinical practice by using a case-based approach; and use video case presentations to illustrate the differential diagnosis of seizure-like events and how to classify seizures. This program complements C182: Clinical Epilepsy II: Considerations Across the Age Span Pediatrics, Pregnancy and Elderly and C197: Clinical Epilepsy III: Advanced (Status, Beyond AED, Video EEG), but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to efficiently and thoroughly evaluate a patient presenting with seizures, accurately apply the latest approved classification system for epilepsy, choose appropriate firstline treatments, and recognize and know how to evaluate common psychiatric comorbidities Lecture/Faculty: }} Video Cases in Diagnosis and Classification Tracey A. Milligan, MD, FAAN, Boston, MA }} Psychiatric Co-morbidities: What All Neurologists Need to Know in the Management of the Seizure Disorder Andres M. Kanner, MD, FAAN, Miami, FL }} Individualizing AED Choices Jacqueline French, MD, FAAN, New York, NY Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive, Panel Discussion CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, Epileptologist

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Epilepsy

Therapy for Pharmaco-resistant Epilepsy

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.


Program Descriptions

Epilepsy/Clinical Neurophysiology (EEG)

Course Thursday, April 26, 2018

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C182 Clinical Epilepsy II: Considerations Across the Age Span Pediatrics, Pregnancy, and Elderly

Topic: Epilepsy/Clinical Neurophysiology (EEG) Director: Barbara C. Jobst, MD, FAAN, Lebanon, NH

J

Program Description: Faculty will comprehensively address specific aspects to epilepsy care across the age span. This includes recognition and treatment of childhood epilepsy syndromes, including special considerations for special testing including early genetic testing. Women’s health issues in seizure care, especially care during pregnancy, will inform about the risks and benefits of medical and surgical treatments. Birth control options for patients with epilepsy will be discussed. The elderly are another distinct patient population. The distinction between epileptic and non-epileptic events is particularly important in this age group. Declining cognition and the effects of antiepileptic medications and their interactions will be discussed. Illustrative cases will complement the course. This program complements C172: Clinical Epilepsy I: Basics and C197: Clinical Epilepsy III: Advances (Status, Beyond AED, Video EEG), but covers independent topics. The combined courses should give a comprehensive review about epilepsy diagnosis and treatment. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to efficiently and thoroughly evaluate a patient presenting with seizures while considering special agerelated aspects of care. Participants will be informed about diagnosis and treatment of common childhood epilepsy syndromes, be able treat and advise women in the reproductive age appropriately, and be informed about special aspects of epilepsy care in the elderly. Lecture/Faculty: }} Diagnosis and Treatment of Pediatric Epilepsy Lily Wong-Kisiel, MD, Rochester, MN }} Pregnancy and Reproductive Health in Patients with Epilepsy Faculty }} Epilepsy in the Elderly: Special Considerations Barbara C. Jobst, MD, FAAN, Lebanon, NH Core Competencies:  Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement, Professionalism Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive, Audience Participation CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, NonNeurologist

64 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

Course Thursday, April 26, 2018

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

C197 Clinical Epilepsy III: Advanced (Status, Beyond AED, Video EEG)

Topic: Epilepsy/Clinical Neurophysiology (EEG) Director: Tobias Loddenkemper, MD, Boston, MA

J

Program Description: Faculty will review and discuss complicated aspects of diagnosing and treating patients with epilepsy with a focus on tertiary aspects in this Clinical Epilepsy III course. The recognition of acute repetitive seizures and status epilepticus in their various forms from subtle to convulsive will be discussed in detail. Management options will be reviewed in various settings, including in the home, the emergency room, inpatient, and the intensive care unit. The latest definition for drug resistant epilepsy will be discussed and how to apply it to an individual patient. Therapeutic options beyond antiepileptic drugs will be reviewed in detail, including diet, devices, surgery, and marijuana. Faculty will review the latest advances in each topic discussed. Issues most useful to clinical practice will be emphasized by using a case-based approach. Video case presentations will be used to illustrate different seizure types in an engaging manner with the audience. This program complements C172: Clinical Epilepsy I: Basics and C182: Clinical Epilepsy II: Considerations Across the Age Span Pediatrics, Pregnancy, and Elderly, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to recognize when a patient meets criteria for acute repetitive seizures, status epilepticus, and drug resistant epilepsy. Participants should be able to know the latest therapeutic approaches to these patients in a variety of settings from home, to outpatient clinic, and in the hospital. Participants should recognize when to consider treatments in addition to AEDs and which ones to consider given a specific patient seizure type and clinical scenario. Participants will become more familiar with classifying seizures through video presentations. Lecture/Faculty: }} Acute Repetitive Seizures and Status Epilepticus Tobias Loddenkemper, MD, Boston, MA }} Beyond AEDs—Surgery, Devices, Diet, or Marijuana? Elson L. So, MD, FAAN, Rochester, MN }} Video-EEG Cases: You Make the Call William O. Tatum, IV, DO, FAAN, Jacksonville, FL Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive, Audience Participation CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, Trainee, Neurointensivist, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

Friday, April 27, 2018

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

C223 The Burden of Epilepsy: Managing Comorbidities and Quality of Life

Topic: Epilepsy/Clinical Neurophysiology (EEG) Director: Gregory D. Cascino, MD, FAAN, Rochester, MN

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Program Description: This program will address the cognitive, neurologic, and psychiatric disorders associated with epilepsy, and the socio-economic consequences of the disease. The adverse effects of the therapy will also be considered. The comorbidity of epilepsy may be progressive and impair the patients' quality of life. In selected individuals, these disorders may be more significant than the seizure activity. The burden of epilepsy is not well understood by many neurologists, and not addressed adequately in the evaluation and treatment of people with epilepsy. Upon Completion: Participants should become familiar with the current recommendations for the evaluation and treatment of comorbid conditions that occur in people with epilepsy, including language and cognitive disorders, behavioral problems, depression, and complications of treatment. Clinical pearls to screen patients for significant mood disorders that may be associated with suicide will be provided. The risks, prevalence, and possible prevention of sudden unexplained death in epilepsy (SUDEP) will be presented. Lecture/Faculty: }} Adverse Effects of Antiepileptic Drug Therapy and Comorbidities Terence John O’Brien, MBBS, Victoria, Australia }} Cognitive and Psychiatric Issues Associated with Seizure Disorders Kimford J. Meador, MD, FAAN, Stanford, CA }} SUDEP Update: Mechanisms, Disclosure, Guidelines Jeffrey R. Buchhalter, MD, FAAN, Phoenix, AZ Core Competencies:  Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Skills Workshop Friday, April 27, 2018

1:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

C234 Epilepsy Skills Workshop: Focus on Treatment

$ (registration required) Topic: Epilepsy/Clinical Neurophysiology (EEG) Director: William O. Tatum, IV, DO, FAAN, Jacksonville, FL

J

Program Description: Recognizing important key elements of management requires experience which is often best learned through a direct "handson" approach. The goal of this workshop is to facilitate practical learning regarding accurate seizure and epilepsy diagnosis and treatment. Topics will include EEG interpretation, video EEG monitoring, childhood epilepsy syndromes, seizure emergencies, and outpatient clinical medical and surgical decision-making in patients with epilepsy emphasizing clinical pearls gleaned from the history, physical examination, and diagnostic evaluation. An expert faculty will emphasize skills pertaining to common errors, misinterpretation, gaps, and pitfalls using case studies, protocols that involve a Sim-man in the status epilepticus portion of the workshop, and a hands-on demonstration of neuromodulation. Groups will be limited to 20 attendees to maximize the opportunity to interact with an expert faculty. Common case scenarios expected to be encountered in routine clinical practice will be presented to provide skills for the practicing neurologist. Upon Completion: Participants should become familiar with the essential skills required to provide effective emergency management of seizures in the hospital and at the bedside; learn how to identify commonly misdiagnosed EEG patterns and typical semiologies necessary to make accurate diagnoses; understand how to address common chief complaints of patients with seizures and epilepsy who present to the outpatient clinic; be able to apply new definitions and terminology to patients with seizures; and integrate newer forms of treatment including new anti-seizure drugs, formulations, surgical techniques and neuromodulation into the treatment regimens of both the pediatric and adult patients with epilepsy. Lecture/Faculty: }} EEG Interpretation Barbara C. Jobst, MD, FAAN, Lebanon, NH }} Video-EEG Monitoring Joseph F. Drazkowski, MD, FAAN, Phoenix, AZ }} Epilepsy Clinic William O. Tatum, IV, DO, FAAN, Jacksonville, FL }} Pediatric Epilepsy Raj D. Sheth, MD, FAAN, Jacksonville, FL }} Seizure Emergencies Matthew T. Hoerth, MD, Phoenix, AZ Joseph I. Sirven, MD, FAAN, Scottsdale, AZ Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care

AAN.com/view/AM18 65

Epilepsy

Course


Program Descriptions Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive, Simulation CME Credits:  4 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, Neurosurgeon, Pediatric Neurologist

Experiential Learning Area Friday, April 27, 2018

1:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Live Intraoperative Monitoring Topic: Epilepsy/Clinical Neurophysiology (EEG) Speaker: Constantine Moschonas, MD, FAAN, Scottsdale, AZ Experiential Learning Area: HeadTalks

DJI

Program Description: This highly interactive event demonstrating how real time intraoperative monitoring is performed. There will be real time intraoperative monitoring of case(s) during this hour. This offers a look at how remote intraoperative monitoring takes place and is part of the expanding telemedicine field.

Scientific Platform Session Friday, April 27, 2018

S51 Topic:

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Epilepsy/Clinical Neurophysiology (EEG) Platform Session Epilepsy/Clinical Neurophysiology (EEG)

66 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

G

Epilepsy/Clinical Neurophysiology (EEG)


General Neurology Overview

Saturday, April 21 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C2  Functional Neurologic Disorders I: Movement, Seizures, and Multiple Sclerosis 7:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m. C6  Neurology MOC Prep Course 9:30 a.m.–11:30 a.m. C8  Emergency Neurology: Evaluation of Coma, Meningitis, and Viral Encephalitis in the Emergency Room

1:00 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C48  Genomic Neurology Skills Workshop: Developing Practical Knowledge of Tools and Concepts Through Case Studies 3:00 p.m.–3:45 p.m. X  How Your Social Life Might Be Helping (or Harming) Your Brain 3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m. X  Blind Spots: The Impact of Conscious and Unconcious Biases 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C54  Therapy in Neurology II: Epilepsy and Movement Disorders

9:30 a.m.–11:30 a.m. C12  Functional Neurologic Disorders II: Life Experiences and Management of Functional Disorders

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C55  Autoimmune Neurology II Advanced: Autoimmune Encephalitis at the Frontiers of Neuroscience

12:00 p.m.–12:30 p.m. X  Navigating the Annual Meeting App and Convention Center Tour

Monday, April 23

1:30 p.m.–3:30 p.m. C23  Critical Care Consultations for Neurohospitalists 2:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. X  Rural Neurology 3:00 p.m.–3:45 p.m. X  Acupuncture Demonstration: 4 Gates 3:15 p.m.–4:15 p.m. X  Successful Women in Neurology Panel

Sunday, April 22 8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. X  Mind Over Matter: Meditation for the Practicing Neurologist 9:15 a.m.–10:15 a.m. Presidential Plenary Session: Presidential Lecture: California Dreaming: BRAIN and Precision Medicine in 2018 12:00 p.m.–1:00 p.m. X  Neurology Pictionary 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. S4  Neuroepidemiology Platform Session 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. S5  General Neurology Platform Session 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C35  Borderlands of Neurology and Internal Medicine: Chalk Talk 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C39  Therapy in Neurology I: Headache and Stroke 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C40  Autoimmune Neurology I Basics and Beyond: Autoimmune Encephalitis and Paraneoplastic Neurological Syndromes of the CNS and PNS

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C65  Clinical Pearls: Learning from Complex Cases Simple Lessons that Apply to Everyday Problems 12:00 p.m.–1:00 p.m. X  Is There a Neurologist on This Flight? 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C71  Therapy in Neurology III: Neurological Infectious Diseases and Neuroophthalmologic Disorders 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C74  Neuro-rheumatology: Neurological Manifestations of Systemic Inflammatory and Autoimmune Disease I 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C75  Safe and Appropriate Opioid Prescribing in Neurology 1:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m. X  Eminence-based Medicine vs Evidence-based Medicine 3:00 p.m.–3:45 p.m. X  Introduction to Acupuncture I: Conceptual Framework and Mechanism of Action 3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m. X  Publication Editors Tell All: Hits, Misses, and Tips 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C84  Evidence Based Neurology Foresights for Busy Clinicians 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C85  Therapy in Neurology IV: Autoimmune PNS Synaptic Disorders and Neuro-Oncology 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C93  Advances in Neurogenetics 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C94  Hot Topics in Education

AAN.com/view/AM18 67

General Neurology

T

he Annual Meeting offers countless opportunities for general neurologists. Check out the four Neurology Update courses covering 12 topics, the two General Neurology courses, or the four “Neuroimaging for the General Neurologist” courses. Many plenary session presentations will look to the future of neurology, with lectures on connectomics, precision medicine in 2018, and BigBrain, the 3D digital atlas of the human brain. The dynamic experiential learning areas include “Ask Us Anything” expert panels where you can share your challenging cases, along with numerous presentations to help you take care of your mental and physical health and new, engaging features such as “Neurology Game Show: Localize the Lesion” and “Neurology Pictionary” that will both educate and entertain you.




General Neurology Tuesday, April 24 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C99  Good Neurology in Challenging Conditions: Lessons from Military Neurology

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C168  CNS Toxicities 4:15 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

X  The Neurology of Voodoo

12:00 p.m.–1:00 p.m. X  Neurology Game Show: Localize the Lesion

5:15 p.m.–6:15 p.m. X  Neurology and Art

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. N3  Neuroscience in the Clinic: Challenges in Genetic Diagnosis in Neurology

Thursday, April 26

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C112 Continuum® Test Your Knowledge: A Multiple-choice Question Review I 1:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m. X  Neurological Exam Tips and Tricks 3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m. X  Biological and Chemical Neuroterrorism and Neurowarfare 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C122  Multiple Sclerosis Overview III: The Pathogenesis of Multiple Sclerosis and Mechanism of Action of Treatments for MS 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C125 Continuum® Test Your Knowledge: A Multiple-choice Question Review II 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C131  Introduction to Integrative Neurology 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C132  Actualization Científica en Español Durante el Congreso Anual I 4:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. X  Zombie Apocalypse! The Neuroscience of the Undead

Wednesday, April 25 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C139  Neurologic Case Studies in Pregnancy 8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. Acupuncture Demonstration: Auriculotherapy 10:35 a.m.–10:55 a.m. Frontiers in Neuroscience Plenary Session: BigBrain: A high Resolution 3D Digital Human Brain Atlas 12:00 p.m.–1:00 p.m. X  Neurology Jeopardy Game Show 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C144  Neurology Update I: Epilepsy, Behavioral Neurology, and Neurologic Infections 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C148  LGBTQI Health in Neurology 2:00 p.m.–2:45 p.m. X  Resiliency for the Neurologist 3:00 p.m.–3:45 p.m. X  Introduction to Acupuncture II: Evidence-based Applications for Acupuncture in the Treatment of Neurologic Conditions 3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m. X  Health Care Disparities Among Underserved Populations 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C160  Neurology Update II: Movement Disorders, Spine Disorders, and Sleep Disorders

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C180  Principles of Genomic Medicine: Clinical Exome Sequencing in Neurologic Disease 12:00 p.m.–12:45 p.m. X  The Purpose Checkup: Find Meaning, Live Longer, Better 12:00 p.m.–1:00 p.m. X  Who Wants to be a Millionaire 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C185  Neurology Update III: Neuromuscular, Headache, and Stroke 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C188  Neuroimaging for the General Neurologist I: Spine and Peripheral Nerve 1:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m. X  Caring for Your Neurologic Patient for $500 or Less 3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m. X  Neurological Exam Tips and Tricks: En Español 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C199  Neurology Update IV: Multiple Sclerosis, Neuro-ophthalmology, and Autoimmune Encephalopathies 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C202  Neuroimaging for the General Neurologist II: Spine and Peripheral Nerve 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C207  Mitochondrial Disorders in Neurology 6:30 p.m.–9:30 p.m. C212  Case Studies: Test Your Knowledge: A Case-based Approach to Neuroimaging

Friday, April 27 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C216  Neuroendocrine Update: Nuts and Bolts of What You Need to Know 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C220  Drugs and Toxin-induced Neurologic Emergencies 12:00 p.m.–1:00 p.m. X  Creativity and the Brain…at the Piano 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. S49  General Neurology Platform Session 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C228  Neuroimaging for the General Neurologist I: Brain 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C230  Neurologic Complications of Medical and Surgical Therapies 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C233  Actualización Científica Durante el Congreso Anual II 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C237  Neurologic Complications of Medical Disease 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C240  Neuroimaging for the General Neurologist II: Brain

68 2018 AAN Annual Meeting


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

Course Saturday, April 21, 2018

C2

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Functional Neurologic Disorders I: Movement, Seizures, and Multiple Sclerosis

Topic: General Neurology Director: Alberto J. Espay, MD, FAAN, Cincinnati, OH

J

Program Description: Through an emphasis on case-based learning, this course will cover the clinician’s approach to the diagnosis and initial management of functional movement disorders, functional non-epileptic seizures, and functional neurological disorders misdiagnosed as multiple sclerosis, including the approach to delivering the diagnosis in an assertive and sympathetic fashion and remove inappropriate medications to minimize iatrogenic harm. Therapeutic strategies will be discussed to a greater extent in Functional Neurologic Disorders II, which this program complements but does not replace. This program complements C12: Functional Neurologic Disorders II: Life Experiences and Management of Functional Disorders, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should recognize the pearls and pitfalls in the diagnosis of the most common functional neurologic disorders, and be in a position to apply strategies to minimize iatrogenic harm, correct misdiagnoses, and initiate a treatment plan. Lecture/Faculty: }} An Approach to Functional Movement Disorders Alberto J. Espay, MD, FAAN, Cincinnati, OH }} An Approach to Non-Epileptic Seizures W. Curt LaFrance, Jr., MD, MPH, FAAN, Providence, RI }} An Approach to Misdiagnosed Multiple Sclerosis Andrew Solomon, MD, Burlington, VT Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Course Saturday, April 21, 2018

C6

7:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m.

Neurology MOC Prep Course $ (registration required)

Topic: General Neurology Director: Nicholas Elwood Johnson, MD, Salt Lake City, UT

Program Description: This one-day course is designed to prepare neurologists for the ABPN MOC examination. The course will feature ten lectures covering the major topics stressed on the ABPN MOC examination: Vascular disorders, Neuroimmunology, Developmental and Congenital Disorders, Epilepsy, Brain and Spine Trauma, Headache and Pain, Neuromuscular Disorders, Movement Disorders, Sleep Disorders, and Infectious Diseases. The presentations will be given by the authors of the AAN MOC On-Line Prep Course product. The program will incorporate pre-test questions for each presentation to assist attendees in identifying areas that require focused study. Presentations and syllabus materials will be provided and will include resources for ongoing study and review. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to identify areas of neurology that require more focused study and review in preparation for the MOC examination; self-assess knowledge after completion of the educational program to further focus study and review; and demonstrate improved competency and performance in clinical practice and patient outcomes based upon application of new and reviewed information derived from the educational program in their clinical practice, as well as for successful recertification and continued maintenance. Lecture/Faculty: }} Vascular Disorders Eugene Scharf, MD, Rochester, MN }} Neuroimunology Stacey Clardy, MD, PhD, Salt Lake City, UT }} Developmental and Congenital Disorders Erika Augustine, MD, FAAN, Rochester, MN }} Epilepsy and Episodic Disorders Jonathan K. Smith, MD, Bethesda, MD }} Brain and Spine Trauma Eugene Scharf, MD, Rochester, MN }} Headache and Pain Christopher Tarolli, MD, Rochester, NY }} Neuromuscular Disorders Nicholas Elwood Johnson, MD, Salt Lake City, UT }} Movement Disorders Christopher Tarolli, MD, Rochester, NY }} Sleep Disorders Jonathan K. Smith, MD, Bethesda, MD }} Infectious Diseases Faculty Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, PracticeBased Learning and Improvement, Systems-Based Practice Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  7.5 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Specialist Neurologist

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$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University


Program Descriptions

General Neurology

Course Saturday, April 21, 2018

C8

9:30 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Emergency Neurology: Evaluation of Coma, Meningitis, and Viral Encephalitis in the Emergency Room

Experiential Learning Area Saturday, April 21, 2018

Neuro Trauma, Critical Care, and Sports Neurology; General Neurology Director: Jose I. Suarez, MD, Baltimore, MD See complete course description on page 133 »

Course Saturday, April 21, 2018

C12

9:30 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Functional Neurologic Disorders II: Life Experiences and Management of Functional Disorders

Topic: General Neurology Director: Alberto J. Espay, MD, FAAN, Cincinnati, OH

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Program Description: This session will examine the role of early life experiences and life events in the development of functional neurological disorders and highlight the importance of physiotherapy and other treatment modalities in both outpatient and inpatient settings, coordinated through an interdisciplinary team to reduce the burden of functional disability. This program complements C2: Functional Neurologic Disorders I: Movement, Seizures, and Multiple Sclerosis, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to understand the effect of early life experiences on the development of functional neurological disorders and appreciate the importance of interdisciplinary collaboration between cognitive therapists, physiotherapists, and other allied health personnel in addressing functional symptoms and disability. Lecture/Faculty: }} Early Life Experiences and Life Events Selma Aybek, MD, Lausanne, Switzerland }} Physiotherapy for Functional Neurological Disorders Glenn Nielsen, PT, London, United Kingdom }} Inpatient Therapeutic Strategies Kathrin LaFaver, MD, Louisville, KY Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Interactive, Case-Based, Audience Participation CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist 70 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

Navigating the Annual Meeting App and Convention Center Tour Topic: General Neurology Speaker: Carlayne E. Jackson, MD, FAAN, San Antonio, TX Experiential Learning Area: HeadTalks

Topics:

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12:00 p.m.–12:30 p.m.

I

Program Description: Navigating the Annual Meeting is an informative and interactive 30 minute session hosted by Carlayne E. Jackson, MD, FAAN. This session highlights learning, networking, and engagement opportunities available to attendees at the 2018 Annual Meeting. The session is comprised of a comprehensive Annual Meeting App overview, question and answer session and concludes with a tour of the convention center.

Course Saturday, April 21, 2018

C23

1:30 p.m.–3:30 p.m.

Critical Care Consultations for Neurohospitalists

Topics:

Neuro Trauma, Critical Care, and Sports Neurology; General Neurology Director: Vanja C. Douglas, MD, San Francisco, CA

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See complete course description on page 133 »

Experiential Learning Area Saturday, April 21, 2018

2:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Rural Neurology Topic: General Neurology Speakers: Dario Beltran, MD, FAAN, Midland, TX Michael Stitzer, MD, Winslow, AZ Experiential Learning Area: HeadTalks

DJ

Program Description: The demand for neurologists throughout the country is increasing. Many of the locations with the highest need are in rural areas. Join the faculty for a talk of the challenges and rewards of such a practice.


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

Saturday, April 21, 2018

3:00 p.m.–3:45 p.m.

Acupuncture Demonstration: 4 Gates Topic: General Neurology Speaker: Jennifer Bickel, MD, FAAN, Kansas City, MO Experiential Learning Area: Live Well

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Program Description: Receive an introductory acupuncture treatment tailored for relaxation from a neurologist also certified in acupuncture. Waiver required.

Experiential Learning Area Saturday, April 21, 2018

the human nervous system, and how this knowledge and practice can help us neurologists. The session will include a 20 minute guided meditation.

3:15 p.m.–4:15 p.m.

Successful Women in Neurology Panel Topic: General Neurology Speakers: Allison Brashear, MD, MBA, FAAN, Winston Salem, NC Cynthia L. Comella, MD, FAAN, Chicago, IL Helena C. Chui, MD, Los Angeles, CA Merit E. Cudkowicz, MD, MSC, Boston, MA Mona Bahouth, MD, Baltimore, MD Barbara G. Vickrey, MD, MPH, FAAN, New York, NY Experiential Learning Area: HeadTalks

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Program Description: Renowned women in Neurology will share their leadership journey. They will discuss their challenges and successes throughout their career.

Experiential Learning Area Sunday, April 22, 2018

Plenary Session Sunday, April 22, 2018

Presidential Plenary Session

Topics: Neuro-oncology; Epilepsy/Clinical Neurophysiology (EEG); Child Neurology and Developmental Neurology; General Neurology; Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG) Moderator: Natalia S. Rost, MD, MPH, FAAN, Boston, MA

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9:15 a.m.–10:15 a.m. }} Presidential Lecture: California Dreaming: BRAIN and Precision Medicine in 2018

Francis Collins, MD, PhD, Bethesda, MD, Director, National Institutes of Health

Experiential Learning Area Sunday, April 22, 2018

Topic: General Neurology Speaker: Sarah Mulukutla, MD, Harriman, NY Experiential Learning Area: Live Well

Topic: General Neurology Speaker: Bert B. Vargas, MD, FAAN, Richardson, TX Experiential Learning Area: HeadTalks

A

Program Description: This charades inspired guessing game centers around all things neurology.

Scientific Platform Session Sunday, April 22, 2018

S4

Topic:

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Neuroepidemiology Platform Session General Neurology

EC

Program Description: Meditation is a practice of self-reflective mental training. Attention, concentration, and mindfulness are used to direct activity of the mind. Almost immediately, heart and respiratory rate decrease, and changes in EEG activity can be seen. In 6-8 weeks, daily meditation induces neuroplastic changes detectable on fMRI, and alters immune and epigenetic response. Can mental training really be this potent? Join us in exploring the innate connection between meditation and

12:00 p.m.–1:00 p.m.

Neurology Pictionary

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Mind Over Matter: Meditation for the Practicing Neurologist

9:15 a.m.–12:00 p.m.

G

Scientific Platform Session Sunday, April 22, 2018

S5

Topic:

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

General Neurology Platform Session General Neurology

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Experiential Learning Area


Program Descriptions Course Sunday, April 22, 2018

C35

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Borderlands of Neurology and Internal Medicine: Chalk Talk

Topic: General Neurology Director: Martin A. Samuels, MD, MACP, FAAN, Boston, MA

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Program Description: A large swath of neurology consists of providing consultations to internists regarding neurological complications of general medical disease. Some examples of these areas in the borderlands between neurology and internal medicine are neurocardiology, neurohematology, neurorheumatology, neuroendocrinology, neurological infectious and inflammatory diseases, neurogastroenterology, neurohepatology, and neuro-oncology. This longstanding course is led by a neurologist who is also an internist and who has had a career-long interest in these important interface areas. The chalk talk is case based and will involve active involvement of participants in analyzing real patient examples of representative conditions. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to analyze a patient with a disorder in the interface between internal medicine and neurology and provide a cogent opinion to the consulting physician regarding the diagnosis and management of important neurological complications of general medical diseases. Lecture/Faculty: }} Borderlands of Neurology and Internal Medicine Chalk Talk Martin A. Samuels, MD, MACP, FAAN, Boston, MA Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Course Sunday, April 22, 2018

C39

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Therapy in Neurology I: Headache and Stroke

Topic: General Neurology Director: David W. Dodick, MD, FAAN, Phoenix, AZ

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Program Description: Advances in headache therapy have been rapid over the recent past and will impact the practice of clinicians dealing with patients with primary and secondary headache disorders. Faculty will present an 72 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

General Neurology update on the most recent advances in the care of patients with major primary and secondary headache disorders and a strategy on how to optimize the use of long-established therapies. This program complements C54: Therapy in Neurology II: Epilepsy and Movement Disorders, C71: Therapy in Neurology III: Neurological Infectious Diseases and Neuro-ophthalmologic Disorders, and C85: Therapy in Neurology IV: Autoimmune PNS Synaptic Disorders and Neuro-Oncology, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to implement an evidence-based treatment approach to major primary and secondary headache disorders and describe the most recent pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatment advances and how to best integrate them into clinical practice. Lecture/Faculty: }} Stroke Prevention and Therapy Cumara Barahona O’Carroll, MD, Scottsdale, AZ }} Headache Therapy David W. Dodick, MD, FAAN, Phoenix, AZ Core Competencies:  Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement, Professionalism Teaching Style:  Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Course Sunday, April 22, 2018

C40

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Autoimmune Neurology I Basics and Beyond: Autoimmune Encephalitis and Paraneoplastic Neurological Syndromes of the CNS and PNS

Topic: General Neurology Director: Maarten Jan Titulaer, MD, PhD, Rotterdam, Netherlands

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Program Description: Recent years have been very exciting for autoimmune neurology: many new diseases have been discovered, providing possibilities to treat patients previously considered untreatable. Faculty will describe the full range of neural autoantibodies and their relevant clinical disorders (neurological, psychiatric, neuropediatric, and oncological), from encephalitis to the neuromuscular junction; including clinical pearls aiding diagnosis of autoimmune and paraneoplastic neurologic disorders, also covering differential diagnosis, investigations, and treatment. This course will cover the basics, and go somewhat beyond, but be less advanced than the Autoimmune Neurology II course. Although both courses stand


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

alone, overlap is minimized, and physicians are encouraged to complete both courses.

in practice. Attendees should bring their laptops or tablets to enable hands-on experience using websites relevant to their practice.

This program complements C55: Autoimmune Neurology II Advanced: Autoimmune Encephalitis at the Frontiers of Neuroscience, but covers independent topics.

Upon Completion: Participants should be able to list the factors that help determine which patients are appropriate candidates for neuro-genomic testing; determine, using online tools, the clinical significance of a genetic variants related to diagnosing and treating neurologic disease; describe key aspects of informed consent for genomic analyses; describe the process of next-generation sequencing data analysis; and describe the benefits and limitations of integrative genomic analyses for patients with neurologic disease, including managing incidental findings, and be able to ask appropriate and knowledgeable questions when interacting with genetic specialists.

Upon Completion: Participants should be able to understand the autoantibody nomenclature; recognize autoimmune neurologic disorders; know the neurologic and cancer associations of the autoantibodies; know the pitfalls in antibody testing; know the appropriate oncological evaluations for paraneoplastic neurologic disorders; and know some treatment regimens for autoimmune neurologic disorders. Lecture/Faculty: }} Classical Paraneoplastic Neurological Disorders Andrew McKeon, MD, Rochester, MN }} Autoimmune Disorders of the Peripheral Nervous System Eric Lancaster, MD, PhD, Philadelphia, PA }} Autoimmune Encephalitis—The Cell Surface and Synaptic Antibodies Josep O. Dalmau, MD, PhD, FAAN, Barcelona, Spain Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, PracticeBased Learning and Improvement Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Skills Workshop Sunday, April 22, 2018

C48

1:00 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Genomic Neurology Skills Workshop: Developing Practical Knowledge of Tools and Concepts Through Case Studies

Topic: General Neurology Director: Jeffery M. Vance, MD, PhD, Miami, FL

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Program Description: This program seeks to provide neurologists with knowledge of genomic databases, with emphasis on practical experience using key websites. Team-based learning (TBL) will allow participants to work together using online genomics tools to answer practical clinical questions in a case-based format. Participants will receive instructional materials prior to the workshop. This flippedclassroom model allows more classroom time for performancebased interaction with instructors. A brief pre-lecture will ensure participants understand the important concepts to proceed to the TBL activity, but lecture time is kept to a minimum, with emphasis on participants actually getting hands-on experience. Teams will answer case questions related to practical issues in ordering and interpreting genomic testing and using next-generation sequencing

Lecture/Faculty: }} Team-based Learning Activity Richard Haspel, MD, PhD, Boston, MA Jeffery M. Vance, MD, PhD, Miami, FL Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, PracticeBased Learning and Improvement Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Interactive, Team Learning CME Credits:  4 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Experiential Learning Area Sunday, April 22, 2018

3:00 p.m.–3:45 p.m.

How Your Social Life Might Be Helping (or Harming) Your Brain Topic: General Neurology Speaker: Joel A. Salinas, MD, Boston, MA Experiential Learning Area: Live Well

DEC

Program Description: Evidence implicating social and behavioral influences, such as social isolation, with higher risk of stroke, cognitive dysfunction, and accumulation of Alzheimer’s disease pathology suggests that healthy cognitive aging may be heavily influenced by social relationships, a largely unexplained modifiable risk factor that represents the combined effect of distinct functional (social support) and structural (social network) elements. We will examine the existing evidence supporting this association and discuss challenges and opportunities in its study.

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General Neurology

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University


Program Descriptions Experiential Learning Area Sunday, April 22, 2018

3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Blind Spots: The Impact of Conscious and the Unconscious Biases Topic: General Neurology Speakers: Jeffrey C. McClean, II, MD, FAAN, San Antonio, TX Laraine Kaminsky, Ottawa, ON, Canada Charles C. Flippen II, MD, FAAN, Los Angeles, CA Experiential Learning Area: HeadTalks

DE

Program Description: In a neurological exam, you don’t expect your patient to find their own blind spot, so why do we assume we can diagnosis our own? Come to this highly interactive presentation about the conscious and unconscious bias we all have. The panel will discuss the impact of those biases and also make some recommendations on how to mitigate our biases. *NOTE-to get the most out of this program we highly encourage you prior to the program to take the Project Implicit Test at implicit.harvard.edu/implicit/ takeatest.html.

Course Sunday, April 22, 2018

C54

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Therapy in Neurology II: Epilepsy and Movement Disorders

Topic: General Neurology, Epilepsy, Movement Disorders Director: David W. Dodick, MD, FAAN, Phoenix, AZ

J

Program Description: Pharmacotherapy and surgery for epilepsy has advanced rapidly and will impact the practice of clinicians dealing with seizures and epilepsy. Advances in the pharmacotherapy and surgery for movement disorders will impact the practice of clinicians dealing with movement disorders. Through presentations of common and challenging epilepsies and movement disorders, faculty will update the audience on the appropriate implementation strategy of medical and surgical treatments for epilepsy and movement disorders. This program complements C39: Therapy in Neurology I: Headache and Stroke, C71: Therapy in Neurology III: Neurological Infectious Diseases and Neuro-ophthalmologic Disorders, and C85: Therapy in Neurology IV: Autoimmune PNS Synaptic Disorders and NeuroOncology, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to develop a strategy to implement an evidence-based approach to the management of patients with epilepsy and movement disorders.

74 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

General Neurology Lecture/Faculty: }} Movement Disorders Cynthia L. Comella, MD, FAAN, Chicago, IL }} Epilepsy Joseph I. Sirven, MD, FAAN, Scottsdale, AZ Core Competencies:  Patient Care, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement, Professionalism, Medical Knowledge, Interpersonal and Communication Skills Teaching Style:  Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, Intensive Care Specialist, Internist

Course Sunday, April 22, 2018

C55

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Autoimmune Neurology II Advanced: Autoimmune Encephalitis at the Frontiers of Neuroscience

Topic: General Neurology Director: Maarten Jan Titulaer, MD, PhD, Rotterdam, Netherlands

J

Program Description: Recent years have shown many discoveries of new antibodies. These new antibodies have broadened the horizon of these diseases, bordering with psychiatry, pediatrics, intensive care medicine, and (chronic) epilepsy. Many physicians struggle to keep up with all the new developments. Faculty will cover the newest developments, discuss caveats at diagnosis, test results, and treatment decisions. This course will be more advanced than the Autoimmune Neurology I course, and expects some basic knowledge of antibodies and the related syndromes. Overlap is minimized, and physicians are encouraged to complete both courses. This program complements C40: Autoimmune Neurology I Basics and Beyond: Autoimmune Encephalitis and Paraneoplastic Neurological Syndromes of the CNS and PNS, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to identify the different disorders; adequately assess consultations at the psychiatry, pediatric neurology, and epilepsy wards; be able to avoid the pitfalls associated with antibody testing; and identify the appropriate tumors associated with the different syndromes. Lecture/Faculty: }} Neuropsychiatry and Encephalitis Josep O. Dalmau, MD, PhD, FAAN, Barcelona, Spain }} Epilepsy and Encephalitis Maarten Jan Titulaer, MD, PhD, Rotterdam, Netherlands


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic

Experiential Learning Area Monday, April 23, 2018

Is There a Neurologist on This Flight? Topic: General Neurology Speaker: Joseph I. Sirven, MD, FAAN, Scottsdale, AZ Experiential Learning Area: HeadTalks

JA

CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Course Monday, April 23, 2018

C65

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Clinical Pearls: Learning from Complex Cases Simple Lessons that Apply to Everyday Problems

Topic: General Neurology Director: S. Andrew Josephson, MD, FAAN, San Francisco, CA

JF

Program Description: The successful busy clinical practice of neurology is dependent upon insightful and efficient bedside diagnostic clinical skills. Faculty will share their clinical experiences and observations in an interactive format to enhance and enrich the neurologist’s ability to make effective and correct diagnoses with a goal on improving patient outcomes. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to enhance and enrich their ability to make effective and correct clinical diagnoses using bedside clinical observations and thus improving patient outcomes. Lecture/Faculty: }} Neuromuscular Surprises Robert M. Pascuzzi, MD, FAAN, Indianapolis, IN }} Inpatient Cases: Difficult Decisions that Apply to Everyday Practice S. Andrew Josephson, MD, FAAN, San Francisco, CA }} Where Neurology and Medicine Interact Martin A. Samuels, MD, MACP, FAAN, Boston, MA Core Competencies:  Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, Professionalism Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

12:00 p.m.–1:00 p.m.

Program Description: With the ever increasing number of packed planes loaded with passengers of various ages and with various conditions, neurologists are often called to serve when a passenger has a medical condition on a flight. Given that neurological issues are one of the most common conditions that a physician will encounter on a flight, the frequently asked question is how does a neurologist address such a situation? This HeadTalk explores various scenarios that may occur, what is on board most jets and what resources can a neurologist access in these situations.

Course Monday, April 23, 2018

C71

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Therapy in Neurology III: Neurological Infectious Diseases and Neuroophthalmologic Disorders

Topics:

General Neurology; Infectious Disease: Neuro-opthalmology Director: Madhu Soni, MD, Chicago, IL

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Program Description: The rapid advances in neurology require both experienced and beginning practitioners to remain updated on novel therapeutic options and evidence-based guidelines. The aim of this course is to provide a review and update on current therapy for commonly encountered neurologic conditions with a specific focus on neurologic infectious diseases and neuro-ophthalmology. This program complements C39: Therapy in Neurology I: Headache and Stroke; C54: Therapy in Neurology II: Epilepsy and Movement Disorders; C85: Therapy in Neurology IV: Autoimmune PNS Synaptic Disorders and Neuro-Oncology, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to discuss current treatments and evidence-based guidelines for common neurologic infectious diseases and neuro-ophthalmologic disorders. Lecture/Faculty: }} Updates for Treating Neurological Infections Michael R. Wilson, MD, San Francisco, CA

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General Neurology

}} Imaging and Encephalitis John Probasco, MD, Baltimore, MD }} Difficult Cases and Clinical Pearls Josep O. Dalmau, MD, PhD, FAAN, Barcelona, Spain John Probasco, MD, Baltimore, MD Maarten Jan Titulaer, MD, PhD, Rotterdam, Netherlands Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care


Program Descriptions }} Therapy of Neuro-Ophthalmologic Disorders Nancy J. Newman, MD, FAAN, Atlanta, GA Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care

General Neurology based medicine), implying that the two are not compatible. This presentation will use real case examples of how evidence and experience compliment each other in making neurological diagnoses.

Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive

Experiential Learning Area

CME Credits:  2

Monday, April 23, 2018

Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Course Monday, April 23, 2018

C74 Topics:

MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease; General Neurology Director: Jeffrey Marc Gelfand, MD, MAS, FAAN, San Francisco, CA

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See complete course description on page 124 »

Course Monday, April 23, 2018

C75 Topics:

Pain and Palliative Care; General Neurology Director: Shaheen E. Lakhan, MD, PhD, MEd, FAAN, Roanoke, VA

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See complete course description on page 171 »

Experiential Learning Area Monday, April 23, 2018

DJC

Program Description: Acupuncture has seen an increase in popularity in the US, including among patients with neurologic conditions. This talk is an introduction to acupuncture’s conceptual framework and the major ways in which it differs from western physiologic paradigms. Modern acupuncture has been influenced by allopathic medicine in ways which have lead to standardization of acupuncture points and techniques. Various theories exist about acupuncture’s mechanism of action such as the fascia theory, endorphin theory, immune effect theory, central theory, placebo, structural theory. This talk will offer a critical overview of the evidence for each theory, with an emphasis on the central and peripheral nervous system.

Experiential Learning Area

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Safe and Appropriate Opioid Prescribing in Neurology

1:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Eminence-based Medicine vs Evidence-based Medicine Topic: General Neurology Speaker: Martin A. Samuels, MD, MACP, FAAN, Boston, MA Experiential Learning Area: HeadTalks

DJ

Program Description: Evidence based medicine has become a zeitgeist (spirit of the times) and experience has become derided with the term (eminence76 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

Introduction to Acupuncture I: Conceptual Framework and Mechanism of Action Topic: General Neurology Speaker: Alexandra Dimitrova, MD, Portland, OR Experiential Learning Area: Live Well

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Neuro-rheumatology: Neurological Manifestations of Systemic Inflammatory and Autoimmune Disease I

3:00 p.m.–3:45 p.m.

Monday, April 23, 2018

3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Publication Editors Tell All: Hits, Misses, and Tips Topic: General Neurology Speakers: Joseph E. Safdieh, MD, FAAN, New York, NY Orly Avitzur, MD, MBA, FAAN, Tarrytown, NY Robert H. Gross, MD, Aurora, CO Experiential Learning Area: HeadTalks

DJ

Program Description: Journal editors respond to your questions about how the full range of AAN publications can aid in clinical practice.


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

Course

C84

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Evidence Based Neurology Foresights for Busy Clinicians

Topics:

General Neurology; Practice, Policy, and Ethics Director: Andrei Ivashynka, MD, Novara, Italy

JG

Program Description: Every year the results of a huge number of neurological studies are published. Often, the data of some studies contradict the results of others. The neurologist wonders: "What research should I trust?" The answers to many questions are mediated by the results of reports classified at the highest level of the evidence hierarchy, such as Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis reflected in Guidelines. The authors of recent Systematic Reviews, Meta-analysis, and Guidelines will share with course participants the results of their work and experience. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to become familiar with the quality assessment of the systematic review and meta-analysis findings in neurological practice; use the data of Systematic Review to answer the question what kind of Modifiable Risk Factors are significantly important for Multiple Sclerosis progression; practical application of Guidelines in routine clinical work; use the data of the Guideline to answer the question what kind of Risk Factors are significantly important for Sudden Unexpected Death. Lecture/Faculty: }} Quality Assessment of Systematic Reviews and MetaAnalyses in Examples Gary S. Gronseth, MD, FAAN, Kansas City, KS }} Interpretation of the Results of Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses in Examples Andrei Ivashynka, MD, Novara, Italy }} Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy Incidence Rates and Risk Factors: Guideline Development and Application Discussion Cynthia L. Harden, MD, New York, NY Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement Teaching Style:  Didactic, Audience Participation CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Monday, April 23, 2018

C85

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Therapy in Neurology IV: Autoimmune PNS Synaptic Disorders and Neuro-Oncology

Topic: General Neurology Director: Madhu Soni, MD, Chicago, IL

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Program Description: The rapid advances in neurology require both experienced and beginning practitioners to remain updated on novel therapeutic options and evidence-based guidelines. The aim of this course is to provide a review and update on current therapy for commonly encountered autoimmune neurologic conditions with a focus on peripheral nervous system synaptic disorders. The course will also provide an update on therapy for common neuro-oncology disorders. This program complements C39: Therapy in Neurology I: Headache and Stroke; C54: Therapy in Neurology II: Epilepsy and Movement Disorders; and C71: Therapy in Neurology III: Neurological Infectious Diseases and Neuro-ophthalmologic Disorders, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to discuss current treatments and evidence-based guidelines for commonly encountered autoimmune synaptic disorders affecting the peripheral nervous system, and common neuro-oncology disorders. Lecture/Faculty: }} Therapy of Antibody-mediated Neuromuscular Disorders Steven Vernino, MD, PhD, FAAN, Dallas, TX }} Therapy of Primary and Metastastic Brain Tumors Amy A. Pruitt, MD, Philadelphia, PA Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Didactic, Interactive, Audience Participation, CaseBased CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Course Monday, April 23, 2018

C93

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Advances in Neurogenetics

Topic: General Neurology Director: Matthew Harms, MD, New York, NY

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Program Description: The rapid pace of neurogenetic discoveries is leading to improved diagnosis, providing new mechanistic insights, and identifying

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General Neurology

Monday, April 23, 2018

Course


Program Descriptions therapeutic targets. The introductory lecture will highlight technological advances and genetic discoveries impacting the entire spectrum of neurologic diseases. This year’s Focus Topics will provide up-to-the-minute reviews of the explosion of genetic understanding in hereditary spastic paraplegia and epilepsy. Faculty will cover critical areas in neurogenetics, encompassing a broad spectrum of neurologic disorders that differ in their clinical manifestation, age of onset, neuroanatomical susceptibility, and genetic mechanism. Faculty will also cover important ethical and methodological issues concerning genetic testing for neurogenetic disorders, challenges in data interpretation, and translation of neurogenetics into clinical practice. Upon Completion: Participants should obtain a broad overview of neurogenetic advances, familiarity with available tools in diagnostics, current understanding of disease mechanisms underlying hereditary developmental and degenerative neurologic disorders, treatment strategies, and expert opinions on practical and still-evolving approaches to neurogenetic disorders. Lecture/Faculty: }} Overview 2018: Genetic Discoveries and Technological Advances Across Neurology Matthew Harms, MD, New York, NY }} Focus Topic I: Genetic Advances in Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia Rebecca E. Schuele, MD, Tuebingen, Germany }} Focus Topic II: Genetic Advances in Epilepsy Faculty Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2

General Neurology collaboration. Speakers will offer a brief overview of the scope and practice of military neurology and provide updates on important topics identified in a large and unique population of active duty service members. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to better understand unique issues in military neurology, use lessons learned from military experience in their civilian practice, and recognize opportunities to collaborate with military providers on populations with shared disease burden or riskfactor/exposure profiles. Lecture/Faculty: }} Military Neurology and its History Jeffrey C. McClean, II, MD, FAAN, San Antonio, TX }} Neurology at a Military Academy Michele A. Gatheridge, MD, Colorado Springs, CO }} Traumatic Brain Injury in the Military Renee M. Pazdan, MD, FAAN, Colorado Springs, CO }} Military Traumatic Nerve Injuries: A Multidisciplinary Clinic Experience Jonathan K. Smith, MD, Bethesda, MD }} Panel Discussion: Neurology in the Deployed Setting Faculty Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement, Systems-Based Practice, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, NonNeurologist

Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Course Tuesday, April 24, 2018

C99

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Good Neurology in Challenging Conditions: Lessons from Military Neurology

Topic: General Neurology Director: Jeffrey C. McClean, II, MD, FAAN, San Antonio, TX

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Program Description: Military neurologists deal with neurological disease in unique settings including resource-limited combat theaters and humanitarian missions while treating patients faced with extreme physical demands. Lessons learned from military practice offer an opportunity for all neurologists to enhance their ability to care for patients, regardless of the setting. The 2017 National Defense Authorization Act encourages military health care providers to build co-operative partnerships with civilian health care systems to maintain military readiness, increasing opportunities for 78 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

Experiential Learning Area Tuesday, April 24, 2018

12:00 p.m.–1:00 p.m.

Neurology Game Show: Localize the Lesion Topic: General Neurology Speaker: Luis F. Torres, MD, Miami, FL Experiential Learning Area: HeadTalks

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Program Description: New this year, Localize the Lesion is a lively game show asking questions about patient symptoms and signs.


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

Tuesday, April 24, 2018

N3

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Neuroscience in the Clinic: Challenges in Genetic Diagnosis in Neurology

Topic:

Aging, Dementia, Cognitive, and Behavioral Neurology; General Neurology Directors: Guy A. Rouleau, MD, PhD, Montreal, QC Canada Massimo Pandolfo, MD, FAAN, Brussels, Belgium

Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Experiential Learning Area Tuesday, April 24, 2018

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See complete course description on page 36 »

Course Tuesday, April 24, 2018

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C112 Continuum® Test Your Knowledge: A Multiple-choice Question Review I

Neurological Exam Tips and Tricks Topic: General Neurology Speakers: Kapil D. Sethi, MD, FRCP (UK), FAAN, Augusta, GA Thomas R. Swift, MD, FAAN, Augusta, GA Christopher H. Hawkes, MD, Bsc, FRCP, Romford, United Kingdom Experiential Learning Area: HeadTalks

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Program Description: A yearly fan favorite, this program will focus on the useful aspects of the neuro exam.

Experiential Learning Area

Topic:

General Neurology; MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease; Neuro-oncology Director: Steven L. Lewis, MD, FAAN, Allentown, PA

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Program Description: This course will use case-based, multiple-choice questions and brief faculty expert discussions to help neurologists stay current in clinical practice. Using the audience response system, faculty will engage participants in clinical problem solving and use multiple-choice questions from recent issues of Continuum: Lifelong Learning in Neurology ® as a springboard for discussion of timely and important topics in neuro-oncology and multiple sclerosis. This program complements C125: Continuum ® Test Your Knowledge: A Multiple-choice Question Review II, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to increase and refresh their knowledge of neuro-oncology and multiple sclerosis through presentation of common and not-so-common clinical problems, as well as learn to work through difficult clinical presentations both logically and successfully. Lecture/Faculty: }} Neuro-oncology Amy A. Pruitt, MD, Philadelphia, PA }} Multiple Sclerosis Stephen Krieger, MD, FAAN, New York, NY Core Competencies:  Patient Care, Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Professionalism, Medical Knowledge, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Interactive CME Credits:  2

1:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Tuesday, April 24, 2018

3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Biological and Chemical Neuroterrorism and Neurowarfare Topic: General Neurology Speaker: Thomas P. Bleck, MD, FAAN, Chicago, IL Experiential Learning Area: HeadTalks

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Program Description: Using case examples, this presentation will discuss the ways in which victims of biological and chemical warfare agents may present to neurologists, the diagnostic and differential diagnostic considerations they raise, and their management. The distinct presentations of individual and mass casualty exposures will be covered.

Course Tuesday, April 24, 2018

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

C122 Multiple Sclerosis Overview III: The

Pathogenesis of Multiple Sclerosis and Mechanism of Action of Treatments for MS

Topic:

MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease; General Neurology Director: Michael K. Racke, MD, Columbus, OH

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General Neurology

Neuroscience in the Clinic Session


Program Descriptions

General Neurology

Course Tuesday, April 24, 2018

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

C125 Continuum® Test Your Knowledge: A Multiple-choice Question Review II

Topic: General Neurology, Movement Disorders Director: Steven L. Lewis, MD, FAAN, Allentown, PA

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Program Description: This course will use case-based, multiple-choice questions and brief faculty expert discussions to help neurologists stay current in clinical practice. Using the audience response system, faculty will engage participants in clinical problem solving and use multiple-choice questions from recent issues of Continuum: Lifelong Learning in Neurology ® as a springboard for discussion of timely and important topics in movement disorders and the neurology of systemic disease. This program complements C112: Continuum ® Test Your Knowledge: A Multiple-choice Question Review I, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to increase and refresh their knowledge of movement disorders and the neurology of systemic disease through presentation of common and not-so-common clinical problems, as well as learn to work through difficult clinical presentations both logically and successfully. Lecture/Faculty: }} Movement Disorders Susan Fox, MD, Toronto, ON, Canada }} Neurology of Systemic Disease Neeraj Kumar, MD, Rochester, MN Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, PracticeBased Learning and Improvement, Professionalism, Interpersonal and Communication Skills Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

80 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

Course Tuesday, April 24, 2018

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

C131 Introduction to Integrative Neurology Topic: General Neurology Director: Sarah Mulukutla, MD, Harriman, NY

JC

Program Description: Integrative Medicine is a medical approach that preferentially uses therapeutic lifestyle interventions, stress-reduction, and behavioral interventions as adjunct therapy for chronic medical conditions. A growing body of literature confirms that diet modification, physical activity, and mind-body interventions can improve outcomes for patients with neurologic disease. Trained faculty will review evidence and offer practical tools that allow application of integrative therapies in the inpatient and outpatient setting suitable for neurologists or health care professionals at any level of training. Upon Completion: Participants will understand the tenants of integrative neurology and its practical application, become familiar with the evidence base for lifestyle interventions in specific neurologic conditions, and learn how to counsel patients in a motivational interviewing style. Lecture/Faculty: }} Introduction to Integrative Neurology Sarah Mulukutla, MD, Harriman, NY }} Update on Nutritional Neuroscience: Eating for Brain Health, an Evidence-based Approach Vanessa Baute, MD, Winston Salem, NC }} The Benefits of Exercise for Various Neurologic Conditions and How to Motivate Patients Laurence J. Kinsella, MD, FAAN, St. Louis, MO }} Therapies that Promote Mind-Body Connection Sarah Mulukutla, MD, Harriman, NY Core Competencies:  Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, Systems-Based Practice Teaching Style:  Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

Course Tuesday, April 24, 2018

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Course Wednesday, April 25, 2018 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

C132 Actualización Científica en Español Durante C139 Neurologic Case Studies in Pregnancy Topic: General Neurology Director: Alejandro Tobon, MD, San Antonio, TX

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Program Description: Esta plataforma ofrece a los participantes la oportunidad de escuchar en español un resumen de los estudios científicos mas relevantes presentados durante el Congreso Anual de Neurología. Los tópicos son revisados por un grupo de expertos quienes analizan la información científica proveída por los investigadores y su relevancia clínica. Este curso se presentará en español. Upon Completion: Se espera que los participantes obtengan un mejor entendimiento de los estudios científicos mas relevantes presentados durante el Congreso Anual. Lecture/Faculty: }} Actualización Científica Durante el Congreso Anual I Jose Gutierrez, MD, New York, NY Joel Armando Salinas, MD, Boston, MA Alejandro Tobon, MD, San Antonio, TX Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Experiential Learning Area Tuesday, April 24, 2018

4:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Zombie Apocalypse! The Neuroscience of the Undead Topic: General Neurology Speakers: Bert B. Vargas, MD, FAAN, Richardson, TX Joseph I. Sirven, MD, FAAN, Scottsdale, AZ Constantine Moschonas, MD, FAAN, Scottsdale, AZ Jennifer Bickel, MD, FAAN, Kansas City, MO Experiential Learning Area: HeadTalks

Topic: General Neurology Director: Mary Angela O’Neal, MD, Boston, MA

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Program Description: This case-based course demonstrates how experts in the field approach headache, neurological emergencies, ethical decisions, and demyelinating disorders in pregnancy. Using cases, experts will discuss the differential diagnoses, imaging, and necessary tests to decide on optimal management. Presenters will summarize the key points for the case, as well as the most recent information regarding the disorder. Cases will illustrate neurologic emergencies, headache, and demyelinating disorders management in pregnancy. In addition, an approach to ethical dilemmas in pregnancy will be presented. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to understand the physiological changes in pregnancy which contribute to neurological emergencies; recommend safe imaging in pregnancy; understand the evaluation, management, and treatment of stroke, demyelinating disorders, and headache; and understand an approach to making ethical decisions during pregnancy and postpartum. Lecture/Faculty: }} A Practical Approach to Headaches in Pregnancy and Postpartum Mary Angela O’Neal, MD, Boston, MA }} Demyelinating Disorders in Pregnancy Maria K. Houtchens, MD, Boston, MA }} Ethical Decisions in Pregnancy Faculty Core Competencies:  Patient Care, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement, Medical Knowledge Teaching Style:  Didactic, Interactive, Audience Participation, CaseBased CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

JA

Program Description: The concept of zombies will be utilized to illustrate how the zombie patient illustrates clinical neuroanatomy and how symptoms and signs are utilized in localization of health problems in the nervous systems.

AAN.com/view/AM18 81

General Neurology

el Congreso Anual I


Program Descriptions

General Neurology

Experiential Learning Area

Course

Wednesday, April 25, 2018 8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Wednesday, April 25, 2018 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C144 Neurology Update I: Epilepsy, Behavioral

Acupuncture Demonstration: Auriculotherapy Topic: General Neurology Speaker: Jennifer Bickel, MD, FAAN, Kansas City, MO Experiential Learning Area: Live Well

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Program Description: Receive an introduction to auriculotherapy from a neurologist also certified in acupuncture. Auriculotherapy is a form of acupuncture focused on the external ear which is widely used throughout the US military and VA systems. Treatments are tailored for general pain relief and relaxation. Waiver required.

Plenary Session Wednesday, April 25, 2018 9:15 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Frontiers in Neuroscience Plenary Session

Topic(s): Aging, Dementia, Cognitive, and Behavioral Neurology; General Neurology; MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease; Neuro-rehabilitation; Sleep

Topics:

General Neurology; Epilepsy, Neurophysiology (EEG); Aging, Dementia, Cognitive, and Behavioral Neurology; Infectious Disease Director: Ralph F. Józefowicz, MD, FAAN, Rochester, NY

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Program Description: Neurology is now one of the fastest changing fields in all of medicine and has differentiated into numerous well-defined complex subspecialties. These factors make it an enormous challenge to stay current. The Annual Meeting will offer four update programs, two offered on Wednesday afternoon and two on Thursday afternoon. Because of the large number of important topics, these four programs will each cover three unique subjects, each presented by a pre-eminent expert in the field who has also demonstrated superior skills at presenting material of this type to large audiences. This program complements C160: Neurology Update II: Movement Disorders, Spine Disorders and Sleep Disorders, C185: Neurology Update III: Neuromuscular, Headache, and Stroke, and C199: Neurology Update IV: Multiple Sclerosis, Neuro-ophthalmology, and Autoimmune Encephalopathies, but covers independent topics.

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Upon Completion: Participants should be able to recognize and treat the common seizure disorders; identify patients with Alzheimer disease and non-Alzheimer dementias, and apply current evidence to choosing appropriate treatments; and diagnose and treat the common neurological infectious diseases.

Experiential Learning Area

Lecture/Faculty: }} Update in Epilepsy Gregory K. Bergey, MD, FAAN, Baltimore, MD }} Update in Behavioral Neurology Gregory S. Day, MD, MSc, St. Louis, MO }} Update in Neuro-infectious Diseases Kenneth L. Tyler, MD, FAAN, Aurora, CO Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, PracticeBased Learning and Improvement

10:35 a.m.–10:55 a.m. }} BigBrain: A High Resolution 3D Digital Human Brain Atlas Alan Evans, Phd, Montreal, QC, Canada

Wednesday, April 25, 2018 12:00 p.m.–1:00 p.m.

Neurology, and Neurologic Infections

Neurology Jeopardy Game Show Topic: General Neurology Speakers: Laurice T. Yang, MD, MHA, Palo Alto, CA Veronica E. Santini, MD, Stanford, CA Experiential Learning Area: HeadTalks

JA

Program Description: This favorite game show focuses on the answer before the question. These contestants have accepted the neurology challenge. See who will be the 2018 Champ.

82 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

Teaching Style:  Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

Experiential Learning Area

Wednesday, April 25, 2018 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Wednesday, April 25, 2018 3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

C148 LGBTQI Health in Neurology

Topics:

Practice, Policy, and Ethics; General Neurology Director: Holly E. Hinson, MD, MCR, Portland, OR

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See complete course description on page 178 »

Experiential Learning Area Wednesday, April 25, 2018 2:00 p.m.–2:45 p.m.

Resiliency for the Neurologist Topic: General Neurology Speaker: Justin T. Jordan, MD, MPH, Boston, MA Experiential Learning Area: Live Well

DEC

Program Description: While specific vulnerability differs by subspecialty, death is an inescapable part of caring for patients with neurological disorders. In order to sustain quality and empathy in patient care, while simultaneously protecting one’s personal health and sense of worth, neurologists must be intentional in their efforts to preserve their own wellness and resiliency; critical to this balance are the avoidance of both professional burnout and compassion fatigue. In this discussion, I will provide a primer for neurologists on providing empathy to patients in a self-preserving manner, strategies for coping with professional loss without depersonalization, and ultimately prioritizing physician wellness as well as patient wellness.

Experiential Learning Area Wednesday, April 25, 2018 3:00 p.m.–3:45 p.m.

Introduction to Acupuncture II: Evidencebased Applications for Acupuncture in the Treatment of Neurologic Conditions Topic: General Neurology Speaker: Alexandra Dimitrova, MD, Portland, OR Experiential Learning Area: Live Well

JC

Program Description: A growing body of acupuncture research over the last 2 decades has yielded new evidence in the treatment of various neurologic conditions including migraine, tension headache, cervical and lumbar radiculopathy, peripheral neuropathy, fibromyalgia, spasticity and stroke rehabilitation. Acupuncture research and practice present unique challenges including proper blinding, standardized regimens and dosing. A critical overview of the evidence will address indications for acupuncture referral and the role of acupuncture as an adjunct therapy in various neurologic conditions.

Topics:

Health Care Disparities Among Underserved Populations

General Neurology; Practice, Policy, and Ethics Speakers: Holly E. Hinson, MD, MCR, Portland, OR Charles C. Flippen II, MD, FAAN, Los Angeles, CA Lisa M. Shulman, MD, FAAN, Baltimore, MD Temitayo Oyegbile, MD, PhD, Washington, DC Experiential Learning Area: HeadTalks

DE

Program Description: There are approximately 9 million Americans who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer or intersex (LGBTQI). Increasingly, research has shown disparities in access to care, in outcomes for particular diseases, and higher all-cause mortality for this community, prompting the NIH to recently designate this community as a healthy disparity population in need of further research. While the etiology of these health disparities is multifactorial, studies have suggested that provider behavior is a significant contributing factor. We will provide a brief overview of this topic and summarize the work of the AAN’s LGBTQI section to address these healthcare disparities.

Course Wednesday, April 25, 2018 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

C160 Neurology Update II: Movement Disorders, Spine Disorders, and Sleep Disorders

Topics:

General Neurology; Movement Disorders; Neuro-rehabilitation; Sleep Director: Ralph F. Józefowicz, MD, FAAN, Rochester, NY

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Program Description: Neurology is now one of the fastest changing fields in all of medicine, and has differentiated into numerous well-defined complex subspecialties. These factors make it an enormous challenge to stay current. The Annual Meeting will offer four update programs, two offered on Wednesday afternoon and two on Thursday afternoon. Because of the large number of important topics, these four programs will each cover three unique subjects, each presented by a pre-eminent expert in the field who has also demonstrated superior skills at presenting material of this type to large audiences. This program complements C144: Neurology Update I: Epilepsy, Behavioral Neurology, and Neurologic Infections, C185: Neurology Update III: Neuromuscular, Headache, and Stroke, and C199: Neurology Update IV: Multiple Sclerosis, Neuro-ophthalmology, and Autoimmune Encephalopathies, but covers independent topics. AAN.com/view/AM18 83

General Neurology

Course


Program Descriptions Upon Completion: Participants should be able to utilize the current medical and surgical approaches to treating Parkinson’s disease and the various other movement disorders; appropriately diagnose and treat patients presenting with spine and back disorders; and diagnose and manage the common sleep disorders. Lecture/Faculty: }} Update in Movement Disorders Cynthia L. Comella, MD, FAAN, Chicago, IL }} Update in Spine Disorders J. D. Bartleson, MD, FAAN, Rochester, MN }} Sleep Disorders Update: From A to Zzzz Douglas B. Kirsch, MD, FAAN, Charlotte, NC Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, PracticeBased Learning and Improvement

General Neurology Lecture/Faculty: }} CNS Toxicities: Pharmaceuticals Eoin P. Flanagan, MBBCh, Rochester, MN }} Drugs of Abuse Neeraj Kumar, MD, Rochester, MN }} CNS Toxicities: Syndromes Eoin P. Flanagan, MBBCh, Rochester, MN }} Metals Neeraj Kumar, MD, Rochester, MN Core Competencies:  Patient Care, Medical Knowledge Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Teaching Style:  Didactic

Experiential Learning Area

CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Wednesday, April 25, 2018 4:15 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Course Wednesday, April 25, 2018 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

C168 CNS Toxicities

Topic: General Neurology Director: Neeraj Kumar, MD, Rochester, MN

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Program Description: New drugs of abuse are emerging at an alarming rate as manufacturers of "legal high" products use chemicals to replace those that are banned. Many of these drugs (bath salts, spice, molly) are touted as legal, perceived as safe, and in many cases difficult to detect on standard drug screens. The industrial use of metals resulting in occupational exposure continues to engender public and scientific interest. Over the counter medications may be associated with neurotoxicity. Use of biologics like TNF alpha-inhibitors and various monoclonal antibodies may be accompanied by neurological side effects. CNS toxicities are seen in context of antineoplastics, antiepileptics, analgesics, anesthetics, and antimicrobials. Syndromes such as posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES), neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS), reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS), and serotonin syndrome result from commonly used medications. This course will cover the topic of CNS toxicities in a case-based format with a focus on recent developments. Upon Completion: Participants should have a clear understanding of how to diagnose and treat CNS disorders that may accompany heavy metal toxicity, illicit drug use, and those that occur as an adverse effect of prescribed medications.

84 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

The Neurology of Voodoo Topic: General Neurology Speaker: Ann H. Tilton, MD, FAAN, New Orleans, LA Experiential Learning Area: HeadTalks

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Program Description: Through the lens of Voodoo we can gain increased awareness of nontraditional cultural rituals in their own medical practices. The underlying principles of illness, pain, possession, and death in voodoo raise our understanding and increase the mystery of our own perceptions of what constitutes western medicine.

Experiential Learning Area Wednesday, April 25, 2018 5:15 p.m.–6:15 p.m.

Neurology and Art Topic: General Neurology Speaker: David E. Thaler, MD, PhD, Boston, MA Experiential Learning Area: HeadTalks

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Program Description: From its initial conception as a way to brighten a neurology waiting room, Neurology Illustrated, became a journey to describe neurology by examples in art, and to understand art by its neurological influence. It is now an installed art exhibit that spans millennia and is meant to educate and please patients, families, medical students, nurses, doctors, administrators and anyone else who wanders through the Department of Neurology at Tufts Medical Center in Boston. Dr. Thaler will explain the journey using examples from the exhibit that connect an Egyptian stele with FDR, Charcot with melting Antarctic ice, and Wilde’s incision with homophobia.


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

Course 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

C180 Principles of Genomic Medicine: Clinical

Exome Sequencing in Neurologic Disease

Thursday, April 26, 2018

Topic: General Neurology Director: Wayne Grody, MD, PhD, Los Angeles, CA

Upon Completion: Participants should be able to understand the principles of genomic medicine and the basics of common genomic diagnostic testing methodologies (e.g., clinical exome sequencing); effectively educate, counsel, and consent patients and their families regarding genomic diagnostic testing; understand, interpret, and communicate genomic diagnostic testing results to patients; and appreciate the ethical challenges inherent in genomic medicine and identify strategies to address them in clinical practice. Lecture/Faculty: }} Introduction and Overview of Clinical Exome Sequencing in Neurology Brent L. Fogel, MD, PhD, FAAN, Los Angeles, CA }} Ethical and Legal Issues in Clinical Exome Sequencing for Neurologic Diseases Wayne Grody, MD, PhD, Los Angeles, CA }} Explanation of Whole-Exome Data and Variant Interpretation Hane Lee, PhD, Los Angeles, CA }} Illustrative Case Examples of Utility of Exome Sequencing in Patients with Undiagnosed Neurologic Disorders Faculty Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, Interpersonal and Communication Skills Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, Genetic Counselor

The Purpose Checkup: Find Meaning, Live Longer, Better Topic: General Neurology Speaker: Richard Leider, Founder, Inventure Group, Inc., Edina, MN Experiential Learning Area: Live Well

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Program Description: Faculty will discuss the concept of genomic medicine and its use in clinical practice, as well as available diagnostic testing designed to comprehensively assess the human genome for disease-causing mutations (i.e., clinical exome sequencing). Types of mutations identified will be described and presented in the context of their role in neurogenetic disease. Faculty will discuss indications for the clinical use of this technology for various common neurologic diseases (e.g., movement disorders, epilepsy, neurodevelopmental disorders, metabolic disease); ethical challenges, including informed consent, appropriate genetic counseling, the reporting of incidental findings, and the detection of variants of unknown significance; strategies to resolve such issues; and expected results from such testing, and strategies for effective clinical interpretation.

12:00 p.m.–12:45 p.m.

DEC

Program Description: What makes you want to get out of bed in the morning? At times in our lives, the answer to that question seems more difficult than earlier to answer. Based on Richard’s perennial bestselling book, ’The Power of Purpose: Find Meaning, Live Longer, Better' this talk will help you unlock your purpose to answer the question. Purpose is not a luxury. It is fundamental to health, healing, and, ultimately, to happiness.

Experiential Learning Area Thursday, April 26, 2018

12:00 p.m.–1:00 p.m.

Who Wants to be a Millionaire Topic: General Neurology Speakers: Andrew James Westwood, MD, New York, NY Jose H. Posas, MD, New Orleans, LA Experiential Learning Area: HeadTalks

JA

Program Description: Contestants answer increasingly difficult neuro-based questions. Tune in to this lively audience interactive program.

Course Thursday, April 26, 2018

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C185 Neurology Update III: Neuromuscular, Headache, and Stroke

Topics:

General Neurology; Neuro-muscular and Clinical Neurophsiology (EMG); Cerebrovascular Disease and Interventional Neurology; Headache Director: Adam Quick, MD, Columbus, OH

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Program Description: Neurology is now one of the fastest changing fields in all of medicine and has differentiated into numerous well-defined complex subspecialties. These factors make it an enormous challenge to stay AAN.com/view/AM18 85

General Neurology

Thursday, April 26, 2018

Experiential Learning Area


Program Descriptions current. The Annual Meeting will offer four update programs: two on Wednesday afternoon and two on Thursday afternoon. Because of the large number of important topics, these four programs will each cover three unique subjects, each presented by a pre-eminent expert in the field who has also demonstrated superior skills at presenting material of this type to large audiences. This program complements C144: Neurology Update I: Epilepsy, Behavioral Neurology, and Neurologic Infections; C160: Neurology Update II: Movement Disorders, Spine Disorders, and Sleep Disorders; and C199: Neurology Update IV: Multiple Sclerosis, Neuro-ophthalmology, and Autoimmune Encephalopathies, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to recognize and treat the important neuromuscular disorders, recognize and treat the common headache syndromes, and apply evidence-based approaches to the treatment and prevention of stroke. Lecture/Faculty: }} Update in Neuromuscular Disorders John T. Kissel, MD, FAAN, Columbus, OH }} Update in Headache Christopher J. Boes, MD, FAAN, Rochester, MN }} Update in Stroke Amie W. Hsia, MD, Washington, DC Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, PracticeBased Learning and Improvement

General Neurology Upon Completion: Participants should be able to systematically review images of the spine and detect degenerative and vascular abnormalities. Lecture/Faculty: }} Approach to Spine Imaging: Degenerative Disease, Trauma, and Neurography Joshua P. Klein, MD, PhD, FANA, FAAN, Boston, MA }} Vascular Imaging of the Spine Ashutosh P. Jadhav, MD, Pittsburgh, PA Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, PracticeBased Learning and Improvement Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, Neurology Allied Practitioner

Experiential Learning Area Thursday, April 26, 2018

Practice, Policy, and Ethics; General Neurology Speaker: Donn Dexter, MD, FAAN, Eau Claire, WI Experiential Learning Area: HeadTalks

CME Credits:  2

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See complete course description on page 180 »

Course Thursday, April 26, 2018

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Experiential Learning Area Thursday, April 26, 2018

C188 Neuroimaging for the General Neurologist I: Spine and Peripheral Nerve

Topic: General Neurology Director: Joshua P. Klein, MD, PhD, FANA, FAAN, Boston, MA

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Program Description: This program is designed to increase clinician comfort and competence in reviewing neuroimaging studies of the spine and peripheral nerves by providing a practical and systematic approach that will allow for recognition of degenerative and vascular conditions. This program complements C202: Neuroimaging for the General Neurologist II: Spine and Peripheral Nerve, but covers independent topics.

86 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

Caring for Your Neurologic Patient for $500 or Less Topic:

Teaching Style:  Didactic Recommended Audience:  Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist

1:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Neurological Exam Tips and Tricks: En Español Topic: General Neurology Speakers: Jose Biller, MD, FAAN, FACP, FAHA, Maywood, IL Vladimir Hachinski, MD, DSc, FAAN, London, ON, Canada Experiential Learning Area: HeadTalks

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Program Description: A yearly fan favorite, this program will focus on the useful aspects of the neuro exam in Spanish.


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

Course 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

C199 Neurology Update IV: Multiple Sclerosis, Neuro-ophthalmology, and Autoimmune Encephalopathies

Topics:

General Neurology; Multiple Sclerosis; Neuro‑ophthemology Director: Adam Quick, MD, Columbus, OH

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Program Description: Neurology is now one of the fastest changing fields in all of medicine and has differentiated into numerous well-defined complex subspecialties. These factors make it an enormous challenge to stay current. The Annual Meeting will offer four update programs: two on Wednesday afternoon and two on Thursday afternoon. Because of the large number of important topics, these four programs will each cover three unique subjects, each presented by a pre-eminent expert in the field who has also demonstrated superior skills at presenting material of this type to large audiences. This program complements C144: Neurology Update I: Epilepsy, Behavioral Neurology, and Neurologic Infections; C160: Neurology Update II: Movement Disorders, Spine Disorders, and Sleep Disorders; and C185: Neurology Update III: Neuromuscular, Headache, and Stroke, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to use the newest disease modifying treatments for multiple sclerosis, recognize the important neuroophthalmologic disorders seen in neurology practice, and offer patients with autoimmune encephalopathies the best evidencebased treatment options. Lecture/Faculty: }} Update in Multiple Sclerosis Michelle Fabian, MD, New York, NY }} Update in Neuro-ophthalmology Marc Dinkin, MD, New York, NY }} Update in Autoimmune Encephalopathies Steven Vernino, MD, PhD, FAAN, Dallas, TX Core Competencies:  Patient Care, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement, Medical Knowledge Teaching Style:  Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Thursday, April 26, 2018

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

C202 Neuroimaging for the General Neurologist II: Spine and Peripheral Nerve

Topic: General Neurology Director: Joshua P. Klein, MD, PhD, FANA, FAAN, Boston, MA

J

Program Description: This program is designed to increase clinician comfort and competence in reviewing neuroimaging studies of the spine and peripheral nerves, providing a practical and systematic approach that will allow for recognition of neoplastic and inflammatory conditions. This program complements C188: Neuroimaging for the General Neurologist I: Spine and Peripheral Nerve, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to systematically review images of the spine and detect neoplastic and inflammatory conditions. Lecture/Faculty: }} Imaging of Spinal Infections and Inflammation Shamik Bhattacharyya, MD, Boston, MA }} Imaging of Spinal Tumors Jorg Dietrich, MD, PhD, Boston, MA Core Competencies:  Patient Care, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement, Medical Knowledge Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Course Thursday, April 26, 2018

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

C207 Mitochondrial Disorders in Neurology Topic: General Neurology Director: Michio Hirano, MD, FAAN, New York, NY

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Program Description: Mitochondrial dysfunction accounts for an ever-increasing number of neurologic disorders (mitochondrial encephalomyopathies). Faculty will discuss basic concepts of mitochondrial biogenesis and the dual (and often overlapping) roles of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and nuclear DNA (nDNA) in causing these frustratingly heterogeneous clinical disorders. The increasing application of new-generation exome sequencing is revealing novel pathogenic mechanisms and revising traditional classifications of mitochondrial diseases. In practical terms, faculty will cover the impact of new scientific AAN.com/view/AM18 87

General Neurology

Thursday, April 26, 2018

Course


Program Descriptions knowledge on the diagnostic approach to mitochondrial diseases and to emerging experimental therapeutic options. Upon Completion: Participants should be familiar with recent progress in mitochondrial genetics; gain a better understanding of the relationships, which are not always straightforward, between mutations in either genome (mtDNA or nDNA) and clinical presentations; learn useful clues to the correct diagnosis; glean ideas about pathogenesis (energy shortage, oxidative stress); and get a realistic understanding of palliative and experimental therapy. Lecture/Faculty: }} Mitochondrial Biology Eric A. Schon, PhD, New York, NY }} Mitochondrial Diseases Michio Hirano, MD, FAAN, New York, NY }} Treatment of Mitochondrial Diseases Salvatore DiMauro, MD, New York, NY Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, PracticeBased Learning and Improvement Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, Genetic Counselors, Pediatric Neurologists, Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist

Course Thursday, April 26, 2018

6:30 p.m.–9:30 p.m.

C212 Case Studies: Test Your Knowledge: A Casebased Approach to Neuroimaging

Topic: General Neurology Director: Joshua P. Klein, MD, PhD, FANA, FAAN, Boston, MA

J

Program Description: Neuroimaging places in the hands of neurologists powerful tools for clinical diagnosis and patient management. In this activity, attendees will have an opportunity to test and improve their knowledge of neuroimaging by learning an approach to brain imaging studies, comparing their responses to those of the group and panel when reviewing different neuroimaging cases, and reviewing carefully a set of different neuroimaging cases discussed by the faculty. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to describe an organized approach to reading neuroimaging studies, as well as helpful imaging clues to identify on imaging the diagnosis of common and unusual disorders. Lecture/Faculty: }} A Practical Approach to Neuroimaging Joshua P. Klein, MD, PhD, FANA, FAAN, Boston, MA

88 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

General Neurology }} Neuroimaging Cases I Joseph C. Masdeu, MD, PhD, FAAN, Houston, TX }} Neuroimaging Cases II Jorg Dietrich, MD, PhD, Boston, MA }} Neuroimaging Cases III Joshua P. Klein, MD, PhD, FANA, FAAN, Boston, MA Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  3 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Course Friday, April 27, 2018

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

C216 Neuroendocrine Update: Nuts and Bolts of What You Need to Know

Topic: General Neurology Director: Alison M. Pack, MD, New York, NY

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Program Description: Neuroendocrine axes affect the presentation and treatment of neurological diseases. Through review of the neuroendocrine anatomy and humoral relationships, faculty will discuss the effects of the neuroendocrine system on epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, headaches, stroke, and trauma. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to understand how neuroendocrine anatomy and humoral relationships influence the presentation and treatment of epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, headaches, and trauma. Lecture/Faculty: }} Neuroendocrine Axes: Hyopthalamus, Pituitary, and Beyond Faculty }} Epilepsy, Antiepileptic Drugs, and Neuroendocrine Effects Alison M. Pack, MD, New York, NY }} Neuroendocrine Aspects of Parkinson’s Disease: An Overview Michele Tagliati, MD, FAAN, Los Angeles, CA }} Neuroendocrine Aspects of Cognitive Aging and Dementia Victor W. Henderson, MD, FAAN, Stanford, CA }} Neurocritical Care and Neuroendocrinology: An Overview Torrey Boland Birch, MD, Chicago, IL Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

Friday, April 27, 2018

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

C220 Drugs and Toxin-induced Neurologic Emergencies

Topic: General Neurology Director: Sara E. Hocker, MD, Rochester, MN

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Program Description: Drugs and toxins can result in a variety of neurologic emergencies. Neurologic emergencies may result from drugs administered in the hospital and the outpatient setting, or from neurotoxic effects of environmentally significant chemical hazards, manufactured drugs, and naturally occurring compounds. Faculty will review specific complications of drug therapies encountered in the intensive care unit, drug-induced movement disorders, and neuro-toxicology emergencies. These categories have significant overlap. The session is expected to be highly case based and interactive and will offer manageable approaches to toxic syndromes rather than an encyclopedic review. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to evaluate, diagnose, and treat neurologic emergencies resulting from drugs administered in the hospital or from neurotoxic effects of environmentally significant effects of environmentally significant chemical hazards, manufactured drugs, and naturally occurring compounds. Lecture/Faculty: }} Drug-induced Disorders Seen in the ICU Sara E. Hocker, MD, Rochester, MN }} Drug-induced Movement Disorder Emergencies Joseph Y. Matsumoto, MD, Rochester, MN }} Neurotoxicology and Neurologic Emergencies Michel Toledano, MD, Rochester, MN Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Experiential Learning Area Friday, April 27, 2018

12:00 p.m.–1:00 p.m.

Creativity and the Brain…at the Piano Topic: General Neurology Speaker: Phillip L. Pearl, MD, FAAN, Boston, MA Experiential Learning Area: HeadTalks

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Program Description: Demonstration and discussion of jazz chord sequences, scales, and improvisation patterns with review of emerging literature illuminating cerebral processing associated with musical creativity. Review of musical output of the Great American Songbook, correlating with the neurological histories of musical masters and renditions of their works with a neurologist’s interpretation at the piano.

Scientific Platform Session Friday, April 27, 2018

S49

Topic:

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

General Neurology Platform Session General Neurology

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Course Friday, April 27, 2018

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C228 Neuroimaging for the General Neurologist I: Brain

Topic: General Neurology Director: Jennifer McVige, MD, Amherst, NY

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Program Description: Neuroimaging is a critical tool to aid in the diagnosis and prognosis of neurologic conditions. Up-to-date information on these imaging advances is essential for neurologists who are continuously being scrutinized by payors who demand cost effective, but appropriate care of patients. Faculty will discuss imaging modalities such as MRI and CT, as well as approaches to reading images, common causes, and differential diagnoses. The course will cover neuroanatomy as it relates to pediatric and adult interpretation of CT and MRI of the brain, traumatic brain injuries, the aging process, and Tau. This program complements C240: Neuroimaging for the General Neurologist II: Brain, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to describe an organized approach to ordering and incorporating neuroimaging studies and sequences in the clinical practice of neurology. What neurologists need to know about MRI, CT, and its sequences, as well as the future horizons in neuroimaging, will be presented. Lecture/Faculty: }} Brain MRI for the Clinician Ryan Hakimi, DO, Greenville, SC }} TBI and Concussion Jennifer McVige, MD, Amherst, NY }} Imaging of Diseases Leading to Dementia Joseph C. Masdeu, MD, PhD, FAAN, Houston, TX

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General Neurology

Course


Program Descriptions Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, PracticeBased Learning and Improvement, Systems-Based Practice Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Course Friday, April 27, 2018

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C230 Neurologic Complications of Medical and Surgical Therapies

Topic: General Neurology Director: Sara E. Hocker, MD, Rochester, MN

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Program Description: Neurologic complications of medical and surgical therapies frequently are major sources of morbidity for patients admitted to the hospital. Drug therapies, critical care, and cardiac surgeries and procedures in particular are major sources of neurologic complications. Faculty will review specific neurologic complications of drug therapies, intensive care, and cardiac surgeries and procedures. This program complements C237: Neurologic Complications of Medical Disease, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to identify neurologic syndromes resulting from commonly used drugs; recognize neurologic syndromes commonly associated with intensive care; and have an approach to the evaluation of altered mental status, abnormal movements, or focal deficits following cardiac surgeries or procedures. Lecture/Faculty: }} Neurologic Complications of Cardiac Surgeries and Procedures Sara E. Hocker, MD, Rochester, MN }} Neurologic Complications of Critical Care Christopher Lawrence Kramer, MD, Chicago, IL }} Neurologic Complications of Drug Therapies Sara E. Hocker, MD, Rochester, MN Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Didactic, Interactive, Audience Participation, CaseBased CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

90 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

General Neurology

Course Friday, April 27, 2018

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C233 Simposio Español: Actualización Científica Durante el Congreso Anual II

Topic: General Neurology Director: Jose E. Cavazos, MD, PhD, FAAN, San Antonio, TX

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Program Description: Esta plataforma ofrece a los participantes la oportunidad de escuchar en español un resumen de los estudios científicos mas relevantes presentados durante el Congreso Anual de Neurología. Los tópicos son revisados por un grupo de expertos quienes analizan la información científica proveída por los investigadores y su relevancia clínica. Este curso se presentará en español. Upon Completion: Se espera que los participantes obtengan un mejor entendimiento de los estudios científicos mas relevantes presentados durante el Congreso Anual. Lecture/Faculty: }} Actualización Científica Durante el Congreso Anual II Jose E. Cavazos, MD, PhD, FAAN, San Antonio, TX Nicte I. Mejia, MD, Boston, MA Edgar A. Samaniego, MD, Iowa City, IA CME Credits:  2 Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist

Course Friday, April 27, 2018

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

C237 Neurologic Complications of Medical Disease

Topic: General Neurology Director: Sara E. Hocker, MD, Rochester, MN

J

Program Description: The interface of neurology and medicine is vast and much of the overlap is uncommonly encountered by an individual physician who may encounter, for example, only a single case of Behcet’s disease once in his/her career. Faculty will present an update of the interface of neurology and medicine in 75 minutes, followed by a 45-minute in-depth overview of the neurologic complications of cardiac and aortic disease.


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

This program complements C230: Neurologic Complications of Medical and Surgical Therapies, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to recognize "update issues" as they pertain to areas of overlap between cardiology, rheumatology, hematology, nephrology, and neurology. Lecture/Faculty: }} Neurologic Complications of Rheumatologic Disease Neeraj Kumar, MD, Rochester, MN }} Neurologic Complications of Cardiac and Aortic Disease James P. Klaas, MD, Rochester, MN }} Neurologic Complications of Hematologic Disease Neeraj Kumar, MD, Rochester, MN }} Neurologic Complications of Renal Disease Sara E. Hocker, MD, Rochester, MN Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic

Lecture/Faculty: }} Ultrasound for Stroke: PFO, Intracranial Disease, Collaterals, Sonothrombolysis and Beyond Faculty }} MRI in Diagnosis and Management of MS—How to Differentiate Guy Jerome Buckle, MD, Atlanta, GA }} Neuroimaging in Neuro-oncology Laszlo Mechtler, MD, FAAN, FASN, Amherst, NY Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, PracticeBased Learning and Improvement, Systems-Based Practice Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Course Friday, April 27, 2018

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

C240 Neuroimaging for the General Neurologist II: Brain

Topic: General Neurology Director: Jennifer McVige, MD, Amherst, NY

J

Program Description: Neuroimaging is a critical tool to aid in the diagnosis and prognosis of neurologic conditions. Up-to-date information on these imaging advances is essential for neurologists who are continuously being scrutinized by payors who demand cost effective, but appropriate, care of patients. Faculty will discuss imaging modalities such as MRI, CT, and ultrasonography, as well as approaches to reading images, common causes, and differential diagnoses. The course will cover neuroanatomy of the brain as it relates to intra and extra cranial vasculature, white matter changes and multiple sclerosis, and neurooncology disorders. This program complements C228: Neuroimaging for the General Neurologist I: Brain, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to describe an organized approach to ordering and incorporating neuroimaging studies and sequences in the clinical practice of neurology. What neurologists need to know about MRI, CT, ultrasonography, and its sequences, as well as the future horizons in neuroimaging, will be presented.

AAN.com/view/AM18 91

General Neurology

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University


Global Health Overview

E

nhance your understanding of the incidence, prevalence, and risk factors of neurologic diseases and infections in different regions of the world, including in resource-limited areas. Look for education and science covering global health topics, and don’t miss the scientific platform sessions taking place in the dynamic, interactive experiential learning areas—all on one day! Global Health

Wednesday, April 25 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C134  Tuberculosis of the Central Nervous System 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C154  The Global Burden of Neurologic Diseases 3:30 p.m.–4:00 p.m. S32  Global Health Platform Session

Course Wednesday, April 25, 2018 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

C134 Tuberculosis of the Central Nervous System Topics:

Infectious Disease; Global Health Director: Jerome H. Chin, MD, PhD, MPH, FAAN, New York, NY

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See complete course description on page 100 »

Course Wednesday, April 25, 2018 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C154 The Global Burden of Neurologic Diseases

Topic: Global Health Director: Jerome H. Chin, MD, PhD, MPH, FAAN, New York, NY

Upon Completion: Participants should be familiar with the leading causes and treatment of epilepsy in Latin America, know the neurologic complications of HIV infection, and understand the importance of primary prevention for reducing the global burden of stroke. Lecture/Faculty: }} Epidemiology and Management of Epilepsy in Latin America Jorge G. Burneo, MD, MSPH, FAAN, London, ON, Canada }} Neurologic Manifestations of HIV Infection David B. Clifford, MD, FAAN, Saint Louis, MO }} Stroke Prevention in Low- and Middle-Income Countries Jerome H. Chin, MD, PhD, MPH, FAAN, New York, NY Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

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Program Description: Neurologic diseases, including stroke and neurologic infections, represent 10 percent of the total global burden of disease. The epidemiology, prevention, and treatment of neurologic diseases are constantly changing and vary by region, country, and populations. Faculty will present practical and up-to-date information on the global burden of neurologic diseases from the most recent observational studies, systematic reviews, and reports from the WHO, the CDC, and the Global Burden of Disease Study Collaborators. 92 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

Scientific Platform Session Wednesday, April 25, 2018 3:30 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

S32

Topic:

Global Health Platform Session Global Health

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Headache Overview

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Saturday, April 21

Wednesday, April 25

12:45 p.m.–1:45 p.m. X  Ask Us Anything: Expert Panel on Headache and Pain

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C137  What Do I Do Now?: Emergency and Inpatient Management of Migraine and Other Headache Disorders

Sunday, April 22 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C50  Low and High Pressure Headache: Clinical Presentation and Approach to Evaluation and Management

Monday, April 23 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C79  Comprehensive Migraine Education Program I: Diagnosis, Risk Factors, and Neurobiology 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C90  Comprehensive Migraine Education Program II: Behavioral and Psychological Approaches, and Preventive and Acute Treatment Advances

Tuesday, April 24 8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. S18  “Best of” Session: Headache 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C108  Introduction to Primary Headache Disorders I: Migraine and Other Primary Headaches Including Tension-Type, Hypnic, Primary Stabbing and Nummular Headache Syndromes, Epicrania Fugax and Retinal Migraine 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C121  Introduction to Primary Headache Disorders II: Trigeminal Autonomic Cephalalgias and Other Primary Headaches Including New Daily Persistent Headache, Cough, Exercise, and Thunderclap Headaches

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. S31  Headache Platform Session 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C185 Neurology Update III: Neuromuscular, Headache , and Stroke

Thursday, April 26 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C195  Practical Training in Injection Techniques in the Treatment of Headache Disorders Skills Workshop 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. S42  Headache Platform Session 6:30 p.m.–9:30 p.m. C214  Case Studies: Challenging Headache Cases

Friday, April 27 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C232  Hot Topics in Headaches and Related Disorders I: Migraine Pathophysiology, Brain Imaging, and Therapeutic Advances 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C243  Hot Topics in Headaches and Related Disorders II: Unusual Headaches, Childhood Headaches, and Concussion Management

AAN.com/view/AM18 93

Headache

hether you’re looking for high-level overviews on the latest diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of migraine, headache, and related disorders, or want deep dives into particularly challenging cases, the Annual Meeting has it. Look for the latest education in unusual and childhood headaches, low- and highpressure headache, injection treatment techniques, and emergency and inpatient management, as well as a “Best of” scientific session.


Program Descriptions Experiential Learning Area Saturday, April 21, 2018

12:45 p.m.–1:45 p.m.

Ask Us Anything: Expert Panel on Headache and Pain Topics:

Headache; Pain and Palliative Care Speakers: Todd D. Rozen, MD, FAAN, Jacksonville, FL Peter Goadsby, MD, PhD, San Francisco, CA Experiential Learning Area: HeadTalks

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Program Description: This lively interactive session will feature renowned experts in the field of Headache and Pain. The audience will be able to ask questions regarding difficult cases or seek opinions on challenges facing Headache and Pain sub specialty today.

Course Sunday, April 22, 2018

C50

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Low and High Pressure Headache: Clinical Presentation and Approach to Evaluation and Management

Topic: Headache Director: Kathleen B. Digre, MD, FAAN, Salt Lake City, UT

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Program Description: Headache is a common neurological complaint, but when the headache is associated with either high or low pressure, a complicated headache picture begins to emerge. In this course we will review the clinical approach to headaches associated with low and high pressure, discuss clues to recognizing headaches associated with low and high pressure, and review the evaluation and management of headaches using a case-based approach. Faculty will guide attendees through conundrums about the management of these disorders and highlight principles of treatment. Attendees are encouraged to submit cases to the faculty that could be used for discussion. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to describe the approach to diagnosing headache associated with high and low pressure and understand treatment options. Lecture/Faculty: }} Understanding Pressure and Headache Relationships Deborah I. Friedman, MD, MPH, FAAN, Dallas, TX }} Basic Recognition/Evaluation of Low Pressure Headache Syndromes Kathleen B. Digre, MD, FAAN, Salt Lake City, UT

94 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

Headache }} Basic Recognition/Evaluation of High Pressure Headache Syndromes Deborah I. Friedman, MD, MPH, FAAN, Dallas, TX }} Case Discussions Kathleen B. Digre, MD, FAAN, Salt Lake City, UT Deborah I. Friedman, MD, MPH, FAAN, Dallas, TX Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, PracticeBased Learning and Improvement Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Trainee

Course Monday, April 23, 2018

C79

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Comprehensive Migraine Education Program I: Diagnosis, Risk Factors, and Neurobiology

Topic: Headache Director: Gretchen E. Tietjen, MD, Toledo, OH

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Program Description: The Comprehensive Migraine Education Program (CMEP) was developed by the American Headache Society. The CMEP highlights epidemiologic data on the scope and distribution of migraine with an emphasis on chronic migraine, practical methods for diagnosing chronic migraine, and recent insights into the mechanisms of the disorder, setting the stage for improving treatment outcomes for this most disabling of headache disorders. The CMEP is designed to provide a comprehensive understanding of migraine with an emphasis on chronic migraine, as well as to better diagnose and treat these serious problems. This program complements C90: Comprehensive Migraine Education Program II: Behavioral and Psychological Approaches, and Preventative and Acute Treatment Advances, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to apply criteria for the clinical diagnosis and differential diagnosis of chronic migraine and episodic migraine using diagnostic algorithms; recognize the scope, burden, and distribution of chronic migraine in the population as well as the risk factors that predispose to it; and describe emerging insights into the pathophysiology of chronic migraine. Lecture/Faculty: }} Diagnosis of Chronic Migraine Morris Levin, MD, FAAN, San Francisco, CA }} Risk Factors and Prognosis of Chronic Migraine Richard B. Lipton, MD, FAAN, Bronx, NY }} Neurobiology of Chronic Migraine Stewart J. Tepper, MD, Lebanon, NH


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Scientific Platform Session Tuesday, April 24, 2018

S18

Topic:

“Best of” Session: Headache Headache

Course Monday, April 23, 2018

C90

Topic: Headache Director: Gretchen E. Tietjen, MD, Toledo, OH

J

Program Description: The Comprehensive Migraine Education Program (CMEP) was developed by the American Headache Society to provide a comprehensive understanding of migraine, particularly chronic migraine, in order to improve diagnosis and treatment of this serious condition. Comprehensive Migraine Education Program II reviews treatment options, including pharmacological, device, behavioral and psychological approaches for migraine prevention and management of acute attacks. This program complements C79: Comprehensive Migraine Education Program I: Diagnosis, Risk Factors, and Neurobiology, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to describe the preventive management of chronic migraine, including behavioral and psychological approaches, and advances in the treatment of acute attacks. Lecture/Faculty: }} Behavioral and Psychological Aspects of Migraine Dawn C. Buse, PhD, Bronx, NY }} Preventive Treatment of Chronic Migraine Bert B. Vargas, MD, FAAN, Richardson, TX }} Acute Treatment of Migraine Gretchen E. Tietjen, MD, Toledo, OH Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, PracticeBased Learning and Improvement Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

G Course

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Comprehensive Migraine Education Program II: Behavioral and Psychological Approaches, and Preventive and Acute Treatment Advances

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Tuesday, April 24, 2018

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C108 Introduction to Primary Headache Disorders I: Migraine and Other Primary Headaches Including Tension-Type, Hypnic, Primary Stabbing and Nummular Headache Syndromes, Epicrania Fugax and Retinal Migraine

Topic: Headache Director: Deborah I. Friedman, MD, MPH, FAAN, Dallas, TX

J

Program Description: Primary headaches are recurrent headaches that are not attributable to an identifiable cause, such as a neoplasm, cerebrovascular condition, or intracranial pressure disorder. The most common primary headache disorders are migraine, cluster, and tension-type headache. Neurologists may encounter patients with other lesserknown primary headache disorders in practice. This course focuses on the primary headache syndromes, including their epidemiology, clinical manifestations, differential diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment using case-based scenarios. It includes migraine, tensiontype headache, primary stabbing headache, nummular headache, hemicrania continua, hypnic headache, and epicrania fugax. This program complements C121: Introduction to Primary Headache Disorders II: Trigeminal Autonomic Cephalalgias and Other Primary Headaches Including New Daily Persistent Headache, Cough, Exercise, and Thunderclap Headaches, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants will be able to diagnose and evaluate migraine and other primary headache disorders, and formulate a treatment plan using updated evidence-based treatment guidelines. Lecture/Faculty: }} Migraine Lawrence C. Newman, MD, FAAN, New York, NY }} Other Primary Headache Disorders (Nummular, Primary Stabbing, Tension-Type, Epicrania Fugax) Deborah I. Friedman, MD, MPH, FAAN, Dallas, TX Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, PracticeBased Learning and Improvement

AAN.com/view/AM18 95

Headache

Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, PracticeBased Learning and Improvement


Program Descriptions

Headache

Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic

CME Credits:  2

CME Credits:  2

Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Trainee

Course Tuesday, April 24, 2018

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

C121 Introduction to Primary Headache Disorders

II: Trigeminal Autonomic Cephalalgias and Other Primary Headaches Including New Daily Persistent Headache, Cough, Exercise, and Thunderclap Headaches

Topic: Headache Director: Christopher J. Boes, MD, FAAN, Rochester, MN

J

Program Description: Primary headache disorders are those that are not attributable to an underlying secondary condition, like a brain neoplasm. The most well-recognized primary headache subtypes are migraine, cluster, and tension-type headache, but there are many more primary headache disorders listed in the International Classification of Headache Disorders that neurologists should be aware of, as they may encounter them in their clinical practice. This introductory course will focus on the primary headache syndromes and will delve into their epidemiology, clinical presentation, and treatment, using case-based scenarios. Faculty will focus on the trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias and lesser known headache conditions, including new daily persistent headache, cough headache, exercise headache, headache associated with sexual activity, and primary thunderclap headache. This program complements C108: Introduction to Primary Headache Disorders I: Migraine and Other Primary Headaches Including Tension-Type, Hypnic, Primary Stabbing and Nummular Headache Syndromes, Epicrania Fugax and Retinal Migraine, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be familiar with how to diagnose and treat various primary headache disorders; become familiar with the International Classification of Headache Disorders, 3rd edition (beta version); be able to define various subtypes of trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias; and identify specific treatment for these subtypes. Lecture/Faculty: }} Trigeminal Autonomic Cephalalgias Christopher J. Boes, MD, FAAN, Rochester, MN }} Other Primary Headache Disorders Todd D. Rozen, MD, FAAN, Jacksonville, FL Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, PracticeBased Learning and Improvement Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic

96 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

Course Wednesday, April 25, 2018 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

C137 What Do I Do Now?: Emergency and

Inpatient Management of Migraine and Other Headache Disorders

Topic: Headache Director: Stephanie J. Nahas, MD, FAAN, Philadelphia, PA

J

Program Description: A combined case-based and didactic approach will illustrate empiric and evidence-based diagnosis and management strategies for patients presenting with headache in the urgent or inpatient setting. Topics to be covered include migraine, trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias, secondary headaches, and others. Four illustrative cases will serve as the backbone of this course. Each faculty member will bring one case for discussion, and the last case may be submitted from a member of the AAN. One faculty member will lead each case discussion, but all will participate as part of a panel. If interested in submitting your case, please email stephanie.nahas@ jefferson.edu by February 1, 2018. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to discuss the diagnostic approach to patients with headache in the emergency department or hospital and explain the process and rationale for selecting therapy. Lecture/Faculty: }} Case #1 Faculty }} Case #2 Faculty }} Case #3 Faculty }} Case #4 Faculty Core Competencies:  Patient Care, Medical Knowledge Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Panel Discussion CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

Wednesday, April 25, 2018 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

S31

Topic:

Headache Platform Session Headache

G Course

Thursday, April 26, 2018

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C185 Neurology Update III: Neuromuscular,

Lecture/Faculty: }} Hands-on Training Morris Levin, MD, FAAN, San Francisco, CA Matthew S. Robbins, MD, FAAN, Bronx, NY Thomas N. Ward, MD, FAAN, Norwich, VT Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, PracticeBased Learning and Improvement Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Interactive, Hands on Practice CME Credits:  4 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Headache, and Stroke

Topics:

General Neurology; Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG); Cerebrovasular Disease and Interventional Neurology; Headache Director: Adam Quick, MD, Columbus, OH

J

Scientific Platform Session Thursday, April 26, 2018

S42

Topic:

Headache Platform Session Headache

See complete course description on page 85 »

Skills Workshop Thursday, April 26, 2018

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

G Course

Thursday, April 26, 2018

6:30 p.m.–9:30 p.m.

Case Studies: Challenging Headache Cases C195 Practical Training in Injection Techniques in C214 Topic: Headache the Treatment of Headache Disorders Skills Workshop $ (registration required) Topic:

Headache; Pain and Palliative Care Director: Morris Levin, MD, FAAN, San Francisco, CA

J

Program Description: This will be a practical training course for a limited number of participants. Skills taught will include nerve blockade—greater and lesser occipital nerves, supraorbital and supratrochlear nerves, and auriculotemporal nerve; posterior cervical and temporomandibular trigger point injections; and botulinum toxin injections using the FDAapproved protocol for chronic migraine. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to perform the key cranial nerve blocks and key trigger point injections used in the management of headache disorders, and perform onabotulinum toxin injections used in the treatment of chronic migraine.

Director: Deborah I. Friedman. MD, MPH, FAAN, Dallas, TX

J

Program Description: We learn the basics and guidelines on many headache diagnoses and treatments, but how do we apply this knowledge to real-life cases that we are challenged by in every day practice where the basics are not enough and even guidelines do not help us? This course is designed to challenge the attendee and the presenters as we work through complex headache cases—highlighting challenges to diagnosis, evaluation, interpretation, and treatment of complex cases. Faculty will highlight guidelines and best practice, with the assumption that attendees have had some basic headache background and are willing to grapple with complex issues in headache through discussion, sharing, and even debate. Cases will be posted ahead of time, with references and key points about the cases posted upon completion of the session. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to diagnose a variety of headache disorders often with confusing presentations, formulate treatment plans that can incorporate multi-disciplinary regimens, analyze drug treatment side effects as well as interactions in therapeutic options, recognize the importance of co-morbidities that contribute to complexity in headache diagnosis and treatment, and integrate these factors into a therapeutic plan. AAN.com/view/AM18 97

Headache

Scientific Platform Session


Program Descriptions Lecture/Faculty: }} Challenging Cases in Headache Deborah I. Friedman, MD, MPH, FAAN, Dallas, TX Stephanie J. Nahas, MD, FAAN, Philadelphia, PA Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, PracticeBased Learning and Improvement Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Interactive CME Credits:  3 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Trainee

Course Friday, April 27, 2018

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C232 Hot Topics in Headaches and Related

Disorders I: Migraine Pathophysiology, Brain Imaging, and Therapeutic Advances

Topic: Headache Director: Andrew Charles, MD, Los Angeles, CA

J

Program Description: This program will address a range of emerging issues relevant to clinical practice. Faculty will cover important changes in the understanding of migraine pathophysiology, explore the latest in brain imaging and how it can be used to classify the disorder, and cover the newest therapeutic advances to prepare physicians for what is to come in terms of novel treatments for migraine patients. This program complements C243: Hot Topics in Headaches and Related Disorders II: Unusual Headaches, Childhood Headaches, and Concussion Management, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to incorporate a better understanding of migraine pathophysiology and imaging in their care of patients, and become aware of new treatments that are currently available or on the immediate horizon. Lecture/Faculty: }} An Update on Migraine Pathophsyiology Andrew Charles, MD, Los Angeles, CA }} An Update on Imaging in Headache Todd J. Schwedt, MD, FAAN, Phoenix, AZ }} New and Emerging Therapies for Headache Peter Goadsby, MD, PhD, San Francisco, CA Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, Child Neurologist

98 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

Headache

Course Friday, April 27, 2018

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

C243 Hot Topics in Headaches and Related

Disorders II: Unusual Headaches, Childhood Headaches, and Concussion Management

Topic: Headache Director: Amy Gelfand, MD, San Francisco, CA

J

Program Description: This program will address a range of issues relevant to clinical practice that are developing or emerged in recent years. Faculty will cover important updates in the understanding of and management of unusual primary headache disorders, headache in children and adolescents (with a particular focus on migraine), and concussion. The newest therapeutic advances will be covered to prepare physicians for what is to come in terms of novel treatments. This program complements C232: Hot Topics in Headaches and Related Disorders I: Migraine Pathophysiology, Brain Imaging, and Therapeutic Advances, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to explain more completely to patients (adult and pediatric) the pathophysiology of cluster headache, migraine, and post-traumatic headache, as well as new treatments for the same. Lecture/Faculty: }} Unusual Headache Disorders and Emerging Therapies Faculty }} Treating Headache in Children and Adolescents Amy Gelfand, MD, San Francisco, CA }} Rules of the Game for Optimal Concussion Management Christopher Giza, MD, Los Angeles, CA Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee


Infectious Disease Overview

I

f your schedule won’t allow you to stay for the whole meeting, maximize your time in Los Angeles and get the most out of a shorter trip with this Neuroinfectious Disease specialty track, with core programming taking place Wednesday to Friday. Look for education and science covering the full spectrum neuroinfectious disease topics, including differential diagnosis, treatment and management, diagnostic testing, and emergencies.

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C95  Spanish Symposium: Update on CNS Infections and Tropical Medicine

Wednesday, April 25 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C134  Tuberculosis of the Central Nervous System 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C144  Neurology Update I: Epilepsy, Behavioral Neurology, and Neurologic Infections

Thursday, April 26 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C177  So You’ve Diagnosed Your Patient with a Neuroinfectious Disease, Now What? Practical Pearls in the Treatment and Management of Neuroinfectious Diseases

Course Monday, April 23, 2018

C95

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Spanish Symposium: Update on CNS Infections and Tropical Medicine

Topics:

Infectious Disease; MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease Director: Oscar H. Del Brutto, MD, FAAN, Miami, FL

JK

Program Description: Infectious diseases of the central nervous system affect millions of people in tropical areas, where most of these conditions are linked to poverty and underdevelopment. In addition, increased tourism and immigration have turned some formerly geographically restricted infections into widespread conditions. Parasites and viruses are top ranked among infectious diseases in the tropics. In addition, tropical neurology is not confined to infections, since other conditions such as nutritional and toxic disorders, as well as bites from snakes and other poisonous animals represent significant causes of disease in rural areas of these regions. Infections and other tropical diseases of the nervous system cause pleomorphic and nonspecific clinical syndromes, including seizure disorders, subacute or chronic meningitis, acute or subacute encephalitis, space-occupying brain lesions, stroke, and

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. S40  Infectious Disease Platform Session 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C201  Differential Diagnosis of Neurologic Infections

Friday, April 27 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C218  Infections of the Nervous System I: Diagnostic Testing of Neurological Infections 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C226  Infections of the Nervous System II: Neuro-ID Emergencies 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C239  Infections of the Nervous System III: Advanced Topics in Infectious Neurology

myelopathy. In this course we will review the most common tropical diseases in the tropics. This program will be presented in Spanish. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to recognize and treat the most common infections and other diseases affecting the nervous system in tropical areas. Lecture/Faculty: }} Neuroviruses Emerging in the Americas Study (NEAS) Carlos A. Pardo-Villamizar, MD, Baltimore, MD }} Advances in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Neurocysticercosis Oscar H. Del Brutto, MD, FAAN, Miami, FL }} Nutritional Diseases of the Nervous System in the Tropics Gustavo C. Roman, MD, FAAN, Houston, TX }} Case Discussions Oscar H. Del Brutto, MD, FAAN, Miami, FL Daniel Ontaneda, MD, Cleveland, OH Carlos A. Pardo-Villamizar, MD, Baltimore, MD Gustavo C. Roman, MD, FAAN, Houston, TX Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge Teaching Style:  Didactic, Audience Participation, Case-Based CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee AAN.com/view/AM18 99

Infectious Disease

Monday, April 23


Program Descriptions

Infectious Disease

Course Wednesday, April 25, 2018 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Course Wednesday, April 25, 2018 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C134 Tuberculosis of the Central Nervous System C144 Neurology Update I: Epilepsy, Behavioral Neurology, and Neurologic Infections

Topics:

Infectious Disease; Global Health Director: Jerome H. Chin, MD, PhD, MPH, FAAN, New York, NY

J

Program Description: Tuberculosis is the leading infectious cause of death in the world with cases reported in every region. Central nervous system tuberculosis, including meningitis, tuberculomas, and vertebral involvement, carries the highest morbidity and mortality. With increasing global migration and travel, neurologists in all countries need to be prepared to diagnosis and treat tuberculosis. The faculty will discuss the current guidelines and recent advances in the diagnosis and treatment of central nervous system tuberculosis. Case presentations will be used to provide practical guidance. Upon Completion: Participants should be familiar with the different clinical presentations of central nervous system tuberculosis, understand the advantages and limitations of diagnostic studies, and be able to make a diagnosis using available clinical, laboratory, and imaging findings. Lecture/Faculty: }} Global and Regional Epidemiology of Tuberculosis Jaydeep M. Bhatt, MD, New York, NY }} Challenges and Developments in the Diagnosis of Tuberculous Meningitis Omar Siddiqi, MD, Lusaka, Zambia }} Case Presentations and Tuberculosis Treatment Guidelines Jerome H. Chin, MD, PhD, MPH, FAAN, New York, NY Core Competencies:  Patient Care, Medical Knowledge Teaching Style:  Didactic, Case-Based CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, Neurohospitalist, Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist

Topics:

 eneral Neurology; G Epilepsy/Clinical Neurophysiology (EEG); Aging, Dementia, Cognitive, and Behavioral Neurology; Infectious Disease Director: Ralph F. Józefowicz, MD, FAAN, Rochester, NY

J

See complete course description on page 82 »

Course Thursday, April 26, 2018

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

C177 So You’ve Diagnosed Your Patient with

a Neuroinfectious Disease, Now What? Practical Pearls in the Treatment and Management of Neuroinfectious Diseases

Topic: Infectious Disease Director: Felicia Chow, MD, San Francisco, CA

J

Program Description: This case-based interactive course will focus on the management of patients with infections of the nervous system and associated neurological complications. An interdisciplinary panel of experts from both neurology and infectious diseases will share their approach to challenging neuroinfectious diseases cases. An emphasis will be placed on an up-to-date, evidence-based approach to complicated cases combined with on-the-ground experience from clinical experts in the field. Upon Completion: Participants will have increased familiarity and confidence with the evaluation and management of neuroinfectious diseases, including selection of antimicrobial therapy; CNS penetration and neurological toxicities of antimicrobial therapy; timing and duration of corticosteroid therapy for neurological infections; management of common complications of CNS infections (e.g., increased intracranial pressure, hyponatremia, vasculitis); utility of laboratories for monitoring response to therapy. Lecture/Faculty: }} Case One Usha K. Misra, MD, FAAN, Lucknow, India }} Case Two David Koelle, MD, Seattle, WA Maria A. Nagel, MD, Aurora, CO Core Competencies:  Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement

100 2018 AAN Annual Meeting


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Scientific Platform Session Thursday, April 26, 2018

S40

Topic:

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Course Friday, April 27, 2018

C218 Infections of the Nervous System I: Diagnostic Testing of Neurological Infections

Topic: Infectious Disease Director: Tracey Cho, MD, FAAN, Boston, MA

J

Infectious Disease Platform Session Infectious Disease

G

Course Thursday, April 26, 2018

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

C201 Differential Diagnosis of Neurologic Infections

Topic: Infectious Disease Director: Marie Francisca Grill, MD, Scottsdale, AZ

J

Program Description: Differential diagnosis of patients with possible neurologic infections will be presented to discuss diagnostic considerations, imaging, cerebrospinal fluid interpretation, PCR testing and other microbiologic tests, as well as mimicking disorders. Specific topics will include cases highlighting coverage of encephalitis, meningitis, and myelitis. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to improve their ability to form a more precise differential diagnosis of possible neurologic infections, and to recognize specific laboratory tests and imaging findings that can guide the differential diagnosis accordingly.

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Program Description: This program will provide an overview of the laboratory and imaging studies available for timely and accurate diagnosis of a range of infections of the nervous system. Faculty will provide updates on the appropriate use of currently available tests, including sensitivity and specificity, as well as comment on emerging diagnostic modalities. Case discussions with audience questions will be encouraged. This program complements C226: Infections of the Nervous System II: Neuro-ID Emergencies and C239: Infections of the Nervous System III: Advanced Topics in Infectious Neurology, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to effectively order and interpret laboratory and imaging studies for timely and accurate diagnosis of infections of the nervous system. Lecture/Faculty: }} Diagnostic Laboratory Testing for CNS Infections Michael R. Wilson, MD, San Francisco, CA }} Diagnostic Imaging for CNS Infections Tracey Cho, MD, FAAN, Boston, MA Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Trainee, General Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist

Lecture/Faculty: }} Encephalitis Avindra Nath, MD, MBBS, FAAN, Bethesda, MD }} Chronic Meningitis Israel Steiner, MD, Petah Tiqva, Israel }} Myelopathies Marie Francisca Grill, MD, Scottsdale, AZ Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Interactive CME Credits   2 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

AAN.com/view/AM18 101

Infectious Disease

Teaching Style:  Interactive, Expert Panel, Audience Participation, Case-Based


Program Descriptions

Infectious Disease

Course Friday, April 27, 2018

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C226 Infections of the Nervous System II: Neuro‑ID Emergencies

Topic: Infectious Disease Director: Tracey Cho, MD, FAAN, Boston, MA

J

Program Description: Infections of the nervous system can present acutely and cause permanent neurologic disability or death. Prompt diagnosis and appropriate treatment can mitigate the morbidity and mortality of acute CNS infections. Faculty will focus on acute meningitis and encephalitis, with an emphasis on diagnosis and management of these relatively common infectious syndromes. Syndromic approach to diagnosis and case discussions with audience questions will be encouraged. This program complements C218: Infections of the Nervous System I: Diagnostic Testing of Neurological Infections and C239: Infections of the Nervous System III: Advanced Topics in Infectious Neurology, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to recognize, differentiate, and manage common acute infections of the nervous system. Lecture/Faculty: }} Meningitis Christina Marra, MD, FAAN, Seattle, WA }} Acute Encephalitis: From Infections to Autoimmunity Arun Venkatesan, MD, PhD, Baltimore, MD Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

102 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

Course Friday, April 27, 2018

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

C239 Infections of the Nervous System III:

Advanced Topics in Infectious Neurology

Topic: Infectious Disease Director: Tracey Cho, MD, FAAN, Boston, MA

J

Program Description: This program will provide an overview of advanced topics in infections of the central nervous system. Faculty will provide updates on the appropriate approach to diagnosis and management of a neurological Lyme disease and infectious causes of stroke. Case discussions with audience questions will be encouraged. This program complements C218: Infections of the Nervous System I: Diagnostic Testing of Neurological Infections and C226: Infections of the Nervous System II: Neuro-ID Emergencies, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to identify current diagnostic algorithms and treatment recommendations for a variety of advanced infections and infectious complications affecting the central nervous system. Lecture/Faculty: }} Brain Abscess Kelly Baldwin, MD, Danville, PA }} Neuro-HIV Felicia Chow, MD, San Francisco, CA Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee


Leadership University Overview

B

Saturday, April 21

Tuesday, April 24

7:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m. C7  Women in Leadership

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C105  Mentoring…Growing the Next Generation of Neurologist

12:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m. C16  Leadership Challenges in Practice

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C118  Leadership in the Era of Burnout: A Practical Approach to Becoming a True Physician Leader

1:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m. C18  Educators’ Leadership Course

Sunday, April 22 1:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m. C45  Being a Resilient Leader: How Do You Lead the Change? 1:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m. C46  The Most Important Tool in Your Black Bag: Gallup StrengthsFinders™ Assessment

Wednesday, April 25 1:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m. C157  Advanced Leadership Training: Preparing for Your Career’s Insurmountable Opportunities 1:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m. C158  Leadership Strengths in Neurology: The Data, Tools and Practical Application of Strengths for Leadership, Team Building, and Personal Development

Monday, April 23 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C69  Continuing Your Leadership Journey: Uncharted Waters 1:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m. C81  Mitigating the Impact of Unconscious Bias Workshop 4:15 p.m.–5:00 p.m. X  From Member to Leader: How to Engage with the AAN

AAN.com/view/AM18 103

Leadership

uild your leadership skills to take your career to the next level! These leadership course offerings have something for everyone, at every career stage. Choose from courses designed for women and those focused on leadership challenges in practice to those open to anyone who wants a deeper understanding of their strengths and how to use them to work more effectively. Note that some of these courses require advance registration.


Program Descriptions Course Saturday, April 21, 2018

C7

7:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m.

L Women in Leadership $ (registration required)

Topic: Leadership Directors: Janice M. Massey, MD, FAAN, Durham, NC Orly Avitzur, MD, MBA, FAAN, Tarrytown, NY Keri Bischoff, Gallup Certified Strength Consultant Saint Paul, MN Julie Anderson, Gallup Certified Strength Consultant Stillwater, MN

DEC

Program Description: This customized program will help participants understand how they uniquely influence and lead and reveal a personalized look at leadership style. Discover how you authentically lead using your natural talents, realizing that when we try to be who you’re not, it’s exhausting! Presenters will identify common experiences and leadership issues using personal stories of women in neurology. Through interactive conversation and guided exercises you’ll create a customized Strengths-based Leadership Statement: Your guide to being the best leader you can be. No two leaders are alike, and no two challenges will be solved in the same manner. We approach each situation in our own way, seeing the world through our own lens. The language of Strengths will help you understand how you’re wired to come at the world so that you can lead more intentionally and effectively. Upon Completion: Participants will be empowered through the affirming language of Strengths to lead and influence with more authenticity, confidence, and intention in areas of communication, negotiation, and work life balance. Lecture/Faculty: }} The Language of StrengthsFinder: Understanding Individual Leadership Skills Through Our Strengths to Develop a Customized Leadership Statement Julie Anderson, Stillwater, MN Keri Bischoff, Saint Paul, MN }} Communication Skills: Conveying Confidence by Identifying Blind Spots for More Effective Presentation Skills as a Leader Orly Avitzur, MD, MBA, FAAN, Tarrytown, NY Janice M. Massey, MD, FAAN, Durham, NC }} Gender Disparity and Negotiation Skills Faculty }} Well-Being: How Strengths Influence Our Needs Resulting in Improved Work-life Balance and Complimentary Partnerships to Help Accomplish Our Leadership Goals Julie Anderson, Stillwater, MN Orly Avitzur, MD, MBA, FAAN, Tarrytown, NY Keri Bischoff, Saint Paul, MN Janice M. Massey, MD, FAAN, Durham, NC

104 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

Leadership University }} Panel Discussion: Supportive Voices from Top Women Leaders in Neurology Faculty Core Competencies:  Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Professionalism Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Interactive CME Credits:  0 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Course Saturday, April 21, 2018

C16

12:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

L Leadership Challenges in Practice

Topics:

Leadership; Practice, Policy, and Ethics Director: Brad C. Klein, MD, MBA, FAAN, Willow Grove, PA

DEF

Program Description: Neurologists face more challenges than ever to be successful in clinical practice. In either employed or private practice models, leadership skills have a positive impact on individual and organizational success. This program will discuss relationship development and communication techniques to improve leadership effectiveness within an organization of any size, as well as tools to successfully negotiate with health care systems, insurers, and regulatory agencies; refine analytical skills to properly implement an economical and useful EHR system; evaluate and improve work flows and processes to increase new sources of revenue; and increase patient/provider satisfaction while meeting regulatory demands. Upon Completion: Participants should understand the fundamentals of organizational behavior and will have tools to impact change in all practice sizes, mitigate the economic and regulatory demands of a practicing neurologist in the US health care system, and ensure high-quality and rewarding care remains top priority in large organizations and independent practice settings. Lecture/Faculty: }} Leadership and Temperament James C. Stevens, MD, FAAN, Fort Wayne, IN }} Leadership in Practice Efficiency and Patient/Provider Satisfaction Brad C. Klein, MD, MBA, FAAN, Willow Grove, PA }} Managing Negotiations Jonathan P. Hosey, MD, FAAN, Bethlehem, PA }} Leadership and Health Information Technology Allen L. Gee, MD, PhD, FAAN, Cody, WY }} Making Neurology’s Case for Health Care Value in 2018 Daniel M. Feinberg, MD, FAAN, Philadelphia, PA


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

CME Credits:  0 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Course

C18

1:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

L Educators' Leadership Course (application required)

Topic: Leadership Director: Jaffar Khan, MD, FAAN, Atlanta, GA

DE

Program Description: Neurology clerkship and program directors are among the most important gatekeepers of our pipeline to careers in neurology. In many cases, these education leaders are responsible for the first contact with potential candidates for the future workforce in neurology. This course is designed to optimize the skill set of these influential leaders. The target audience is program directors, associate program directors, and clerkship directors that have been in their roles three to four years. Up to 10 program directors and 10 clerkship directors will be selected to participate via an application process. Upon Completion: The objective of this program is to develop, enhance, and strengthen the leadership attributes/skills/potential of neurology clerkship and program directors, and provide selected candidates the opportunity to develop personal awareness, understand principles of leadership, and enhance interpersonal skills as they relate to their role as leaders in education. Lecture/Faculty: }} Qualities, Principles, and Responsibilities of Leadership Ralph F. Józefowicz, MD, FAAN, Rochester, NY }} Leading as a Team Madhu Soni, MD, Chicago, IL }} Strategic Thinking Joseph E. Safdieh, MD, FAAN, New York, NY }} Negotiation Skills/Conflict Resolution Rana R. Said, MD, Dallas, TX Core Competencies:  Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Professionalism Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Interactive CME Credits:  0 Recommended Audience:  Program Directors, Associate Program Directors and Clerkship Directors

Sunday, April 22, 2018

C45

Teaching Style:  Didactic

Saturday, April 21, 2018

Course 1:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

L Being a Resilient Leader: How Do You Lead the Change?

Topic: Leadership Directors: Heidi B. Schwarz, MD, FAAN, Rochester, NY Jennifer Rose Molano, MD, FAAN, Cincinnati, OH

HDEC

Program Description: The issue of burnout is prevalent in medicine and neurology, with personal, professional, and organizational implications. We all have the potential to be leaders of change in our work units and organizations to promote wellness and resilience. Those efforts can fuel policy changes at a state and national level. In this four-hour, interactive course, faculty will share the current knowledge and creative approaches to addressing factors contributing to burnout in the work unit and organization, as well as the economic argument for institutions to address burnout. Small group sessions will allow participants to use this information to formulate their own plan for promoting resilience and how to advocate for this. A panel of current leaders who have addressed these issues in their own practice/organization will share their interventions including successes and roadblocks. The goal is to empower neurologists to become leaders in their communities to increase personal engagement within one’s organization, practice, or institution. Upon Completion: Participants will be able to use the information about the prevalence and impact of burnout to fuel changes within the work unit and organizational structure to increase engagement and resilience for not only the participants but other team members; discuss challenges in promoting resiliency at one’s local organization, clinic, or institution; and identify strategies to promote resiliency and professionalism in the culture of one’s local organization, clinic, or institution. Lecture/Faculty: }} Approaching Burnout and Wellness: Organizational Perspectives and Challenges Jennifer Rose Molano, MD, FAAN, Cincinnati, OH Heidi B. Schwarz, MD, FAAN, Rochester, NY }} Small Group Breakouts on Individual Opportunities and Challenges Faculty }} Sharing Small Group Ideas with All Participants Faculty }} Panel Discussion: Interventions to Promote Resiliency Faculty Core Competencies:  Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Professionalism Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Interactive CME Credits:  0 Recommended Audience:  Neurohospitalist, Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee AAN.com/view/AM18 105

Leadership

Core Competencies:  Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement, Professionalism, Systems-Based Practice


Program Descriptions Course Sunday, April 22, 2018

C46

1:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

L The Most Important Tool in Your Black

Bag: Gallup StrengthsFinders™ Assessment

Leadership University Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Interactive CME Credits:  0 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

$ (registration required)

Topic: Leadership Directors: Keri Bischoff, Gallup Certified Strength Consultant Saint Paul, MN Julie Anderson, Gallup Certified Strength Consultant Stillwater, MN

DEC

Program Description: "A leader needs to know his strengths as a carpenter knows his tools, or a physician knows the instruments at her disposal.” - Donald Clifton Back by popular demand, this is the foundation for all AAN Strengths learning in neurology. In this customized half-day workshop, Gallup Certified consultants Keri Bischoff and Julie Anderson will share a language for understanding your unique strengths, which has powerful application for well being and happiness. Through customized exercises, materials, and conversations this interactive workshop encourages a new perspective through your own unique lens. Using the science behind the StrengthsFinder™ assessment we’ll discover your top five talent themes, and a positive language to leverage what’s right. We’ll share ways this approach can change the culture of your organization through engagement, which leads to increased productivity, patient satisfaction, and peer understanding. Gallup research reveals that in health care, relationships are key. How can we optimize communication skills? To patients, feelings are facts: How do you relate to others, and how do others experience you? Do you know? Online assessment required prior to workshop, access code provided. *Prerequisite for Program ll—Leadership Strengths in Neurology: The Data, Tools and Practical Application of Strengths for Leadership, Team Building, and Personal Development. Upon Completion: Participants will attain actionable, customized insight into their own unique strengths, leading to greater well-being and awareness of individual and team communication styles in organizational contexts for personal and professional development. Lecture/Faculty: }} Foundation of Gallup StrengthsFinder™ Philosophy Keri Bischoff, Saint Paul, MN }} Applying Strengths Personally and Professionally Julie Anderson, Stillwater, MN }} Organizational Application Keri Bischoff, Saint Paul, MN }} Communication, Strengths, and Misperceptions Julie Anderson, Stillwater, MN Core Competencies:  Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Professionalism

106 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

Course Monday, April 23, 2018

C69

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

L Continuing Your Leadership Journey: Uncharted Waters (registration required)

Topic: Leadership Director: Barbara L. Hoese, President, Pentacore Coaching, Victoria, MN

DE

Program Description: You’ve committed to leadership. Now what? After successfully completing the AAN’s leadership program, you set off equipped with new skills for leading. As you increased your proficiency with those skills, you took on great leadership roles. Along with those new opportunities, you ran into a roadblock or two that you hadn’t encountered before. You may be realizing it’s time to refresh your skills and to take your leadership to the next level. Join your colleagues to reconnect and learn from each other’s experience on the path to a higher level of leading. Bring a challenge that you are currently facing and get ideas on how to see your issue in a different light, reframe it into an opportunity, and create new solutions. To register for this course, please email Amy Nostdahl at anostdahl@aan.com. Space is limited and will be offered on a first come, first serve basis. Lecture/Faculty: }} Leadership Challenges: Big, Hairy Problems and Everyday Trials Barbara L. Hoese, Victoria, MN }} Relationships: Partners, Allies and Confidants Barbara L. Hoese, Victoria, MN }} Renewing Your Commitment: Holding Fast Barbara L. Hoese, Victoria, MN Core Competencies:  Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Professionalism Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Interactive CME Credits:  0 Recommended Audience:  Leadership Program Graduates


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

Course

C81

1:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

L Mitigating the Impact of Unconscious Bias Workshop

Topic: Leadership Director: Laraine Kaminsky, CEO, Global LK, Ottawa, ON, Canada

D

Program Description: During this informative, participatory, and engaging workshop, faculty will explore the science of unconscious bias, with a specific focus on the impact of bias and resulting disparities in the health care sector. The facilitator will define and explain the differences between bias and unconscious bias: - Bias- A judgment/decision made consciously even with compelling data and information to the contrary. - Unconscious Bias- A quick and often inaccurate judgment/ decision based on limited facts and our own life experiences which gives certain individuals and groups both unearned advantage and unearned disadvantage in the workplace, workforce, and community. Lecture/Faculty: }} Moving from Diversity to Inclusion Laraine Kaminsky, Ottawa, ON, Canada }} Barriers to Inclusion: Unconscious Bias Laraine Kaminsky, Ottawa, ON, Canada }} The Impact of Bias Laraine Kaminsky, Ottawa, ON, Canada }} Conscious Inclusion: Reflecting on Personal, Team, and Organizational Next Steps Laraine Kaminsky, Ottawa, ON, Canada }} Key Leadership Competencies for Inclusice Leaders Laraine Kaminsky, Ottawa, ON, Canada Core Competencies:  Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Patient Care, Professionalism Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Interactive CME Credits:  0 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Monday, April 23, 2018

4:15 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

From Member to Leader: How to Engage with the AAN Topic: Leadership Speakers: Jeffrey C. McClean, II, MD, FAAN, San Antonio, TX Terrence L. Cascino, MD, FAAN, Rochester, MN Christine E. Phelps, Minneapolis, MN Experiential Learning Area: HeadTalks

DE

Program Description: Have you ever wondered how do I get involved with the American Academy of Neurology? Do you feel that you have a voice that needs to be heard? Come to this presentation to hear an overview of leadership opportunities available at the American Academy of Neurology.

Course Tuesday, April 24, 2018

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C105 L Mentoring…Growing the Next Generation of Neurologist

$ (registration required) Topic: Leadership Director: Joanne Smikle, PhD, Ellicott City, MD, Principal Consultant, Smikle Training Services

DE

Program Description: This session focuses on the competencies required to build strong developmental relationships. It emphasizes the factors required to successfully build mentoring relationships with physicians or staff from different settings and at different stages of practice. The presenter will explore the distinctions between coaching and mentoring, provide a framework for building a solid mentoring relationship, and offer approaches for maximizing the mentor/ mentee relationship. Participants are encouraged to bring their questions and dilemmas related to mentoring as there will be many opportunities for large and small group discussions during the session. The session includes clear guidelines for establishing and maintaining productive mentor/mentee relationships. Lecture/Faculty: }} Mentoring…Growing the Next Generation of Neurologist Joanne Smikle, PhD, Ellicott City, MD Core Competencies:  Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Professionalism Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Interactive CME Credits:  0

AAN.com/view/AM18 107

Leadership

Monday, April 23, 2018

Experiential Learning Area


Program Descriptions Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Course Tuesday, April 24, 2018

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C118 L Leadership in the Era of Burnout: A

Practical Approach to Becoming a True Physician Leader

Topic: Leadership Director: Terrence L. Cascino, MD, FAAN, Rochester, MN

Leadership University and life. Leaders from private practice and from academia will share their perspectives and consider ways of setting and reaching new goals. This workshop will bring together people from many career stages to consider how one can shift gears and pursue highlyproductive, generative, and creative activities as a practitioner, educator, or researcher. The format will include panel discussions with neurologists "who have been there," as well as discussions among participants and facilitator Richard Leider of "Life Reimagined." Topics and issues that will be considered include: mentoring, global opportunities, focusing on your mission, fostering diversity, and supporting your passion. Other experienced practitioners and AAN leaders will lead breakout groups in creative discussions of your career and goals, as well as their own.

Lecture/Faculty: }} Strategic Leadership Terrence L. Cascino, MD, FAAN, Rochester, MN }} Preventing Burnout and Promoting Wellness Terrence L. Cascino, MD, FAAN, Rochester, MN }} Change Management and Critical Conversations Terrence L. Cascino, MD, FAAN, Rochester, MN }} Physician Leadership Terrence L. Cascino, MD, FAAN, Rochester, MN Core Competencies:  Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Professionalism

Lecture/Faculty: }} Point of View: Richard Leider to Introduce Life Reimagined Concept Richard Leider, Edina, MN }} Panel Discussion: Where You’ve Been, Where You Are, and Where You’re Headed Thomas E. Feasby, MD, FAAN, Calgary, AB, Canada Robert C. Griggs, MD, FAAN, Rochester, NY Elaine C. Jones, MD, FAAN, Reston, VA Roger P. Simon, MD, Atlanta, GA }} Small Group Breakouts—Led by participants Amy S. Chappell, MD; Heidi B. Schwarz, MD; Robert W. Hamill, MD; Richard L. Barbano, MD, PhD; Steven T. DeKosky, MD; Barney J. Stern, MD; Nimish A. Mohile, MD; Erika Fullwood Augustine, MD }} “Inclusiveness”: Bridging the Gender Gap and Fostering Diversity: Discussion led by Nimish Mohile, MD; Roger Simon, MD; and Erika Fullwood Augustine, MD Core Competencies:  Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Professionalism

Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Interactive

Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Audience Participation

CME Credits:  0

CME Credits:  0

Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Recommended Audience:  Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, , Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist

DEC

Program Description: The challenge of being an leader is complicated by a high rate of burnout. This course will exam how to lead effectively and at the same time promote wellness. We will discuss what it means to be a true physician leader and how to develop into one.

Course Wednesday, April 25, 2018 1:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

C157 L Advanced Leadership Training:

Preparing for Your Career’s Insurmountable Opportunities

Topic: Leadership Director: Robert C. Griggs, MD, FAAN, Rochester, NY

DE

Program Description: This highly-interactive program will consider the strategies for finding and creating new opportunities for leadership in one’s career 108 2018 AAN Annual Meeting


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

Wednesday, April 25, 2018 1:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

C158 L Leadership Strengths in Neurology: The Data, Tools and Practical Application of Strengths for Leadership, Team Building, and Personal Development $ (registration required)

Topic: Leadership Directors: Keri Bischoff, Gallup Certified Strength Consultant Saint Paul, MN Julie Anderson, Gallup Certified Strength Consultant Stillwater, MN

ED

Program Description: Leadership Strengths in Neurology builds on the foundational learning in the introductory course, The Most important Tool in Your Black Bag: Gallup StrengthsFinder™ Education Workshop, which is a prerequisite for this course. Understanding the practical and specific application of Strengths is the focus of this advanced workshop. Current Strengths data in the field of neurology will be shared to address your unique needs through interactive and guided discussions as we highlight tools to improve relationships and maximize team productivity.

neurology and, personally, how you uniquely come at the world and can best contribute your strengths to improve team dynamics and optimize performance. Lecture/Faculty: }} Advanced StrengthsFinder Data for Neurology and Leadership Julie Anderson, Stillwater, MN }} Application of Strengths and Values for Greater SelfAwareness Keri Bischoff, Saint Paul, MN }} Best Practices for Strength-based Teams Julie Anderson, Stillwater, MN }} Effective Approaches to Research, Clinical, and Educational Settings Keri Bischoff, Saint Paul, MN Core Competencies:  Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Professionalism Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Interactive CME Credits:  0 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist

A team-based approach is essential in all aspects of your profession: clinical, education, research. Written exercises, a personalized Strengths Development poster session, directed conversations, customized materials, and advanced StrengthsFinder™ tools will create self-understanding and an appreciation for how you, uniquely, come at the world. We often use our own perceptions when we diagnose, describe, and discover: What are yours? We see those around us through a lens of our own strength. This advanced workshop helps you look at yourself, and others, differently. This deeper understanding brings you to a more nuanced realization of how you lead and how those around may approach the very same goals in very different ways. • How can I improve my relationships professionally and socially? • How can I contribute my strengths to team dynamics and performance? Join Gallup Certified Strengths consultants Keri Bischoff and Julie Anderson in this customized half-day workshop focusing on neurology. StrengthsFinder™ assessment results must be provided prior to Advanced Workshop. *Prerequisite: Program l in the Strengths-based Leadership Series— The Most important Tool in Your Black Bag: Gallup StrengthsFinder™ Education Workshop. Upon Completion: Gain a deeper understanding of your strengths and a new perspective on those around you, including your patients, peers, and administrators. Professionally, you’ll have a better understanding of the science and data supporting Strengths-based leadership in

AAN.com/view/AM18 109

Leadership

Course


Movement Disorders Overview

L

ook for education and science covering topics ranging from diagnosis and management of ataxias and deep brain stimulation programming to evaluation of tremor in the office and nonmotor manifestations of Parkinson’s disease. From high-level overviews to deep dives into complex cases, the Annual Meeting has it. Also, look for the “Ask Us Anything” panel for a chance to ask the experts about your most challenging cases, plus other interactive presentations in the dynamic experiential learning area. Saturday, April 21 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C4  Hyperkinetic Movement Disorders: Videodiagnosis and Treatment 9:30 a.m.–11:30 a.m. C14  Parkinson’s Disease Update 1:30 p.m.–3:30 p.m. C24  Diagnosis and Treatment of Functional Movement Disorders

Sunday, April 22 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C25  Hot Topics and Controversies in Parkinson’s Disease 8:00 a.m.–9:10 a.m. X  Challenges in Clinicogenetic Correlations: One Gene, Many Phenotypes; One Phenotype, Many Genes 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. S3  Movement Disorders Platform Session 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C37  Nonmotor Manifestations of Parkinson’s Disease I 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C52  Nonmotor Manifestations of Parkinson’s Disease II 4:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. X  What is that Twitch?

Monday, April 23 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C60  Balance and Gait Disorders 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C67  Video EEG: Name That Spell 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C70  Evaluating Tremor in the Office 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. S16  Movement Disorders Platform Session

Tuesday, April 24 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C102  Movement Disorders for the General Neurologist I: New Concepts in the Diagnosis and Management of Parkinson’s Disease 1:00 p.m.–1:45 p.m. X  Complementary Therapies in Parkinson’s Disease 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C115  Movement Disorders for the General Neurologist II: Tremor, Druginduced Movement Disorders, RLS, and Ataxia 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. Invited Science: Movement Disorders 2:00 p.m.–2:45 p.m. X  Dancing with Parkinson’s

110 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. S25  Movement Disorders Platform Session 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C123  Child Neurology: A Case-based Approach 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C125 Continuum ® Test Your Knowledge: A Multiple Choice Review II 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C128  Movement Disorders for the General Neurologist III: Chorea, Dystonia, Myoclonus, Stereotypies, and Tics

Wednesday, April 25 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C140  Paroxysmal Movement Disorders 8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. S26  “Best of” Session: Movement Disorders 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. S29  Movement Disorders Platform Session 1:00 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C159  Clinical Uses of Botulinum Toxin for Dystonia Skills Workshop 1:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m. X  Ask Us Anything: Expert Panel on Parkinson’s Disease 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C160  Neurology Update II: Movement Disorders, Spine Disorders, and Sleep Disorders

Thursday, April 26 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C176  The Dystonia: Diagnosis, Treatment and Update on Etiologies 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C187  Cerebellar and Afferent Ataxias: Diagnosis and Management 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. S44  Movement Disorders Platform Session 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C209  Clinical Usefulness of Botulinum Toxin for Spasticity Skills Workshop 6:30 p.m.–9:30 p.m. C213  Case Studies: Unusual Movement Disorders

Friday, April 27 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C222  Therapy of Movement Disorders: A Case-based Approach 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C229  Deep Brain Stimulation I: Basic Principles and Programming in Movement Disorders 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C241  Deep Brain Stimulation II: Advanced Management in Movement Disorders and Applications Beyond Movement Disorders


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

Course

C4

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Hyperkinetic Movement Disorders: Videodiagnosis and Treatment

Topic: Movement Disorders Director: Steven Frucht, MD, New York, NY

J

Program Description: Hyperkinetic movement disorders present special challenges for the practicing clinician. Recent advances in genetics and expansion of the genotype-phenotype relationship have made this area particularly challenging. Using a wide assortment of videos and case-based format, this session will help prepare attendees to recognize and treat unusual hyperkinetic movement disorders. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to recognize, diagnose, and treat the broad spectrum of hyperkinetic movement disorder patients Lecture/Faculty: }} Chorea Steven Frucht, MD, New York, NY Pichet Termsarasab, MD, Bangkok, Thailand }} Dystonia Steven Frucht, MD, New York, NY Pichet Termsarasab, MD, Bangkok, Thailand }} Myoclonus Steven Frucht, MD, New York, NY Pichet Termsarasab, MD, Bangkok, Thailand }} Unusual Movement Disorders Steven Frucht, MD, New York, NY Pichet Termsarasab, MD, Bangkok, Thailand Core Competencies:  Patient Care, Medical Knowledge Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Saturday, April 21, 2018

C14

9:30 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Parkinson’s Disease Update

Topic: Movement Disorders Director: Melissa J. Nirenberg, MD, PhD, FAAN, New York, NY

J

Program Description: This program will provide participants with a global overview of Parkinson’s disease, including the latest information about pathophysiology, genetic and environmental risk factors, biomarkers, and clinical phenomenology. Faculty will focus on the evidencebased management of motor symptoms, nonmotor symptoms, and complications of dopaminergic therapy, including the role of new and emerging medical and surgical treatments. Upon Completion: Participants should have a broad understanding of Parkinson’s disease, including pathophysiology, genetics, biomarkers, risk factors, motor and nonmotor symptoms, complications of dopaminergic therapy, and evidence-based medical and surgical therapies. Lecture/Faculty: }} Parkinson’s Disease Update: Part I Hubert H. Fernandez, MD, FAAN, Cleveland, OH }} Parkinson’s Disease Update: Part II Melissa J. Nirenberg, MD, PhD, FAAN, New York, NY Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, PracticeBased Learning and Improvement Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, Advanced Practice Provider

Course Saturday, April 21, 2018

C24

1:30 p.m.–3:30 p.m.

Diagnosis and Treatment of Functional Movement Disorders

Topic: Movement Disorders Director: Mark Hallett, MD, FAAN, Bethesda, MD

J

Program Description: Functional (psychogenic) movement disorders are common problems, but they are often difficult to diagnose and treat. This seminar will first consider the clinical features that help make the diagnosis on positive elements and not rely only on ruling out organic disorders. The diagnosis can often be supported by clinical neurophysiology and other laboratory testing, and the useful tests will be the second topic. The third topic will be a review of the new approaches to therapy of these patients which are markedly improving the

AAN.com/view/AM18 111

Movement Disorders

Saturday, April 21, 2018

Course


Program Descriptions prognosis. Treatment begins with communicating the diagnosis to the patient in a clear and compassionate manner, and then includes physical therapy, psychotherapy, and multidisciplinary treatments. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to make a positive diagnosis of functional movement disorders, and know how to organize a multidisciplinary approach to therapy. Lecture/Faculty: }} Clinical Assessment and Diagnosis Alberto J. Espay, MD, FAAN, Cincinnati, OH }} Laboratory Support for the Diagnosis Mark Hallett, MD, FAAN, Bethesda, MD }} Treatment Kathrin LaFaver, MD, Louisville, KY Core Competencies:  Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, Professionalism Teaching Style:  Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Course Sunday, April 22, 2018

C25

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Hot Topics and Controversies in Parkinson’s Disease

Topic: Movement Disorders Director: Melissa J. Nirenberg, MD, PhD, FAAN, New York, NY

J

Program Description: This course will use an interactive format to address some of the most cutting-edge issues and controversies related to the diagnosis and management of Parkinson’s disease. Faculty will discuss and debate these issues based on the evidence-based literature. An active learning format, including use of the audience response system, will allow participants to gain a deeper understanding of some of the most important issues, controversies, and challenges currently facing clinicians who treat patients with Parkinson’s disease. Upon Completion: Participants will understand how to approach and tackle some of the most important issues, controversies, and challenges in the diagnosis and management of Parkinson’s disease. Lecture/Faculty: }} Hot Topics and Controversies in Parkinson’s Disease Alberto J. Espay, MD, FAAN, Cincinnati, OH Melissa J. Nirenberg, MD, PhD, FAAN, New York, NY Core Competencies:  Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement 112 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

Movement Disorders Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Experiential Learning Area Sunday, April 22, 2018

8:00 a.m.–9:10 a.m.

Challenges in Clinicogenetic Correlations: One Gene, Many Phenotypes; One Phenotype, Many Genes Topic: Movement Disorders Speakers: Kailash P. Bhatia, MD, FAAN, London, United Kingdom Roy Alcalay, MD, New York, NY Experiential Learning Area: Research Corner

J

Program Description: Genetic testing is not well integrated in the evaluation of patients with movement disorders in clinical practice. Faculty will present demonstrative videos of various phenotypic presentations attributed to only one gene and phenotypic presentations attributed to multiple genes in patients with Parkinson disease, dystonia and chorea. In addition to increase clinician awareness of genetic differential diagnosis, this program will provide practical knowledge regarding the methods of ordering genetic tests and the pros and cons of different testing strategies. It will suggest strategies for optimizing insurance authorizations and appealing denials. This program was modeled after a very successful offering at the International Parkinson Disease and Movement Disorder Society Congress.

Scientific Platform Session Sunday, April 22, 2018

S3

Topic:

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Movement Disorders Platform Session Movement Disorders

G


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

Course

C37

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Nonmotor Manifestations of Parkinson’s Disease I

Topic: Movement Disorders Director: Charles H. Adler, MD, PhD, FAAN, Scottsdale, AZ

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Program Description: This program will cover the nonmotor features that are known to predate motor Parkinson’s disease (PD), as well as those that affect quality of life as PD progresses. PD is a systemic disorder and there will be discussion of the pathological basis for nonmotor features. Data will be presented showing which findings predate motor PD and how these may be used to identify individuals at higher risk for developing PD. Methods to assess patients for nonmotor symptoms, including questionnaires and examination methods, will be discussed. As quality of life has been shown to be very impacted by nonmotor features of PD, this course will raise awareness of a topic that has not received nearly enough attention by PD and non-PD neurologists. This program complements: C52: Nonmotor Manifestations of Parkinson’s Disease II, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to discuss Prodromal Parkinson’s disease and identify nonmotor features of PD that predate motor signs, and discuss methods for assessing nonmotor features including questionnaires and examination skills. Lecture/Faculty: }} Prodromal Parkinson’s Disease: Diagnosis and Underlying Pathophysiology Charles H. Adler, MD, PhD, FAAN, Scottsdale, AZ }} Diagnosis and Impact of Nonmotor Complications of Parkinson’s Disease Janis Miyasaki, MD, FAAN, Edmonton, Canada Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Interactive, Didactic

Sunday, April 22, 2018

C52

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Nonmotor Manifestations of Parkinson’s Disease II

Topic: Movement Disorders Director: Charles H. Adler, MD, PhD, FAAN, Scottsdale, AZ

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Program Description: This program will cover the nonmotor features of Parkinson’s disease that have a significant impact on quality of life including cognitive impairment, psychiatric, sleep, and autonomic symptoms and signs. Treatment options for the various nonmotor features will be discussed. As quality of life has been shown to be very impacted by nonmotor features of PD, this course will raise awareness of a topic that has not received nearly enough attention by PD and non-PD neurologists. This program complements: C37: Nonmotor Manifestations of Parkinson’s Disease I, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to discuss methods for assessing cognitive, sleep, and autonomic symptoms and describe current treatment options for these nonmotor features of PD. Lecture/Faculty: }} Cognitive and Neuropsychiatric Symptoms in Parkinson’s Disease Jennifer G. Goldman, MD, MS, FAAN, Chicago, IL }} Sleep and Autonomic Complications in Parkinson’s Disease Stewart A. Factor, DO, FAAN, Atlanta, GA Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Trainee

CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Trainee

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Sunday, April 22, 2018

Course


Program Descriptions Experiential Learning Area Sunday, April 22, 2018

4:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

What is that Twitch? Topic: Movement Disorders Speakers: Leonard Verhagen Metman, MD, PhD, Chicago, IL Susan B. Bressman, MD, FAAN, New York, NY Experiential Learning Area: HeadTalks

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Program Description: This presentation will provide participants with the opportunity to view and discuss common and uncommon movement disorders cases and to hear experts discuss phenomenology and diagnosis. Each case will highlight clinical pearls that can be applied in the office setting. This presentation is offered in partnership with the International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

Course Monday, April 23, 2018

C60

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Balance and Gait Disorders

Topic: Movement Disorders Director: Bastiaan Roelof Bloem, MD, PhD, Nijmegen, Netherlands

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Program Description: Mobility is a prized ability. Disorders of balance and gait impair mobility, reduce independence, lead to falls and fall-related injuries, reduce quality of life, and are associated with reduced survival. The neurologist needs to be able to recognize the clinical patterns of balance and gait disorders in order to diagnose and intervene effectively. Faculty will review the clinical exam of gait and balance and the latest classification for gait and balance disorders, then discuss video examples of various gait and balance disorders. Audience observations and questions about the video examples will be encouraged.

Movement Disorders Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, Geriatrician, Rehabilitation Specialist, Nursing Home Specialist

Course Monday, April 23, 2018

C67

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Video EEG: Name That Spell

Topics:

Epilepsy/Clinical Neurophysiology (EEG); Movement Disorders Director: Amy Z. Crepeau, MD, Phoenix, AZ

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See complete course description on page 59 »

Course Monday, April 23, 2018

C70

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Evaluating Tremor in the Office

Topic: Movement Disorders Director: Vicki Shanker, MD, New York, NY

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Program Description: This program is geared towards general practioners and trainees. Tremor is a common presentation in the neurologist’s office and may be normal or pathologic. Although phenomenologically there are several characteristic differences of the disease states that produce these tremors, parkinsonian tremor, essential tremor, and dystonic tremor are often confused, leading to early misdiagnosis and delay in care. Through didactic lecture and video clips, in addition to case-based presentations, faculty will review key distinguishing characteristics of common and uncommon disease entities that produce tremor and provide clinical pearls for diagnosis.

Upon Completion:

At the conclusion of this program, you are invited to continue the conversation with the director and faculty. More information will be provided at the conclusion of the program.

Participants should better appreciate the clinical importance of gait and balance disorders, gain techniques to improve their exam of gait and balance, learn to use the current classification of gait and balance disorders in a clinically useful manner, and learn to recognize several common gait and balance disorders.

Upon Completion: Participants should be able to recognize the clinical features of a parkinsonian tremor, essential tremor, and dystonic tremor as well as less common tremor conditions, and be able to apply clinical techniques to distinguish these disease entities in the office.

Lecture/Faculty: }} Clinical Assessment of Gait and Balance Disorders Bastiaan Roelof Bloem, MD, PhD, Nijmegen, Netherlands Alfonso Fasano, MD, PhD, Toronto, ON, Canada

114 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

Lecture/Faculty: }} Introduction to the Clinical and Diagnostic Approach to Tremor Vicki Shanker, MD, New York, NY }} Tremor in Parkinson’s Disease Andres Felipe Deik Acosta Madiedo, MD, Philadelphia, PA


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Video Review CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Trainee

Lecture/Faculty: }} Features and Relevance of Clinical and Prodromal PD Irene Litvan, MD, FAAN, La Jolla, CA }} Common Errors in Diagnosing PD Faculty }} Advances in PD Therapeutics Michael S. Okun, MD, FAAN, Gainesville, FL Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, PracticeBased Learning and Improvement Teaching Style:  Didactic, Interactive, Audience Participation CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Trainee

Scientific Platform Session Monday, April 23, 2018

S16

Topic:

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Movement Disorders Platform Session Movement Disorders

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Course Tuesday, April 24, 2018

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

C102 Movement Disorders for the General

Neurologist I: New Concepts in the Diagnosis and Management of Parkinson’s Disease

Experiential Learning Area Tuesday, April 24, 2018

Complementary Therapies in Parkinson’s Disease Topic: Movement Disorders Speaker: Veronica E. Santini, MD, Stanford, CA Experiential Learning Area: Live Well

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Program Description: This interactive didactic will review the evidence-based, conservative therapies used in Parkinson’s disease. Included in this talk is the role of exercise in Parkinson’s disease, as well as a review of the alternative and complementary therapies studied in the literature.

Topic: Movement Disorders Director: Irene Litvan, MD, FAAN, La Jolla, CA

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Program Description: Advances in the understanding of Parkinson’s disease have greatly impacted the way that the disease is diagnosed and managed. Presentations will address ways to diagnose Parkinson’s disease before motor features are present, to avoid errors in diagnosing Parkinson’s disease, and newer available therapies. This program complements C115: Movement Disorders for the General Neurologist II: Tremor, Drug-induced Movement Disorders, RLS, and Ataxia and C128: Movement Disorders for the General Neurologist III: Chorea, Dystonia, Myoclonus, Sterotypies, and Tics, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should become familiar with ways to identifying clinical, prodromal, and early Parkinson’s disease; avoid misdiagnoses; and get an update on new breakthroughs in management.

1:00 p.m.–1:45 p.m.

Course Tuesday, April 24, 2018

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C115 Movement Disorders for the General

Neurologist II: Tremor, Drug-induced Movement Disorders, RLS, and Ataxia

Topic: Movement Disorders Director: John C. Morgan, MD, PhD, Augusta, GA

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Program Description: This is part two of a basic overview of movement disorders for the non-expert. The field of movement disorders is highly reliant upon visual recognition and differentiation among abnormal movements and differential diagnosis of potential underlying etiologies. Faculty will aim to help clinicians recognize various abnormal movements and provide an overview of common and uncommon etiologies of these movements. Presenters will use videos, provide pointers that help in differential diagnosis in clinical practice, and discuss appropriate AAN.com/view/AM18 115

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}} Tremor in Dystonia Andres Felipe Deik Acosta Madiedo, MD, Philadelphia, PA }} Tremor in Essential Tremor Vicki Shanker, MD, New York, NY }} Uncommon Tremors: Psychogenic and Beyond Vicki Shanker, MD, New York, NY Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, PracticeBased Learning and Improvement


Program Descriptions

Movement Disorders

Experiential Learning Area

investigations in a patient presenting with various movement disorders. Faculty will also briefly discuss appropriate treatment. This program complements C102: Movement Disorders for the General Neurologist I: New Concepts in the Diagnosis and Management of Parkinsonian Disorders and Movement Disease and C128: Movement Disorders for the General Neurologist III: Chorea, Dystonia, Myoclonus, Stereotypes, and Tics, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to recognize and classify the majority of common movement disorders and even some uncommon ones, be able to generate an appropriate differential diagnosis and initiate acost-effective work-up, and be able to appropriately initiate symptomatic treatment for the major movement disorders discussed. Lecture/Faculty: }} Tremor and Drug-Induced Movement Disorders Susan Fox, MD, Toronto, ON, Canada }} Restless Legs Syndrome and Ataxia Shyamal Mehta, MD, PhD, Phoenix, AZ Core Competencies:  Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2

Tuesday, April 24, 2018

Dancing with Parkinson’s Topic: Movement Disorders Speaker: Diviya Kaul, MD, Palo Alto, CA Experiential Learning Area: Live Well

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Program Description: This presentation will include a brief discussion of dopamine depletion in Parkinson’s Disease, followed by a brief summary of why dance specifically helps and what it improves for patients with Parkinson’s Disease. This lecture will conclude with a video and live demonstration with audience participation.

Scientific Platform Session Tuesday, April 24, 2018

S25

Topic:

Tuesday, April 24, 2018

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Movement Disorders

G

Course Tuesday, April 24, 2018

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

C123 Child Neurology: A Case-based Approach Topics:

Child Neurology and Developmental Neurology; Movement Disorders Director: Elaine C. Wirrell, MD, FAAN, Rochester, MN

Invited Science: Movement Disorders Topic:

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Movement Disorders Platform Session

Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Trainee

Invited Science Session

2:00 p.m.–2:45 p.m.

J

Movement Disorders

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Program Description: Top abstracts previously presented at the International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society Annual Meeting will be presented by their authors. Select abstracts from their "best of" lineups emphasize basic, clinical, and translational science as they evolve toward a more complete understanding of movement disorders with the overall goal of developing more effective prevention and treatment. This presentation is offered in partnership with the International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

See complete course description on page 56 »

Course Tuesday, April 24, 2018

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

C125 Continuum® Test Your Knowledge: A Multiple-choice Question Review II

Topic: General Neurology; Movement Disorders Director: Steven L. Lewis, MD, FAAN, Allentown, PA

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See complete course description on page 80 »

116 2018 AAN Annual Meeting


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

Course 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

C128 Movement Disorders for the General Neurologist III: Chorea, Dystonia, Myoclonus, Stereotypies, and Tics

Topic: Movement Disorders Director: John C. Morgan, MD, PhD, Augusta, GA

J

Program Description: This is part three of a basic overview of movement disorders for the non-expert. The field of movement disorders is highly reliant upon visual recognition and differentiation among abnormal movements and differential diagnosis of potential underlying etiologies. Faculty will aim to help clinicians recognize various abnormal movements and provide an overview of common and uncommon etiologies of these movements. Presenters will use videos, provide pointers that help in differential diagnosis in clinical practice, discuss appropriate investigations in a patient presenting with various movement disorders, and briefly discuss appropriate treatment. This program complements C102: Movement Disorders for the General Neurologist I: New Concepts in the Diagnosis and Management of Parkinson’s Disease and C115: Movement Disorders for the General Neurologist II: Tremor, Drug-induced Movement Disorders, RLS, and Ataxia, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to recognize and classify the majority of common movement disorders and even some uncommon ones, be able to generate an appropriate differential diagnosis and initiate a cost-effective work-up, and be able to appropriately initiate symptomatic treatment for the movement disorders discussed. Lecture/Faculty: }} Chorea and Dystonia Faculty }} Myoclonus, Sterotypies, and Tics John C. Morgan, MD, PhD, Augusta, GA Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, PracticeBased Learning and Improvement, Interpersonal and Communication Skills Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive

Wednesday, April 25, 2018 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

C140 Paroxysmal Movement Disorders

Topic: Movement Disorders Director: Kailash P. Bhatia, MD, FAAN, London, United Kingdom

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Program Description: Advances in identification of different forms of paroxysmal movement disorders and also molecular genetics have greatly impacted the practice of clinicians dealing with these conditions. Through presentations of video cases of common and rarer forms of acquired and genetic paroxysmal movement disorders the faculty will facilitate a discussion about differential diagnosis and laboratory evaluation. Each case will be followed by an overview and update on the topic. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to identify the different forms pf paroxysmal movement disorders and be able to order appropriate investigations, whether they be imaging, biochemical, CSF examination, or genetics to arrive at the right diagnosis; and consider the appropriate drug or other management for each form of paroxysmal movement disorder. Lecture/Faculty: }} Primary Paroxysmal Dyskinesias Kailash P. Bhatia, MD, FAAN, London, United Kingdom }} Secondary Paroxysmal Dyskinesias Kapil D. Sethi, MD, FRCP (UK), FAAN, Augusta, GA Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Scientific Platform Session Wednesday, April 25, 2018 8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

S26

Topic:

CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Trainee

“Best of” Session: Movement Disorders Movement Disorders

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Scientific Platform Session Wednesday, April 25, 2018 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

S29

Topic:

Movement Disorders Platform Session Movement Disorders

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Tuesday, April 24, 2018

Course


Program Descriptions Skills Workshop Wednesday, April 25, 2018 1:00 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

C159 Clinical Uses of Botulinum Toxin for Dystonia Skills Workshop

Movement Disorders Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive, Practical Tips Through Case Reviews CME Credits:  4 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Advanced Practice Provider, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Experiential Learning Area

$ (registration required)

Topic: Movement Disorders Director: Diego Torres-Russotto, MD, FAAN, Omaha, NE

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Program Description: Chemodenervation is one of the most useful treatments for dystonias. Faculty will cover all presentations of the disorder that could benefit from this treatment and the full gamut of indications where botulinum toxin injections could be helpful. The course will also provide training in how to perform the injections. Faculty will begin with presentations reviewing cervical, periocular, oromandibular, and limb dystonias, and the evidence for chemodenervation; and review how to set up a successful chemodenervation practice. During the second half, attendees will participate in interactive sessions covering injection tips, dilution training, injection videos, and practice on simulation systems. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to list indications and contraindications for chemodenervation; select appropriate candidates for botulinum toxin injections in dystonia; recognize the phenomenology that leads to the development of an injection plan in patients; and review best practices for the establishment of a successful chemodenervation clinic. Lecture/Faculty: }} Dystonia Generalities Diego Torres-Russotto, MD, FAAN, Omaha, NE }} Toxin Generalities Danish Bhatti, MD, Omaha, NE }} Chemodenervation for Cervical Dystonia: Rationale, Muscle Selection, and Dosing Danish Bhatti, MD, Omaha, NE }} Chemodenervation for Blepharospasm: Rationale, Muscle Selection, and Dosing Diego Torres-Russotto, MD, FAAN, Omaha, NE }} Chemodenervation for Oromandibular and Lingual Dystonia: Rationale, Muscle Selection, and Dosing Andres Felipe Deik Acosta Madiedo, MD, Philadelphia, PA }} Chemodenervation for Limb Dystonia: Rationale, Muscle }} Selection, and Dosing Brad A. Racette, MD, FAAN, Saint Louis, MO }} How to Set Up a Successful Chemodenervation Clinic Diego Torres-Russotto, MD, FAAN, Omaha, NE }} Interactive Injection Simulation Break-out Sessions Faculty Core Competencies:  Patient Care, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement, Medical Knowledge

118 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

Wednesday, April 25, 2018 1:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Ask Us Anything: Expert Panel on Parkinson’s Disease Topic: Movement Disorders Speakers: Janis Miyasaki, MD, FAAN, Edmonton, AB, Canada Cynthia L. Comella, MD, FAAN, Chicago, IL Oksana Suchowersky, MD, FAAN, Edmonton, AB, Canada Experiential Learning Area: HeadTalks

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Program Description: This lively interactive session will feature renowned experts in the field of Parkinson’s disease. The audience will be able to ask questions regarding difficult cases or seek opinion on challenges facing Parkinson’s disease today.

Course Wednesday, April 25, 2018 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

C160 Neurology Update II: Movement Disorders, Spine Disorders, and Sleep Disorders

Topics:

General Neurology; Movement Disorders; Neuro-rehabilitation; Sleep Director: Ralph F. Józefowicz, MD, FAAN, Rochester, NY

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See complete course description on page 83 »

Course Thursday, April 26, 2018

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

C176 The Dystonia: Diagnosis, Treatment and Update on Etiologies

Topic: Movement Disorders Director: Rachel J. Saunders-Pullman, MD, New York, NY

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Program Description: Dystonia is the third most common movement disorder, yet is often misdiagnosed. Using video demonstrations, faculty will address the


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

Upon Completion: Participants should become familiar with the clinical manifestations of dystonia; current classification schema; an understanding of the etiology and pathogenesis of dystonia, including leading genetic causes; and treatment options for dystonia, including medical, chemodenervation, and deep brain stimulation surgery. Lecture/Faculty: }} Clinical Features, Diagnosis, and Classification of Dystonia Daniel Tarsy, MD, FAAN, Boston, MA }} Update on Causes with Focus on Genetics Rachel J. Saunders-Pullman, MD, New York, NY }} Medical, Including Chemodenervation and Surgical Treatment of Dystonia Faculty Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic, Video Demonstrations CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist

Course Thursday, April 26, 2018

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C187 Cerebellar and Afferent Ataxias: Diagnosis and Management

Topic: Movement Disorders Director: Massimo Pandolfo, MD, FAAN, Brussels, Belgium

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Program Description: Ataxia is the predominant manifestation of many acquired and inherited neurologic disorders affecting the cerebellum, its connections, and the afferent proprioceptive pathways. This course covers the phenomenology and etiologies of cerebellar and afferent ataxias and provides indications for a rational approach to diagnosis and management. Particular attention will be given to inherited ataxias and new developments in genetic testing. Through case presentations, faculty will discuss the diagnostic process and test result interpretation. Upon Completion: Participants should be familiar with the differential diagnoses and work-up, including genetic testing, of ataxias. Lecture/Faculty: }} The Dominant Spinocerebellar Ataxias Stefan M. Pulst, MD, FAAN, Salt Lake City, UT }} Recessive and X-linked Ataxias Massimo Pandolfo, MD, FAAN, Brussels, Belgium

}} Case Presentations Massimo Pandolfo, MD, FAAN, Brussels, Belgium Stefan M. Pulst, MD, FAAN, Salt Lake City, UT Core Competencies:  Patient Care, Medical Knowledge Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Scientific Platform Session Thursday, April 26, 2018

S44

Topic:

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Movement Disorders Platform Session Movement Disorders

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Skills Workshop Thursday, April 26, 2018

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

C209 Clinical Usefulness of Botulinum Toxin for Spasticity Skills Workshop $ (registration required)

Topic: Movement Disorders Director: Allison Brashear, MD, MBA, FAAN, Winston Salem, NC

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Program Description: This program will exposure participants to the typical patient who would benefit from spasticity treatment, including assessments, outcomes, and long-term planning for the use of botulinum toxin in patients with spasticity. Participants will use models to learn injection technique. The use of ultrasound for localization will be reviewed with hands on equipment. Faculty will review the use of botulinum toxin in patients with spasticity from stroke, traumatic brain injury, and in children. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to correctly identify patients who may benefit from injections; discuss the anatomy of the muscle to be treated; discuss the use of ultrasound in the injection process, discuss the different type of toxins used including doses and deliver modality; and discuss the long term goals of treatment of spasticity. Lecture/Faculty: }} Spasticity in Pediatric Patients Ann H. Tilton, MD, FAAN, New Orleans, LA }} Anatomy in Spasticity Treatment: Ultrasound Katharine Alter, MD, Bethesda, MD }} Case-based Studies in Spasticity Treatment Allison Brashear, MD, MBA, FAAN, Winston Salem, NC

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clinical spectrum and classification of the dystonias, and discuss strategies for diagnostic evaluation, including current concepts regarding the underlying causes, and genetic testing, and medical and surgical treatment strategies.


Program Descriptions Core Competencies:  Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Interactive CME Credits:  4 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Course Thursday, April 26, 2018

6:30 p.m.–9:30 p.m.

C213 Case Studies: Unusual Movement Disorders Topic: Movement Disorders Director: Kailash P. Bhatia, MD, FAAN, London, United Kingdom

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Program Description: This course has a long tradition of case presentations by both the faculty and members of the audience, highlighting diagnostic challenges. Participants are invited to bring interesting cases for presentation. These cases will be intermixed with cases from the faculty. Known diagnoses will be prioritized. The faculty will first emphasize an interactive discussion regarding visual recognition of the clinical phenomenology followed by a discussion of differential diagnoses, investigations, and management. Attendees hoping to present cases should contact Kailash Bhatia, MD, FAAN, at k.bhatia@ucl.ac.uk to discuss the potential case presentation. Upon Completion: Participants should become familiar with unusual movement disorders and be able to formulate better differential diagnoses for them. Where relevant, participants should also be able to initiate appropriate diagnostic investigation and management of these disorders. Lecture/Faculty: }} Case Studies Kailash P. Bhatia, MD, FAAN, London, United Kingdom Alberto J. Espay, MD, FAAN, Cincinnati, OH Anthony E. Lang, MD, FAAN, Toronto, ON, Canada Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, PracticeBased Learning and Improvement Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Interactive CME Credits:  3 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

120 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

Movement Disorders

Course Friday, April 27, 2018

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

C222 Therapy of Movement Disorders: A Casebased Approach

Topic: Movement Disorders Director: David E. Riley, MD, Cleveland Heights, OH

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Program Description: This course is aimed at neurologists who wish to enhance their management skills for movement disorders. Faculty will focus on Parkinson’s disease, which is becoming ever more complex as we recognize an increasing variety of disease manifestations and complications. Faculty will present cases that demonstrate a wide spectrum of problems encountered, with a discussion of management options. Cases will address topics such as choice of initial therapy, management of motor complications associated with medications, and recognition and management of non-motor features of Parkinson’s disease and its treatment. The emphasis will be on practical therapeutic suggestions. In addition to Parkinson’s disease, faculty will use a similar case-based approach to present treatment alternatives for other selected common movement disorders. There will be ample room for questions; audience participation is encouraged. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to identify common motor and nonmotor management challenges in Parkinson’s disease, apply a number of treatment options to solve common motor and nonmotor problems in Parkinson’s disease, and formulate a treatment plan for other selected movement disorders. Lecture/Faculty: }} 5 Case Presentations and Discussion Alberto J. Espay, MD, FAAN, Cincinnati, OH }} 5 Case Presentations and Discussion David E. Riley, MD, Cleveland Heights, OH Core Competencies:  Patient Care, Medical Knowledge Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Didactic, Case-Based CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Trainee, Nurse, Physician’s Assistant, Advanced Practice Provider


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

Course 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C229 Deep Brain Stimulation I: Basic Principles

and Programming in Movement Disorders

Topic: Movement Disorders Director: Jill L. Ostrem, MD, San Francisco, CA

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Program Description: Deep brain stimulation therapy is widely used to treat medically refractory movement disorders, including essential tremor, Parkinson’s disease, and dystonia. Understanding the DBS system, proper patient selection, accurate lead placement, and optimized postoperative management are essential for successful outcomes. Each issue will be discussed, with an emphasis on practical information for clinicians. This course has been divided into two sequential sessions. Those registering for the course are encouraged to participate in both sessions for a comprehensive overview of the topic. Part I focuses on basic DBS principles and programming issues in movement disorders. Part II focuses on more advanced DBS issues in movement disorders and also highlight DBS in non-movement disorders conditions. These programs will include case-based discussions highlighting patient candidacy and management of DBS. This program complements C241: Deep Brain Stimulation II: Advanced Management in Movement Disorders and Applications Beyond Movement Disorders, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to describe the rationale for the use of DBS and the patients for whom the treatment is most indicated and have a general understanding and appreciate the principles of initial DBS stimulator activation and programming. Lecture/Faculty: }} Overview of DBS, Current Indications, Patient Selection, Basics of Surgery Leonard Verhagen Metman, MD, PhD, Chicago, IL }} The Art and Science of Basic DBS Stimulation Programming (Focus PD and ET) Michael Pourfar, MD, New York, NY Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, Nurse Practitioner, Registered Nurse

Friday, April 27, 2018

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

C241 Deep Brain Stimulation II: Advanced

Management in Movement Disorders and Applications Beyond Movement Disorders

Topic: Movement Disorders Director: Jill L. Ostrem, MD, San Francisco, CA

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Program Description: Deep brain stimulation therapy is widely used to treat medically refractory movement disorders, including essential tremor, Parkinson’s disease, and dystonia. Understanding the DBS system, proper patient selection, accurate lead placement, and optimized postoperative management are essential for successful outcomes. Each issue will be discussed, with an emphasis on practical information for clinicians. This course has been divided into two sequential sessions. Those registering for the course are encouraged to participate in both sessions for a comprehensive overview of the topic. Part I focuses on basic DBS principles and programming issues in movement disorders. Part II focuses on more advanced DBS issues in movement disorders and also highlight DBS in non-movement disorders conditions. These programs will include case-based discussions highlighting patient candidacy and management of DBS. This program complements C229: Deep Brain Stimulation I: Basic Principles and Programming in Movement Disorders, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants will be able to describe the rationale for the use of DBS and the patients for whom the treatment is most indicated. They will have a general understanding of the principles of DBS programming and strategies for troubleshooting common DBS-related management issues. They will also be aware of DBS applications in non-movement disorder conditions. Lecture/Faculty: }} Advanced Management of PD, ET, Dystonia, and Troubleshooting Joohi Jimenez Shahed, MD, Houston, TX }} Novel and Emerging Uses of DBS: OCD, Tourette Syndrome, Depression, Alzheimer’s and Epilespy Michael S. Okun, MD, FAAN, Gainesville, FL Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, Nurse Practitioner, Nurse

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Friday, April 27, 2018

Course


MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease Overview

D

ue to the high demand for MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease-related programming, we’ve expanded to one single, spacious location for these programs all week long! Here you’ll find a full gamut of MS and CNS topics, from general to deep dives—some of which will be presented in Spanish—as well as a “Best Of” session. And don’t miss the related Frontiers in Neuroscience Plenary Session on pediatric MS. Saturday, April 21

Wednesday, April 25

9:30 a.m.–11:30 a.m. C11  Treatment of Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis in the Current Era

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C136  Multiple Sclerosis Therapy: Disease-modifying Treatment I

Sunday, April 22

10:55 a.m.–11:15 a.m. Frontiers in Neuroscience Plenary Session: Pediatric MS: A Unique Window into Environmental and Genetic Risk Factors for MS

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C34  Multiple Sclerosis in the Trenches: Controversy and Consensus in Clinical Decision-Making 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. S7  MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease Platform Session 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C59  Actualización Sobre el Tratamiento de la Esclerosis Múltiple

Monday, April 23 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. S11  MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease Platform Session 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C74  Neuro-rheumatology: Neurological Manifestations of Systemic Inflammatory and Autoimmune Disease I 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C87  Neuro-rheumatology: Neurological Manifestations of Systemic Inflammatory and Autoimmune Disease II 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C95  Spanish Symposium: Update on CNS Infections and Tropical Medicine

Tuesday, April 24 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C98  Multiple Sclerosis Overview I: Clinical Pearls 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C109  Multiple Sclerosis Overview II: Clinical Advances 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C112 Continuum ® Test Your Knowledge: A Multiple Choice Review I 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. S23  MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease Platform Session 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C122  Multiple Sclerosis Overview III: The Pathogenesis of Multiple Sclerosis and Mechanism of Action of Treatments for MS

122 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C147  Multiple Sclerosis Therapy: Disease-modifying Treatment II 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. S35  MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease Platform Session 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C162  Multiple Sclerosis Therapy: Symptom Management 4:00 p.m.–4:45 p.m. X  Diets and Supplements in MS: What’s the Evidence Thus Far?

Thursday, April 26 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C175  Clinical Pearls in Autoimmune Neurology: Real World Cases 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. N5  Neuroscience in the Clinic: Treatment of Progressive Multiple Sclerosis 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. S43  MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease Platform Session

Friday, April 27 8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. S46  “Best of” Session: MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C224  Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorders 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. S50  MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease Platform Session 4:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. X  Ask Us Anything: Expert Panel on Multiple Sclerosis


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

Course

C11

9:30 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Treatment of Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis in the Current Era

Topics:

MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease; Child Neurology and Developmental Neurology Director: Brenda Banwell, MD, FAAN, Philadelphia, PA

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Program Description: This program will cover current and emerging therapies for multiple sclerosis in children, highlighting recent clinical trials, and will discuss the real-world experience of implementation of clinical trials in the pediatric multiple sclerosis population. In addition to pharmacological aspects of treatment, the program will also highlight the importance of multidisciplinary care. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to understand the clinical features of pediatric multiple sclerosis and how current therapies influence disease activity; appreciate the array of current medications and how they are used in practice; appreciate the current clinical trials, their challenges, and next steps; and advocate for comprehensive care for children with multiple sclerosis. Lecture/Faculty: }} Clinical Features of MS in Children and Role for Therapy Brenda Banwell, MD, FAAN, Philadelphia, PA }} Clinical Trials in Pediatric MS Tanuja Chitnis, MD, FAAN, Boston, MA }} Comprehensive Care of Pediatric MS Brenda Banwell, MD, FAAN, Philadelphia, PA Core Competencies:  Patient Care, Medical Knowledge Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive, Audience Participation CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Sunday, April 22, 2018

C34

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Multiple Sclerosis in the Trenches: Controversy and Consensus in Clinical Decision-Making

Topic: MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease Director: Aaron E. Miller, MD, FAAN, New York, NY

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Program Description: Clinical decision-making in MS has become increasingly complex with more than a dozen disease-modifying agents FDA approved, and still others used off-label. Recent changes in diagnostic criteria and phenotype classification increase the challenges. Assimilating and using this new information may be particularly difficult for neurologists who do not have the extensive experience of MS subspecialists. This course will address those challenges by utilizing a novel, interactive format to engage the audience in answering the practical questions that arise in daily clinical practice. The format will consist of a series of brief case vignettes focused on specific and controversial issues involving clinical decision nodes. For each vignette, two MS experts will offer their opinions about the course of action and the moderator will add or elicit further commentary. The audience may express their own views, before and after the experts, using the audience response system. Upon Completion: Participants should better understand and select DMTs in various circumstances; better understand the use of the McDonald Criteria and their limitations, as well as the new phenotypic descriptions used for MS; and better understand a variety of social and other medical situations that impact the management of people with MS. Lecture/Faculty: }} Discussion of Brief Case Vignettes Myla D. Goldman, MD, MSC, Charlottesville, VA Stephen Krieger, MD, FAAN, New York, NY Aaron E. Miller, MD, FAAN, New York, NY Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist

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Saturday, April 21, 2018

Course


Program Descriptions

MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease

Scientific Platform Session Sunday, April 22, 2018

S7 Topic:

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease Platform Session MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease

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Scientific Platform Session Monday, April 23, 2018

S11 Topic:

MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease Platform Session MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease

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Course Sunday, April 22, 2018

C59

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Simposio Español: Actualización Sobre el Tratamiento de la Esclerosis Múltiple

Topic: MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease Director: Lilyana M. Amezcua, MD, Los Angeles, CA

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Program Description: Los avances en la esclerosis múltiple han producido tratamientos más complejos que requieren que los médicos generales se familiaricen con los cambios y las posibles consecuencias de las terapias modificadoras de la enfermedad de alta eficacia en el cuidado de la EM. A través de presentaciones de casos comunes y más desafiantes presentados en español, el profesorado facilitará una discusión con la audiencia hispanohablante de escenarios de la vida real y la evaluación del tratamiento. Cada caso será seguido por una descripción general y actualización sobre el tema. Upon Completion: Los participantes deben familiarizarse con el diagnóstico de la EM, sus imitadores comunes y diversos tratamientos modificadores de la enfermedadque sera presentada en español. Lecture/Faculty: }} MS Diagnosis and Treatment of Relapses Victor M. Rivera, MD, FAAN, Houston, TX }} MS Disease Modifying Treatments Marcelo Matiello, MD, Boston, MA Core Competencies:  Patient Care, Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist

124 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Course Monday, April 23, 2018

C74

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Neuro-rheumatology: Neurological Manifestations of Systemic Inflammatory and Autoimmune Disease I

Topic:

MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease; General Neurology Director: Jeffrey Marc Gelfand, MD, MAS, FAAN, San Francisco, CA

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Program Description: This course will provide a practical update on neuro-rheumatologythe neurological manifestations of systemic inflammatory and autoimmune syndromes-from an interdisciplinary faculty of neurologists and rheumatologists. Part I will review rheumatological diagnosis, physical examination techniques, and interpretation of laboratory studies; discuss neurological manifestations and treatment of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Sjogren’s Syndrome, Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome, Rheumatoid Arthritis, and Mixed Connective Tissue Disease; and Peripheral Nervous System Manifestations of Rheumatological Diseases. Part II will review diagnosis and treatment of Neurosarcoidosis, Pachymeningitis, and Behcet’s Disease; CNS vasculitis and other vasculitides; and conclude with an interdisciplinary faculty panel and case discussion with faculty highlighting how rheumatologists and neurologists approach differential diagnosis, treatment, and management. This program complements C87: Neuro-rheumatology: Neurological Manifestations of Systemic Inflammatory and Autoimmune Disease II, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should become familiar with the differential diagnosis of neurological manifestations of systemic inflammatory, autoimmune, and rheumatological diseases; be able to identify common phenotypes associated with neurological organ system involvement of rheumatological syndromes; learn ways of distinguishing neurorheumatological diagnoses from other neuroinflammatory disorders; and develop practical approaches to treatment, care coordination, and health maintenance for neuro-rheumatological conditions.


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Course Monday, April 23, 2018

C87

Neuro-rheumatology: Neurological Manifestations of Systemic Inflammatory and Autoimmune Disease II

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Program Description: This course will provide a practical update on neuro-rheumatology— the neurological manifestations of systemic inflammatory and autoimmune syndromes—from an interdisciplinary faculty of neurologists and rheumatologists. Part I will review rheumatological diagnosis, physical examination techniques, and interpretation of laboratory studies; discuss neurological manifestations and treatment of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Sjogren’s Syndrome, Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome, Rheumatoid Arthritis and Mixed Connective Tissue Disease; and Peripheral Nervous System Manifestations of Rheumatological Diseases. Part II will review diagnosis and treatment of Neurosarcoidosis, Pachymeningitis and Behcet’s Disease; CNS vasculitis and other vasculitides; and conclude with an interdisciplinary faculty panel and case discussion with faculty highlighting how rheumatologists and neurologists approach differential diagnosis, treatment, and management. This program complements C74: Neuro-rheumatology: Neurological Manifestations of Systemic Inflammatory and Autoimmune Disease I, but covers independent topics.

Lecture/Faculty: }} CNS Vasculitis and Mimics Rula Hajj-Ali, MD, Cleveland, OH }} Neurosarcoidosis, Pachymeningitis, Behcet’s Disease Jeffrey Marc Gelfand, MD, MAS, FAAN, San Francisco, CA }} Case Discussions with Faculty Neurologists and Rheumatologists; Questions and Answers Faculty Core Competencies:  Practice-Based Learning and Improvement, Systems-Based Practice, Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Topic: MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease Director: Jeffrey Marc Gelfand, MD, MAS, FAAN, San Francisco, CA

Upon Completion: Participants should become familiar with the differential diagnosis of neurological manifestations of systemic inflammatory, autoimmune, and rheumatological diseases; be able to identify common phenotypes associated with neurological organ system involvement of rheumatological syndromes; learn ways of distinguishing neurorheumatological diagnoses from other neuroinflammatory disorders; and develop practical approaches to treatment, care coordination, and health maintenance for neuro-rheumatological conditions.

Course Monday, April 23, 2018

C95

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Spanish Symposium: Update on CNS Infections and Tropical Medicine

Topics:

Infectious Disease; MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease Director: Oscar H. Del Brutto, MD, FAAN, Miami, FL

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See complete course description on page 99 »

Course Tuesday, April 24, 2018

C98

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Multiple Sclerosis Overview I: Clinical Pearls

Topic: MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease Director: John Corboy, MD, FAAN, Aurora, CO

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Program Description: Diagnosis and treatment of multiple sclerosis and related disorders are getting more complex. Through a case-based approach, including common and uncommon scenarios, we will discuss issues related to diagnosis and treatment choices, including starting, monitoring, switching, and stopping disease modifying therapies. AAN.com/view/AM18 125

MS and CNS Disease

Lecture/Faculty: }} Rheumatological Approaches to Differential Diagnosis, Physical Examination, and Interpretation of Laboratory Studies: Lessons for the Practicing Neurologist Sarah Goglin, MD, San Francisco, CA }} Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Sjogren’s Disease, Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome, Rheumatoid Arthritis, and Mixed Connective Tissue Disease: Neurological Manifestations Shamik Bhattacharyya, MD, Boston, MA }} Peripheral Nervous System Manifestations of Rheumatological Disease: Vasculitic Neuropathies, Small Fiber Neuropathies, Sensory Neuropathies Kelly G. Gwathmey, MD, Charlottesville, VA Core Competencies:  Systems-Based Practice, Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement


Program Descriptions

MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease

This program complements C109: Multiple Sclerosis Overview II: Clinical Advances and C122: Multiple Sclerosis Overview III: The Pathogenesis of Multiple Sclerosis and Mechanism of Action of Treatments for MS, but cover independent topics.

This program complements C98: Multiple Sclerosis Overview I: Clinical Pearls and C122: Multiple Sclerosis Overview III: The Pathogenesis of Multiple Sclerosis and Mechanism of Action of Treatments for MS, but covers independent topics.

Upon Completion: Participants should become more familiar with diagnosis and treatment of multiple sclerosis and related conditions, including use of more efficacious and risky medications.

Upon Completion: Participants should feel more confident in prescribing and monitoring multiple sclerosis (MS) disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) as it relates to their efficacy and safety profiles, and develop a better understanding of key considerations in clinical practice; become familiar with late-stage DMTs that have a strong potential of getting approved for use in MS.; and be able to recognize what factors put an MS patient at risk for long-term disability and when to consider switching therapies.

Lecture/Faculty: }} Case Presentations I Mary Alissa Willis, MD, Cleveland, OH }} Case Presentations II Enrique Alvarez, MD, PhD, Aurora, CO }} Case Presentations III John Corboy, MD, FAAN, Aurora, CO Core Competencies:  Patient Care, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement, Systems-Based Practice, Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Medical Knowledge Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist

Lecture/Faculty: }} The Expanding Armamentarium of Multiple Sclerosis Therapeutics Scott Douglas Newsome, DO, FAAN, Baltimore, MD }} Case-based Considerations in Clinical Practice for Multiple Sclerosis Myla D. Goldman, MD, MSC, Charlottesville, VA Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Course Tuesday, April 24, 2018

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C109 Multiple Sclerosis Overview II: Clinical Advances

Topic: MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease Director: Scott Douglas Newsome, DO, FAAN, Baltimore, MD

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Program Description: It is extremely important for clinicians treating MS to enhance their knowledge base about the changing landscape of the MS disease-modifying therapies (DMTs). Making treatment decisions for an individual MS patient is a daunting task and the individualized patient benefit-risk assessment becomes increasingly difficult as new therapies emerge. Furthermore, if these therapies become available, clinicians need to have a full understanding of their benefit-risk profiles. Faculty will review the efficacy and safety profiles of current and late-stage emerging MS DMTs. It is equally challenging to define what constitutes optimal and suboptimal response to DMTs for an individual patient. Moreover, it is critical for clinicians to be able to recognize short-term clinical and paraclinical factors that may help identify patients at high risk for long-term disability. Faculty will review key considerations in MS clinical practice to address the above challenges in both didactic and case-based formats.

126 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

Course Tuesday, April 24, 2018

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C112 Continuum® Test Your Knowledge: A Multiple-choice Question Review I

Topics:

General Neurology; MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease; Neuro-oncology Director: Steven L. Lewis, MD, FAAN, Allentown, PA

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See complete course description on page 79 »

Scientific Platform Session Tuesday, April 24, 2018

S23 Topic:

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease Platform Session MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease

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H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

Tuesday, April 24, 2018

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

C122 Multiple Sclerosis Overview III: The

Pathogenesis of Multiple Sclerosis and Mechanism of Action of Treatments for MS

Topic:

MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease; General Neurology Director: Michael K. Racke, MD, Columbus, OH

arguably more effective treatments have become available, decisionmaking in regard to MS DMTs has become much more complex for both neurologists and people with MS. This course will review the mechanisms of action and the risk-benefit ratios of the DMTs and delve into different treatment paradigms, risk mitigation strategies, sequencing considerations, and shared decision making. This program complements C147: Multiple Sclerosis Therapy: Disease-modifying Treatment II and C162: Multiple Sclerosis Therapy: Symptom Management, but covers independent topics.

Program Description: Improved management of multiple sclerosis (MS) would result from understanding of MS pathogenesis, risk factors, immune abnormalities, and mechanism of action of MS treatments, including understanding of complications that can result from those treatments. Faculty will discuss new understanding in MS pathogenesis and how immune interventions can alter disease pathogenesis for an improved clinical outcome, and the mechanism of action of current MS therapies, including therapies targeting B cells.

Upon Completion: Participants should be familiar with the indications and risks associated with approved disease-modifying agents in multiple sclerosis, and be better able to identify the appropriate patient populations for the newer agents. Lecture/Faculty: }} A Brave New World of MS Therapeutics David E. Jones, MD, Charlottesville, VA }} MS Treatment Paradigms, Risk Mitigation, and Sequencing Considerations Gabriel Pardo, MD, Oklahoma City, OK Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Didactic, Interactive

This program complements C98: Multiple Sclerosis Overview I: Clinical Pearls and C109: Multiple Sclerosis Overview II: Clinical Advances, but covers independent topics.

Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

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Upon Completion: Participants should be able to identify steps in MS pathogenesis, treatments used in MS management, and how approved therapies affect the immune response and potential complications resulting from those interventions. Lecture/Faculty: }} MS Pathogenesis and Mechanism of MS Therapies Faculty Core Competencies:  Patient Care, Medical Knowledge Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Course Wednesday, April 25, 2018 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

C136 Multiple Sclerosis Therapy: Disease-

CME Credits:  2

Plenary Session Wednesday, April 25, 2018 9:15 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Frontiers in Neuroscience Plenary Session

Topics: Sleep; MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease; Aging, Dementia, Cognitive, and Behavioral Neurology; General Neurology; Neuro-rehabilitation; Child Neurology and Developmental Neurology Moderator: Paul M. George, MD, PhD, MSE, Stanford, CA

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10:55 a.m.–11:15 a.m. }} Pediatric MS: A Unique Window into Environmental and Genetic Risk Factors for MS Emmanuelle Waubant, MD, FAAN, San Francisco, CA

modifying Treatment I

Topic: MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease Director: David E. Jones, MD, Charlottesville, VA

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Program Description: The use of disease-modifying treatments (DMTs) in MS is one of the most rapidly evolving therapeutic areas in neurology. As new and

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MS and CNS Disease

Course


Program Descriptions

MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease

Course

Course

Wednesday, April 25, 2018 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Wednesday, April 25, 2018 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

C147 Multiple Sclerosis Therapy: Disease-

C162 Multiple Sclerosis Therapy: Symptom

modifying Treatment II

Topic: MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease Director: John W. Rose, MD, FAAN, Salt Lake City, UT

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Management

Topic: MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease Director: Jonathan L. Carter, MD, Scottsdale, AZ

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Program Description: Disease-modifying treatments in MS are one of the most rapidly evolving areas of therapeutic intervention in neurology. As new treatments become available, the options for patients, and their prescribing physicians, increases. Many of the newer therapies have complex risk: benefit profiles and require specialized expertise for safe and effective administration. Faculty will focus on therapeutic strategies and risk mitigation of currently available diseasemodifying therapies, discuss proper use of these drugs and risk assessment, and use specific examples to cover the most frequent issues arising from MS treatment strategies.

Program Description: Symptom management in MS remains a very important determinant of quality of life in MS patients, even with the advent of increasing numbers of MS disease-modifying therapies. Symptoms of MS may be under-recognized and there are knowledge gaps among neurologists regarding management of these common symptoms. Faculty will review the management of common MS symptoms including spasticity, fatigue, gait disorders, bladder problems, bowel problems, and sexual dysfunction, and conclude with a panel discussion regarding management of these and other commonly encountered symptoms in MS patients.

This program complements C136: Multiple Sclerosis Therapy: Disease-modifying Treatment I and C162: Multiple Sclerosis Therapy: Symptom Management, but covers independent topics.

This program complements C136: Multiple Sclerosis Therapy: Disease-modifying Treatment I and C147: Multiple Sclerosis Therapy II: Disease-modifying Treatment II, but covers independent topics.

Upon Completion: Participants should be familiar with the indications and risks associated with approved disease-modifying agents in multiple sclerosis, and be better able to identify the appropriate patient populations for the newer agents.

Upon Completion: Participants should be able to diagnose and treat symptoms of fatigue, sleep disorders, spasticity, gait difficulties, bladder and bowel symptoms, and sexual dysfunction in MS patients.

Lecture/Faculty: }} Multiple Sclerosis Therapy: Disease-modifying Treatment II Faculty Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, General Neurologist

Scientific Platform Session Wednesday, April 25, 2018 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

S35 Topic:

MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease Platform Session MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease

128 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

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Lecture/Faculty: }} Management of Fatigue, Sleep Disorders, and Spasticity in MS Jonathan L. Carter, MD, Scottsdale, AZ }} Management of Ambulatory Dysfunction in MS Michelle Cameron, MD, Portland, OR }} Management of GU Dysfunction: When MS Hits Below the Belt Faculty }} Case-Based Panel Discussion: MS Symptom Management Michelle Cameron, MD, Portland, OR Jonathan L. Carter, MD, Scottsdale, AZ Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee


Wednesday, April 25, 2018 4:00 p.m.–4:45 p.m.

Diets and Supplements in MS: What’s the Evidence Thus Far? Topic: MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease Speaker: Vijayshree Yadav, MD, MCR, FANA, Portland, OR Experiential Learning Area: Live Well

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Program Description: Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a chronic neurologic illness where the cause remains unknown. While approved disease modifying therapies are the mainstay of MS management, there can be many side effects of the drugs that limit their use. In part due to these factors, there is a huge interest amongst the people with MS to try dietary approaches or non-pharmacological agents to help MS. Most of the time the people with MS do not discuss these options with their MS providers and additionally MS providers are not enough knowledgeable about potential role or side effects of these approaches in MS management. The scientific evidence supporting the use of dietary approaches or supplement intake is evolving and there is a significant need to educate both health care providers as well people with MS to make better management choices for the MS care. This talk will give an update of research in common dietary approaches and supplement use in MS.

The cases are selected in collaboration with faculty and experts from the Autoimmune Neurology Section of the AAN. Upon Completion: Participants should be familiar with the spectrum of autoimmune and paraneoplastic neurological disorders, with a focus on the intersection of autoimmune neurology on all traditional neurology subspecialties, including movement disorders, epilepsy, behavioral/ cognitive, neuromuscular, autonomic, demyelinating, and neurooncologic. Participants should also recognize the systemic manifestations associated with autoimmune neurologic disorders as clues to diagnosis, and be able to discriminate antibody-mediated neurologic disorders from mimics, including other autoinflammatory conditions, neurologic manifestations of rheumatologic disease, and immunodeficiency states with superimposed autoimmunity. There will be a focus on practical approaches to diagnosis treatment based on objective parameters and outcomes. Lecture/Faculty: }} Case Presentations and Discussion Thais Armangue, MD, Barcelona, Spain Stacey Clardy, MD, PhD, Salt Lake City, UT Jerome Honnorat, Lyon, France Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Neuroscience in the Clinic Session

Course Thursday, April 26, 2018

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

C175 Clinical Pearls in Autoimmune Neurology: Real World Cases

Topic: MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease Director: Stacey Clardy, MD, PhD, Salt Lake City, UT

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Program Description: This course will provide an interactive, dynamic environment in which to learn about challenging cases in the field of autoimmune neurology. Faculty will discuss the presentation, diagnosis, and management of a variety of autoimmune neurologic disorders, including epilepsy, encephalitis, dementia, and movement disorders. Disease mimics and related conditions will be included. The audience will be encouraged to discuss controversial aspects of diagnosis and management. This case-based, interactive course will supplement prior wellreceived lecture-based courses in this area. Via a learner-centered, interactive approach, the course will provide neurologists with a practical approach to evaluating and managing patients in this rapidly evolving field. Participants are encouraged to suggest cases of their own prior to the course by contacting Stacey Clardy, MD, PhD, at stacey.clardy@hsc.utah.edu

Thursday, April 26, 2018

N5

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Neuroscience in the Clinic: Treatment of Progressive Multiple Sclerosis

Topic: MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease Directors: Eric Klawiter, MD, Boston, MA Ellen M. Mowry, MD, FAAN, Baltimore, MD

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Program Description: Advances in the understanding of multiple sclerosis have opened up potential therapeutic targets, addressing a great need in progressive MS. Following a case presentation, faculty will discuss disease pathogenesis, biomarker development, and the latest clinical trial results with a focus of relating the recent discoveries in neuroscience in this area back to the bedside. Upon Completion: Participants should become familiar with the pathogenesis of progressive multiple sclerosis and how to assess progressive multiple sclerosis. They should be equipped to improve their management of patients with progressive multiple sclerosis. Lecture/Faculty: }} Progressive MS Case Presentation Faculty AAN.com/view/AM18 129

MS and CNS Disease

Experiential Learning Area


Program Descriptions }} From Pathology to Pathogenesis of Progressive MS Gabriele C. De Luca, MD, PhD, Oxford, United Kingdom }} A Clinician’s Perspective of Progressive MS Jiwon Oh, MD, Toronto, ON, Canada }} Progress in Progressive MS Faculty }} Abstract Presentations: (Selected in February 2018) }} Progressive MS Panel Discussion Faculty Core Competencies:  Patient Care, Medical Knowledge Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist

Scientific Platform Session Thursday, April 26, 2018

S43 Topic:

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease Platform Session MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease

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Scientific Platform Session Friday, April 27, 2018

S46 Topic:

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

“Best of” Session: MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease

MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease detected or not. Faculty will present a state-of-the-art review of NMOSD pathogenesis, diagnosis, AQP4-IgG assay interpretation, and the role of emerging autoantibodies associated with NMOSD clinical phenotypes (such as MOG-IgG) and summarize a practical approach to treatment and prevention of attacks. Case presentations will be used to illustrate key learning points during lectures and in a case-based discussion session. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to understand the clinical, neuroimaging, laboratory, and pathologic characteristics of NMOSD; compare the utility of AQP4-IgG assay methods; recognize clinical characteristics associated with MOG-IgG; be able to discuss elements of the newly revised NMOSD diagnostic criteria; and describe approaches to prevention and treatment of acute NMOSD attacks. Lecture/Faculty: }} NMOSD: Pathogenesis and Clinical Diagnosis Brian G. Weinshenker, MD, FAAN, Rochester, MN }} NMOSD: Current and Emerging Therapies and Strategies Dean M. Wingerchuk, MD, FAAN, Scottsdale, AZ }} Case-based Discussion Brian G. Weinshenker, MD, FAAN, Rochester, MN Dean M. Wingerchuk, MD, FAAN, Scottsdale, AZ Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive, Audience Participation CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Scientific Platform Session Friday, April 27, 2018

S50

MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease

Topic:

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Course Friday, April 27, 2018

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C224 Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorders Topic: MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease Director: Dean M. Wingerchuk, MD, FAAN, Scottsdale, AZ

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Program Description: Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSD) are a collection of clinical syndromes and neuroradiological accompaniments unified by their association with an autoantibody specific for the astrocytic water channel aquaporin-4 (AQP4). Recently revised diagnostic criteria for NMOSD, which include the classic transverse myelitis and optic neuritis attacks but also define additional brain, diencephalic, and brain stem syndromes, stratify the diagnosis based on whether AQP4-IgG is 130 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease Platform Session MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease

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Experiential Learning Area Friday, April 27, 2018

4:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Ask Us Anything: Expert Panel on Multiple Sclerosis Topic: MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease Speakers: John Corboy, MD, FAAN, Aurora, CO Experiential Learning Area: HeadTalks

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Program Description: This lively interactive session will feature renowned experts in the field of Multiple Sclerosis. The audience will be able to ask questions regarding difficult cases or seek opinions on challenges facing Multiple Sclerosis subspecialty today.


NEW AT 2018 ANNUAL MEETING

New for 2018 Medical Student Symposium: Careers in Neurology Sunday, April 22, 2018

Attend this half-day event to explore the exciting opportunities that a career in neurology can offer. This program is specifically designed for medical students to attend and discover their career potential as well as network with other students. Scholarships are available.

Young Investigators Programming Support your budding career in research with training and mentoring specifically for medical students and residents. Components include training, mentoring, and networking designed to address the specific needs of pre- and early-career researchers. Scholarships and opportunities to present your research are available.

Visit AAN.com/view/StudentsRF to learn more about these programs.


Neuro Trauma, Critical Care, and Sports Neurology Overview

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rom the field to the emergency room, this lineup of education and science programming will cover the gamut of topics related to neuro trauma, critical care, and sports neurology, including both general diagnosis and management strategies and deep dives into the most severe and challenging cases faced in the ICU. And don’t miss the Invited Science platform session featuring authors giving encore presentations of abstracts previously presented at the National Neurotrauma Society subspecialty meeting. Saturday, April 21

Wednesday, April 25

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C3  Emergency Room Neuro-ophthalmology

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C145  Severe TBI: From ICU to Rehabilitation

9:30 a.m.–11:30 a.m. C8  Emergency Neurology: Evaluation of Coma, Meningitis, and Viral Encephalitis in the Emergency Room

Thursday, April 26

1:30 p.m.–3:30 p.m. C23  Critical Care Consultations for Neurohospitalists

Sunday, April 22 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C27  Neurological Intensive Care I: The Essentials 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C38  Neurological Intensive Care II: Acute Brain and Spinal Cord Injury and Acute Neuromuscular Dysfunction 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C53  Neurological Intensive Care III: Vascular Diseases

Monday, April 23 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C72  Sports Neurology: Enhancing Athletic Performance

Tuesday, April 24 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C104  Sports Concussion Skills Workshop: Event Coverage Foundational Skills and Sport Specific Pearls 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C106  Critical Care EEG Monitoring 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C114  Concussion: Pathogenesis, Fluid and Imaging Biomakers, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Post-Concussion Headache 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C127  Concussion Management: Chronic Sequelae and Symptom Targeted Treatment in the Acute, Subacute and Chronic Phase After Concussion

132 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

8:00 a.m.–8:45 a.m. X  Sleep and Performance in Elite Athletes 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. S41  Neurocritical Care Platform Session 1:00 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C196  Brain Death Skills Workshop: How to Perform a Brain Death Evaluation, Avoid Pitfalls and Convey the News to the Family 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. Invited Science Session: Neuro Trauma 6:30 p.m.–9:30 p.m. C211  Case Studies in the ICU

Friday, April 27 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. S48  Neuro Trauma and Sports Neurology Platform Session


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

Course

C3

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Emergency Room Neuro-ophthalmology

Topics:

Neuro-ophthalmology/Neuro-otology; Neuro Trauma, Critical Care, and Sports Neurology Director: Heather Moss, MD, PhD, FAAN, Palo Alto, CA

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Saturday, April 21, 2018

C23

Critical Care Consultations for Neurohospitalists

Topics:

Neuro Trauma, Critical Care, and Sports Neurology; General Neurology Director: Vanja C. Douglas, MD, San Francisco, CA

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See complete course description on page 159 »

Course Saturday, April 21, 2018

C8

9:30 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Emergency Neurology: Evaluation of Coma, Meningitis, and Viral Encephalitis in the Emergency Room

Topics:

Neuro Trauma, Critical Care, and Sports Neurology; General Neurology Director: Jose I. Suarez, MD, Baltimore, MD

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Program Description: Advances in the treatment of neurologic emergencies have increased the complexity of their initial evaluation and impacted the way neurologists deal with them. Faculty will present discussions to highlight important issues such as high level of clinical suspicion, rapid and effective diagnosis and execution of treatment plans. All presentations will emphasize importance of appropriate therapeutic decisions carried out during the first few minutes of the initial encounter to prevent further neurologic injury. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to delineate the steps to follow to provide immediate evaluation and management of patients in coma in an organized fashion. In addition, participants should be able to recognize and initiate work up and management of patients presenting with suspected meningitis and encephalitis particularly in the current environment of emergent world pandemics. Lecture/Faculty: }} Coma Jose I. Suarez, MD, Baltimore, MD }} Meningitits and Viral Encephalitis Faculty Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care

1:30 p.m.–3:30 p.m.

Program Description: Neurohospitalists are frequently asked to consult on patients in the intensive care unit. Common reasons for consultation include prognosis after cardiac arrest, seizures and status epilepticus, and neuromuscular respiratory failure. In this course, faculty will discuss neuroprotection and prognostication after cardiac arrest; detection, diagnosis and management of seizures in the intensive care unit, including an update on management of status epilepticus; and common and rare but treatable causes of neuromuscular respiratory failure. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to discuss the neuroprotective effect of targeted temperature management after cardiac arrest and prognosticate effectively in these patients; utilize the most up to date treatment algorithms for status epilepticus and describe approaches to treatment of non-convulsive status epilepticus; and diagnose both the most common causes of neuromuscular respiratory failure as well as rare but treatable diseases such as acid maltase deficiency. Lecture/Faculty: }} Status Epilepticus and Seizures in the Intensive Care Unit John Betjemann, MD, San Francisco, CA }} Common and Rare Causes of Neuromuscular Respiratory Failure Every Neurohospitalist Should Be Aware Of R Brian Sommerville, MD, Saint Louis, MO }} Neuroprotection and Prognosis After Cardiac Arrest in the Era of Targeted Temperature Management Vanja C. Douglas, MD, San Francisco, CA Core Competencies:  Patient Care, Medical Knowledge Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Trainee, Advanced Practice Provider

Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

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Neuro Trauma/Critical Care/Sports

Saturday, April 21, 2018

Course


Program Descriptions

Neuro Trauma, Critical Care, and Sports Neurology

Course Sunday, April 22, 2018

C27

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Neurological Intensive Care I: The Essentials

Topic: Neuro Trauma, Critical Care, and Sports Neurology Director: David M. Greer, MD, FAAN, Boston, MA

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Program Description: This program will provide the essentials of neurocritical staples, including neuroprognostication, multimodality monitoring, and elevated intracranial pressure, both its prevention and management. The expert speakers will provide up-to-date discussions of the processes in each of these areas, arming the attendees with strong knowledge base for these neurocritical care situations and management. This program complements C38: Neurological Intensive Care II: Acute Brain and Spinal Cord Injury and Acute Neuromuscular Dysfunction and C53: Neurological Intensive Care III: Vascular Diseases, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to understand the basics of multimodality monitoring, how to approach prognostication for a variety of acute brain injuries, and how to prevent and treat elevated intracranial pressure in the intensive care unit. Lecture/Faculty: }} Neuroprognostication David Y. Hwang, MD, New Haven, CT }} Elevated ICP: Prevention and Management Anna Marisa Cervantes-Arslanian, MD, Boston, MA }} Multimodality Monitoring Stephan A. Mayer, MD, Detroit, MI Core Competencies:  Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement, Systems-Based Practice Teaching Style:  Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, Nurse, Nurse Practitioner, Physician Assistant

134 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

Course Sunday, April 22, 2018

C38

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Neurological Intensive Care II: Acute Brain and Spinal Cord Injury and Acute Neuromuscular Dysfunction

Topic: Neuro Trauma, Critical Care, and Sports Neurology Director: Kristine H. O’Phelan, MD, Miami, FL

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Program Description: This session will provide instruction for best practice management of common disorders encountered in neurocritical care practice. These include traumatic brain injury, acute spinal cord injury, status epilepticus, and acute neuromuscular dysfunction. Specific attention is given to targeting improved functional outcomes for our patients and avoiding common pitfalls of management. This program complements C27: Neurological Intensive Care I: The Essentials and C53: Neurological Intensive Care III: Vascular Diseases, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to identify markers of severity of illness in patients with acute traumatic brain injury, acute spinal cord injury, and acute neuromuscular dysfunction; explain the pathophysiology of secondary brain injury in acute traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injury and give examples of therapies to mitigate this risk; and describe an approach to the patient with acute respiratory failure due to neuromuscular weakness. Lecture/Faculty: }} Management of Acute Neuromuscular Diseases in the NSICU Neha Dangayach, MD, New York, NY }} Management of Acute TBI and SCI in the NSICU Kristine H. O’Phelan, MD, Miami, FL }} Management of Status Epilepticus in the NSICU Jan Claassen, MD, PhD, New York, NY Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, Nurse, Advanced Practice Provider


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

Course

C53

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Neurological Intensive Care III: Vascular Diseases

Topic: Neuro Trauma, Critical Care, and Sports Neurology Director: Lori A. Shutter, MD, PT, Pittsburgh, PA

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Program Description: The practice of neurocritical care requires knowledge of brain pathophysiology and vascular diseases of the nervous system. The lectures in this session will provide in-depth reviews of essential topics for any neurologists caring for critically ill patients following acute ischemic and hemorrhagic intracranial events, including ischemic stroke, cerebral reperfusion, subarachnoid hemorrhage, intracerebral hemorrhage, and cerebral sinus thrombosis This program complements C27: Neurological Intensive Care I: The Essentials, and C38: Neurological Intensive Care II: From the Brain to the Muscles, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to discuss the ICU care of ischemic stroke and reperfusion issues, address the medical management of subarachnoid patients, and identify the ICU needs of patients with intraparenchymal hemorrhagic lesions. Lecture/Faculty: }} ICU Management of Ischemic Stroke and Reperfusion Nerissa U. Ko, MD, San Francisco, CA }} Medical Management of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Sherry Chou, MD, Pittsburgh, PA }} Critical Care of Intraparenchymal Hemorrhage Asma Moheet, MD, Los Angeles, CA Core Competencies:  Practice-Based Learning and Improvement, Patient Care, Medical Knowledge Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, Nurse

Monday, April 23, 2018

C72

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Sports Neurology: Enhancing Athletic Performance

Topic: Neuro Trauma, Critical Care, and Sports Neurology Director: Kevin E. Crutchfield, MD, Baltimore, MD

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Program Description: Increasing involvement by neurologists as part of sports medicine teams has broadened the scope of advice to be given to these teams by the neurologists. Mainly through didactic and case studies, the faculty will teach the audience by engaging them in intellectual discourse to broaden their knowledge regarding modifiable and fixed factors that diminish athletic performance so that consultation can be provided to sports teams or athletes on how to modify or accommodate for them. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to identify the performance modifying factors and how to accommodate for them to maximize athletic performance. Lecture/Faculty: }} Effects of Sleep on Athletic Performance Harry G. Kerasidis, MD, Prince Frederick, MD }} Effects of Temperature and Altitude on Athletic Performance Francis O’Connor, MD, Bethesda, MD }} Occipital-Atlantoaxial Injuries Kevin E. Crutchfield, MD, Baltimore, MD Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Skills Workshop Tuesday, April 24, 2018

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

C104 Sports Concussion Skills Workshop: Event Coverage Foundational Skills and Sport Specific Pearls $ (registration required)

Topic: Neuro Trauma, Critical Care, and Sports Neurology Director: Vernon B. Williams, MD, Los Angeles, CA

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Program Description: Event Coverage Skills are those necessary to expertly evaluate and manage acute concussion on-site. Expert event coverage involves unique administrative, social, and clinical skills, often different from

AAN.com/view/AM18 135

Neuro Trauma/Critical Care/Sports

Sunday, April 22, 2018

Course


Program Descriptions those developed during training and clinical practice. Information and skill demonstration will be presented using a combination of didactic, case-based, and video content presentations. In addition, we will provide pearls from experts with decades of sideline sports medicine experience that is specific to the particular sport environment. The dynamics associated with coverage of sports played on a field, court, ring, octagon, and ice are as critical as dynamics associated with youth, high school, collegiate, or professional/elite levels of participation. All scenarios represent concussion risk, but the specific skills associated with event coverage are unique. This program’s intended audience includes those currently or interested in covering events with high risk of concussion at all levels of participation and in all sports environments. Upon Completion: Participants will be able to appropriately assess and manage injured athletes relative to the issue of concussion. Participants should possess the ability to provide acute recommendations to athletes, trainers, coaches, parents, and other stakeholders in the acute sports-related concussion setting using practical skills. They should be aware of the unique aspects of "real-time" concussion assessment and integration into the athletic event environment. Lecture/Faculty: }} Introduction and Administrative Skills Vernon B. Williams, MD, Los Angeles, CA }} Foundational Event Coverage Skills Faculty }} Field Sport Cases and Pearls Tad Dean Seifert, MD, Louisville, KY }} Court Sport Cases and Pearls Vernon B. Williams, MD, Los Angeles, CA }} Combat Sports Cases and Pearls Anthony G. Alessi, MD, FAAN, Norwich, CT }} Ice, Snow, and Extreme Cases and Pearls Jeffrey S. Kutcher, MD, FAAN, Brighton, MI Core Competencies:  Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement, Professionalism Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive, Video Analysis CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Course Tuesday, April 24, 2018

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C106 Critical Care EEG Monitoring Topics:

Epilepsy/Clinical Neurophysiology (EEG); Neuro Trauma, Critical Care, and Sports Neurology Director: Suzette M. LaRoche, MD, FAAN, Asheville, NC

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See complete course description on page 61 » 136 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

Neuro Trauma, Critical Care, and Sports Neurology

Course Tuesday, April 24, 2018

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C114 Concussion: Pathogenesis, Fluid and

Imaging Biomakers, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Post-Concussion Headache

Topic: Neuro Trauma, Critical Care, and Sports Neurology Director: David W. Dodick, MD, FAAN, Phoenix, AZ

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Program Description: Advances in knowledge regarding the biology, diagnostic tools, and treatment have impacted the understand of and management of concussion. The presentations will facilitate a discussion with the audience of the pathogenesis, fluid and imaging biomarkers, diagnostic approach, management of common post-concussion symptoms and chronic sequelae of repeated concussion and subconcussive head trauma. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to discuss the underlying pathogenesis of concussion; describe the current advances in fluid and imaging biomarkers for concussion and their current and future role in clinical practice; describe the approach to the diagnosis of concussion and management of post-traumatic headache; discuss the management of the most common symptoms of concussion; and describe the current understanding of chronic sequelae of concussion and the approach to management and rehabilitation. Lecture/Faculty: }} Concussion: Pathogenesis, Fluid and Imaging Biomakers, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Post-Concussion Headache Faculty }} Pathogenesis and Fluid Biomarkers Faculty }} Office Diagnosis and Management of Post-Concussion Headache David W. Dodick, MD, FAAN, Phoenix, AZ Core Competencies:  Patient Care, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement, Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Medical Knowledge, Professionalism Teaching Style:  Interactive, Didactic, Audience Participation, CaseBased CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, Sports Medicine Physician


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

Course Tuesday, April 24, 2018

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Course Wednesday, April 25, 2018 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C127 Concussion Management: Chronic Sequelae C145 Severe TBI: From ICU to Rehabilitation and Symptom Targeted Treatment in the Acute, Subacute and Chronic Phase After Concussion

Topic:

Neuro-rehabilitation; Aging, Dementia, Cognitive, and Behavioral Neurology; Neuro Trauma, Critical Care, and Sports Neurology Director: Susanne Muehlschlegel, MD, MPH, Worcester, MA

Topic: Neuro Trauma, Critical Care, and Sports Neurology Director: David W. Dodick, MD, FAAN, Phoenix, AZ

Upon Completion: Participants should be able to discuss the management of the most common symptoms of concussion and describe the current understanding of chronic sequelae of concussion and the approach to management and rehabilitation. Lecture/Faculty: }} Concussion Management: Symptom Targeted Treatment in the Acute and Chronic Phase Vernon B. Williams, MD, Los Angeles, CA }} Repeated concussion and subconcussive brain trauma: Diagnostic evaluation and management of chronic sequelae Robert Stern, PhD, Boston, MA Core Competencies:  Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement, Professionalism

Experiential Learning Area Thursday, April 26, 2018

Sleep and Performance in Elite Athletes Topics:

Sleep; Neuro Trauma, Critical Care, and Sports Neurology Speaker: Scott J. Kutscher, MD, Redwood City, CA Experiential Learning Area: Live Well

DJC

See complete course description on page 193 »

Scientific Platform Session Thursday, April 26, 2018

S41

Topic:

Recommended Audience:  Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, Sports Medicine Physician, Non-Neurologist, General Neurologist, Advanced Practice Provider

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Neurocritical Care Platform Session Neuro Trauma, Critical Care, and Sports Neurology

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Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2

8:00 a.m.–8:45 a.m.

Course Thursday, April 26, 2018

1:00 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

C196 Brain Death Skills Workshop: How to

Perform a Brain Death Evaluation, Avoid Pitfalls and Convey the News to the Family $ (registration required)

Topic: Neuro Trauma, Critical Care, and Sports Neurology Director: Panayiotis N. Varelas, MD, PhD, Detroit, MI

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Program Description: In 2010, the AAN published straightforward guidance for the declaration of death by neurological criteria (brain death, BD), but policies and practices continue to vary significantly across the US and worldwide, increasing the risk for false brain death declarations and erosion of the public trust on our ability to pronounce death

AAN.com/view/AM18 137

Neuro Trauma/Critical Care/Sports

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Program Description: Advances in knowledge regarding the early and late sequelae of concussion and symptom-targeted management has advanced and will impact the understand of and management of post-concussion symptoms. The presentations will facilitate a discussion of the management of common early and late symptoms after concussion and repeated traumatic brain injury.

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See complete course description on page 167 »


Program Descriptions

Neuro Trauma, Critical Care, and Sports Neurology

Course

reliably. Therefore, there is a great need for health care providers to improve practices surrounding the declaration of BD. This workshop will include 3 consecutive sessions: didactics including videos, simulation of BD in mannequins (or difficult cases-vignettes), and question and answer discussion regarding BD controversies and presentation of BD results to families. Upon Completion: Participants will become familiar with the process of conducting a complete BD evaluation, be able to address difficult cases and avoid pitfalls, and be able to conduct a thorough and compassionate discussion with the relatives of the patient and improve their understanding of BD. Lecture/Faculty: }} Brain Death Evaluation Lecture and Video David M. Greer, MD, FAAN, Boston, MA }} Breakout Session: Mannequin Simulation Faculty }} Breakout Session: Difficult Cases: Vignettes Gene Y. Sung, MD, MPH, Los Angeles, CA }} Breakout Session: Difficult Cases: Vignettes Ariane Lewis, MD, New York, NY }} How to Approach Families and What to Tell Them Ariane Lewis, MD, New York, NY }} Controversies in Brain Death: Questions and Answers/Discussion Faculty Core Competencies:  Patient Care Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive, Mannequin Simulation CME Credits:  4 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Invited Science Session Thursday, April 26, 2018

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Invited Science Session: Neuro Trauma Topic(s): Neuro Trauma, Critical Care, and Sports Neurology

Thursday, April 26, 2018

6:30 p.m.–9:30 p.m.

C211 Case Studies in the ICU

Topic: Neuro Trauma, Critical Care, and Sports Neurology Director: Nicholas Joseph Silvestri, MD, FAAN, Buffalo, NY

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Program Description: Neurologic complications in ICU patients often have a substantial negative impact on their outcome. Neurologists are being asked increasingly to evaluate patients in intensive care units. They are often called to assess unusual neurologic manifestations of other primary diseases, evaluate the consequences of critical care therapy, offer a prognosis, or determine brain death. Using a case-based approach, faculty will provide the core elements of modern neurologic critical care and suggested approach to the management of some of the most commonly encountered problems. Topics will include: approach to neurologic problems in the ICU, including failure to awaken after cardiac arrest; brain death; neuromuscular considerations in the ICU; difficulty-towean off artificial ventilation; and epilepsy, including status epilepticus. Interactions between faculty and participants will be encouraged. Upon Completion: Participants should have a comprehensive understanding of the general aspects of critical care of neurologic patients and common neurologic problems encountered in the ICU setting, be able to incorporate evidence-driven data into their recommendations, and be able to evaluate and treat common disorders in the ICU and provide an opinion regarding prognosis. Lecture/Faculty: }} Case Studies in Coma and Brain Death David M. Greer, MD, FAAN, Boston, MA }} Case Studies in Epilepsy and Status Epilepticus Julie Roth, MD, Providence, RI }} Case Studies in Neuromuscular Disorders in the ICU Nicholas Joseph Silvestri, MD, FAAN, Buffalo, NY Core Competencies:  Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement, Professionalism, Systems-Based Practice Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Interactive CME Credits:  3 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

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Program Description: Top abstracts previously presented at the National Neurotrauma Society Annual Meeting will be presented by their authors. Select abstracts from their “best of” lineups emphasize basic, clinical, and translational science as they evolve toward a more complete understanding of neurotrauma with the overall goal of developing more effective prevention and treatment.

138 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

Scientific Platform Session Friday, April 27, 2018

S48 Topic:

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Neuro Trauma and Sports Neurology Platform Session Neuro Trauma, Critical Care, and Sports Neurology

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See the full listing of exclusive member benefits and apply or renew AAN.com/membership


Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG) Overview T

he very latest in neuromuscular disorders, autonomic disorders, and clinical neurophysiology will be presented in both high-level overviews and deep dives into complex cases. Look for education and science covering topics ranging from neuromuscular junction testing and genetic testing for peripheral neuropathy to inflammatory myopathies and dysautonomia. Improve your EMG skills through several course offerings. New this year, the autonomic disorders platform session will be presented in a dynamic, interactive experiential learning area. Saturday, April 21

Wednesday, April 25

9:30 a.m.–11:30 a.m. C9  Evaluation and Management of Autonomic Disorders I: Autonomic Testing, Failure, and Peripheral Neuropathies

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C142  Mastering EMG Waveform Recognition Skills in Just Two Hours!

1:30 p.m.–3:30 p.m. C21  Evaluation and Management of Autonomic Disorders II: Diagnostic Approach and Treatments for Dysautonomia

Sunday, April 22 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C31  Peripheral Neuropathy I: Anatomical Basis and Acquired Demyelinating Neuropathies

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. S30  Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG) Platform Session 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C155  Small Fiber Neuropathies: Sensory, Autonomic, and Both I: Focus on Autonomic Nervous System 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C169  Small Fiber Neuropathies: Sensory, Autonomic, and Both II: Focus on Sensory Nervous System

10:45 a.m.–11:15 a.m. Presidential Plenary Session: Sidney Carter Award in Child Neurology: Spinal Muscular Atrophy is a Treatable Neurogeneractive disease

Thursday, April 26

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C41  Peripheral Neuropathy II: Diabetic and Inherited Neuropathies

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. S37  “Best of” Session: Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG)

1:00 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C49  Neuromuscular Ultrasound Skills Workshop 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C56  Peripheral Neuropathy III: Genetic Testing and Next Generation Sequencing

Monday, April 23 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C63  Therapy of Neuromuscular Disease: ALS, Inflammatory Neuropathies and Myopathies, and Myasthenia Gravis 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C76  Clinical Approach to Muscle Disease I: Role of Antibodies, Muscle Imaging and Genetic Testing 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. N2  Neuroscience in the Clinic: Antisense Oligonucleotide (ASO) Therapy 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C89  Clinical Approach to Muscle Disease II: Inflammatory Myopathies, and Muscle Pathology

Tuesday, April 24 12:00 p.m.–12:45 p.m. X  Treatment of Neuropathy Symptoms Without Medication 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. S20  Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG) Platform Session 1:00 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C119  EMG Skills Workshop: Basic 3:30 p.m.–4:20 p.m. S22  Autonomic Disorders Platform Session 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. S24  Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG) Platform Session

140 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C179  Clinical EMG I: Principles and Practice of NCS and Needle EMG

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C192  Clinical EMG II: Neuromuscular Junction Testing and Quantitative EMG 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. S45  Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG) Platform Session 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C206  Clinical EMG III: Nerve Conduction Criteria and Electrodiagnostic Approaches 6:30 p.m.–9:30 p.m. C210  Case Studies: Unusual Diagnostic and Management of Cases in Neuromuscular Disease

Friday, April 27 8:00 a.m.–9:10 a.m. X  Role of Placebo in Neuromuscular Clinical Trials and in Management of NM Disorders 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C225  Neuromuscular Junction Disorders I: Myasthenia Gravis, Ocular, and MuSK Myasthenia 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C236  Neuromuscular Junction Disorders II: Toxins, Lambert-Eaton Syndrome and Less Common Disorders of Neuromuscular Transmission


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

Saturday, April 21, 2018

C9

9:30 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Evaluation and Management of Autonomic Disorders I: Autonomic Testing, Failure, and Peripheral Neuropathies

Topic: Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG) Director: Amanda C. Peltier, MD, MS, Nashville, TN

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Program Description: Faculty will provide an overview of assessing autonomic function, including common and less common tests for diagnosis of autonomic disorders, and discuss and provide a differential diagnosis of central and peripheral causes of autonomic failure. This program complements C21: Evaluation and Management of Autonomic Disorders II: Diagnostic Approach and Treatments for Dysautonomia, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to improve their ability to formulate a differential diagnosis of autonomic failure, appropriate tests to order to identify autonomic failure and help localize whether the disorder is central or peripheral, and be able to identify common etiologies of autonomic failure. Lecture/Faculty: }} Autonomic Testing Wolfgang Singer, MD, Rochester, MN }} Alpha-Synucleinopathies and Autonomic Failure Faculty }} Autonomic Peripheral Neuropathy Roy L. Freeman, MD, Boston, MA Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Didactic, Audience Participation, Case-Based CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Course Saturday, April 21, 2018

C21

1:30 p.m.–3:30 p.m.

Evaluation and Management of Autonomic Disorders II: Diagnostic Approach and Treatments for Dysautonomia

Program Description: Discrimination between structural and functional autonomic disorders and the treatment of both is expanding neurologic practice and management. Faculty will provide an overview of common functional autonomic disorders typically encountered, and clinical approaches to treatment for symptoms of autonomic disorders. This program complements C9: Evaluation and Management of Autonomic Disorders I: Autonomic Testing, Failure, and Peripheral Neuropathies, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to improve their ability to formulate a differential diagnosis for functional autonomic disorders and a treatment plan for patients with common varieties of autonomic dysfunction. Lecture/Faculty: }} Diagnosis of Autonomic Disorders William P. Cheshire, Jr., MD, FAAN, Jacksonville, FL }} Treatment of Autonomic Disorders Amanda C. Peltier, MD, MS, Nashville, TN Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Course Sunday, April 22, 2018

C31

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Peripheral Neuropathy I: Anatomical Basis and Acquired Demyelinating Neuropathies

Topic: Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG) Director: Michael E. Shy, MD, Iowa City, IA

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Program Description: Peripheral neuropathies (PN) ultimately affect almost 10 percent of the population. New diagnostic and management options make rational therapies for PN increasingly possible. However, the high cost of certain diagnostic tests and therapies, along with the complexities involved in choosing which tests and treatments to initiate, complicate the management of patients with PN. Faculty will provide an overview of the peripheral nervous system, including a pathological overview of PN, and review the diagnosis and management of acquired immune-based ceuropathies, including Guillain Barre syndrome and CIDP.

Topic: Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG) Director: Amanda C. Peltier, MD, MS, Nashville, TN

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AAN.com/view/AM18 141

Neuromuscular (EMG)

Course


Program Descriptions This program complements C41: Peripheral Neuropathy II: Diabetic and Inherited Neuropathies and C56: Peripheral Neuropathy III: Genetic Testing and Next Generation Sequencing, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to understand the anatomical basis and pathological consequences of peripheral neuropathies, distinguish between acquired and inherited peripheral neuropathies, and use a rational, evidence-based approach to treat acquired immunologically based peripheral neuropathies. Lecture/Faculty: }} Peripheral Neuropathy: Overview of Anatomy and Pathology Steven Scherer, MD, Media, PA }} Diagnosis and Treatment of Acquired Demyelinating Neuropathies Faculty }} Case Presentations / Questions and Answers Steven Scherer, MD, Media, PA Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Case-Based CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Plenary Session Sunday, April 22, 2018, 9:15 a.m.–12:00 p.m.

Presidential Plenary Session

Topics: Neuro-oncology; Epilepsy/Clinical Neurophysiology (EEG); Child Neurology and Developmental Neurology; General Neurology; Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG) Moderator: Natalia S. Rost, MD, MPH, FAAN, Boston, MA

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10:45 a.m.–11:15 a.m. }} Sidney Carter Award in Child Neurology: Spinal Muscular Atrophy Is a Treatable Neurodegenerative Disease Richard S. Finkel, MD, Orlando, FL

Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG)

Course Sunday, April 22, 2018

C41

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Peripheral Neuropathy II: Diabetic and Inherited Neuropathies

Topic: Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG) Director: Michael E. Shy, MD, Iowa City, IA

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Program Description: Peripheral neuropathies (PN) ultimately affect almost 10 percent of the population. New diagnostic and management options make rational therapies for PN increasingly possible. However, the high cost of certain diagnostic tests and therapies, along with the complexities involved in choosing which tests and treatments to initiate, complicate the management of patients with PN. Faculty will review approaches and management issues for patients with inherited neuropathies, as well as approaches and management issues for the various forms of diabetic neuropathy. This program complements C31: Peripheral Neuropathy I: Anatomical Basis and Acquired Demyelinating Neuropathies and C56: Peripheral Neuropathy III: Genetic Testing and Next Generation Sequencing, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to determine whether a neuropathy is likely to be genetically based; identify the likely genetic causes of a genetic neuropathy; become familiar with current and future management approaches in different genetic causes of inherited neuropathy; identify the distinct forms of diabetic neuropathy; determine whether a neuropathy is likely to be related to diabetes; and obtain a rational, evidence-based approach to treating diabetic neuropathies. Lecture/Faculty: }} Diabetic Neuropathies A. Gordon Smith, MD, FAAN, Salt Lake City, UT }} Inherited Neuropathies Michael E. Shy, MD, Iowa City, IA }} Case Presentations / Questions and Answers Michael E. Shy, MD, Iowa City, IA A. Gordon Smith, MD, FAAN, Salt Lake City, UT Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

142 2018 AAN Annual Meeting


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

Skills Workshop

C49

1:00 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Neuromuscular Ultrasound Skills Workshop $ (registration required)

Topic: Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG) Director: Craig M. Zaidman, MD, Saint Louis, MO

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Program Description: This skills workshop will introduce participants to the field of neuromuscular ultrasound (NMUS) and cover the basic principles of ultrasonography and current applications. NMUS techniques will be presented through both video and live demonstration sessions. Participants will also have the opportunity to gain limited handson experience with ultrasound systems under the guidance of a faculty member. Specific information will be presented on the role of NMUS in the diagnosis and management of entrapment neuropathies, and its use in guided procedures and in the diagnosis of muscular disorders. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to understand the basic principles of neuromuscular ultrasonography, including its advantages and limitations, and the role of ultrasound in the diagnosis of entrapment neuropathies; become familiar with the techniques required to use ultrasound in the guidance of neuromuscular procedures, and the methods required to use muscle ultrasound; and learn to integrate electrodiagnostic and sonographic information through case presentations. Lecture/Faculty: }} Introduction and Orientation to Neuromuscular Ultrasound Craig M. Zaidman, MD, Saint Louis, MO }} Breakout I: Upper Extremity Ultrasound Rocio Carolina Garcia Santibanez, MD, Atlanta, GA }} Breakout II: Ultrasound Guided Procedures/Diaphragmatic EMG Faculty }} Breakout III: Brachial Plexus and Muscle Vanessa Baute, MD, Winston Salem, NC }} Breakout IV: Lower Extremity Ultrasound Craig M. Zaidman, MD, Saint Louis, MO Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  4 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Sunday, April 22, 2018

C56

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Peripheral Neuropathy III: Genetic Testing and Next Generation Sequencing

Topic: Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG) Director: Michael E. Shy, MD, Iowa City, IA

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Program Description: Next generation sequencing testing is making a genetic diagnosis increasingly available and affordable for patients with inherited neuropathies. However, it is increasingly confusing and complex in deciding what genetic testing to perform and how to interpret the results. Expert faculty with extensive experience in ordering and interpreting genetic testing for CMT will review strategies for ordering and interpreting test results, as well as discuss the current state and future of next generation testing for patients with inherited neuropathies and related disorders. This program complements C31: Peripheral Neuropathy I: Anatomical Basis and Acquired Demyelinating Neuropathies and C41: Peripheral Neuropathy II: Diabetic and Inherited Neuropathies, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to determine when to consider ordering genetic testing for patients with neuropathy, determine when testing is positive or negative and have an approach of what to do when results are inconclusive, and understand the different forms of next generation sequencing and the strengths and weaknesses of these forms. Lecture/Faculty: }} Interpreting Genetic Testing Results in Patients with Inherited Neuropathies Shawna Feely, Iowa City, IA }} Advances and Limits of Next Generation Sequencing Beyond Clinical Testing Stephan Zuchner, MD, Miami, FL }} Case Presentations / Questions and Answers Shawna Feely, Iowa City, IA Stephan Zuchner, MD, Miami, FL Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Didactic, Interactive, Case-Based, Audience Participation CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

AAN.com/view/AM18 143

Neuromuscular (EMG)

Sunday, April 22, 2018

Course


Program Descriptions

Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG)

Course Monday, April 23, 2018

C63

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Therapy of Neuromuscular Disease: ALS, Inflammatory Neuropathies and Myopathies, and Myasthenia Gravis

Topic: Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG) Director: Michael D. Weiss, MD, FAAN, Seattle, WA

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Program Description: Many neuromuscular diseases are immune-mediated and are treatable and potentially curable. Regrettably, diseases like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are not, but even patients with ALS can see substantial improvements in quality of life and survival with proper therapy. Faculty will provide up-to-date and concise guidelines for the management of ALS, inflammatory neuropathies and myopathies, and myasthenia gravis. Upon Completion: Participants should be familiar with the current management of ALS, inflammatory neuropathies and myopathies, and myasthenia gravis. Lecture/Faculty: }} Treatment of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Michael D. Weiss, MD, FAAN, Seattle, WA }} Treatment of Inflammatory Neuropathies Michael D. Weiss, MD, FAAN, Seattle, WA }} Treatment of Myasthenia Gravis Anthony A. Amato, MD, FAAN, Boston, MA }} Treatment of Inflammatory Myopathies Anthony A. Amato, MD, FAAN, Boston, MA Core Competencies:  Patient Care, Medical Knowledge Teaching Style:  Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Course Monday, April 23, 2018

C76

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Clinical Approach to Muscle Disease I: Role of Antibodies, Muscle Imaging and Genetic Testing

Topic: Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG) Director: Tahseen Mozaffar, MD, FAAN, Orange, CA

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Program Description: Patterns of recognition for various inherited and acquired muscle diseases are important to accurately diagnose and minimize testing. It also helps to judiciously select testing modality. Furthermore, the role of muscle pathology has changed in the diagnosis of muscle disorders, especially inherited muscle disorders. Role of autoimmune myositis specific and associated antibodies has modified the way we approach inflammatory muscle disorders. Through presentations of common and more challenging cases, faculty will facilitate a discussion with the audience of differential diagnosis and laboratory evaluation. Each case will be followed by an overview and update on the topic. This program complements C89: Clinical Approach to Muscle Disease II: Inflammatory Myopathies, and Muscle Pathology, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to recognize the various clinical patterns associated with myopathies that will help narrow down the differential diagnosis and judiciously reach a final diagnosis. Participants would learn about the role of muscle pathology in diagnosis of inherited and acquired muscle diseases. The participants will understand the role of autoimmune myositis associated and myositis specific autoantibodies in managing myositis patients. Participants will be able to understand the various causes of limb-girdle muscular dystrophies and understand clinical patterns, and the role of genetic testing in these disorders Lecture/Faculty: }} Approach to Myopathy: Role of Antibodies and Muscle Imaging Namita Goyal, MD, Orange, CA }} Update on Muscular Dystrohies Matthew P. Wicklund, MD, FAAN, Aurora, CO Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

144 2018 AAN Annual Meeting


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

Neuroscience in the Clinic Session

N2

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Neuroscience in the Clinic: Antisense Oligonucleotide (ASO) Therapy

Topic: Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG) Directors: John W. Day, MD, PhD, Palo Alto, CA Richard S. Finkel, MD, Orlando, FL

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Program Description: Ongoing clinical research has already identified the genetic cause of hundreds of distinct disorders, most notably in the area of neuromuscular neurology. While knowing the underlying genetic cause provides a clear target for course-modifying treatments, the ability to successfully and safely modify genes in the clinical world has remained difficult until very recently. After decades of development, technologies are now being successfully used to modify pathogenic mutations using antisense technologies. The faculty will discuss the range of antisense technologies now in clinical investigation, and the multiple methods by which they can alter expression of disease-causing mutations, focusing on current successes such as for Spinal Muscular Atrophy, and future targets. Specific cases will be discussed to show how antisense technologies are being used clinically and how they will impact current and future care of neuromuscular disorders. Upon Completion: Participants will be able to identify different antisense oligonucleotide chemistries and their relative values. They will understand the biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of some antisense oligonucleotides, and the various ways in which antisense oligonucleotides can impact normal and pathogenic gene expression. They will get an update on recently approved antisense treatments that are now commercially available, as well as those that are currently in development. Lecture/Faculty: }} Scientific Content on ASOs Faculty }} Case Presentation Richard S. Finkel, MD, Orlando, FL }} Case Presentation John W. Day MD, PhD, Palo Alto, CA }} Scientific Wrap-up of Case Presentation Treatments Faculty }} Abstract Presentations: (Selected in February 2018) }} Panel Discussion Faculty

Monday, April 23, 2018

C89

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Clinical Approach to Muscle Disease II: Inflammatory Myopathies, and Muscle Pathology

Topic: Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG) Director: Tahseen Mozaffar, MD, FAAN, Orange, CA

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Program Description: Patterns of recognition for various inherited and acquired muscle diseases are important to accurately diagnose and minimize testing. It also helps to judiciously select testing modality. Furthermore, the role of muscle pathology has changed in the diagnosis of muscle disorders, especially inherited muscle disorders. Role of autoimmune myositis specific and associated antibodies has modified the way we approach inflammatory muscle disorders. Through presentations of common and more challenging cases, faculty will facilitate audience discussion of differential diagnosis and laboratory evaluation. Each case will be followed by an overview and update on the topic. This program complements C76: Clinical Approach to Muscle Disease I: Role of Antibodies, Muscle Imaging and Genetic Testing Rhabdomyolysis, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to recognize the various clinical patterns associated with myopathies that will help narrow down the differential diagnosis and judiciously reach a final diagnosis. Participants would learn about the role of muscle pathology in diagnosis of inherited and acquired muscle diseases. The participants will understand the role of autoimmune myositis associated and myositis specific autoantibodies in managing myositis patients. Participants will be able to understand the various causes of limb-girdle muscular dystrophies and understand clinical patterns, and the role of genetic testing in these disorders Lecture/Faculty: }} The Evolving Classification of Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathies: Myopathologic and Serologic Advances Tahseen Mozaffar, MD, FAAN, Orange, CA }} Illustrative Cases in Myopathology Suur Biliciler, MD, Houston, TX Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

AAN.com/view/AM18 145

Neuromuscular (EMG)

Monday, April 23, 2018

Course


Program Descriptions Experiential Learning Area Tuesday, April 24, 2018

12:00 p.m.–12:45 p.m.

Treatment of Neuropathy Symptoms Without Medication Topic: Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG) Speaker: Janice F. Wiesman, MD, FAAN, New York, NY Experiential Learning Area: Live Well

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Program Description: At least 20 million people in the United States suffer from peripheral neuropathy. Regardless of the cause, relief of symptoms including pain, tingling, autonomic dysfunction and weakness is important to maintain function and quality of life. Given that symptomatic treatments do not "repair" neuropathy, that this may be a lifelong problem and that people with neuropathy often are taking medications for other illnesses, an approach that does not use oral medication may be best. I will discuss symptomatic treatments of neuropathy that do not involve the use of oral medications. I will also address the usefulness of treatments advertised on the Internet, including devices and supplements.

Skills Workshop Tuesday, April 24, 2018

1:00 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

C119 EMG Skills Workshop: Basic

Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG) }} Needle Electromyography Cynthia Bodkin, MD, Indianapolis, IN }} Workshop Pearls and Q&A With the Experts Faculty Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, PracticeBased Learning and Improvement, Systems-Based Practice Teaching Style:  Interactive CME Credits:  4 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, EMG Technologist

Scientific Platform Session Tuesday, April 24, 2018

S20 Topic:

Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG) Platform Session Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG)

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Scientific Platform Session Tuesday, April 24, 2018

S22

Topic:

Topic: Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG) Director: Ezgi Tiryaki, MD, FAAN, Minneapolis, MN Program Description: The program consists of four sessions covering motor nerve conduction studies; sensory nerve conduction studies; nerve conduction techniques, such as repetitive nerve stimulation, F waves, and H reflexes; and needle EMG. In small, hands-on group sessions, faculty will first demonstrate and then supervise attendees performing these techniques. The presentations will also cover the clinical utility and technical pitfalls of these techniques. Attendees rotate through each of the sessions. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to describe fundamentals of nerve conduction and needle examination, list electrodiagnostic approaches to common problems encountered in the EMG laboratory, and recognize common technical pitfalls and artifacts. Lecture/Faculty: }} Sensory Nerve Conduction Studies Holli Ann Horak, MD, FAAN, Tucson, AZ }} Motor Nerve Conduction Studies Jun Kimura, MD, FAAN, Iowa City, IA }} Late Responses and Repetitive Stimulation Faculty 146 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

3:30 p.m.–4:20 p.m.

Autonomic Disorders Platform Session Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG)

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$ (registration required)

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1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Scientific Platform Session Tuesday, April 24, 2018

S24 Topic:

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG) Platform Session Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG)

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H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

Course

Scientific Platform Session

Wednesday, April 25, 2018 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Wednesday, April 25, 2018 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C142 Mastering EMG Waveform Recognition

S30

Topic: Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG) Director: Devon I. Rubin, MD, FAAN, Jacksonville, FL

Topic:

Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG) Platform Session Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG)

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Program Description: Interpretation of EMG studies relies on the ability to accurately identify and interpret normal and abnormal spontaneous activity and changes in motor unit potentials (MUP) that occur in neuromuscular diseases. Mastering accurate and efficient EMG waveform identification requires learning skills of pattern recognition and auditory semi-quantitation. Once these skills are learned, EMG diagnostic efficiency and accuracy can be enhanced with appropriate practice. This interactive session will teach attendees methods used to identify EMG waveforms using an interactive, audience participation approach. Attendees will learn and practice the methods of auditory pattern recognition and semi-quantitation with focus on MUP recruitment, as well as recognition of other MUP parameters including stability, phases, and duration. Examples of spontaneous EMG waveforms and MUP abnormalities will be shown through case examples to test waveform recognition skills. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to demonstrate the ability to recognize the auditory firing patterns of EMG waveforms; understand the significance of abnormal recruitment changes in motor unit potential in diseases; recognize morphologic MUP changes according to the temporal course of a neuromuscular disease; learn to identify common and uncommon abnormal spontaneous EMG waveforms; and correlate EMG abnormalities with underlying neuromuscular diseases. Lecture/Faculty: }} Mastering EMG Waveforms: Concepts and Practice Devon I. Rubin, MD, FAAN, Jacksonville, FL Core Competencies:  Patient Care, Medical Knowledge Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Specialist Neurologist, General Neurologist, Trainee

Course Wednesday, April 25, 2018 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C155 Small Fiber Neuropathies: Sensory,

Autonomic, and Both I: Focus on Autonomic Nervous System

Topic: Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG) Director: Christopher H. Gibbons, MD, FAAN, Boston, MA

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Program Description: Small fiber and autonomic neuropathies are common but often unrecognized conditions that affect the peripheral, somatic, and autonomic nervous systems. Through the presentation of didactic material and cases of varying complexity, faculty will facilitate a discussion of the pathophysiology, differential diagnosis, diagnostic evaluation, and therapy of these conditions. Part I will focus more heavily on conditions that impact the autonomic nervous system; Part II will focus more heavily on conditions that impact the somatic or sensory nervous system. Both parts will discuss conditions that may impact the sensory and autonomic small fibers simultaneously. This program complements C169: Small Fiber Neuropathies: Sensory, Autonomic, and Both II: Focus on Sensory Nervous System, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should become familiar with the pathophysiology, semiology, differential diagnosis, diagnostic approaches (including skin biopsy and autonomic testing), laboratory evaluation, and treatment of small fiber somatic and autonomic neuropathies. Lecture/Faculty: }} Small Fiber Autonomic Neuropathies: Diagnosis Christopher H. Gibbons, MD, FAAN, Boston, MA }} Small Fiber Autonomic Neuropathies: Management Horacio C. Kaufmann, MD, FAAN, New York, NY Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

AAN.com/view/AM18 147

Neuromuscular (EMG)

Skills in Just Two Hours!


Program Descriptions

Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG)

Course

Course

Wednesday, April 25, 2018 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Thursday, April 26, 2018

C169 Small Fiber Neuropathies: Sensory,

C179 Clinical EMG I: Principles and Practice of

Autonomic, and Both II: Focus on Sensory Nervous System

Topic: Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG) Director: Christopher H. Gibbons, MD, FAAN, Boston, MA

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Program Description: Small fiber and autonomic neuropathies are common but often unrecognized conditions that affect the peripheral, somatic, and autonomic nervous systems. Through the presentation of didactic material and cases of varying complexity, faculty will facilitate a discussion of the pathophysiology, differential diagnosis, diagnostic evaluation, and therapy of these conditions. Part I will focus more heavily on conditions that impact the autonomic nervous system; Part II will focus more heavily on conditions that impact the somatic or sensory nervous system. Both parts will discuss conditions that may impact the sensory and autonomic small fibers simultaneously. This program complements C155: Small Fiber Neuropathies: Sensory, Autonomic, and Both I: Focus on Sensory Nervous System, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should become familiar with the pathophysiology, semiology, differential diagnosis, diagnostic approaches (including skin biopsy and autonomic testing), laboratory evaluation, and treatment of small fiber somatic and autonomic neuropathies. Lecture/Faculty: }} Small Fiber Sensory Neuropathy Diagnostic Considerations J. Robinson Singleton, MD, Salt Lake City, UT }} Small Fiber Neuropathy and Neuropathic Pain Roy L. Freeman, MD, Boston, MA Core Competencies:  Patient Care, Medical Knowledge Teaching Style:  Didactic, Interactive, Audience Participation, CaseBased CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

148 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

NCS and Needle EMG

Topic: Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG) Director: Ruple S. Laughlin, MD, FAAN, Rochester, MN

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Program Description: Accurate electrodiagnostic testing and interpretation is based on a solid understanding of functional nerve and muscle anatomy, physiology, and pathophysiology in addition to technical considerations. This course is the first in a three-part series of complementary courses aimed at enhancing the understanding and application of EMG to clinical practice. Clinical EMG I serves as the foundation for understanding the basics of nerve conduction studies and needle electromyography. Technical factors, pitfalls, pattern recognition, and clues to pathophysiology will be highlighted throughout the course. This program complements C192: Clinical EMG II: Neuromuscular Junction Testing and Quantitative EMG and C206: Clinical EMG III: Nerve Conduction Criteria and Electrodiagnostic Approaches, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to demonstrate a basic understanding into the origins and acquisition of compound muscle action potentials, sensory nerve action potentials, and late responses; and understand the origin of EMG waveforms and how auditory pattern recognition assists in spontaneous and voluntary waveform assessment and interpretation. Lecture/Faculty: }} Nerve Conduction Studies:Origins, Acquisition, and Implications Ruple S. Laughlin, MD, FAAN, Rochester, MN }} Needle EMG: Waveform Identification and Interpretation Devon I. Rubin, MD, FAAN, Jacksonville, FL Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

Scientific Platform Session

S37 Topic:

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

“Best of” Session: Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG) Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG)

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Thursday, April 26, 2018

S45 Topic:

Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG) Platform Session Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG)

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Course Thursday, April 26, 2018

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C192 Clinical EMG II: Neuromuscular Junction Testing and Quantitative EMG

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Course Thursday, April 26, 2018

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

C206 Clinical EMG III: Nerve Conduction Criteria and Electrodiagnostic Approaches

Topic: Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG) Director: Mark B. Bromberg, MD, PhD, FAAN, Salt Lake City, UT

Topic: Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG) Director: Mark B. Bromberg, MD, PhD, FAAN, Salt Lake City, UT

Program Description: Accurate electrodiagnostic testing and interpretation is based on a solid understanding of functional nerve and muscle anatomy, physiology, and pathophysiology in addition to technical considerations. This course is the second in a three-part series of complementary courses aimed at enhancing the understanding and application of EMG to clinical practice.

Program Description: Accurate electrodiagnostic testing and interpretation is based on a solid understanding of functional nerve and muscle anatomy, physiology, and pathophysiology in addition to technical considerations. This course is the third in a three-part series of complementary courses aimed at enhancing the understanding and application of EMG to clinical practice.

This program complements C179: Clinical EMG I: Principles and Practice of NCS and Needle EMG and C206: Clinical EMG III: Nerve Conduction Criteria and Electrodiagnostic Approaches, but covers independent topics.

This program complements C179: Clinical EMG I: Principles and Practice of NCS and Needle EMG and C192: Clinical EMG II: Neuromuscular Junction Testing and Quantitative EMG, but covers independent topics.

Upon Completion: Participants should be able to have a basic understanding into the origins and acquisition of compound muscle and sensory nerve action potentials and late responses, as well as how to use patterns of firing to assist in spontaneous and voluntary waveform recognition and interpretation.

Upon Completion: Participants should be able to have a basic understanding into the origins and acquisition of compound muscle and sensory nerve action potentials and late responses, as well as how to use patterns of firing to assist in spontaneous and voluntary waveform recognition and interpretation.

Lecture/Faculty: }} Electrodiagnostic Approach to Neuromuscular Junction Testing Vern C. Juel, MD, FAAN, Durham, NC }} Quantitative EMG Mark B. Bromberg, MD, PhD, FAAN, Salt Lake City, UT Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care

Lecture/Faculty: }} Myopathies: Diagnostic Guidance and Correlations from EMG/NCS Laurie Gutmann, MD, FAAN, Iowa City, IA }} Electrodiagnostic Approach to Diagnosing ALS/MMN Mark B. Bromberg, MD, PhD, FAAN, Salt Lake City, UT }} Nerve Conduction Criteria for AIDP/CIDP Mark B. Bromberg, MD, PhD, FAAN, Salt Lake City, UT Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care

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Teaching Style:  Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

J

Teaching Style:  Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Trainee, General Neurologist, Specialist NeurologistCourse

AAN.com/view/AM18 149

Neuromuscular (EMG)

Thursday, April 26, 2018

Scientific Platform Session


Program Descriptions

Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG)

Course Thursday, April 26, 2018

6:30 p.m.–9:30 p.m.

C210 Case Studies: Unusual Diagnostic and

Management of Cases in Neuromuscular Disease

Topic: Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG) Director: Anne M. Connolly, MD, FAAN, Saint Louis, MO

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Program Description: The practice of neuromuscular medicine has been impacted by recent advances in immunology, molecular biology, and genetics. Through the presentation of both common disorders with unusual diagnostic or management issues, as well as rarer and more challenging cases, faculty will facilitate a discussion of diagnosis, laboratory workup, and treatment of a wide array of neuromuscular conditions. Each case will include an overview and an update on the particular clinical entity, including evolving concepts and approaches to therapy. Upon Completion: Participants should be familiar with the differential diagnosis, evaluation, treatment, and management of common and uncommon neuromuscular disorders, and gain an enhanced awareness of rare or unusual neuromuscular phenotypes. Lecture/Faculty: }} Unusual Diagnostic and Management of Cases in Neuromuscular Disease Muhammad Al-Lozi, MD, Saint Louis, MO Anne M. Connolly, MD, FAAN, Saint Louis, MO P. James B. Dyck, MD, FAAN, Rochester, MN Core Competencies:  Patient Care, Medical Knowledge Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Interactive, Audience Participation CME Credits:  3 Recommended Audience:  Trainee, General Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist

Experiential Learning Area Friday, April 27, 2018

8:00 a.m.–9:10 a.m.

Role of Placebo in Neuromuscular Clinical Trials and in Management of NM Disorders Topic: Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG) Speakers: A ziz I. Shaibani, MD, FAAN, Houston, TX Richard J. Barohn, MD, FAAN, Kansas City, KS Experiential Learning Area: Research Corner

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Program Description: Placebo effect is not the result of an "inert agent" but it relates to engagement in a clinical environment. If controlled for regression to the mean, spontaneous remission and other bias, placebo effect results from a reproducible complex psychobiological effect that involves release of certain cerebral chemicals and activation of certain neural pathways. Failure of many clinical trials for pain is attributed to the power of the placebo arm. The field of neuromuscular medicine just recently started looking into the impact of placebo both in clinical trials and on the health and disease of the neuromuscular patients.

Course Friday, April 27, 2018

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C225 Neuromuscular Junction Disorders I:

Myasthenia Gravis, Ocular, and MuSK Myasthenia

Topic: Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG) Director: Laura Marie Tormoehlen, MD, Indianapolis, IN

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Program Description: Faculty will provide current perspectives on the diagnosis, pathogenesis, and care of patients with myasthenia gravis, ocular and MuSK myasthenia. Case presentations will demonstrate a practical approach to identification, evaluation, and management of common and more challenging patients in the clinical setting. This program complements C236: Neuromuscular Junction Disorders II: Toxins, Lambert-Eaton Syndrome, and Less Common Disorders of Neuromuscular Transmission, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be familiar with the diagnosis and management of patients with myasthenia gravis and related disorders; learn to critically select therapies; and be able to distinguish myasthenia gravis, MuSK myasthenia, Lambert-Eaton syndrome, and recognize the less common disorders of neuromuscular transmission. Lecture/Faculty: }} Diagnosis of Myasthenia Gravis: Patient Scenarios Janice M. Massey, MD, FAAN, Durham, NC

150 2018 AAN Annual Meeting


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

}} Treating Myasthenia Gravis in 2018: New Developments and Best Available Evidence Jeff Guptill, MD, Durham, NC Core Competencies:  Patient Care, Medical Knowledge Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Trainee, General Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist

Course Friday, April 27, 2018

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

C236 Neuromuscular Junction Disorders II:

Toxins, Lambert-Eaton Syndrome and Less Common Disorders of Neuromuscular Transmission

Topic: Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG) Director: Laura Marie Tormoehlen, MD, Indianapolis, IN

J

Neuromuscular (EMG)

Program Description: Faculty will provide current perspectives on the diagnosis, pathogenesis, and care of patients with Lambert-Eaton and congenital myasthenic syndromes, as well as toxin-induced NMJ disorders. Case presentations demonstrate a practical approach to identification, evaluation, and management of common and more challenging patients in the clinical setting. This program complements C225: Neuromuscular Junction Disorders I: Myasthenia Gravis, Ocular and MuSK Myasthenia, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be familiar with the diagnosis and management of patients with less common NMJ disorders; learn to critically select therapies; and be able to distinguish myasthenia gravis, MuSK myasthenia, Lambert-Eaton syndrome, and recognize the less common disorders of neuromuscular transmission. Lecture/Faculty: }} Toxins and Disorders of Neuromuscular Transmission Laura Marie Tormoehlen, MD, Indianapolis, IN }} Lambert-Eaton Syndrome and the Less Common Disorders of Neuromuscular Transmission Robert M. Pascuzzi, MD, FAAN, Indianapolis, IN Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

AAN.com/view/AM18 151


SPECIAL PRESENTATION Bennet Omalu, MBBS, MPH, MBA

Don’t Break the Rules, Change the Game: How Bennet Omalu SingleHandedly Changed American Football, Professional Sports, and How the World Perceives Traumatic Brain Injuries Tuesday, April 24, 1:00 p.m.–2:15 p.m. As chronicled in the 2015 film “Concussion,” Bennet Omalu’s story is one of triumph in the face of seemingly insurmountable odds. Born in eastern Nigeria during a civil war, Omalu and his family lived as refugees, yet he entered medical school at age 15 and became a physician by age 21. Steven DeKosky, MD, FAAN, FANA, FACP, is the Deputy Director of the McKnight Brain Institute in Gainesville, FL. In 2002, he was introduced to Dr. Omalu at the University of Pittsburgh. After looking at the case of the late Pittsburgh Steeler Mike Webster, they together confirmed the first case of dementia pugilistica/chronic encephalopathy in an American football player. Four more cases followed. As the first doctors to identify chronic brain damage as a major factor in the deaths of some professional athletes, DeKosky and Omalu withstood dismissals, backlash, and pressure from peers and the National Football League. Omalu’s new memoir, Truth Doesn’t Have a Side, will be available for purchase both before and after his presentation. Following Omalu’s presentation, he will be joined by DeKosky for a panel discussion.

April 21–27 • Los Angeles


Neuro-oncology Overview

I

f your schedule won’t allow you to stay for the whole meeting, maximize your time in Los Angeles and get the most out of a shorter trip with this Neuro-oncology specialty track, with core programming taking place Tuesday to Thursday. Look for education and science covering an array of topics in neuro-oncology. Sunday, April 22

Wednesday, April 25

11:15 a.m.–11:45 a.m. Presidential Plenary Session: Robert Wartenberg Lecture: Neuro-Oncology: How Cancer and the Nervous System Interact

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C149  What Do I Do Now?: Neurologic Consultations in Cancer Patients I

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C100  Basic Principles of Brain Tumors: For Practice and for Certification 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C112  Continuum ® Test Your Knowledge: A Multiple-choice Question Review I 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. S21  Neuro-oncology Platform Session 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C124  The Palliative Care Guide in Neurology: Best Practice in Communication, Advance Care Planning, and End-of-life Care of Patients with Brain Tumors and Other Life-limiting Neurological Disorders

Thursday, April 26 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C178  Neuro-oncology in 2018: Navigating Current Trends 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C190  Neuro-oncologic Predicaments in the Hospital Setting 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. N6  Neuroscience in the Clinic: Neurologic Complications of Cancer Immunotherapy: A New Frontier in Neuro-Inflammation

Plenary Session

Course

Sunday, April 22, 2018, 9:15 a.m.–12:00 p.m.

Tuesday, April 24, 2018

C100 Basic Principles of Brain Tumors: For

Presidential Plenary Session

Topics: Neuro-oncology; Epilepsy/Clinical Neurophysiology (EEG); Child Neurology and Developmental Neurology; General Neurology; Neuromuscular and Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG) Moderator: Natalia S. Rost, MD, MPH, FAAN, Boston, MA

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11:15 a.m.–11:45 a.m. }} Robert Wartenberg Lecture: Neuro-Oncology: How Cancer and the Nervous System Interact Lisa M. DeAngelis, MD, FAAN, New York, NY

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Practice and for Certification

Topic: Neuro-oncology Director: Erin M. Dunbar, MD, Atlanta, GA

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Program Description: This course is high-yield for the initial boards and MOC exams. This course concisely reviews primary brain tumors, including the WHO Classifications, evidenced-based multidisciplinary treatment, symptom management, neuro-oncology emergencies, genetic syndromes, and scenarios for referral. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to improve their skills, outcomes, and confidence in the management of these tumors with this high-impact review for those taking their initial boards and/or their maintenance of certification (MOC).

AAN.com/view/AM18 153

Neuro-oncology

Tuesday, April 24

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C164  What Do I Do Now?: Neurologic Consultations in Cancer Patients II


Program Descriptions Lecture/Faculty: }} High-yield Neuropathology for the Clinician Gregory Fuller, MD, PhD, Houston, TX }} State of the Art Radiation Oncology Helen Shih, Boston, MA }} Evidence-based Neuro-oncology Roy E. Strowd, III, MD, Winston Salem, NC }} Practical Symptom-directed (Palliative) Management Erin M. Dunbar, MD, Atlanta, GA Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive, Audience Participation CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Course Tuesday, April 24, 2018

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C112 Continuum® Test Your Knowledge: A Multiple-choice Question Review I

Topics:

General Neurology; MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease; Neuro-oncology Director: Steven L. Lewis, MD, FAAN, Allentown, PA

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See complete course description on page 79 »

Scientific Platform Session Tuesday, April 24, 2018

S21

Topic:

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Neuro-oncology Platform Session Neuro-oncology

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Neuro-oncology

Course Tuesday, April 24, 2018

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

C124 The Palliative Care Guide in Neurology: Best Practice in Communication, Advance Care Planning, and End-of-life Care of Patients with Brain Tumors and Other Life-limiting Neurological Disorders

Topics:

Neuro-oncology; Pain and Palliative Care Director: Tobias Walbert, MD, PhD, Detroit, MI

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Program Description: This program is intended to teach neurologists the broad principles of palliative care, with a focus on how to apply those principles in the practice with brain tumor patients, as well as other life-limiting neurological disorders. Faculty will cover an introduction to the history and goals of palliative care, distinction of palliative care from hospice care, communicating with the patient and the patient’s family (how to disclose bad news and how to provide honest, yet compassionate, information), understanding the concept of quality of life, and fostering trust and avoiding perceptions by the patient of abandonment and how to initiate advance care planning. The principles will focus on neuro-oncology patients, as well as other patients with life-limiting neurological disorders. Special attention will be given to practical decision making, symptom management, and advance care planning. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to communicate a serious diagnosis to a patient in an honest yet compassionate manner, identify the key components of palliative care and hospice, discuss end-of-life issues with patients and assist them in developing advance directives, and manage the palliative care needs of a patient with brain tumors. Lecture/Faculty: }} The Role of Hospice and Palliative Care: Advance Care Planning in Neurology Tobias Walbert, MD, PhD, Detroit, MI }} Difficult Conversations Made Easier Alan C. Carver, MD, New York, NY Core Competencies:  Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement, Professionalism, Systems-Based Practice Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

154 2018 AAN Annual Meeting


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

Course

Course

Wednesday, April 25, 2018 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Wednesday, April 25, 2018 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

C149 What Do I Do Now?: Neurologic

C164 What Do I Do Now?: Neurologic

Topic: Neuro-oncology Director: Amy A. Pruitt, MD, Philadelphia, PA

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Program Description: Faculty will present an overview of the evolving spectrum of neurologic complications of immunotherapies and then, using audience response system, discuss 10-12 cases representing such problems as stroke in a cancer patient, complications of new immune checkpoint inhibitors, acute mental status changes in transplant recipients, and neurologic problems of cancer survivors such as chemobrain, secondary neoplasms, and infections. Some cases will address the evolving role of palliative care consultation in the management of these patients. This program complements C164: What Do I Do Now?: Neurologic Consultations in Cancer Patients II, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to recognize the complications of PD-1 and CTLA-4 inhibitors and to manage thromboembolic complications in cancer patients. They will also recognize toxicities of drugs used in transplantation, efficiently evaluate patients for CNS infections, and screen for neurologic treatment sequelae in long-term cancer survivors. Lecture/Faculty: }} Introduction Amy A. Pruitt, MD, Philadelphia, PA }} Complications of Cancer Immunotherapies Patrick Y. Wen, MD, FAAN, Boston, MA }} What Do I Do Now?: Neurologic Consultations in Cancer Patients I Jaishri Blakeley, MD, Baltimore, MD Amy A. Pruitt, MD, Philadelphia, PA Patrick Y. Wen, MD, FAAN, Boston, MA Core Competencies:  Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Medical Knowledge, Patient Care

Consultations in Cancer Patients II

Topic: Neuro-oncology Director: Patrick Y. Wen, MD, FAAN, Boston, MA

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Program Description: Faculty will discuss the medical and neurologic management of patients with brain tumors and provide an update on the recent advances in treatment of brain tumors; the recent advances in diagnosis and management of paraneoplastic neurologic syndromes; and approximately 10 cases neurologists may encounter when consulting on cancer patients. This program complements C149: What Do I Do Now?: Neurologic Consultations in Cancer Patients I, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to diagnose and treat medical and neurologic complications in brain tumors patients, diagnose and manage paraneoplastic neurologic syndromes, and recognize and treat both common and rare neurologic complications in cancer patients. Lecture/Faculty: }} Medical Management and Update on Treatments of Brain Tumors Patrick Y. Wen, MD, FAAN, Boston, MA }} Paraneoplastic Syndromes of the Nervous System Josep O. Dalmau, MD, PhD, FAAN, Barcelona, Spain }} Case Studies in Cancer Patients Amy A. Pruitt, MD, Philadelphia, PA Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Case-Based CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Trainee, General Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist

AAN.com/view/AM18 155

Neuro-oncology

Consultations in Cancer Patients I


Program Descriptions

Neuro-oncology

Course Thursday, April 26, 2018

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Course Thursday, April 26, 2018

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C178 Neuro-oncology in 2018: Navigating Current C190 Neuro-oncologic Predicaments in the Trends

Hospital Setting

Topic: Neuro-oncology Director: Maciej M. Mrugala, MD, Phoenix, AZ

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Program Description: This program will aim to teach residents, fellows, general neurologists, and junior neuro-oncologists about most recent developments in the field of neuro-oncology. The first talk will cover new experimental therapies showing promise. Patients are frequently asking about these therapies, and critical overview of the data for the practicing clinician will be provided. The second talk will address molecular diagnostics in primary brain tumors. This is an area of active research and many of the molecular markers recently discovered have clinical utility. Practical information about ordering different molecular panels and how to interpret them will be provided. In the third talk we will cover novel surgical techniques being already used or in stages of advanced development, in therapy for primary and metastatic brain tumors. We will emphasize information important for clinicians when advising patients about pros and cons of each therapeutic approach. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to identify novel developments in the field of neuro-oncology with emphasis on molecular testing, and new emerging therapies.

Topic: Neuro-oncology Director: Na Tosha N. Gatson, MD, PhD, Danville, PA

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Program Description: Emergent issues in neuro-oncology are variable and require timely recognition of their level of acuity. Delays in management and transitions in care could lead to costly outcomes that impact hospital stay as well as patient neurologic function and rehabilitation. This course is formatted as a combination of cases and didactic learning with audience participation to cover relevant acute inpatient issues in neuro-oncology. Topics covered will address the following clinical presentations: increased intracranial pressure, salt-balance, autonomic dysregulation, immunosuppression, cancer treatment effects, stroke, seizure, and acute decline in mental status. Each topic will have a representative case presented, followed by a didactic approach to working through a three-tiered differential, and finish with an evidence-based discussion of management and identification of areas for quality improvement. Upon Completion: Participants should be familiar with the differential diagnoses and inpatient management of common and uncommon neuro-oncologic clinical presentations in adults, and identify areas for process improvement in these conditions.

Lecture/Faculty: }} Novel Medical Therapies in Neuro-oncology Maciej M. Mrugala, MD, Phoenix, AZ }} Advances in Surgical Treatment of Brain Tumors Bernard Bendok, MD, Phoenix, AZ }} Deciphering Molecular Testing in Neuro-oncology Seema Nagpal, MD, Palo Alto, CA Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care

Lecture/Faculty: }} Neuro-oncologic Predicaments in the Hospital Setting Na Tosha N. Gatson, MD, PhD, Danville, PA Javier Gonzalez, MD, Columbus, OH Anthony Noto, MD, Danville, PA Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, SystemsBased Practice

Teaching Style:  Didactic

CME Credits:  2

CME Credits:  2

Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, Oncologist

Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Trainee, Neuro-oncologist

156 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic, Audience Participation


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

Thursday, April 26, 2018

N6

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Neuroscience in the Clinic: Neurologic Complications of Cancer Immunotherapy: A New Frontier in Neuro-Inflammation

Topic: Neuro-oncology Directors: Antonio M. P. Omuro, MD, Miami, FL Andreas Felix Hottinger, MD, Lausanne, Switzerland

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Program Description: The use of anti-cancer immunotherapies has become widespread in oncology, and multiple agents spanning a variety of mechanisms of action are currently approved, including immune checkpoint inhibitors (anti-CTLA-4, PD-1 and PD-L1 antibodies), CAR-T cells therapy and dendritic cell vaccines. Many of these agents disrupt mechanisms involved in prevention of auto-immunity and maintenance of selftolerance, or have pro-inflammatory properties. As a result, a wide spectrum of neurologic inflammatory complications have emerged as potential, and at times life-threatening side effects, posing diagnostic and therapeutic challenges that neurologists will be required to address. In this course, the most common immunotherapy complications involving both the CNS and peripheral nervous system will be reviewed, including encephalitis, myelitis, peripheral neuropathies, radiculopathies, neuro-muscular junction disorders and myopathy. The mechanisms underlying these side effects, as well as principles governing immune responses within the nervous system will be discussed, integrated with a review on diagnosis and clinical management.

}} Clinical Implications Bianca Santomasso, MD, New York, NY }} Future Directions Antonio M. P. Omuro, MD, Miami, FL }} Abstract Presentations: (Selected in February 2018) }} Abstracts Discussion and Implications for Clinical Practice Andreas Felix Hottinger, MD, Lausanne, Switzerland }} Panel Discussion/Questions and Answers Faculty Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Neuro-oncology

Neuroscience in the Clinic Session

Upon Completion: Participants should be able to recognize and treat neurologic complications of anti-CTLA-4, anti-PD-1, anti-PD-L1 antibodies and CAR-T cell therapies and understand the mechanisms of action of such agents, how they can translate into injury to the nervous system and how they can be reversed. Lecture/Faculty: }} Introduction on Cancer Immunotherapy Antonio M. P. Omuro, MD, Miami, FL }} Case Presentation Bianca Santomasso, MD, New York, NY }} Neuroscience Background: The Peripheral and CNS Immune System: Physiology and Effects of Anti-Cancer Immunotherapies David A. Hafler, MD, FAAN, New Haven, CT

AAN.com/view/AM18 157


Neuro-ophthalmology/ Neuro-otology Overview

W

hether you want a high-level overview or a deep dive into complex cases and diagnoses, the Annual Meeting offers countless opportunities to learn the very latest in neuro-ophthalmology and neuro-otology. Look for education and science covering topics ranging from emergency room neuro-ophthalmology and pediatric neuro-ophthalmology to common peripheral vestibular disorders. For a hands-on mini-lab, register separately for the Neuro-ophthalmology and Neurovestibular Exam Lab Skills Workshop with stations for individualized instruction and troubleshooting with an expert on these examination skills. Saturday, April 21

Tuesday, April 24

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C3  Emergency Room Neuro-ophthalmology

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C103  Now You See It, Now You Know It: Pathognomonic Neuroophthalmology Examination Findings

1:30 p.m.–3:30 p.m. C19  Pediatric Neuro-ophthalmology Update

Sunday, April 22 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C26  Neuro-ophthalmology I: Visual Loss, Optic Neuropathies, and Papilledema 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C44  Neuro-ophthalmology II: Optic Neuritis, Visual Fields, and Anisocoria 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C58  Neuro-ophthalmology III: Diplopia, Ocular Motility Disorders, and Nystagmus

Monday, April 23 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C62  Neuro-ophthalmology: Overview and Update 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. S14  Neuro-ophthalmology/Neuro-otology Platform Session 1:00 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C83  Neuro-ophthalmology and Neurovestibular Exam Lab Skills Workshop

158 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

Wednesday, April 25 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C133  Higher Cortical Visual Disorders: Case-based Review 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C152  Nystagmus and Saccadic Intrusions Made Simple 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C167  Eye Movement Disorders: A Systematic Approach to the Evaluation of Diplopia

Thursday, April 26 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C191  Neuro-otology I: The Common Peripheral Vestibular Disorders 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C205  Neuro-otology II: Diagnosis and Treatment of Nuanced Causes of Dizziness


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

Course

C3

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Emergency Room Neuro-ophthalmology

Topics:

Neuro-ophthalmology/Neuro-otology; Neuro Trauma, Critical Care, and Sports Neurology Director: Heather Moss, MD, PhD, FAAN, Palo Alto, CA

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Program Description: In the patient with acute visual loss, diplopia, and extra-eye movements, it is important to recognize certain entities as a timely diagnosis improves chances of a favorable outcome. Faculty will highlight such neuro-ophthalmic emergencies, focusing on examination techniques, evaluation, and management. Didactic lectures, case examples, and open discussion with the faculty will provide participants with both basic knowledge and updates on current controversies.

Saturday, April 21, 2018

C19

1:30 p.m.–3:30 p.m.

Pediatric Neuro-ophthalmology Update

Topics:

Neuro-ophthalmology/Neuro-otology; Child Neurology and Developmental Neurology Director: Christopher Glisson, DO, Grand Rapids, MI

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Program Description: This course will review pediatric neuro-ophthalmic topics including optic neuropathies in childhood (with a focus on optic neuritis and its relationship to MS), pediatric eye movement disorders, and causes of optic disc swelling. Knowledge will be transferred by various formats, including lecture, case-based discussion, and audience participation.

Upon Completion: Participants should be familiar with the clinical features and initial management of neuro-ophthalmic conditions that present in the emergency department, including giant cell arteritis, pituitary apoplexy, aneurysmal third nerve palsy, cerebral venous thrombosis, arterial dissection, and brainstem ocular motor disorders.

Upon Completion: Participants should be able to demonstrate familiarity with afferent neuro-ophthalmic disorders in children (including optic neuritis, optic disc edema, and vision loss), be knowledgable concerning the common efferent neuro-ophthalmic disorders that affect children (including diplopia, third/fourth/sixth nerve palsies, and other eye movement abnormalities), and review the relevant neuro-ophthalmic manifestations of systemic disease in the pediatric population.

Lecture/Faculty: }} Approach to Patients with Vision Loss Heather Moss, MD, PhD, FAAN, Palo Alto, CA }} Approach to the Funduscopic Exam Beau Benjamin Bruce, MD, Atlanta, GA }} Emergent Afferent Neuro-ophthalmic Cases Heather Moss, MD, PhD, FAAN, Palo Alto, CA }} Approach to Patients with Diplopia Heather Moss, MD, PhD, FAAN, Palo Alto, CA }} Approach to Patients with Funny Eye Movements Eric R. Eggenberger, DO, FAAN, Jacksonville, FL }} Emergent Efferent Neuro-ophthalmic Cases Eric R. Eggenberger, DO, FAAN, Jacksonville, FL Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care

Lecture/Faculty: }} The Pediatric Neuro-Ophthalmic Examination Christopher Glisson, DO, Grand Rapids, MI }} Optic Disc Swelling in Childhood Melissa W. Ko, MD, FAAN, Jamesville, NY }} Keynote: Pediatric Optic Neuritis Grant Liu, MD, FAAN, Philadelphia, PA }} Nystagmus and Nystagmoid Eye Movements Robert Avery, DO, Philadelphia, PA }} Pediatric 3rd, 4th, and 6th Nerve Palsies Grant Liu, MD, FAAN, Philadelphia, PA }} Neuro-Ophthalmic Manifestations of Systemic Disease Robert Avery, DO, Philadelphia, PA Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care

Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive

Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive

CME Credits:  2

Recommended Audience:  Trainee, General Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist

Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

CME Credits:  2

AAN.com/view/AM18 159

Neuro-ophthalmology

Saturday, April 21, 2018

Course


Program Descriptions

Neuro-ophthalmology/Neuro-otology

Course Sunday, April 22, 2018

C26

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Neuro-ophthalmology I: Visual Loss, Optic Neuropathies, and Papilledema

Topic: Neuro-ophthalmology/Neuro-otology Director: Nancy J. Newman, MD, FAAN, Atlanta, GA

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Program Description: This is part I of a three-part comprehensive review of clinical neuroophthalmology designed to be a stand-alone course; however, attendees are strongly encouraged to attend all three parts. Numerous case presentations will be followed by related short reviews. Topics specifically addressed in part I include the differential diagnosis of visual loss, the examination of the ocular fundus, optic neuropathies, and papilledema, with cases addressing a large number of clinical problems. Practical clinical and management issues will be emphasized. This course is designed to enhance interaction between participants and faculty. This program complements C44: Neuro-ophthalmology II: Optic Neuritis, Visual Fields, and Anisocoria and C58: Neuroophthalmology III: Diplopia, Ocular Motility Disorders, and Nystagmus, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should become familiar with the diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of common afferent neuro-ophthalmic problems Lecture/Faculty: }} Case 1 Valerie Biousse, MD, Atlanta, GA }} Visual Loss Nancy J. Newman, MD, FAAN, Atlanta, GA }} Case 2 Valerie Biousse, MD, Atlanta, GA }} Optic Neuropathies Nancy J. Newman, MD, FAAN, Atlanta, GA }} Case 3 Valerie Biousse, MD, Atlanta, GA }} Papilledema Valerie Biousse, MD, Atlanta, GA }} Case 4 Valerie Biousse, MD, Atlanta, GA }} Case 5 Nancy J. Newman, MD, FAAN, Atlanta, GA Core Competencies:  Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement, Professionalism, Systems-Based Practice Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee 160 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

Course Sunday, April 22, 2018

C44

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Neuro-ophthalmology II: Optic Neuritis, Visual Fields, and Anisocoria

Topic: Neuro-ophthalmology/Neuro-otology Director: Nancy J. Newman, MD, FAAN, Atlanta, GA

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Program Description: This is part II of a three-part comprehensive review of clinical neuroophthalmology designed to be a stand-alone course; however, attendees are strongly encouraged to attend all three parts. Numerous case presentations will be followed by related short reviews. Topics specifically addressed in part II include the differential diagnosis and management of optic neuritis, localization of lesions causing visual field defects, and pupillary disorders and how to approach the patient with anisocoria, with cases addressing a large number of clinical problems. Practical clinical and management issues will be emphasized. This course is designed to enhance interaction between participants and faculty. This program complements C26: Neuro-ophthalmology I: Visual Loss, Optic Neuropathies, and Papilledema and C58: Neuroophthalmology III: Diplopia, Ocular Motility Disorders, and Nystagmus, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should become familiar with the diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of common afferent neuro-ophthalmic problems. Lecture/Faculty: }} Case 1 Nancy J. Newman, MD, FAAN, Atlanta, GA }} Management of Optic Neuritis Steven Galetta, MD, FAAN, New York, NY }} Case 2 Nancy J. Newman, MD, FAAN, Atlanta, GA }} Visual Fields Nancy J. Newman, MD, FAAN, Atlanta, GA }} Case 3 and Discussion Valerie Biousse, MD, Atlanta, GA }} Case 4 Valerie Biousse, MD, Atlanta, GA }} Anisocoria Steven Galetta, MD, FAAN, New York, NY }} Case 5 Valerie Biousse, MD, Atlanta, GA }} Case 6 Nancy J. Newman, MD, FAAN, Atlanta, GA Core Competencies:  Systems-Based Practice, Professionalism, Patient Care, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement, Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Medical Knowledge


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Course Sunday, April 22, 2018

C58

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Neuro-ophthalmology III: Diplopia, Ocular Motility Disorders, and Nystagmus

Topic: Neuro-ophthalmology/Neuro-otology Director: Nancy J. Newman, MD, FAAN, Atlanta, GA

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Program Description: This is part III of a three-part comprehensive review of clinical neuro-ophthalmology designed to be a stand-alone course; however, attendees are strongly encouraged to attend all three parts. Numerous case presentations will be followed by related short reviews. Topics specifically addressed in part III include the approach to the patient with double vision, and how to recognize and manage common disorders of ocular motility, including nystagmus, with cases addressing a large number of clinical problems. Practical clinical and management issues will be emphasized. This course is designed to enhance interaction between participants and faculty. At the conclusion of this program, you are invited to continue the conversation with the director and faculty. More information will be provided at the conclusion of the program. This program complements C26: Neuro-Ophthalmology I: Visual Loss, Optic Neuropathies, and Papilledema and C44: Neuroophthalmology II: Optic Neuritis, Visual Fields, and Anisocoria, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should become familiar with the diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of common afferent neuro-ophthalmic problems. Lecture/Faculty: }} Case 1 Valerie Biousse, MD, Atlanta, GA }} Those Other Causes of Diplopia Nancy J. Newman, MD, FAAN, Atlanta, GA }} Case 2 Valerie Biousse, MD, Atlanta, GA }} Supranuclear and Internuclear Ocular Motility Disorders Steven Galetta, MD, FAAN, New York, NY }} Case 3 Valerie Biousse, MD, Atlanta, GA }} Nystagmus Steven Galetta, MD, FAAN, New York, NY }} Case 4 Nancy J. Newman, MD, FAAN, Atlanta, GA

}} Assorted Cases Valerie Biousse, MD, Atlanta, GA Nancy J. Newman, MD, FAAN, Atlanta, GA Core Competencies:  Practice-Based Learning and Improvement, Professionalism, Systems-Based Practice, Patient Care, Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Medical Knowledge Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Course Monday, April 23, 2018

C62

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Neuro-ophthalmology: Overview and Update

Topic: Neuro-ophthalmology/Neuro-otology Director: Nancy J. Newman, MD, FAAN, Atlanta, GA

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Program Description: Clinical neuro-ophthalmology is the overlap specialty between neurology and ophthalmology. It covers all the disorders of both the afferent (the eye, optic nerve, and intracranial pathways of vision) and efferent (pathways of ocular motility) visual systems which comprise more than one-third of the brain. As a result, nearly every neurologic disorder can have neuro-ophthalmologic manifestations. This overview and update is a rapid-fire review of neuroophthalmologic disorders, highlighting the most recent developments in diagnosis, pathogenesis, and management, approached in an anatomical fashion. There will be substantial designated time for audience questions. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to recognize and appreciate common and uncommon neuro-ophthalmologic disorders and neuroophthalmologic manifestations of common and uncommon neurologic diseases, and be familiar with the latest developments in the field. Lecture/Faculty: }} Neuro-ophthalmology Overview and Update Valerie Biousse, MD, Atlanta, GA Nancy J. Newman, MD, FAAN, Atlanta, GA Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, PracticeBased Learning and Improvement, Systems-Based Practice Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

AAN.com/view/AM18 161

Neuro-ophthalmology

Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive


Program Descriptions Scientific Platform Session Monday, April 23, 2018

S14 Topic:

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Neuro-ophthalmology/Neuro-otology Platform Session Neuro-ophthalmology/Neuro-otology

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Skills Workshop Monday, April 23, 2018

C83

1:00 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Neuro-ophthalmology and Neurovestibular Exam Lab Skills Workshop $ (registration required)

Topic: Neuro-ophthalmology/Neuro-otology Director: John Pula, MD, FAAN, Chicago, IL

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Program Description: This is a hands-on mini-lab to convey neuro-ophthalmology and neuro-otology examination skills. The lab consists of stations to address individual components of the exam, including visual acuity (near and Snellen acuity), color vision, fields (confrontation and Amsler grid including techniques to diagnose functional patients), pupils (RAPD and anisocoria), ocular alignment (prism cover, general prism use, red Maddox rod), assessment of pursuits and saccades, nystagmus examination (Frenzel lens), ophthalmoscopy (direct and panoptic ophthalmoscopes), assessment of the vestibular ocular reflex (head thrust and ophthalmoscopy), Hallpike testing, and repositioning treatments. Participants will visit each station for individualized instruction and troubleshooting with an expert on these essential examination skills. Upon Completion: Participants should understand the techniques used in performing the neuro-ophthalmic and neurovestibular exams, including afferent, pupil, efferent, and vestibular components. Lecture/Faculty: }} Slit Lamp Examination (Anterior Chamber, Retina, and 3D View of Optic Nerve) Gregory P. Van Stavern, MD, FAAN, Saint Louis, MO }} Visual Field Testing (Amsler Grid, Functional Vision Loss) Christopher Glisson, DO, Grand Rapids, MI }} Acuity and Color Vision (Near Acuity, Functional Vision Loss, Dyschromatopsia) Eric R. Eggenberger, DO, FAAN, Jacksonville, FL John Pula, MD, FAAN, Chicago, IL }} Neurovestibular Examination (VOR Gain and Suppression, DixHallpike Test, Canalith Repositioning Treatment) Jorge C. Kattah, MD, FAAN, Peoria, IL Kevin A. Kerber, MD, Ann Arbor, MI

162 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

Neuro-ophthalmology/Neuro-otology }} Ocular Motility (Alignment, Ductions, Prisms, Red-Maddox Rod) Matthew J. Thurtell, MD, Iowa City, IA }} Ophthalmoscopy: An Important Skill for All Neurologists Kathleen B. Digre, MD, FAAN, Salt Lake City, UT Heather Moss, MD, PhD, FAAN, Palo Alto, CA }} Pupil Examination (Anisocoria, RAPD) Wayne T. Cornblath, MD, FAAN, Ann Arbor, MI Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, PracticeBased Learning and Improvement, Systems-Based Practice Teaching Style:  Interactive CME Credits:  4 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Trainee

Course Tuesday, April 24, 2018

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

C103 Now You See It, Now You Know It:

Pathognomonic Neuro-ophthalmology Examination Findings

Topic: Neuro-ophthalmology/Neuro-otology Director: Wayne T. Cornblath, MD, FAAN, Ann Arbor, MI

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Program Description: This program consists of images and videos of pathognomonic neuro-ophthalmology examination features (i.e., opsoclonus, blepharospasm, Kayser-Fleischer rings) that are presented as an unknown with the audience using the audience response system to choose the correct diagnosis. This is followed by one or two slides of additional information and further examples of the condition. The format is designed to show the pathognomonic feature of a large number of different diseases so participants can quickly and accurately make the correct diagnosis. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to recognize neuro-ophthalmology findings that are encountered in general neurology practice and quickly arrive at the correct diagnosis. Lecture/Faculty: }} Now You See It, Now You Know It Pathognomonic Neuroophthalmology Findings Wayne T. Cornblath, MD, FAAN, Ann Arbor, MI Eric R. Eggenberger, DO, FAAN, Jacksonville, FL Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

Wednesday, April 25, 2018 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

C133 Higher Cortical Visual Disorders: Casebased Review

Topics:

Neuro-ophthalmology/Neuro-otology; Aging, Dementia, Cognitive, and Behavioral Neurology Director: Sashank Prasad, MD, Boston, MA

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Program Description: This course will review important neurologic disorders of higher visual processing. The diagnosis of these fascinating conditions can be challenging and is often delayed. In these patients, routine evaluations of visual function may not readily yield a diagnosis; it is important to conduct a refined examination of visual functions in order to correctly localize and identify the problem. After reviewing the organization of visual processing networks in the brain, faculty will illustrate specific disorders by using videos that depict patients describing their symptoms followed by focused examinations highlighting their visual processing abnormalities. Topics covered will include Anton syndrome, apperceptive visual agnosia, hemiachromatopsia, alexia without agraphia, Riddoch syndrome, Balint syndrome, prosopagnosia, Charles Bonnet syndrome, Capgras syndrome, and Lhermitte’s peduncular hallucinosis. Discussion of each syndrome, its localization, and recent scientific insights from modern investigations of these disorders will follow each case. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to gain familiarity with the diagnosis, localization, management, and neuroscientific understanding of disorders of visual processing. Lecture/Faculty: }} Anton Syndrome Marc Dinkin, MD, New York, NY }} Visual Agnosia Sashank Prasad, MD, Boston, MA }} Hemiachromaptopsia Marc Dinkin, MD, New York, NY }} Alexia Without Agraphia Sashank Prasad, MD, Boston, MA }} Prospagnosia Marc Dinkin, MD, New York, NY }} Riddoch Syndrome Sashank Prasad, MD, Boston, MA }} Balint Syndrome Marc Dinkin, MD, New York, NY }} Peduncular Hallucinosis Sashank Prasad, MD, Boston, MA }} Charles Bonnet Syndrome Marc Dinkin, MD, New York, NY }} Capgras Syndrome Sashank Prasad, MD, Boston, MA

Core Competencies:  Patient Care, Medical Knowledge Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, Psychologist, Neuropsychologist, Psychiatrist

Course Wednesday, April 25, 2018 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C152 Nystagmus and Saccadic Intrusions Made Simple

Topic: Neuro-ophthalmology/Neuro-otology Director: Janet C. Rucker, MD, New York, NY

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Program Description: Accurate identification of abnormal spontaneous eye movements, such as nystagmus and saccadic intrusions, is critical to proper neurological localization and diagnosis. The focus of this course will be on enhancing accurate identification via pattern recognition of abnormal eye movements that disrupt steady fixation and degrade vision. Through video presentations of ocular oscillations and ample case presentations, faculty will present the clinical features, localization, prognosis, and diagnostic implications of each eye movement. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to accurately identify nystagmus and saccadic intrusion patterns and to discuss the localization of each eye movement and common causative etiologies. Lecture/Faculty: }} Introduction to Nystagmus and Saccadic Intrusions Janet C. Rucker, MD, New York, NY }} Nystagmus Marc Dinkin, MD, New York, NY }} Saccadic Intrusions Janet C. Rucker, MD, New York, NY }} Self-test and Cases Steven Galetta, MD, FAAN, New York, NY Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive, Audience Participation CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist

AAN.com/view/AM18 163

Neuro-ophthalmology

Course


Program Descriptions

Neuro-ophthalmology/Neuro-otology

Course

Course

Wednesday, April 25, 2018 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Thursday, April 26, 2018

C167 Eye Movement Disorders: A Systematic

C191 Neuro-otology I: The Common Peripheral

Approach to the Evaluation of Diplopia

Topic: Neuro-ophthalmology/Neuro-otology Director: Janet C. Rucker, MD, New York, NY

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Program Description: Correct localization is the primary objective in the evaluation of diplopia. Faculty will present a systematic approach to localizing diplopia, including basic and advanced concepts and diagnostically challenging cases. Interactive video-based case examples presented as unknowns will facilitate audience discussion and immediate application of new skills to diagnose diplopia localizing to extraocular muscle, neuromuscular junction, cranial nerve, nuclear, and supranuclear locations. Topic discussions will include pearls, pitfalls, and pathognomonic signs in localization. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to localize diplopia via utilization of basic and advanced examination skills and to recognize the wide-range of clinical diagnoses of patients with diplopia via participation in evaluating diagnostically challenging case presentations. Lecture/Faculty: }} Exam Skills Marc Dinkin, MD, New York, NY }} Supranuclear Causes of Diplopia Janet C. Rucker, MD, New York, NY }} Cranial Nerve Dysfunction Marc Dinkin, MD, New York, NY }} Neuromuscular Junction Janet C. Rucker, MD, New York, NY }} Orbital Causes of Diplopia Marc Dinkin, MD, New York, NY Core Competencies:  Patient Care, Medical Knowledge Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

164 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Vestibular Disorders

Topic: Neuro-ophthalmology/Neuro-otology Director: Kevin A. Kerber, MD, Ann Arbor, MI

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Program Description: This program will provide attendees with detailed information about the approach to the history and physical in patients with dizziness, and specifically regarding the three most common peripheral vestibular disorders: Vestibular neuritis, Meniere’s disease, and benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. A solid understanding of these common peripheral vestibular disorders is critical to the neurologist who evaluates patients with dizziness. Evidence-based diagnosis and management will be discussed, when applicable. This program complements C205: Neuro-otology II: Diagnosis and Treatment of Nuanced Causes of Dizziness, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to identify the key aspects of the history and examination for dizziness presentations, particularly regarding the three most common peripheral vestibular disorders. Lecture/Faculty: }} Approach to the History and Examination in Dizziness Patients Kevin A. Kerber, MD, Ann Arbor, MI }} Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (Posterior Canal) Terry D. Fife, MD, FAAN, Phoenix, AZ }} Meniere’s Disease Robert W. Baloh, MD, FAAN, Los Angeles, CA }} Vestibular Neuritis Kevin A. Kerber, MD, Ann Arbor, MI Core Competencies:  Patient Care, Medical Knowledge Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

Course Thursday, April 26, 2018

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

C205 Neuro-otology II: Diagnosis and Treatment of Nuanced Causes of Dizziness

Topic: Neuro-ophthalmology/Neuro-otology Director: Kevin A. Kerber, MD, Ann Arbor, MI

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Program Description: Neuro-otology II will build on the topics covered in the Neuro-otology I. The clinical topics will be the more nuanced variants of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, dizziness-stroke presentations, and vestibular migraine. The program will conclude with case studies and a question and answer session. Sessions will be as interactive as possible with an opportunity for questions and answers. Evidencebased management will be discussed when applicable. This program complements C191: Neuro-otology I: The Common Peripheral Vestibular Disorders, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to identify features that indicate variants of BPPV, stroke in dizziness presentations, and vestibular migraine.

Neuro-ophthalmology

Lecture/Faculty: }} Horizontal and Anterior Canal BPPV Terry D. Fife, MD, FAAN, Phoenix, AZ }} Stroke and Dizziness Kevin A. Kerber, MD, Ann Arbor, MI }} Vestibular Migraine Robert W. Baloh, MD, FAAN, Los Angeles, CA Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Trainee, General Neurologist, NonNeurologist

AAN.com/view/AM18 165


Neuro-rehabilitation Overview

I

f your schedule won’t allow you to stay for the whole meeting, maximize your time in Los Angeles and get the most out of a shorter trip with this Neuro-rehabilitation specialty track that will take place on consecutive days. Look for education and science covering the full gamut of neuro-rehabilitation topics, and don’t miss the related Frontiers in Neuroscience Plenary Session and scientific platform sessions taking place in the dynamic, interactive experiential learning areas. Tuesday, April 24

Thursday, April 26

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C120  Lumbar Radiculopathy, Lumbar Spinal Stenosis, Low Back Pain, and Failed Back Syndrome

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C174  Rehabilitation in Neurology

Wednesday, April 25 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C143  Evaluation and Treatment of Common Spine Disorders 9:15 a.m.–9:35 a.m. Frontiers in Neuroscience Plenary Session: The Dynamics of the Unconscious Brain under General Anesthesia 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C145  Severe TBI: From ICU to Rehabilitation 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C160  Neurology Update II: Movement Disorders, Spine Disorders, and Sleep Disorders

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C186  Myelopathies I: Recognizing and Evaluating Myelopathic Patients for Inflammatory and Vascular Causes 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C200  Myelopathies II: Approaches to Rehabilitation and Psychosocial Challenges

Friday, April 27 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C235  Neck Pain, Cervical Spinal Stenosis, Cervical Radiculopathy, and Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy

4:30 p.m.–5:10 p.m. S36  Neuro-rehabilitation Platform Session

Course Tuesday, April 24, 2018

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

C120 Lumbar Radiculopathy, Lumbar Spinal

Stenosis, Low Back Pain, and Failed Back Syndrome

Topics:

Pain and Palliative Care; Neuro-rehabilitation Director: Ligia Viorela Onofrei, MD, Salt Lake City, UT

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See complete course description on page 173 »

166 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

Course Wednesday, April 25, 2018 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

C143 Evaluation and Treatment of Common Spine Disorders

Topics:

Neuro-rehabilitation; Pain and Palliative Care Director: J. D. Bartleson, MD, FAAN, Rochester, MN

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Program Description: Neurologists should play a primary role in evaluating patients with spine and/or limb pain because of our ability to detect the presence of spinal cord, spinal nerve, and cauda equina injury. Many neurologists are uncomfortable evaluating patients with spine and limb pain because of a lack of training during residency and a paucity of instructional courses at neurology meetings. Faculty will describe important aspects of the history and neurological and musculoskeletal examination of patients with common spine disorders and cover the use of neurophysiologic testing in the diagnosis of spinal and limb pain. Treatment for common acute and chronic spine disorders is available and effective. Treatment


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

Upon Completion: Participants will be able to diagnose and treat patients with common spine disorders. Treatment options include medications, physical therapies, injections, blocks, and surgery. Lecture/Faculty: }} Evaluation of Common Spine Disorders Ligia Viorela Onofrei, MD, Salt Lake City, UT }} Treatment of Common Spine Disorders J. D. Bartleson, MD, FAAN, Rochester, MN Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Plenary Session Wednesday, April 25, 2018 9:15 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Frontiers in Neuroscience Plenary Session

Topics: Sleep; MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease; Aging, Dementia, Cognitive, and Behavioral Neurology; General Neurology; Neuro-rehabilitation; Child Neurology and Developmental Neurology Moderator: Paul M. George, MD, PhD, MSE, Stanford, CA

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9:15 a.m.–9:35 a.m. }} The Dynamics of the Unconscious Brain under General Anesthesia Emery Brown, MD, PhD, Cambridge, MA

Course Wednesday, April 25, 2018 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C145 Severe TBI: From ICU to Rehabilitation Topic:

Neuro-rehabilitation; Aging, Dementia, Cognitive, and Behavioral Neurology; Neuro Trauma; Critical Care, and Sports Neurology Director: Susanne Muehlschlegel, MD, MPH, Worcester, MA

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Program Description: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the most common, disabling neurologic disorders. Severe TBI continues to be the leading cause

of death and disability after trauma accounting for most of the 52,000 TBI-related deaths in the US annually. Severe TBI presents many difficult clinical and research challenges in diagnosis and treatment, including early diagnosis and management to limit secondary injury, as well as prognostication. This course will focus on severe TBI from the acute care stage in the ICU to rehabilitation. Faculty will discuss the mechanisms of brain damage after TBI, with emphasis on secondary brain injury, as well as best practices for acute management and prognostication after severe TBI. Speakers will present up-to-date guideline-based management strategies; cutting-edge clinical and research neuroimaging methods including diffusion tensor imaging; describe emerging research in biomarkers, prognostication, and decision-making; and address current controversies of diagnosis and treatment. Upon Completion: Participants should be familiar with the variety of pathophysiologic mechanisms associated with TBI and how to prevent or minimize secondary brain injury with up-to-date acute management recommendations emphasizing relevant guidelines; and be comfortable using clinical information and imaging techniques to aid in prognostication after severe TBI. Lecture/Faculty: }} Severe TBI in the ICU: Management and Prognosis Susanne Muehlschlegel, MD, MPH, Worcester, MA }} Imaging in Severe TBI Brian Edlow, MD, Boston, MA }} Pharmacological and Rehabilitative Approaches to Neurological Sequelae of TBI David L. Brody, MD, PhD, Saint Louis, MO Core Competencies:  Practice-Based Learning and Improvement, Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, NeuroIntensivist, Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist

Course Wednesday, April 25, 2018 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

C160 Neurology Update II: Movement Disorders, Spine Disorders, and Sleep Disorders

Topic:

General Neurology; Movement Disorders; Neuro-rehabilitation; Sleep Director: Ralph F. Józefowicz, MD, FAAN, Rochester, NY

J

See complete course description on page 83 »

AAN.com/view/AM18 167

Neuro-rehabilitation

of the patient with spine and limb pain can be gratifying. However, many treatment modalities, including surgery, are used prematurely and excessively. Faculty will describe the treatments that are appropriate for acute and chronic axial spine pain, radiculopathy, spondylotic myelopathy, lumbar spinal stenosis, and cauda equina syndrome. This course will focus on common spine disorders, mostly due to spondylosis.


Program Descriptions

Neuro-rehabilitation

Scientific Platform Session

Course

Wednesday, April 25, 2018 4:30 p.m.–5:10 p.m.

Thursday, April 26, 2018

S36

C186 Myelopathies I: Recognizing and Evaluating

Topic:

Neuro-rehabilitation Platform Session Neuro-rehabilitation

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Course Thursday, April 26, 2018

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

C174 Rehabilitation in Neurology

Topic: Neuro-rehabilitation Director: Marc W. Slutzky, MD, PhD, Chicago, IL

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Program Description: Neurologic rehabilitation is a dynamic process through which patients optimize physical, cognitive, and social functions. It is a patient-centered, multidisciplinary endeavor involving neurologists and a wide range of providers. The ultimate objectives are to renew or maintain independence, participation, and quality of life despite the impairments. Over the past two decades, growing evidence supports specific approaches to neurologic rehabilitation. Rehabilitation is also the translation of basic and clinical neuroscience research to maximize mechanisms of neural reorganization and compensation. Faculty will use the examples of post-stroke care, as well as the care of patients with spinal cord injury, to highlight the role of neurologists in rehabilitation, as well as highlight future directions and emerging technologies that promise to revolutionize neurologic rehabilitation. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to develop a greater understanding of the multidisciplinary care of patients with disability from neu rologic diseases, as well as develop understanding of the current research for improving care. Lecture/Faculty: }} Brain Repair After Stroke Steven C. Cramer, MD, FAAN, Irvine, CA }} SCI Rehabilitation An Hong Do, MD, Orange, CA }} Neurotechnology in Rehabilitation Marc W. Slutzky, MD, PhD, Chicago, IL Core Competencies:  Patient Care, Medical Knowledge Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, Researchers

168 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Myelopathic Patients for Inflammatory and Vascular Causes

Topic: Neuro-rehabilitation Director: Benjamin M. Greenberg, MD, FAAN, Dallas, TX

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Program Description: Acute and subacute myelopathies are common diagnostic considerations in neurological practice. Patients and clinicians are forced to consider multiple potential conditions that are considered neurological emergencies. Myelitis is one potential cause of acute and subacute myelopathy that must be considered. Updates to the approach to diagnosis and consideration of a variant of myelitis— acute flaccid myelitis—will be covered in this course. Furthermore, vascular myelopathies can be difficult to diagnose if clinicians are not familiar with both the presentation and options for testing. This course will use didactic and case-based presentations to cover topics related to the diagnosis and management of patients with inflammatory and vascular myelopathies. This program complements C200: Myelopathies II: Approaches to Rehabilitation and Psychosocial Challenges, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to initiate a work up for acute and subacute myelopathy, initiate empiric treatment, and understand when to order comprehensive testing for vascular myelopathies. Participants will be able to differentiate classical transverse myelitis from acute flaccid myelitis and appreciate the therapeutic and prognostic implications of this differentiation. Lecture/Faculty: }} Inflammatory Myelopathies Benjamin M. Greenberg, MD, FAAN, Dallas, TX }} Vascular Myelopathies Philippe Gailloud, MD, Baltimore, MD Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

Course 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

C200 Myelopathies II: Approaches to

Rehabilitation and Psychosocial Challenges

Topic: Neuro-rehabilitation Director: Benjamin M. Greenberg, MD, FAAN, Dallas, TX

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Program Description: Spinal cord disorders are frequently encountered by both general and subspecialty neurologists. They are potentially devastating, but treatable, conditions that require prompt recognition, testing, and treatment. Rapid scientific advances have enhanced and broadened our understanding of a wide spectrum of these disorders. The first part of this course will cover recognition, classification, diagnostic investigation, and management of myelopathies. Faculty will discuss vascular myelopathies, inflammatory and immune-mediated myelopathies, and the diagnostic approach to these syndromes. In this portion of the course we will review rehabilitation and symptomatic issues related to myelopathies. We will review gait assessments and psychosocial aspects of these conditions. Casebased learning points will be used and will focus on practical clinical information and a comprehensive update on recent developments. This program complements C186: Myelopathies I: Recognizing and Evaluating Myelopathic Patients for Inflammatory and Vascular Causes, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to evaluate gait disorders related to spinal cord dysfunction, understand therapeutic approaches, and be able to understand the psychosocial impacts of these conditions. Lecture/Faculty: }} Psychosocial Considerations in Myelopathy Lana Harder, PhD, Dallas, TX }} Evaluating Gait Patterns in Myelopathic Patients Karen McCain, DPT, Dallas, TX }} Case-based Study of Myelopathy Benjamin M. Greenberg, MD, FAAN, Dallas, TX Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care

Friday, April 27, 2018

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

C235 Neck Pain, Cervical Spinal Stenosis,

Cervical Radiculopathy, and Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy

Topics:

Neuro-rehabilitation; Pain and Palliative Care Director: John W. Engstrom, MD, FAAN, San Francisco, CA

J

Program Description: Neck and low back pain are the second most common reason outpatients seek the opinion of a neurologist. This program is designed to improve the competence of neurology care providers in the management of common cervical spine disorders, skills not commonly taught to neurology residents during training. Presenters will use a combination of case presentations and didactic teaching to engage the audience. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to affectively use "red flags" to identify patients at risk for a serious cause of neck pain, know how to follow the course of nerve roots on spine imaging to understand the common causes of radiculopathy, know how to assess cervical spinal stenosis for possible mimics of myelopathy, and be able to develop a rational plan for conservative or surgical care in the setting of cervical spondylotic myelopathy. Lecture/Faculty: }} Initial Evaluation and Managment of Neck Pain Jeffrey Ralph, MD, San Francisco, CA }} Cervical Spinal Stenosis John W. Engstrom, MD, FAAN, San Francisco, CA }} Cervical Radiculopathy Jeffrey Ralph, MD, San Francisco, CA }} Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy John W. Engstrom, MD, FAAN, San Francisco, CA Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive

Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive

CME Credits:  2

CME Credits:  2

Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, Trainee, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist

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Neuro-rehabilitation

Thursday, April 26, 2018

Course


Pain and Palliative Care Overview

I

f your schedule won’t allow you to stay for the whole meeting, maximize your time in Los Angeles and get the most out of a shorter trip with this Pain and Palliative Care specialty track, with core programming taking place Sunday to Tuesday. Look for education and science covering a variety of pain and palliative care-related topics, including scientific platform sessions taking place in the dynamic, interactive experiential learning areas. Saturday, April 21 9:30 a.m.–11:30 a.m. C10  More than Medicine: How to Access Home Care, Support Caregivers, and Discuss Complex Situations in Advanced Neurologic Disease 12:45 p.m.–1:45 p.m. X  Ask Us Anything: Expert Panel on Headache and Pain

Sunday, April 22

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C124  The Palliative Care Guide in Neurology: Best Practice in Communication, Advance Care Planning, and End-of-life Care of Patients with Brain Tumors and Other Life-limiting Neurological Disorders

Wednesday, April 25 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C143  Evaluation and Treatment of Common Spine Disorders

3:30 p.m.–4:10 p.m. S6  Pain and Palliative Care Platform Session

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. N4  Neuroscience in the Clinic: Opioid Use and Abuse: The Overlapping Neurobiology of Pain and Addiction, and the Path Toward Better Treatments

Monday, April 23

Thursday, April 26

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C75  Safe and Appropriate Opioid Prescribing in Neurology 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C88  Core Concepts in Pain Management: Refractory Neuropathic Pain Practical Pharmacologics, Advances in Neuromodulation, and a Balanced Look at Cannabinoids

Tuesday, April 24 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C111  Enhancing Your Career and Practice Through Neuropalliative Care 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C120  Lumbar Radiculopathy, Lumbar Spinal Stenosis, Low Back Pain, and Failed Back Syndrome

170 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

1:00 p.m.–1:45 p.m. X  Integrative Approach to the Management of Chronic Pain Syndromes 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C195  Practical Training in Injection Techniques in the Treatment of Headache Disorders Skills Workshop

Friday, April 27 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C235  Neck Pain, Cervical Spinal Stenosis, Cervical Radiculopathy, and Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

Course

C10

9:30 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

More than Medicine: How to Access Home Care, Support Caregivers, and Discuss Complex Situations in Advanced Neurologic Disease

Topics:

Pain and Palliative Care; Aging, Dementia, Cognitive, and Behavioral Neurology Director: Farrah N. Daly, MD, MBA, Leesburg, VA

J

Program Description: Despite excellent medical management, in progressive neurologic disease disability accumulates and caregivers experience greater strain. Neurologists can feel frustrated or disheartened by the feeling that they are no longer making a difference. However, neurologists can always make a difference! By connecting patients with appropriate home-based resources, identifying caregiver strain, and facilitating goals of care discussions, neurologists can continue to do excellent work for their patients as disease progresses. This program will provide practical strategies to coordinate care and support patients and families in the context of advanced illness. Through case-driven discussion, personal experience, and literature review, faculty will review challenges and resources for care of patients with neurologic disease in the home and longterm care settings, methods of screening for caregiver stress, and communication tools useful for effective advance care planning. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to list features of progressive neurologic disease that should trigger a palliative care or hospice referral, name at least two situations that are associated with high risk of caregiver strain, and discuss strategies for effective communication regarding transitions of care and advance care planning. Lecture/Faculty: }} Home Care Resources, Palliative Medicine, and Hospice— When, Why, and How Mara Lugassy, MD, New York, NY }} Identifying and Responding to Strain in Care Givers and Care Partners Julie H. Carter, Portland, OR }} Exploring and Translating: Turning Goals into an Individualized Plan of Care Farrah N. Daly, MD, MBA, Leesburg, VA Core Competencies:  Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Patient Care, Professionalism, Systems-Based Practice Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, Advanced Practice Provider

Saturday, April 21, 2018

12:45 p.m.–1:45 p.m.

Ask Us Anything: Expert Panel on Headache and Pain Topic:

Headache; Pain and Palliative Care Speakers: Todd D. Rozen, MD, FAAN, Jacksonville, FL Peter Goadsby, MD, PhD, San Francisco, CA Experiential Learning Area: HeadTalks

J

See complete course description on page 94 »

Scientific Platform Session Sunday, April 22, 2018

S6

Topic:

3:30 p.m.–4:10 p.m.

Pain and Palliative Care Platform Session Pain and Palliative Care

G

Course Monday, April 23, 2018

C75

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Safe and Appropriate Opioid Prescribing in Neurology

Topics:

Pain and Palliative Care; General Neurology Director: Shaheen E. Lakhan, MD, PhD, MEd, FAAN, Roanoke, VA

J

Program Description: Chronic pain is one of the most common reasons why patients visit the neurologist. Opioids are often used in the treatment of these patients. Only until the last decade have the medical and public health communities systematically addressed the practice of prescribing opioids for chronic non-cancer pain. In this course, faculty will facilitate learning on the best practices when considering, starting, monitoring, and tapering opioid therapy for chronic pain. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to describe acute pain, chronic pain, chronic opioid therapy, and opioid misuse, abuse, tolerance, dependency, and addiction; demonstrate the skills of safe opioid prescribing which reflect an understanding of assessing, mitigating, and managing opioid risks in the neurology patient population; interpret the results of a focused history and physical examination, targeted biopsychosocial assessments, and drug panel laboratory testing in the setting of opioid therapy; and demonstrate awareness of opioid misuse, abuse, tolerance, and dependency, and the biopsychosocial impact of addiction on patients and their families and caregivers. AAN.com/view/AM18 171

Pain

Saturday, April 21, 2018

Experiential Learning Area


Program Descriptions Lecture/Faculty: }} Safe and Appropriate Opioid Prescribing: Part One Shaheen E. Lakhan, MD, PhD, MEd, FAAN, Roanoke, VA Daniel L. Menkes, MD, FAAN, Royal Oak, MI }} Safe and Appropriate Opioid Prescribing: Part Two Jennifer L. Ault, DO, PhD, PT, Berkeley, CA Shaheen E. Lakhan, MD, PhD, MEd, FAAN, Roanoke, VA Core Competencies:  Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement, Professionalism, Systems-Based Practice Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive

Pain and Palliative Care }} Neuromodulation: Evolving Technologies, Targets, and Uses Jason Eldrige, MD, Rochester, MN }} Cannabinoids: Fact or Fiction? A Balanced Look at Cannabinoid Usage for Neuropathic Pain Thomas Pittelkow, DO, MPH, Rochester, MN Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Didactic, Multidisciplinary CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Course

CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Course Monday, April 23, 2018

C88

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Core Concepts in Pain Management: Refractory Neuropathic Pain Practical Pharmacologics, Advances in Neuromodulation, and a Balanced Look at Cannabinoids

Topic: Pain and Palliative Care Director: James C. Watson, MD, Rochester, MN

J

Program Description: Neuropathic pain is challenging to treat and frustrating to caregivers and patients when first line agents are insufficient. This session will be presented by a multidisciplinary faculty and focus on the treatment of refractory neuropathic pain. It is structured to be clinically relevant to non-pain specialists. Topics will include the role of non-first line neuropathic pain adjuvants, NMDA antagonists, topicals, opioids, and cognitive behavioral treatments. The evolving role of neuromodulation for refractory neuropathic pain with new technologies and target sites will be discussed. The accessibility of medical cannabinoids continues to grow. This session will also discuss the facts and fiction behind cannabinoids in the treatment of neuropathic pain. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to discuss strategies to mitigate the failure of first line neuropathic pain adjuvants, understand second line pharmacologic and topical treatments, and the role of opioids in neuropathic pain treatment. Participants will understand the expanding types and targets of neuromodulation and where they fit in the treatment algorithm. Participants will understand the facts and fiction behind the use of cannabinoids in the treatment of neuropathic pain. Lecture/Faculty: }} Refractory Neuropathic Pain: Mitigating First Line Treatment Failures and Implementing Multimodal Treatment Options James C. Watson, MD, Rochester, MN 172 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

Tuesday, April 24, 2018

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C111 Enhancing Your Career and Practice Through Neuropalliative Care

Topics:

Pain and Palliative Care; Practice, Policy, and Ethics Director: Maisha T. Robinson, MD, MS, Jacksonville, FL

DJF

Program Description: Palliative care is important in neurologic practice as the trajectory of many neurologic illnesses is progressive and incurable. Recent national platforms have underscored the need for physicians to be knowledgeable about and competent in basic palliative care. Through the use of personal anecdotes, case presentations, and examples in the literature, faculty will provide strategies to effectively incorporate palliative care into routine neurologic practice from the time of diagnosis throughout the disease course. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to incorporate basic palliative care principles into their practice, understand when to consult specialty palliative care, and recognize when patients may need to be transitioned to hospice care. Lecture/Faculty: }} Incorporation of Palliative Care into Community-based and Academic Neurologic Practice Benzi Kluger, MD, FAAN, Aurora, CO }} Challenges in Neuropalliative Care Claire Creutzfeldt, MD, Seattle, WA Core Competencies:  Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Didactic, Interactive, Audience Participation, CaseBased CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

Course 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

C120 Lumbar Radiculopathy, Lumbar Spinal

Stenosis, Low Back Pain, and Failed Back Syndrome

Tuesday, April 24, 2018

C124 The Palliative Care Guide in Neurology: Best Practice in Communication, Advance Care Planning, and End-of-life Care of Patients with Brain Tumors and Other Life-limiting Neurological Disorders

Topics:

Pain and Palliative Care; Neuro-rehabilitation Director: Ligia Viorela Onofrei, MD, Salt Lake City, UT

J

Program Description: Neurologists frequently evaluate and treat patients with low back and lower limb pain. In this program, we will focus on common conditions such as lumbar radiculopathy, lumbar stenosis, and axial back pain, but we will also review facet arthropathy and sacroiliac joint dysfunction, which are less commonly discussed but frequent causes of back and limb pain. We will discuss the indications and timing for obtaining imaging and further diagnostic tests, the treatments available and the evidence behind them, as well as surgical options and indications for and against surgery. We will also expand on the role of opioid analgesics in the treatment of acute and chronic pain. This interactive program will use the audience response system to present cases that attendees will be asked to evaluate and treat. Upon Completion: Participants will become familiar with evidence-based recommendations for diagnostic testing and treatment of common lumbar spine disorders, including when to obtain advanced imaging, when and what kind of spine injections to order, the appropriate use of opioid analgesics for acute and chronic low back and radicular lower limb pain, and when to recommend lumbar spine surgery. Lecture/Faculty: }} Case Presentations and Case Discussion Ligia Viorela Onofrei, MD, Salt Lake City, UT }} Opioid Analgesic Therapy vs Alternatives for Acute and Chronic Low Back and Radicular Lower Limb Pain Gary M. Franklin, MD, MPH, FAAN, Seattle, WA Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, PracticeBased Learning and Improvement, Systems-Based Practice Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, Individuals With Low Back Pain

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Topics:

Neuro-oncology; Pain and Palliative Care Director: Tobias Walbert, MD, PhD, Detroit, MI

JF

See complete course description on page 154 »

Course Wednesday, April 25, 2018 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

C143 Evaluation and Treatment of Common Spine Disorders

Topics:

Neuro-rehabilitation; Pain and Palliative Care Director: J. D. Bartleson, MD, FAAN, Rochester, MN

J

See complete course description on page 166 »

Neuroscience in the Clinic Session Wednesday, April 25, 2018 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

N4

Neuroscience in the Clinic: Opioid Use and Abuse: The Overlapping Neurobiology of Pain and Addiction, and the Path Toward Better Treatments

Topic: Pain and Palliative Care Directors: Jessica Robinson Papp, MD, FAAN, New York, NY Walter J. Koroshetz, MD, FAAN, Bethesda, MD

G

Program Description: Chronic pain and substance use disorders frequently co-exist and neurologists often feel ill-equipped to treat patients with these complex disorders. In this session we will travel from bench to bedside and beyond, exploring the neurobiology underlying pain and addiction, and the hope it brings for better treatments; hearing the patient’s perspective; and learning about governmental policy designed to improve the care of chronic pain patients while working to ameliorate the U.S. opioid epidemic.

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Pain

Tuesday, April 24, 2018

Course


Program Descriptions Upon Completion: Participants will become familiar with central nervous system mechanisms underlying chronic pain and addiction and how knowledge of these mechanisms can inform drug discovery. Participants will also understand changes in public policy which effect neurologists and their patients with chronic pain, with a focus on the U.S. National Pain Strategy. Lecture/Faculty: }} Patient Presentation: Use of Opioids in Complex Disease Elyse J. Singer, MD, Los Angeles, CA }} Neurobiology of Pain and Addiction Catherine Cahill, PhD, Los Angeles, CA }} Clinical Follow-up and Discussion of National Pain Strategy Faculty }} Scientific Wrap-up and Link to Therapeutics Faculty }} Abstract Presentations: (Selected in February 2018) }} Panel Discussion, Questions and Answers, and Closing Remarks Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, Neurohospitalist, Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist

Experiential Learning Area Thursday, April 26, 2018

1:00 p.m.–1:45 p.m.

Integrative Approach to the Management of Chronic Pain Syndromes Topic: Pain and Palliative Care Speaker: Jessica Robinson Papp, MD, FAAN, New York, NY Experiential Learning Area: Live Well

JC

Program Description: Chronic pain has long been understood as a complex biopsychosocial disorder that requires a multimodal treatment approach including pharmacologic, behavioral and physical modalities. The importance of non-pharmacologic treatments for chronic pain is increasingly recognized, as concern about the use of prescription opioids has grown. This presentation will provide a practical and evidence-based review of non-pharmacologic treatments for chronic pain including simple communication strategies, stress reduction techniques, and physical interventions.

174 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

Pain and Palliative Care

Skills Workshop Thursday, April 26, 2018

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C195 Practical Training in Injection Techniques in

the Treatment of Headache Disorders Skills Workshop $ (registration required)

Topics:

Headache; Pain and Palliative Care Director: Morris Levin, MD, FAAN, San Francisco, CA

J

See complete course description on page 97 »

Course Friday, April 27, 2018

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

C235 Neck Pain, Cervical Spinal Stenosis,

Cervical Radiculopathy, and Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy

Topics:

Neuro-rehabilitation; Pain and Palliative Care Director: John W. Engstrom, MD, FAAN, San Francisco, CA

J

See complete course description on page 169 »


Practice, Policy, and Ethics Overview

W

hether you’re just starting a new practice and want to learn the fundamentals of neurology business or are interested in delving into policy and ethics issues that affect your practice, patients, and future of neurology, this lineup of programming has something for you. Look for education and science covering a full gamut of topics—from neuropalliative care to disparities among underserved populations. And don’t miss the interactive presentations and scientific platform sessions taking place in the dynamic experiential learning areas. Saturday, April 21

Wednesday, April 25

12:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m. C16  Leadership Challenges in Practice

1:00 p.m.–1:50 p.m. S27  Practice, Policy, and Ethics Platform Session

Sunday, April 22

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C148  LGBTQI Health in Neurology

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C36  Clinical Neurology for Advanced Practice Providers I 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C51  Clinical Neurology for Advanced Practice Providers II

Monday, April 23 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C61  Starting a Practice From the Ground Up: A Guide for Early Career Neurologists 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C84  Evidence Based Neurology Foresights for Busy Clinicians 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C92  What Keeps You Up at Night? Addressing Mistakes and Injuries, In-nOut-Patient Transition, and Building a Team to Support You

Tuesday, April 24 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C111  Enhancing Your Career and Practice Through Neuropalliative Care

3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m. X  Health Care Disparities Among Underserved Populations 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C163  How to Run a Practice: Business Strategies for Neurology Private Practices, Academic Centers, and the Future

Thursday, April 26 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C189  Business Strategies for Payer Negotiations and/or How to Go off the Grid 1:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m. X  Caring for Your Neurologic Patient for $500 or Less 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C204  Making Sure You Get Paid Under the New Health Care Laws

Friday, April 27 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C231  ICD-10-CM: How to Optimize for Accurate Diagnosis and Reimbursement 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C242  Coding 101: It’s Not Your Father’s Oldsmobile

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Program Descriptions Course Saturday, April 21, 2018

C16

12:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

L Leadership Challenges in Practice

Practice, Policy, and Ethics CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, NonNeurologist, Nurse Practitioner, Physician Assistant, Clinical Nurse Specialist

Course

Topics:

Leadership; Practice, Policy, and Ethics Director: Brad C. Klein, MD, MBA, FAAN, Willow Grove, PA

DEF

See complete course description on page 104 »

Course Sunday, April 22, 2018

C36

Sunday, April 22, 2018

C51

Clinical Neurology for Advanced Practice Providers II

Topic: Practice, Policy, and Ethics Director: Jessica Erfan, PA-C, Austin, TX

JF

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Clinical Neurology for Advanced Practice Providers I

Topic: Practice, Policy, and Ethics Director: Jessica Erfan, PA-C, Austin, TX

JF

Program Description: The role of advanced practice providers (APP) in the care of neurologic patients is increasingly critical. This program will provide information for the early career APP and complements Clinical Neurology for APPs II. Neuroradiology training dedicated to APPs varies across the country. During the first hour, faculty will review neurodiagnostic imaging of the spine through clinical case presentations. The psychosocial aspects of epilepsy can be as devastating as the seizures. Although learning appropriate epilepsy related treatment options is crucial for APPs, they are also responsible for counseling patients and families on lifestyle modifications that may improve their quality of life. During the second hour, faculty will highlight appropriate psychosocial aspects of epilepsy including driving, employment, SUDEP, safety, and liability. This program complements C51: Clinical Neurology for Advanced Practice Providers II. Upon Completion: Participants should become familiar with ordering and interpreting spine neuroimaging. Additionally, participants will recognize and discuss psychosocial aspects of patients with epilepsy. Lecture/Faculty: }} Neuroimaging Basics: A Practical Approach to Neuroimaging of the Spine Ryan Hakimi, DO, Greenville, SC }} The Psychosocial Aspects of Epilepsy: What Every Provider Should Know Lucretia Long, CNP, Columbus, OH Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive

176 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Program Description: The role of advanced practice providers (APP) in the care of neurologic patients is increasingly critical. Formal neurological training dedicated to APPs varies across the country. This program will provide information for the early career APP and complements Clinical Neurology for APPs I. Through clinical presentations of common eye exam findings faculty will facilitate a discussion of neuro ophthalmology for the practicing APP. During the second hour, faculty will review the evaluation and management of migraine and medication overuse headache. This program complements C36: Clinical Neurology for Advanced Practice Providers I. Upon Completion: Participants should identify and localize common findings during the eye exam and build a basic foundation of neuro ophthalmology. Participants will also become familiar with the evaluation and management of migraine and medication overuse headache. Lecture/Faculty: }} Un-nerving Eye Movements: An Ophthalmologic Primer for the Practicing Neurology APP Teresa Frohman, PA, Austin, TX }} Key Elements for the Practicing APP: Demystifying Medication Overuse in Migraine Sufferers Kimberly Hall Oas, MSN, RN, Dallas, TX Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, NonNeurologist, Nurse Practitioner, Physician Assistant, Clinical Nurse Specialist


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

Course

C61

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Starting a Practice From the Ground Up: A Guide for Early Career Neurologists

Topic: Practice, Policy, and Ethics Director: Brad C. Klein, MD, MBA, FAAN, Willow Grove, PA

DF

Program Description: Course topics will include building a successful business model and addressing functions such as billing, insurance management, medicolegal, regulatory, health IT, and other economic issues. Additional goals highlighted will include practice autonomy and incorporation of alternative practice models involving technology, such as telemedicine. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to develop a business plan, understand the revenues and expenses associated with a practice, and the steps to execute it. Lecture/Faculty: }} Building A Business From the Ground Up: Creating A Business Plan Brad C. Klein, MD, MBA, FAAN, Willow Grove, PA }} Building a Business: Expenses, Malpractice, Legal/ Regulatory, and Health IT David A. Evans, MBA, Dallas, TX }} Revenue and Billing J. Todd Barnes, MBA, Oklahoma City, OK }} Alternative Practice Models: Telemedicine, Direct to Consumer, Direct Pay, Concierge and Subscription Models Eric Anderson, MD, PhD, Gulfport, FL Core Competencies:  Practice-Based Learning and Improvement, Professionalism, Systems-Based Practice, Interpersonal and Communication Skills Teaching Style:  Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist

Monday, April 23, 2018

C84

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Evidence Based Neurology Foresights for Busy Clinicians

Topics:

General Neurology; Practice, Policy, and Ethics Director: Andrei Ivashynka, MD, Novara, Italy

JG

See complete course description on page 77 »

Course Monday, April 23, 2018

C92

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

What Keeps You Up at Night? Addressing Mistakes and Injuries, In-n-Out-Patient Transition, and Building a Team to Support You

Topic: Practice, Policy, and Ethics Director: Justin P. Martello, MD, Newark, DE

F

Program Description: We often take it for granted that when a patient leaves your office, he/she will return in pristine order at their next visit—labs will be done, testing will be performed, medications will be administered properly. "The best laid plans…" never accounts for human error, despite all our best efforts to explain to the patient, in detail, the role and responsibility they have in their health care between visits. This course will act as a helpful guide on dealing with the unknown elements your patients are at risk for between office visits (from hospitalizations to medical error, including your own, to what plays a role in non-adherence) leading to a sounder sleep at night, knowing your patient is in the hands of a good health care team with a foolproof plan. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to understand how to address medical mistakes that may or may not lead to harm and the ethical implications involved; understand how to anticipate the problems that may arise between office visits and common patient questions/ concerns/confusion/misperceptions; understand the best ways to facilitate between a patient’s hospitalization and transition between the in-patient and out-patient world; and understand how to form a support team to help in the care of your patient. Lecture/Faculty: }} Community/Outpatient Perspectives Sarah M. Benish, MD, FAAN, Edina, MN }} Academia/In-patient Perspectives Michael Phipps, MD, MHS, Baltimore, MD

AAN.com/view/AM18 177

Practice/Policy/Ethics

Monday, April 23, 2018

Course


Program Descriptions Core Competencies:  Practice-Based Learning and Improvement, Professionalism, Systems-Based Practice, Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, Other Care Team Members

Course Tuesday, April 24, 2018

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C111 Enhancing Your Career and Practice Through Neuropalliative Care

Topics:

Pain and Palliative Care; Practice, Policy, and Ethics Director: Maisha T. Robinson, MD, MS, Jacksonville, FL

DJF

See complete course description on page 172 »

Scientific Platform Session

Practice, Policy, and Ethics Upon Completion: Participants should be able to describe LGBTQI terminology and health disparities; list strategies to collect data on sexual orientation and gender identity in clinical settings; discuss the role of LGBTQI identity specific to neurologic illness; and describe how to create a welcoming and inclusive environment for LGBTQI individuals. Lecture/Faculty: }} LGBTQI Terminology and Concepts Nicole Rosendale, MD, San Francisco, CA }} EMR and Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity (SOGI) Data Allison L. Weathers, MD, FAAN, Beachwood, OH }} Creating a Welcome and Inclusive Environment in Your Clinic David A. Evans, MBA, Dallas, TX }} Disease-specific Cases: Panel Discussion Faculty Core Competencies:  Professionalism, Systems-Based Practice, Patient Care, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement, Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Medical Knowledge Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Experiential Learning Area

Wednesday, April 25, 2018 1:00 p.m.–1:50 p.m.

S27 Topic:

Practice, Policy, and Ethics Platform Session Practice, Policy, and Ethics

FG Course

Wednesday, April 25, 2018 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C148 LGBTQI Health in Neurology Topics:

Practice, Policy, and Ethics; General Neurology Director: Holly E. Hinson, MD, MCR, Portland, OR

F

Program Description: The program will begin with a session explaining key LGBTQI terminology and concepts. Topics covered will include the difference between sexual orientation and gender identity, gender identity versus gender expression, and the concept of minority stress. We will then discuss the importance of collecting sexual orientation and gender identity data in electronic medical records, with practical advice for providers to take back to their home institutions. The session will end with discussion of 3-4 cases in which LGBTQI identity plays a role in patient care and outcomes.

178 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

Wednesday, April 25, 2018 3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Health Care Disparities Among Underserved Populations Topics:

General Neurology; Practice, Policy, and Ethics Speakers: Holly E. Hinson, MD, MCR, Portland, OR Charles C. Flippen II, MD, FAAN, Los Angeles, CA Lisa M. Shulman, MD, FAAN, Baltimore, MD Temitayo Oyegbile, MD, PhD, Washington, DC Experiential Learning Area: HeadTalks

DE

See complete course description on page 83 »


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

Course Wednesday, April 25, 2018 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Course Thursday, April 26, 2018

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C163 How to Run a Practice: Business Strategies C189 Business Strategies for Payer Negotiations Topic: Practice, Policy, and Ethics Director: Brad C. Klein, MD, MBA, FAAN, Willow Grove, PA

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Program Description: Neurology practices struggle for survival due to higher overhead and shrinking reimbursements for cognitive specialists. Higher malpractice premiums and office expenses, lower payments per patient, the rising cost of compliance with government regulations, and time-consuming insurance documentation requirements are the trend. Overlooking the true cost of services and procedures can result in financial drains to neurologic practice and unexpected losses. Faculty will give an overview of basic financial tools and how to apply sound business strategies to neurology practice issues. Faculty will cover the critical processes necessary to quantitatively evaluate a practice’s income and expenses, particularly in-depth analysis of revenue cycle and practice efficiencies. Faculty will also cover the steps involved in determination if expansion of services and/or providers will result in sustainable financial growth, avoidance of internal fraud, and strategic planning for future financial models, such as accountable care organizations. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to understand practice revenues, expenses, and cash flow; identify revenue cycle problems; establish and use key performance indicators for their practices; enhance work flow to maintain fiscal health; use benchmarking to enhance their practice; know and address basic legal issues in setting up and running a practice; understand how to choose and use technology at point of care; evaluate the economics of outsourcing versus providing in-house services; use financial analysis to determine if technology and other capital investments will provide a return on investment; know how to determine which payers are creating an administrative drain on their practices; identify possible fraud internally within the practice; and understand how to evaluate and implement new financial reimbursement and risk-sharing management models such as accountable care organizations. Lecture/Faculty: }} Understanding Your Revenues, Expenses, and Benchmarks to Increase Your Income Gregory J. Esper, MD, MBA, FAAN, Atlanta, GA }} Revenue Cycle Management: How to Make Money in Your Practice and Be a Doctor Brad C. Klein, MD, MBA, FAAN, Willow Grove, PA Core Competencies:  Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Patient Care, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement Teaching Style:  Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, Administrator

and/or How to Go off the Grid

Topic: Practice, Policy, and Ethics Director: David E. Jones, MD, Charlottesville, VA

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Program Description: Neurology practices struggle for survival due to higher overhead and shrinking reimbursements for cognitive specialists. Higher malpractice premiums and office expenses, lower payments per patient, the rising cost of compliance with government regulations, and time-consuming insurance documentation requirements are the trend. Overlooking the true cost of services and procedures can result in financial drains to neurologic practice and unexpected losses. Faculty will give an overview of basic financial tools and how to apply sound business strategies to neurology practice issues. Faculty will cover the critical processes necessary to quantitatively evaluate a practice’s income and expenses, particularly in-depth analysis of revenue cycle and practice efficiencies. Faculty will also cover the steps involved in determination if expansion of services and/or providers will result in sustainable financial growth, avoidance of internal fraud, and strategic planning for future financial models, such as accountable care organizations. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to understand practice revenues, expenses, and cash flow; identify revenue cycle problems; establish and use key performance indicators for their practices; enhance work flow to maintain fiscal health; use benchmarking to enhance their practice; know and address basic legal issues in setting up and running a practice; understand how to choose and use technology at point of care; evaluate the economics of outsourcing versus providing in-house services; use financial analysis to determine if technology and other capital investments will provide a return on investment; know how to determine which payers are creating an administrative drain on their practices; identify possible fraud internally within the practice; and understand how to evaluate and implement new financial reimbursement and risk-sharing management models, such as accountable care organizations. Lecture/Faculty: }} Understanding the Payer Landscape to Enhance Negotiations with Payers David E. Jones, MD, Charlottesville, VA }} Transitioning Without Payers: Where to Begin Daryl Story, MD, Norwalk, CT }} Growing a Successful Practice Without Payers Peter J. McAllister, MD, Stamford, CT Core Competencies:  Practice-Based Learning and Improvement Teaching Style:  Interactive, Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee AAN.com/view/AM18 179

Practice/Policy/Ethics

for Neurology Private Practices, Academic Centers, and the Future


Program Descriptions Experiential Learning Area Thursday, April 26, 2018

1:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Caring for Your Neurologic Patient for $500 or Less Topics:

Practice, Policy, and Ethics; General Neurology Speaker: Donn Dexter, MD, FAAN, Eau Claire, WI Experiential Learning Area: HeadTalks

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Program Description: Advanced imaging and other neurologic testing can provide valuable diagnostic information but at a staggering cost. The neurologic examination and some inexpensive tests will be highlighted in the evaluation and diagnostic evaluation of common neurologic conditions.

Course Thursday, April 26, 2018

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

C204 Making Sure You Get Paid Under the New Health Care Laws

Topic: Practice, Policy, and Ethics Director: Gregory J. Esper, MD, MBA, FAAN, Atlanta, GA

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Program Description: The Quality Payment Program continues to evolve under the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Neurologists should know how to navigate options available to them, including how to succeed in MIPS or how to think about advance alternative payment models. This course will help neurologists understand what they can tangibly do in their practices to succeed. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to describe the quality payment program, their options under the merit-based incentive payment system (MIPS), describe possibilities for future advanced alternative payment models, and understand why partnering with accountable care organizations may or may not be beneficial to them. Lecture/Faculty: }} MACRA Overview and AAN Response Gregory J. Esper, MD, MBA, FAAN, Atlanta, GA }} Strategies for MACRA: Documentation and Population Management Eric M. Cheng, MD, MS, FAAN, Los Angeles, CA }} Using Axon Registry for Quality Reporting Lyell K. Jones, MD, FAAN, Rochester, MN Core Competencies:  Practice-Based Learning and Improvement Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 180 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

Practice, Policy, and Ethics Recommended Audience:  Trainee, Practice Administrator, Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist

Course Friday, April 27, 2018

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C231 ICD-10-CM: How to Optimize for Accurate Diagnosis and Reimbursement

Topic: Practice, Policy, and Ethics Director: Jeffrey R. Buchhalter, MD, FAAN, Phoenix, AZ

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Program Description: On October 1, 2015, the ICD-10-CM code set became required for all transactions involving reimbursement from the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services, as well as for other third-party payers. A one-year grace period was granted that allowed full reimbursement for using the correct code family without full specificity. Presenters will use a case-based approach focusing on practical aspects of ICD-10 including optimizing coding specificity for common neurologic disorders (e.g., stroke, epilepsy, headache), how codes relate to value-based reimbursement (QPP), severity coding (HCC), and how more accurate coding results in fewer denials. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to code common neurologic disorders to the highest degree of specificity to reflect the severity of illness, know the codes for several of the most commonly encountered disorders seen by neurologists, understand how coding plays an essential role in value-based reimbursement, and avoid and respond to denials for services rendered. Lecture/Faculty: }} ICD-10-CM Basics, Value, and Severity Based Coding Jeffrey R. Buchhalter, MD, FAAN, Phoenix, AZ }} ICD-10-CM Coding of Common Neurological Disorders Faculty }} How to Avoid and Respond to Denials David A. Evans, MBA, Dallas, TX Core Competencies:  Practice-Based Learning and Improvement, Medical Knowledge Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, Practice Manager, Billing Specialist, Nurse Practitioner, General Neurologist, Advanced Practice Provider


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

Course Friday, April 27, 2018

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

C242 Coding 101: It’s Not Your Father’s Oldsmobile

Topic: Practice, Policy, and Ethics Director: Bruce H. Cohen, MD, FAAN, Akron, OH

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Program Description: Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) is a publication of the American Medical Association. The E/M codes themselves comprise only a small part of CPT and are the codes that are used in delivering cognitive services. In general, the E/M codes require no special technology and cover visits in the ambulatory and inpatient setting, ED, and other approved health care settings. In this course the most common codes used for the ambulatory and inpatient setting will be discussed, and the rules of how these codes applied stressed. Basic EEG and EMG coding will also be presented, and the most common pitfalls in coding will be presented. Because providers are now providing an increasing amount of time performing non-face-toface patient management, new codes for these services are being developed and approved, and will be discussed as well. Upon Completion: Participants will understand the basis of face-to-face E/M coding, as well as the common pitfalls in incorrect coding; describe the differences between attended and unattended prolonged EEG studies as well as the difference to the patient if the study is performed in an inpatient vs observation setting, and learn the basics of simple EEG coding; determine how to properly code for EMG services; and become familiar with the new codes for nonface-to-face coding that is relevant to the practice of neurology.

Practice/Policy/Ethics

Lecture/Faculty: }} Basic Office and Hospital E&M Coding Raissa Villanueva, MD, Rochester, NY }} Non Face-to-Face and Future E&M Coding Issues Bruce H. Cohen, MD, FAAN, Akron, OH }} EEG, Prolonged EEG, and EMG Coding Jeffrey R. Buchhalter, MD, FAAN, Phoenix, AZ Core Competencies:  Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement, Professionalism Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist

AAN.com/view/AM18 181


Research Methodology, Education, and History Overview

E

nhance your understanding of research methodology, develop your skills as an educator, or delve into the history of neurology with these education and science offerings, including three basic science courses for residents. New this year, the history platform session will be presented in a dynamic, interactive experiential learning area. And don’t miss engaging historical displays highlighting the 70th anniversary of the AAN during the meeting. Saturday, April 21

Monday, April 23

7:00 a.m.–12:30 p.m. C5  Clerkship and Program Directors Conference: Demonstrating Your Impact as a Medical Educator

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. S12  Research Methodology and Education Platform Session

9:20 a.m.–9:50 a.m. X  How to Successfully Publish Quality Improvement Projects 12:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m. C15  Resident Basic Science I: Neuropharmacology

Sunday, April 22 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C29  Faculty Development: Enhancing Your Role in Student and Resident Training

1:00 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C82  Resident Basic Science III: Neuroanatomy: All the Lesions 5:15 p.m.–6:15 p.m. X  Neurology of the 1970s

Tuesday, April 24 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C117  Introduction to Clinical Research and Methods

Wednesday, April 25

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C43  Developing the Treatments of Tomorrow I: Taking Molecules from Lab to Man

8:00 a.m.–9:10 a.m. X  How to Write and Publish Research Papers, Reviews and Other Scientific Communications

1:00 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C47  Resident Basic Science II: Neuropathology

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C150  Where is the Lesion? A History of Neurological Investigations Part I

1:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m. X  Hall of Presidents: Neurology Through the Years

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C165  Where is the Lesion? A History of Neurological Investigation Part II

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C57  Developing the Treatments of Tomorrow II: Clinical Trials in Neurology

Thursday, April 26 1:00 p.m.–2:00 p.m. S38  History of Neurology Platform Session 4:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. X  Neurology History and Wine

182 2018 AAN Annual Meeting


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

Course

C5

7:00 a.m.–12:30 p.m.

Clerkship and Program Directors Conference: Demonstrating Your Impact as a Medical Educator

Topic: Research Methodology, Education, and History Director: Joseph E. Safdieh, MD, FAAN, New York, NY

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Program Description: Neurology Clerkship and Program directors share a common interest in medical education and their skills as clinician educators are likely to be assessed during the promotions process. The theme of this year’s program focuses on what steps a clinician educator can take to demonstrate his or her impact on their learners, their program, their department, and their institution. The course will start with an overview of the steps one can take to develop an education career from the faculty and chair’s perspective. Participants will then engage in breakout sessions with the themes of "Explore" and "Expand." During the "explore" session, participants will reflect on their educational philosophy and current roles. During the "expand" session participants will discuss what new roles they are contemplating and what the next steps might be. The breakout sessions will be facilitated by peers with track records of success as clinician educators. This course is open to anyone interested in building their career in neurology education and not limited to clerkship and Program Directors. This course is open to anyone interested in building their career in neurology education; it is not limited to Clerkship and Program Directors only. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to to demonstrate their impact as medical educators to help them advocate for their professional needs, the needs of their learners, and their career development. Lecture/Faculty: }} Career Development for Clinician Educators: Step-by-step Guide Joseph E. Safdieh, MD, FAAN, New York, NY }} Panel Discussion on Career Development Steven Galetta, MD, FAAN, New York, NY Zachary N. London, MD, FAAN, Ann Arbor, MI Joseph E. Safdieh, MD, FAAN, New York, NY }} Breakout Session 1: Explore Faculty }} Breakout Session 2: Expand Faculty Core Competencies:  Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement, Professionalism, Systems-Based Practice Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  3.5

Saturday, April 21, 2018

9:20 a.m.–9:50 a.m.

How to Successfully Publish Quality Improvement Projects Topic: Research Methodology, Education, and History Speakers: Anup D. Patel, MD, FAAN, Columbus, OH Rohit Das, MD, FAAN, Dallas, TX Experiential Learning Area: Research Corner

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Program Description: Have you ever wanted to know how to publish your quality improvement (QI) work? If so, come and learn some tips to publishing your QI projects and where to consider submitting your work for publication.

Course Saturday, April 21, 2018

C15

12:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Resident Basic Science I: Neuropharmacology

Topic: Research Methodology, Education, and History Director: James W. M. Owens, Jr., MD, PhD, Seattle, WA

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Program Description: Neurology now has an "embarrassment of riches" when it comes to pharmacological treatment. As our understanding of the basic neurobiology of disease progresses, this pharmacopeia continues to expand and to involve novel agents. Faculty will review basic pharmacological principles important for medication selection as well as facilitate an expanded understanding of the treatment of epilepsy, Parkinson’s disease, and sleep disorders. Presentations will include discussion of drug targets and mechanisms punctuated by illustrative cases. This program complements C47: Resident Basic Science II: Neuropathology and C82: Resident Basic Science III: Neuroanatomy: All the Lesions, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to discuss basic pharmacological concepts relevant to the clinical practice of neurology as well as an approach to medication selection for patients with epilepsy, Parkinson’s disease, and sleep disorders based on an understanding of pharmacological mechanisms of action and pharmacokinetcs. Lecture/Faculty: }} Overview of Neuropharmacology James W. M. Owens, Jr., MD, PhD, Seattle, WA }} Neuropharmacology of Anti-epileptic Drugs Atul Maheshwari, MD, Houston, TX

Recommended Audience:  Clerkship and Program Director

AAN.com/view/AM18 183

Research/Education

Saturday, April 21, 2018

Experiential Learning Area


Program Descriptions }} Neuropharmacology of Parkinson’s Disease Joohi Jimenez Shahed, MD, Houston, TX }} Neuropharmacology of Sleep Disorders James W. M. Owens, Jr., MD, PhD, Seattle, WA Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  3.5 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Trainee

Course Sunday, April 22, 2018

C29

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Faculty Development: Enhancing Your Role in Student and Resident Training

Topic: Research Methodology, Education, and History Director: Vicki Shanker, MD, New York, NY

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Program Description: While program directors often receive faculty development, many academic faculty do not. This course will assist in the development of key skills that clinicians are frequently asked to perform when working with trainees: writing letters of recommendation, providing trainee feedback, and teaching at the bedside. Attendees will receive literature-based guidelines for these skills and then will be given the opportunity to apply these principles through guided activities and role play. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to write letters of recommendation that will best convey their trainee and be able to better interpret letters of recommendation when reviewing applications, use techniques such as the "One Minute Preceptor" to assess trainees and provide oral feedback to the learner in a short period of time, provide useful written feedback to the trainee, and teach while bedside rounding and be able to highlight "teachable moments." Lecture/Faculty: }} Dissecting the Letter of Recommendation (LOR) Mark Milstein, MD, FAAN, Bronx, NY }} Improving Oral and Written Feedback Vicki Shanker, MD, New York, NY }} Teaching at the Bedside Ralph F. Józefowicz, MD, FAAN, Rochester, NY Core Competencies:  Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Medical Knowledge, Professionalism Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Audience Participation, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Specialist Neurologist 184 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

Research Methodology, Education, and History

Course Sunday, April 22, 2018

C43

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Developing the Treatments of Tomorrow I: Taking Molecules from Lab to Man

Topic: Research Methodology, Education, and History Director: Amy R. Brooks-Kayal, MD, FAAN, Aurora, CO

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Program Description: This program will provide an overview to a general audience of neurologists and researchers on the initial navigation of novel treatments for neurologic disease, going from discoveries in the lab to initial studies in human subjects. Specific examples will be used to illustrate the challenges that occur during the course of drug development. This program complements C57: Developing the Treatments of Tomorrow II: Clinical Trials in Neurology, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should have an increased understanding of the steps involved in drug discovery and development up to the initial studies in healthy subjects, and will have been introduced to strategies for increasing success in later development. Lecture/Faculty: }} Discovery of Novel Therapeutic Agents for CNS Disorders: Target Selection and Discovery Process Barbara Slusher, PhD, Baltimore, MD }} Entry of Novel Therapeutic Agents into Man Jang-Ho John Cha, MD, PhD, Cambridge, MA }} Beyond Small Molecules: Developing Biologic Therapies Gary Starling, PhD, Palo Alto, CA }} What Can Be Done to Increase Translational Success Shai Silberberg, PhD, Bethesda, MD Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Systems-Based Practice Teaching Style:  Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

Course

C47

1:00 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Resident Basic Science II: Neuropathology

Topic: Research Methodology, Education, and History Director: Matthew D. Cykowski, MD, Houston, TX

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Program Description: Neuropathology is a rapidly and continuously evolving discipline encompassing basic, translational, and clinical neuroscience. A thorough understanding of the basics of neuropathology permits much deeper insight into mechanisms and manifestations of neurologic disease and provides a basis for more complete understanding of neuroimaging and laboratory studies. Faculty will provide a fast-paced, visually oriented overview of central nervous system neuropathology including tumors, demyelinating diseases, infections, cerebrovascular disease, toxic/metabolic conditions, neurotrauma, and neurodegenerative disease. The images shown during the program will be contained in the slide and written syllabi which will also contain substantial supplementary material. This program complements C15: Resident Basic Science I: Neuropharmacology and C82: Resident Basic Science III: Neuroanatomy: All the Lesions, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to recognize common gross, histological, and molecular features of central nervous system disorders, and be able to understand cellular and gross neuropathology in relationship to neurologic disease mechanisms, diagnosis, progression, laboratory studies, and imaging. Lecture/Faculty: }} Tumors and Vascular Disease J. Clay Goodman, MD, FAAN, Houston, TX }} Infections, Trauma, Demyelination, Toxic/ Metabolic J. Clay Goodman, MD, FAAN, Houston, TX }} Neurodegeneration Matthew D. Cykowski, MD, Houston, TX Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic CME Credits:  4 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, Neuropathologists

Sunday, April 22, 2018

1:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Hall of Presidents: Neurology Through the Years Topic: Research Methodology and Education Speakers: Ralph L. Sacco, MD, MS, FAHA, FAAN, Miami, FL Terrence L. Cascino, MD, FAAN, Rochester, MN Robert C. Griggs, MD, FAAN, Rochester, NY Francis I. Kittredge, Jr., MD, FAAN, Rockport, ME Roger N. Rosenberg, MD, FAAN, Dallas, TX Stanley Fahn, MD, FAAN, New York, NY Stephen M. Sergay, MB BCh, FAAN, Tampa, FL Thomas R. Swift, MD, FAAN, Augusta, GA Experiential Learning Area: HeadTalks

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Program Description: Session with panel of past AAN presidents addressing questions related to the AAN.

Course Sunday, April 22, 2018

C57

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Developing the Treatments of Tomorrow II: Clinical Trials in Neurology

Topic: Research Methodology, Education, and History Director: Jeffrey Marc Gelfand, MD, MAS, FAAN, San Francisco, CA

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Program Description: This program will provide an overview and update of the science of clinical trials for practicing neurologists, researchers, and trainees. Clinical trials are the bedrock of evidence-based neurology and one of the most important methodological innovations of modern medicine. Faculty from academia, industry, and government will provide an overview of clinical trials, discuss approaches to optimize success, review advances in trial design and implementation, address statistical and regulatory considerations, and facilitate a discussion with attendees. A companion session will address the preclinical drug development pipeline, translation of research breakthroughs to the clinic, and first-in-human studies. This program complements C43: Developing the Treatments of Tomorrow I: Taking Molecules from Lab to Man, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to understand differences between early- and late-stage clinical trials and their role in the drug development pipeline, assess the strengths and weaknesses of various clinical trial designs, apply appropriate statistical approaches, and understand regulatory issues.

AAN.com/view/AM18 185

Research/Education

Sunday, April 22, 2018

Experiential Learning Area


Program Descriptions Lecture/Faculty: }} Introduction: Clinical Trials in the Drug Development Pipeline Jeffrey Marc Gelfand, MD, MAS, FAAN, San Francisco, CA }} Early and Late Stage Clinical Trials in Neurology Gilmore N. O’Neill, MD, MB, MRCPI, Cambridge, MA }} Statistical Considerations for Clinical Trials in Neurology Christopher Coffey, PhD, Iowa City, IA }} Regulatory Considerations for Clinical Trials in Neurology Lei Xu, MD, Silver Spring, MD }} Innovations in Clinical Trial Design and Implementation Jeffrey Marc Gelfand, MD, MAS, FAAN, San Francisco, CA Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, Professionalism, Systems-Based Practice Teaching Style:  Didactic, Interactive

Research Methodology, Education, and History Lecture/Faculty: }} The Brain Sashank Prasad, MD, Boston, MA }} The Brainstem Raymond Price, MD, Philadelphia, PA }} The Cerebellum and Spinal Cord Faculty }} The Peripheral Nervous System Zachary N. London, MD, FAAN, Ann Arbor, MI Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Didactic CME Credits:  4 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, Trainee

CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Scientific Platform Session Monday, April 23, 2018

S12 Topic:

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Research Methodology and Education Platform Session

Monday, April 23, 2018

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Monday, April 23, 2018

Topic: Research Methodology, Education, and History Speakers: Martin A. Samuels, MD, MACP, FAAN, Boston, MA Thomas R. Swift, MD, FAAN, Augusta, GA Austin J. Sumner, MD, FAAN, New Orleans, LA Sandra F. Olson, MD, FAAN, Chicago, IL Experiential Learning Area: HeadTalks

AB

Topic: Research Methodology, Education, and History Director: Zachary N. London, MD, FAAN, Ann Arbor, MI

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Program Description: This course will present an organized and succinct overview of neuroanatomy. The course will employ a lesion-based approach to functional anatomy of the central and peripheral nervous system, reflecting the importance of neuroanatomic localization as the foundation of clinical neurology. This program complements C15: Resident Basic Science I: Neuropharmacology and C47: Resident Basic Science II: Neuropathology, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to name and recognize clinically relevant structures in the brain, brainstem, cerebellum, spinal cord, and peripheral nervous system, and understand the classic clinical features of a lesion in each of these structures. 186 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

Program Description: An historical look back on what it was like to practice medicine in the 1970’s. Hear how the increased bureaucracy and technology has changed the doctor/patient relationships.

1:00 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Resident Basic Science III: Neuroanatomy: All the Lesions

5:15 p.m.–6:15 p.m.

Neurology of the 1970s

Research Methodology, Education, and History

Course

C82

Experiential Learning Area

Course Tuesday, April 24, 2018

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C117 Introduction to Clinical Research and Methods

Topic: Research Methodology, Education, and History Director: Deborah Hall, MD, PhD, FAAN, Chicago, IL

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Program Description: The complex building of current clinical research continues to stand on three methodological pillars: the clinical trial, the cohort study, and the case-control study. These three methods, along with their combinations and modifications, enable us to investigate any possible cause-effect relationship across biological, personal, or social factors or events, symptoms, diseases, or conditions, and treatments, procedures, or interventions. This program provides a brief introduction to the three methods with emphasis on their complementarities and their relative strengths and weaknesses.


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

Lecture/Faculty: }} Introduction and Case-Control Studies Deborah Hall, MD, PhD, FAAN, Chicago, IL }} Cohort Studies Rebecca Spain, MD, Portland, OR }} Clinical Trials Faculty }} Statistical Considerations for Research Study Design Faculty Core Competencies:  Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Medical Knowledge, Professionalism Teaching Style:  Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Trainee

Experiential Learning Area Wednesday, April 25, 2018 8:00 a.m.–9:10 a.m.

How to Write and Publish Research Papers, Reviews and Other Scientific Communications Topic: Research Methodology, Education, and History Speakers: Mark Hallett, MD, FAAN, Bethesda, MD Francois Boller, MD, PhD, FAAN, Paris, France Michael J. Aminoff, MD, DSc, FAAN, San Francisco, CA Experiential Learning Area: Research Corner

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Program Description: The course will provide the background and rationale for writing a scientific paper or a review including how to choose a topic, define an audience and best ways to reach it. It will emphasize the importance of knowing about indexing and how to critically search the literature, making sure that one takes notes while reading and uses automated devices such as EndNotes. The audience will be encouraged to define a logical structures and to write an outline as one of the first steps in the preparation of their article. We will give advice on how to prepare the various portions of research articles. The organization of a review varies from stateof-the-art reviews favored by Handbooks to those providing a new understanding in a rapidly moving field best suited for a Journal. We will also cover References, Tables and Figures. We will also describe how to best prepare other types of presentations including conference reports, book reviews, theses as well as oral presentations and posters.

Course Wednesday, April 25, 2018 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C150 Where is the Lesion? A History of

Neurological Investigations Part I

Topic: Research Methodology, Education, and History Director: Stefano Sandrone, PhD, London, UK

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Program Description: ’Where is the lesion?' is one of the most important questions in neurologic practice. Neurologic investigation complements the clinical evaluation and is pivotal to precisely achieve the final diagnosis. The development of approaches and techniques to assist and support medical diagnosis has been one of the major achievements of the past hundred years. Faculty will provide a scientific and historical overview on neurologic investigations, as well as on the development and application of diagnostic and imaging tools that have revolutionised neurology. The techniques that will be presented and discussed in this course include: Lumbar Puncture, Angiography, Electroencephalogram, Electromyography, Computed Tomography, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Positron Emission Tomography, and functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging. This program complements C165: Where is the Lesion? A History of Neurological Investigation Part II, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to understand what are the most important questions while assessing a patient with neurologic lesions; understand the location of the lesion, to correlate it with findings and to conduct other investigations; gain knowledge of how we investigate the fundamental questions in neurologic investigations; be aware of how history contributes to the ways we think about and conduct neurologic investigations; and recognize the important contributions of famous and ’forgotten' pioneers in developing tools and approaches that are still fundamental in contemporary neurology. Lecture/Faculty: }} The History of Instruments in the Bedside Neurologic Examination Douglas J. Lanska, MD, FAAN, Tomah, WI }} History of the Lumbar Puncture Deborah I. Friedman, MD, MPH, FAAN, Dallas, TX }} The History of Angiography Francois Boller, MD, PhD, FAAN, Paris, France }} The History of EEG Elizabeth Waterhouse, MD, FAAN, Richmond, VA Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge Teaching Style:  Interactive, Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Non-Neurologist, General Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

We will conclude with an overview of the Review process and of the new perspectives and pitfalls of electronic and open access publications.

AAN.com/view/AM18 187

Research/Education

Upon Completion: Participants should have a better understanding of how evidence is generated and disseminated in clinical neurology; improve their ability to design, conduct, and interpret studies; and improve their ability to write and read scientific papers and grant applications


Program Descriptions

Research Methodology, Education, and History

Course

Scientific Platform Session

Wednesday, April 25, 2018 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Thursday, April 26, 2018

C165 Where is the Lesion? A History of

S38

Neurological Investigation Part II

Topic:

History of Neurology Platform Session Research Methodology, Education, and History

BG

Topic: Research Methodology, Education, and History Director: Stefano Sandrone, PhD, London, UK

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Program Description: ’Where is the lesion?' is one of the most important questions in neurologic practice. Neurologic investigation complements the clinical evaluation and is pivotal to precisely achieve the final diagnosis. The development of approaches and techniques to assist and support medical diagnosis has been one of the major achievements of the past hundred years. Faculty will provide a scientific and historical overview on neurologic investigations as well as on the development and application of diagnostic and imaging tools that have revolutionized neurology. The techniques that will be presented and discussed in this course include: Lumbar Puncture, Angiography, Electroencephalogram, Electromyography, Computed Tomography, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Positron Emission Tomography, and functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging. This program complements C150: Where is the Lesion? A History of Neurological Investigations Part I, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to understand what are the most important questions while assessing a patient with neurologic lesions; understand the location of the lesion, to correlate it with findings and to conduct other investigations; gain knowledge of how we investigate the fundamental questions in neurologic investigations; be aware of how history contributes to the ways we think about and conduct neurologic investigations; and recognize the important contributions of famous and ’forgotten' pioneers in developing tools and approaches that are still fundamental in contemporary neurology. Lecture/Faculty: }} The History of EMG Edward J. Fine, MD, FAAN, Williamsville, NY }} The History of CT and MRI Peter J. Koehler, MD, PhD, FAAN, Heerlen, Netherlands }} The History of PET Joel S. Perlmutter, MD, FAAN, Saint Louis, MO }} The History of fMRI Stefano Sandrone, PhD, London, UK Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge Teaching Style:  Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

188 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

1:00 p.m.–2:00 p.m.

Experiential Learning Area Thursday, April 26, 2018

4:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Neurology History and Wine Topic: Research Methodology, Education, and History Speaker: Christopher Goetz, MD, FAAN, Chicago, IL Experiential Learning Area: HeadTalks

Program Description:

AB

This interactive session will focus on the challenges involved in studying Neurological History, the benefits of such research, and specifically the impact of historical studies on current practice. The presenter will select salient examples from his own career and facilitate a discussion with audience members on their experiences. The session will also highlight opportunities within the AAN for funding and recognition of researchers pursuing neurological history topics and the rich archive and collections under the AAN’s direction.


Sleep Overview

I

f your schedule won’t allow you to stay for the whole meeting, maximize your time in Los Angeles and get the most out of a shorter trip with this Sleep specialty track, with core programming taking place Sunday to Tuesday. Look for education and science covering the full gamut of sleep-related topics, and don’t miss the Frontiers in Neuroscience Plenary Session on circadian rhythms and the Invited Science platform session featuring authors giving encore presentations of abstracts previously presented at the Sleep Research Society subspecialty meeting.

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. S15  Sleep Disorders Platform Session

Tuesday, April 24 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C101  Approaching the Management of Common Sleep Disorders: Casebased Review for the Non-sleep Specialist 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C113  Sleep for the Practicing Neurologist I: Is it Narcolepsy or Something Else? Diagnostic and Management Challenges in the Central Disorders of Hypersomnolence 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C126  Sleep for the Practicing Neurologist II: Night Fighting: Sleep Related Hypermotor Epilepsy, Sleepwalking, and Dream Enactment 4:00 p.m.–4:45 p.m. X  The Sleep Mythbuster!: Illuminating the Facts and Fiction Towards Achieving the Sleep Healthy Neurologist

Wednesday, April 25 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C141  Integrating Sleep Medicine Concepts into Your Child Neurology Practice

9:55 a.m.–10:15 a.m. Frontiers in Neuroscience Plenary Session: Biology of Bedtime: Understanding Circadian Rhythms and Sleep 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C153  Circadian Rhythm Disorders: Implications for Neurology 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. Invited Science Session: Sleep 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C160  Neurology Update II: Movement Disorders, Spine Disorders, and Sleep Disorders

Thursday, April 26 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C173  Using Sleep Medicine to Help Solve Difficult Neurologic Cases 8:00 a.m.–8:45 a.m. X  Sleep and Performance in Elite Athletes 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C183  Hot Topics in Sleep Neurology

Friday, April 27 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C221  REM Sleep Behavior Disorder 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. N7  Neuroscience in the Clinic: REM Sleep Behavior Disorder: Past, Present, Future

Course

Scientific Platform Session Monday, April 23, 2018

S15

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Sleep Disorders Platform Session

Topic:

Sleep

G

Tuesday, April 24, 2018

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

C101 Approaching the Management of Common

Sleep Disorders: Case-based Review for the Non-sleep Specialist

Topic: Sleep Director: Charlene Gamaldo, MD, FAAN, Baltimore, MD

J

Program Description: Using an audience-response system, faculty will feature interactive format for presenting new trends and updates on the evaluation,

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Sleep

Monday, April 23


Program Descriptions treatment, and ongoing management considerations of sleep conditions commonly encountered in the general neurology practice. Neurologists frequently encounter patients who report disturbed sleep. Because few neurologists receive formal training in sleep medicine, sleep problems can be among the most challenging to diagnose and treat. Short cases and clinical challenges will be presented as the basis for updating participants on new developments in sleep medicine. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to update their knowledge of management strategies, diagnostic tools, and therapeutic options for common sleep disorders (insomnia, RLS, insufficient sleep, sleep apnea, etc.). Lecture/Faculty: }} Actively Assessing Apnea: Tools, Tricks, and Tips Douglas B. Kirsch, MD, FAAN, Charlotte, NC }} Unraveling the Complexities of RBD and RLS for the NonSleep Neurologist Rachel Marie E. Salas, MD, FAAN, Baltimore, MD }} Your Sleepless Patient: Clinical Considerations for Non-Sleep Specialists Treating Patients with Insomnia Charlene Gamaldo, MD, FAAN, Baltimore, MD Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Trainee

Course Tuesday, April 24, 2018

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C113 Sleep for the Practicing Neurologist I: Is it

Narcolepsy or Something Else? Diagnostic and Management Challenges in the Central Disorders of Hypersomnolence

Topic: Sleep Director: Rachel Marie E. Salas, MD, FAAN, Baltimore, MD

J

Program Description: This program is open to the first 110 attendees. iPADs will be placed around the room to utilize interactive second-screen technology. Patients with brain disease frequently describe excessive daytime sleepiness. Because of this, neurologists are often asked to investigate and manage the central disorders of hypersomnolence such as narcolepsy types 1 and 2, idiopathic hypersomnia, and Kleine-Levin Syndrome. These treatable conditions are challenging to both clinicians and patients. Faculty will provide a clinically relevant, up-to-date review on the identification and management of patients with central disorders of hypersomnolence; discuss narcolepsy, its unique presentation, pathophysiology, and treatments; and discuss the other central disorder of hypersomnolence. These conditions, which include idiopathic hypersomnia, are difficult to diagnose 190 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

Sleep and treat with currently employed diagnostic and therapeutic tools. Faculty will also discuss mimics of central disorders of hypersomnolence that should be considered in the evaluation. This program complements C126: Sleep for the Practicing Neurologist II: Night Fighting: Sleep Related Hypermotor Epilepsy, Sleepwalking, and Dream Enactment, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to recognize the features of narcolepsy that distinguish it from other central disorders of hypersomnolence; be able to recognize the limitations of the multiple sleep latency test, the most commonly employed laboratory measure of sleepiness; and leave with new insights on the etiology of these conditions. Participants will be able to evaluate a patient who presents with excessive daytime sleepiness, differentiate a central disorders of hyper somnolence (e.g., narcolepsy) from other etiologies. Participants will also understand new directions researchers are taking towards the development of novel therapies for central disorders of hypersomnolence. Lecture/Faculty: }} Approaching Sleepiness as a Non-Sleep Specialist: Cases and Considerations Charlene Gamaldo, MD, FAAN, Baltimore, MD }} Mimics of Central Hypersomnia Rachel Marie E. Salas, MD, FAAN, Baltimore, MD }} Narcolepsy Logan D. Schneider, MD, Redwood City, CA Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Course Tuesday, April 24, 2018

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

C126 Sleep for the Practicing Neurologist II:

Night Fighting: Sleep Related Hypermotor Epilepsy, Sleepwalking, and Dream Enactment

Topic: Sleep Director: LynnMarie Trotti, MD, Atlanta, GA

J

Program Description: This will be an interactive session using an audience response system in a detailed discussion of nocturnal behaviors. Neurologists are frequently called upon to diagnose and manage patient “spells” of various types. The differential diagnosis of sleep-related spells centers on parasomnia, occurring from either NREM or REM sleep, and sleep-related epilepsy. Faculty will provide a clinically relevant,


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

This program complements C113: Sleep for the Practicing Neurologist I: Is it Narcolepsy or Something Else? Diagnostic and Management Challenges in the Central Disorders of Hypersomnolence, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to discuss the pathophysiology of parasomnias, the characteristics that distinguish among nocturnal events, and management strategies for parasomnias and nocturnal epilepsy. Participants will get an update on new breakthroughs in the field. Lecture/Faculty: }} NREM Arousal Parasomnias LynnMarie Trotti, MD, Atlanta, GA }} REM Sleep Behavior Disorder Yo-El Ju, MD, Saint Louis, MO }} Nocturnal Epilepsy Bradley V. Vaughn, MD, FAAN, Chapel Hill, NC Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Experiential Learning Area Tuesday, April 24, 2018

4:00 p.m.–4:45 p.m.

The Sleep Mythbuster!: Illuminating the Facts and Fiction Towards Achieving the Sleep Healthy Neurologist Topic: Sleep Speaker: Charlene Gamaldo, MD, FAAN, Baltimore, MD Experiential Learning Area: Live Well

CDJE

Program Description: In this interactive session, Dr. Gamaldo will focus exploring the sleep habits of the audience and with an engaging audience response interface engage allow the members of the audience to gain insight on their personal sleep behaviors, attitudes and knowledge in order for Dr. Gamaldo to provide evidence based support or debunk myths surrounding those views and perceptions. She will also provide latest evidence how the health behaviors of doctors has been shown to impact how they take care of their patients and to what degree they including these important elements in counseling and guiding their care.

Course Wednesday, April 25, 2018 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

C141 Integrating Sleep Medicine Concepts into Your Child Neurology Practice

Topics:

Sleep; Child Neurology and Developmental Neurology Director: Suresh Kotagal, MD, FAAN, Rochester, MN

J

Program Description: Close to a third of children with neurologic problems show sleepwake dysfunction, the evaluation and management of which can enhance the quality of life of patients. The course faculty are experienced child neurologists and sleep specialists who will share updated and clinically relevant information using an interactive and case-based approach. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to assess childhood sleep-wake disorders in the office setting and utilize pediatric sleep-specific survey instruments; update their knowledge about the diagnosis and management of primary hypersomnia disorders like narcolepsy and Kleine Levin syndrome; appreciate the bidirectional relationship between epilepsy and sleep; and understand the role that improvements in sleep-wake function may play in rehabilitation after head injury. Lecture/Faculty: }} Assessment of Sleep-wake Disorders Suresh Kotagal, MD, FAAN, Rochester, MN }} Diagnosis and Management of Primary Hypersomnia Conditions Kiran Prasad Maski, MD, Boston, MA }} Sleep After Head Injury Anne M. Morse, DO, Danville, PA }} The Bedfellows: Sleep and Epilepsy Sanjeev V. Kothare, MD, FAAN, Lake Success, NY Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, PracticeBased Learning and Improvement Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

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Sleep

up-to-date review on the identification of and management of nocturnal behaviors, including NREM arousal parasomnias, REM sleep behavior disorder, and nocturnal epilepsy. Epidemiology, phenomenology, and pathophysiology will be discussed, with an emphasis on how to distinguish among these disorders.


Program Descriptions Plenary Session Wednesday, April 25, 2018 9:15 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Frontiers in Neuroscience Plenary Session

Topics: A  ging, Dementia, Cognitive, and Behavioral Neurology; General Neurology; MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease; Neuro-rehabilitation; Sleep Moerator: Paul M. George, MD, PhD, MSE, Member, Science Committee

G

9:55 a.m.–10:15 a.m. }} Biology of Bedtime: Understanding Circadian Rhythms and Sleep Amita Sehgal, PhD, Philadelphia, PA

Course

Sleep Lecture/Faculty: }} Circadian Health: Why Timing is Everything Phyllis C. Zee, MD, PhD, Chicago, IL }} Circadian Rhythm Sleep-Wake Disorders in Neurology Sabra M. Abbott, MD, PhD, Chicago, IL }} Circadian Dysregulation in Neurodegeneration Aleksandar Videnovic, MD, MSc, FAAN, Boston, MA Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Invited Science Session Wednesday, April 25, 2018 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Invited Science Session: Sleep Topic(s): Sleep

Wednesday, April 25, 2018 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C153 Circadian Rhythm Disorders: Implications for Neurology

Topic: Sleep Director: Phyllis C. Zee, MD, PhD, Chicago, IL

J

Program Description: The circadian timing system is ubiquitous to nearly all organisms, from single cells to humans. The discovery of the molecular mechanisms underlying the generation of circadian rhythms (2017 Nobel Prize in Medicine/Physiology), and the finding that these circadian clock genes are expressed throughout the central nervous system, and in most peripheral tissues, has expanded our view of the role of circadian rhythms in health and neurologic disease. Circadian based sleep disturbances are an important feature of many neurologic disorders. Through presentation on the genetics and physiology of circadian rhythms and their impact on the expression, development, and treatment of common neurologic disorders, as well as a discussion of challenging cases of circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders, faculty will provide an update of this field and discuss evaluation, diagnostic tools, and treatment approaches for circadian disorders. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to acquire knowledge of the state of the science in circadian rhythm regulation, become familiar with the impact of circadian dysregulation on the expression of neurological disease and clinical outcomes, apply circadian-based diagnostic tools and treatment approaches, and get an update on new breakthroughs in this field.

192 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

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Program Description: Top abstracts previously presented at the American Academy of Sleep Medicine Annual Meeting will be presented by their authors. Select abstracts from their “best of” lineups emphasize basic, clinical, and translational science as they evolve toward a more complete understanding of sleep disorders with the overall goal of developing more effective prevention and treatment.

Course Wednesday, April 25, 2018 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

C160 Neurology Update II: Movement Disorders, Spine Disorders, and Sleep Disorders

Topics:

General Neurology; Movement Disorders; Neuro-rehabilitation; Sleep Director: Ralph F. Józefowicz, MD, FAAN, Rochester, NY

J

See complete course description on page 83 »


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

Course 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Thursday, April 26, 2018

C173 Using Sleep Medicine to Help Solve Difficult Neurologic Cases

Topic: Sleep Director: Bradley V. Vaughn, MD, FAAN, Chapel Hill, NC

J

Program Description: Sleep and Circadian Rhythm disorders are frequently encountered in general neurology practice. The neurologist is in a critical position to provide diagnostic and treatment input for patients with sleep and circadian rhythm disorders. This course will discuss common neurological disorders associated with sleep and circadian disturbances, differential diagnoses of sleep disorders, and identification of sleep disorders caused by or related to neurological disorders. The interaction of circadian rhythm, sleep disorders, and neurological disorders is frequent, requiring the neurologist to understand presentation, pathophysiology, and treatment. The case discussion will highlight advances in key clinical areas of sleep medicine, including identification of underlying insomnia, hypersomnia, sleep disordered breathing, and RLS in patients with common neurological disorders such as headache, stroke, MS, epilepsy, and neurodegenerative disorders. Application to practice will include easily accessible testing techniques, nonpharmacological and pharmacological interventions coding, and documentation of various clinical presentations Upon Completion: Participants should be able to understand the importance of sleep in the generation of neurological symptoms; be able to ask appropriate questions to identify patients with neurological disorder who have sleep issues; and apply basic principles of sleep medicine to patients with neurological complaints. Lecture/Faculty: }} Epilepsy and Headaches "I Can’t Sleep" Bradley V. Vaughn, MD, FAAN, Chapel Hill, NC }} The Sleepy Patient with Neuromuscular Disease Michael H. Silber, MB, ChB, FAAN, Rochester, MN }} Multiple Sclerosis and Never Rested Bradley V. Vaughn, MD, FAAN, Chapel Hill, NC }} Parkinsonism and Dysautonomia Michael H. Silber, MB, ChB, FAAN, Rochester, MN Core Competencies:  Practice-Based Learning and Improvement, Professionalism, Systems-Based Practice, Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, Sleep Specialist

8:00 a.m.–8:45 a.m.

Sleep and Performance in Elite Athletes Topics:

Sleep; Neuro Trauma, Critical Care, and Sports Neurology Speaker: Scott J. Kutscher, MD, Redwood City, CA Experiential Learning Area: Live Well

DJC

Program Description: Learn how athletes are increasingly leveraging the principles of sleep science to enhance recovery, prevent injury and improve performance, and understand how sleep scientists and sports neurologists can use the principles of sleep science to work with athletes, coaches, and other Health Care providers at all levels of competition.

Course Thursday, April 26, 2018

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C183 Hot Topics in Sleep Neurology

Topic: Sleep Director: Erik Kent St. Louis, MD, FAAN, Rochester, MN

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Program Description: Understanding of the purposes of sleep for brain and general health, and the ability to diagnose and treat sleep disturbances and disorders, has advanced significantly in recent years. To optimize quality of life and improve neurological functioning in their patients, neurologists should be familiar with advances in the understanding of sleep, especially in neurologic sleep medicine. Faculty will review the bidirectional relationships between sleep and neurodegeneration; diagnosis, prognostic counseling, and treatment options for patients with REM sleep behavior disorder; diagnosis and recent advances in the management of restless legs syndrome, and the diagnosis and treatment of chronic insomnia. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to understand evolving evidence regarding the bidirectional associations between sleep, sleep disorders, and neurodegeneration; understand evolving diagnostic standards, the strong prognostic association with synucleinopathies, and treatment approaches in patients with REM sleep behavior disorder; use diagnostic standards and treatment approaches to chronic insomnia; and determine best therapies for patients with restless legs syndrome, including those with augmentation. Lecture/Faculty: }} Hot Topics in Sleep Neurology Faculty Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

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Sleep

Thursday, April 26, 2018

Experiential Learning Area


Program Descriptions

Sleep

Course Friday, April 27, 2018

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

C221 REM Sleep Behavior Disorder

Topic: Sleep Director: Alon Y. Avidan, MD, MPH, FAAN, Los Angeles, CA

J

Program Description: Neurologists frequently encounter patients with dream enactment behavior in the setting of Rapid Eye Movement (REM) Sleep Behavior Disorder (RBD). Recent data reveals that in the majority of cases, RBD may be a prognostic indicator of alpha-synucleinopathies. Faculty will present the tools needed to recognize, diagnose, and treat RBD, respecting both the clinical and scientific perspectives of the disease, while maintaining sensitivity to the psychosocial impact from a patient’s perspective. The unique aspect of this educational session is the integration of a patient with RBD. Discussion will focus on the initial presentation of violent dream enactment and impact on quality of life. Participants will be able to appreciate the extent of potentially injurious behaviors impacting these patients. The integration of a live patient will offer attendees a new perspective in employing interview techniques of patients with RBD and their bed-partners. Upon Completion: Participants should develop confidence in recognizing the presenting signs and symptoms of REM sleep Behavior Disorder; use the patient perspective to be better equipped with strategies for improved recognition of the impact of RBD, becoming aware with an initial attempt to cope with aggressive dream enactment to successful amelioration of the episodes with specific therapy; use the case presentation to enhance competency in RBD diagnostic criteria, differential diagnosis, pathophysiology, and evidence based therapy, especially with respect to safety intervention and prognostic implication; and be able to describe the prognostic value of RBD, discuss the condition with patients and family members, and disclose its implication in a supportive manner. Lecture/Faculty: }} REM Sleep Behavior Disorder: Patient Interview, Clinical Features, Diagnosis and Treatment Alon Y. Avidan, MD, MPH, FAAN, Los Angeles, CA }} Pathophysiology and Current Understanding of RBD Bradley F. Boeve, MD, Rochester, MN Core Competencies:  Systems-Based Practice, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement, Professionalism, Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, Interpersonal and Communication Skills Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, Sleep Physicians

194 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

Neuroscience in the Clinic Session Friday, April 27, 2018

N7

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Neuroscience in the Clinic: REM Sleep Behavior Disorder: Past, Present, Future

Topic: Sleep Director: Phyllis C. Zee, MD, PhD, Chicago, IL Aleksandar Videnovic, MD, MSc, FAAN, Boston, MA

G

Program Description: REM Sleep Behavior Disorder (RBD) is a parasomnia characterized by dream enactment in the context of loss of physiological atonia during REM sleep. RBD is of particular importance to neurosciences as it is one of the earliest manifestations of a-synuclein related neurodegeneration. Over 80% of patients with idiopathic RBD eventually develop Parkinson’s disease, dementia with Lewy body or multiple system atrophy. This program with highlight clinical aspects of the disorder, its historical perspective, as well as novel findings related to the pathophysiology of the disorder and its relationship with neurodegenerative disorders. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to recognize clinical characteristics, diagnosis, differential diagnosis, and treatment of RBD; understand novel advances in the pathophysiology of RBD; and discuss the association between RBD and ?-synucleinopathies. Lecture/Faculty: }} Introduction Aleksandar Videnovic, MD, MSc, FAAN, Boston, MA }} Case Presentation Roneil Malkani, MD, Chicago, IL }} RBD‚ Historical Perspective Faculty }} RBD‚ Diagnostic and Treatment Challenges Faculty }} RBD‚ Control of Muscle Tone Across the Sleep-Wake Cycle and in Narcolepsy Jerome Siegel, PhD, Los Angeles, CA }} Abstract Presentations: (Selected in February 2018) }} Panel Discussion Faculty Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, PracticeBased Learning and Improvement, Systems-Based Practice Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee


Business of Neurology Track Overview

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e’ve curated audience-focused programming into select tracks to make navigating the meeting easier than ever. This lineup was created specifically for those starting a new practice, as well as anyone who wants to learn the fundamentals of neurology business. Saturday, April 21, 2018

Thursday, April 26, 2018

12:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m. C16  L  Leadership Challenges in Practice

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C189  Business Strategies for Payer Negotiations and/or How to Go off the Grid

Wednesday, April 25, 2018 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C163  How to Run a Practice: Business Strategies for Neurology Private Practices, Academic Centers, and the Future

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C204  Making Sure You Get Paid Under the New Health Care Laws

Friday, April 27, 2018 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C231 ICD-10-CM: How to Optimize for Accurate Diagnosis and Reimbursement 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C242  Coding 101: It’s Not Your Father’s Oldsmobile

Saturday, April 21, 2018

C16

12:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

L Leadership Challenges in Practice

Topic:

Leadership; Practice, Policy, and Ethics Director: Brad C. Klein, MD, MBA, FAAN, Willow Grove, PA

DEF

Program Description: Neurologists face more challenges than ever to be successful in clinical practice. In either employed or private practice models, leadership skills have a positive impact on individual and organizational success. This program will discuss relationship development and communication techniques to improve leadership effectiveness within an organization of any size, as well as tools to successfully negotiate with health care systems, insurers, and regulatory agencies; refine analytical skills to properly implement an economical and useful EHR system; evaluate and improve work flows and processes to increase new sources of revenue; and increase patient/provider satisfaction while meeting regulatory demands. Upon Completion: Participants should understand the fundamentals of organizational behavior and will have tools to impact change in all practice sizes, mitigate the economic and regulatory demands of a practicing neurologist in the US health care system, and ensure high-quality

and rewarding care remains top priority in large organizations and independent practice settings. Lecture/Faculty: }} Leadership and Temperament James C. Stevens, MD, FAAN, Fort Wayne, IN }} Leadership in Practice Efficiency and Patient/Provider Satisfaction Brad C. Klein, MD, MBA, FAAN, Willow Grove, PA }} Managing Negotiations Jonathan P. Hosey, MD, FAAN, Bethlehem, PA }} Leadership and Health Information Technology Allen L. Gee, MD, PhD, FAAN, Cody, WY }} Making Neurology’s Case for Health Care Value in 2018 Daniel M. Feinberg, MD, FAAN, Philadelphia, PA Core Competencies:  Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement, Professionalism, Systems-Based Practice Teaching Style:  Didactic CME Credits:  0 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

AAN.com/view/AM18 195

Business of Neurology

Course


Program Tracks

Business of Neurology Track

Course Wednesday, April 25, 2018 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Course Thursday, April 26, 2018

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C163 How to Run a Practice: Business Strategies C189 Business Strategies for Payer Negotiations for Neurology Private Practices, Academic Centers, and the Future

Topic: Practice, Policy, and Ethics Director: Brad C. Klein, MD, MBA, FAAN, Willow Grove, PA

F

Program Description: Neurology practices struggle for survival due to higher overhead and shrinking reimbursements for cognitive specialists. Higher malpractice premiums and office expenses, lower payments per patient, the rising cost of compliance with government regulations, and time-consuming insurance documentation requirements are the trend. Overlooking the true cost of services and procedures can result in financial drains to neurologic practice and unexpected losses. Faculty will give an overview of basic financial tools and how to apply sound business strategies to neurology practice issues. Faculty will cover the critical processes necessary to quantitatively evaluate a practice’s income and expenses, particularly in-depth analysis of revenue cycle and practice efficiencies. Faculty will also cover the steps involved in determination if expansion of services and/or providers will result in sustainable financial growth, avoidance of internal fraud, and strategic planning for future financial models, such as accountable care organizations. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to understand practice revenues, expenses, and cash flow; identify revenue cycle problems; establish and use key performance indicators for their practices; enhance work flow to maintain fiscal health; use benchmarking to enhance their practice; know and address basic legal issues in setting up and running a practice; understand how to choose and use technology at point of care; evaluate the economics of outsourcing versus providing in-house services; use financial analysis to determine if technology and other capital investments will provide a return on investment; know how to determine which payers are creating an administrative drain on their practices; identify possible fraud internally within the practice; and understand how to evaluate and implement new financial reimbursement and risksharing management models such as accountable care organizations.

and/or How to Go off the Grid

Topic: Practice, Policy, and Ethics Director: David E. Jones, MD, Charlottesville, VA

F

Program Description: Neurology practices struggle for survival due to higher overhead and shrinking reimbursements for cognitive specialists. Higher malpractice premiums and office expenses, lower payments per patient, the rising cost of compliance with government regulations, and time-consuming insurance documentation requirements are the trend. Overlooking the true cost of services and procedures can result in financial drains to neurologic practice and unexpected losses. Faculty will give an overview of basic financial tools and how to apply sound business strategies to neurology practice issues. Faculty will cover the critical processes necessary to quantitatively evaluate a practice’s income and expenses, particularly in-depth analysis of revenue cycle and practice efficiencies. Faculty will also cover the steps involved in determination if expansion of services and/or providers will result in sustainable financial growth, avoidance of internal fraud, and strategic planning for future financial models, such as accountable care organizations. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to understand practice revenues, expenses, and cash flow; identify revenue cycle problems; establish and use key performance indicators for their practices; enhance work flow to maintain fiscal health; use benchmarking to enhance their practice; know and address basic legal issues in setting up and running a practice; understand how to choose and use technology at point of care; evaluate the economics of outsourcing versus providing in-house services; use financial analysis to determine if technology and other capital investments will provide a return on investment; know how to determine which payers are creating an administrative drain on their practices; identify possible fraud internally within the practice; and understand how to evaluate and implement new financial reimbursement and risk-sharing management models, such as accountable care organizations.

Lecture/Faculty: }} Understanding Your Revenues, Expenses, and Benchmarks to Increase Your Income Gregory J. Esper, MD, MBA, FAAN, Atlanta, GA }} Revenue Cycle Management: How to Make Money in Your Practice and Be a Doctor Brad C. Klein, MD, MBA, FAAN, Willow Grove, PA Core Competencies:  Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Patient Care, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement

Lecture/Faculty: }} Understanding the Payer Landscape to Enhance Negotiations with Payers David E. Jones, MD, Charlottesville, VA }} Transitioning Without Payers: Where to Begin Daryl Story, MD, Norwalk, CT }} Growing a Successful Practice Without Payers Peter J. McAllister, MD, Stamford, CT Core Competencies:  Practice-Based Learning and Improvement

Teaching Style:  Didactic, Interactive

Teaching Style:  Didactic, Interactive

CME Credits:  2

CME Credits:  2

Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, Administrator

Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

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H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

Course Thursday, April 26, 2018

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

C204 Making Sure You Get Paid Under the New Health Care Laws

Topic: Practice, Policy, and Ethics Director: Gregory J. Esper, MD, MBA, FAAN, Atlanta, GA

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Program Description: The Quality Payment Program continues to evolve under the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Neurologists should know how to navigate options available to them, including how to succeed in MIPS or how to think about advance alternative payment models. This course will help neurologists understand what they can tangibly do in their practices to succeed. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to describe the quality payment program, their options under the merit-based incentive payment system (MIPS), describe possibilities for future advanced alternative payment models, and understand why partnering with accountable care organizations may or may not be beneficial to them. Lecture/Faculty: }} MACRA Overview and AAN Response Gregory J. Esper, MD, MBA, FAAN, Atlanta, GA }} Strategies for MACRA: Documentation and Population Management Eric M. Cheng, MD, MS, FAAN, Los Angeles, CA }} Using Axon Registry for Quality Reporting Lyell K. Jones, MD, FAAN, Rochester, MN Core Competencies:  Practice-Based Learning and Improvement Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Trainee, Practice Administrator, Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist

Course Friday, April 27, 2018

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C231 ICD-10-CM: How to Optimize for Accurate Diagnosis and Reimbursement

Topic: Practice, Policy, and Ethics Director: Jeffrey R. Buchhalter, MD, FAAN, Phoenix, AZ

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Program Description: On October 1, 2015, the ICD-10-CM code set became required for all transactions involving reimbursement from the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services, as well as for other third-party payers. A one-year grace period was granted that allowed full reimbursement for using the correct code family without full specificity. Presenters will use a case-based approach focusing on practical aspects of ICD-10 including optimizing coding specificity for common neurologic disorders (e.g., stroke, epilepsy, headache), how codes relate to value-based reimbursement (QPP), severity coding (HCC), and how more accurate coding results in fewer denials. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to code common neurologic disorders to the highest degree of specificity to reflect the severity of illness, know the codes for several of the most commonly encountered disorders seen by neurologists, understand how coding plays an essential role in value-based reimbursement, and avoid and respond to denials for services rendered. Lecture/Faculty: }} ICD-10-CM Basics, Value, and Severity Based Coding Jeffrey R. Buchhalter, MD, FAAN, Phoenix, AZ }} ICD-10-CM Coding of Common Neurological Disorders Faculty }} How to Avoid and Respond to ICD-10-CM Based Denials David A. Evans, MBA, Dallas, TX Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Didactic, Interactive Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, NonNeurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, Practice Manager, Billing Specialist, Nurse Practitioner, General Neurologist

AAN.com/view/AM18 197

Business of Neurology

CME Credits:  2


Program Tracks Course Friday, April 27, 2018

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

C242 Coding 101: It’s Not Your Father’s Oldsmobile Topic: Practice, Policy, and Ethics Director: Bruce H. Cohen, MD, FAAN, Akron, OH

F

Program Description: Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) is a publication of the American Medical Association. The E/M codes themselves comprise only a small part of CPT and are the codes that are used in delivering cognitive services. In general, the E/M codes require no special technology and cover visits in the ambulatory and inpatient setting, ED, and other approved health care settings. In this course the most common codes used for the ambulatory and inpatient setting will be discussed, and the rules of how these codes applied stressed. Basic EEG and EMG coding will also be presented, and the most common pitfalls in coding will be presented. Because providers are now providing an increasing amount of time performing non-face-toface patient management, new codes for these services are being developed and approved, and will be discussed as well. Upon Completion: Participants will understand the basis of face-to-face E/M coding, as well as the common pitfalls in incorrect coding; describe the differences between attended and unattended prolonged EEG studies as well as the difference to the patient if the study is performed in an inpatient vs observation setting, and learn the basics of simple EEG coding; determine how to properly code for EMG services; and become familiar with the new codes for nonface-to-face coding that is relevant to the practice of neurology. Lecture/Faculty: }} Basic Office and Hospital E&M Coding Raissa Villanueva, MD, Rochester, NY }} Non Face-to-Face and Future E&M Coding Issues Bruce H. Cohen, MD, FAAN, Akron, OH }} EEG, Prolonged EEG, and EMG Coding Jeffrey R. Buchhalter, MD, FAAN, Phoenix, AZ Core Competencies:  Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement, Professionalism Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist

198 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

Business of Neurology Track


Neurohospitalist Track Overview

C

reated specifically for neurohospitalists whose primary focus is inpatient care, or for anyone who would like to learn more about the care of hospitalized patients, this lineup of programming will cover the gamut from prevention, telestroke, critical care monitoring and consultations, and issues encountered in the ICU. Saturday, April 21, 2018

Wednesday, April 25, 2018

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C3  Emergency Room Neuro-ophthalmology Topic:Neuro-ophthalmology/ Neuro-otology;

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C137  What Do I Do Now?: Emergency and Inpatient Management of Migraine and Other Headache Disorders

9:30 a.m.–11:30 a.m. C8  Emergency Neurology: Evaluation of Coma, Meningitis, and Viral Encephalitis in the Emergency Room

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C145  Severe TBI: From ICU to Rehabilitation

1:30 p.m.–3:30 p.m. C22  Stroke in Young Adults and Women

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C151  Cerebrovascular Disease III: Update on Neuroimaging Modalities and Endovascular Therapies for Acute Ischemic Stroke

1:30 p.m.–3:30 p.m. C23  Critical Care Consultations for Neurohospitalists

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C166  Cerebrovascular Disease IV: Telestroke

Sunday, April 22, 2018

Thursday, April 26, 2018

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C27  Neurological Intensive Care I: The Essentials

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C177  So You’ve Diagnosed Your Patient with a Neuroinfectious Disease, Now What? Practical Pearls in the Treatment and Management of Neuroinfectious Diseases

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C40  Autoimmune Neurology I Basics and Beyond: Autoimmune Encephalitis and Paraneoplastic Neurological Syndromes of the CNS and PNS 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C53  Neurological Intensive Care III: Vascular Diseases 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C55  Autoimmune Neurology II Advanced: Autoimmune Encephalitis at the Frontiers of Neuroscience

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C190  Neuro-oncologic Predicaments in the Hospital Setting 1:00 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C196  Brain Death Skills Workshop: How to Perform a Brain Death Evaluation, Avoid Pitfalls and Convey the News to the Family 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C201  Differential Diagnosis of Neurologic Infections 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C203  Endovascular Treatment of Acute Stroke and Cerebrovascular Disease

Monday, April 23, 2018

6:30 p.m.–9:30 p.m. C211  Case Studies in the ICU

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C66  Update on Medical Management of Stroke

Friday, April 27, 2018

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C78  Therapeutic Temperature Modulation in the ICU

Tuesday, April 24, 2018 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C96  Status Epilepticus 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C106  Critical Care EEG Monitoring 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C116  Cerebrovascular Disease I: Prevention 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C124  The Palliative Care Guide in Neurology: Best Practice in Communication, Advance Care Planning, and End-of-life Care of Patients with Brain Tumors and Other Life-limiting Neurological Disorders

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C218  Infections of the Nervous System I: Diagnostic Testing of Neurological Infections 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. C220  Drugs and Toxin-induced Neurologic Emergencies 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C226  Infections of the Nervous System II: Neuro-ID Emergencies 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C230  Neurologic Complications of Medical and Surgical Therapies 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C239  Infections of the Nervous System III: Advanced Topics in Infectious Neurology

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C129  Cerebrovascular Disease II: Update on Guidance-Based Diagnosis and Management of Hemorrhagic Stroke

AAN.com/view/AM18 199

Neurohospitalist

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C38  Neurological Intensive Care II: Acute Brain and Spinal Cord Injury and Acute Neuromuscular Dysfunction


Program Tracks

Neurohospitalist Track

Course Saturday, April 21, 2018

C3

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Emergency Room Neuro-ophthalmology

Topic:

Neuro-ophthalmology/Neuro-otology; Neuro Trauma, Critical Care, and Sports Neurology Director: Heather Moss, MD, PhD, FAAN, Palo Alto, CA

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Program Description: In the patient with acute visual loss, diplopia, and extra-eye movements, it is important to recognize certain entities as a timely diagnosis improves chances of a favorable outcome. Faculty will highlight such neuro-ophthalmic emergencies, focusing on examination techniques, evaluation, and management. Didactic lectures, case examples, and open discussion with the faculty will provide participants with both basic knowledge and updates on current controversies. Upon Completion: Participants should be familiar with the clinical features and initial management of neuro-ophthalmic conditions that present in the emergency department, including giant cell arteritis, pituitary apoplexy, aneurysmal third nerve palsy, cerebral venous thrombosis, arterial dissection, and brainstem ocular motor disorders. Lecture/Faculty: }} Approach to Patients with Vision Loss Heather Moss, MD, PhD, FAAN, Palo Alto, CA }} Approach to the Funduscopic Exam Beau Benjamin Bruce, MD, Atlanta, GA }} Emergent Afferent Neuro-ophthalmic Cases Heather Moss, MD, PhD, FAAN, Palo Alto, CA }} Approach to Patients with Diplopia Heather Moss, MD, PhD, FAAN, Palo Alto, CA }} Approach to Patients with Funny Eye Movements Eric R. Eggenberger, DO, FAAN, Jacksonville, FL }} Emergent Efferent Neuro-ophthalmic Cases Eric R. Eggenberger, DO, FAAN, Jacksonville, FL Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

200 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

Course Saturday, April 21, 2018

C8

9:30 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Emergency Neurology: Evaluation of Coma, Meningitis, and Viral Encephalitis in the Emergency Room

Topic:

Neuro Trauma, Critical Care, and Sports Neurology; General Neurology Director: Jose I. Suarez, MD, Baltimore, MD

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Program Description: Advances in the treatment of neurologic emergencies have increased the complexity of their initial evaluation and impacted the way neurologists deal with them. Faculty will present discussions to highlight important issues such as high level of clinical suspicion, rapid and effective diagnosis and execution of treatment plans. All presentations will emphasize importance of appropriate therapeutic decisions carried out during the first few minutes of the initial encounter to prevent further neurologic injury. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to delineate the steps to follow to provide immediate evaluation and management of patients in coma in an organized fashion. In addition, participants should be able to recognize and initiate work up and management of patients presenting with suspected meningitis and encephalitis particularly in the current environment of emergent world pandemics. Lecture/Faculty: }} Coma Jose I. Suarez, MD, Baltimore, MD }} Meningitits and Viral Encephalitis Faculty Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

Course Saturday, April 21, 2018

C22

1:30 p.m.–3:30 p.m.

Stroke in Young Adults and Women

Topic:

Cerebrovascular Disease and Interventional Neurology; Child Neurology and Developmental Neurology Director: Aneesh B. Singhal, MD, FAAN, Boston, MA

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Program Description: Faculty will review the incidence, risk factors, mechanisms, outcomes, and long-term impact after stroke in young adults and women. The program will focus on ischemic stroke; cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, hemorrhagic strokes, and pediatric/neonatal stroke will not be addressed given time constraints. Special emphasis will be given to cerebral arteriopathies such as dissection, vasculitis, and the reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndromes, as well as hormonal risk factors. We will address the unique multi-disciplinary needs of young adults and women with stroke. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to promptly recognize stroke in the young, develop cost-effective diagnostic strategies, deliver appropriate evidence-based acute/preventive treatment, and effectively manage the long-term consequences of stroke in young adults and women. Lecture/Faculty: }} Arterial and Cardiac Causes Aneesh B. Singhal, MD, FAAN, Boston, MA }} Hormones and Hypercoagulable States Cheryl Bushnell, MD, MHS, Winston Salem, NC Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, PracticeBased Learning and Improvement, Systems-Based Practice Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Course Saturday, April 21, 2018

C23

1:30 p.m.–3:30 p.m.

Critical Care Consultations for Neurohospitalists

Topic:

Neuro Trauma, Critical Care, and Sports Neurology; General Neurology Director: Vanja C. Douglas, MD, San Francisco, CA

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Program Description: Neurohospitalists are frequently asked to consult on patients in the intensive care unit. Common reasons for consultation include prognosis after cardiac arrest, seizures and status epilepticus, and neuromuscular respiratory failure. In this course, faculty will discuss neuroprotection and prognostication after cardiac arrest; detection, diagnosis and management of seizures in the intensive care unit, including an update on management of status epilepticus; and common and rare but treatable causes of neuromuscular respiratory failure. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to discuss the neuroprotective effect of targeted temperature management after cardiac arrest and prognosticate effectively in these patients; utilize the most up to date treatment algorithms for status epilepticus and describe approaches to treatment of non-convulsive status epilepticus; and diagnose both the most common causes of neuromuscular respiratory failure as well as rare but treatable diseases such as acid maltase deficiency. Lecture/Faculty: }} Status Epilepticus and Seizures in the Intensive Care Unit John Betjemann, MD, San Francisco, CA }} Common and Rare Causes of Neuromuscular Respiratory Failure Every Neurohospitalist Should Be Aware Of R Brian Sommerville, MD, Saint Louis, MO }} Neuroprotection and Prognosis After Cardiac Arrest in the Era of Targeted Temperature Management Vanja C. Douglas, MD, San Francisco, CA Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2

Neurohospitalist

Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Trainee

AAN.com/view/AM18 201


Program Tracks

Neurohospitalist Track

Course Sunday, April 22, 2018

C27

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Neurological Intensive Care I: The Essentials

Topic: Neuro Trauma, Critical Care, and Sports Neurology Director: David M. Greer, MD, FAAN, Boston, MA

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Program Description: This program will provide the essentials of neurocritical staples, including neuroprognostication, multimodality monitoring, and elevated intracranial pressure, both its prevention and management. The expert speakers will provide up-to-date discussions of the processes in each of these areas, arming the attendees with strong knowledge base for these neurocritical care situations and management. This program complements C38: Neurological Intensive Care II: Acute Brain and Spinal Cord Injury and Acute Neuromuscular Dysfunction and C53: Neurological Intensive Care III: Vascular Diseases, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to understand the basics of multimodality monitoring, how to approach prognostication for a variety of acute brain injuries, and how to prevent and treat elevated intracranial pressure in the intensive care unit. Lecture/Faculty: }} Neuroprognostication David Y. Hwang, MD, New Haven, CT }} Elevated ICP: Prevention and Management Anna Marisa Cervantes-Arslanian, MD, Boston, MA }} Multimodality Monitoring Stephan A. Mayer, MD, Detroit, MI Core Competencies:  Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement, Systems-Based Practice Teaching Style:  Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, Nurse, Nurse Practitioner, Physician Assistant

202 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

Course Sunday, April 22, 2018

C38

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Neurological Intensive Care II: Acute Brain and Spinal Cord Injury and Acute Neuromuscular Dysfunction

Topic: Neuro Trauma, Critical Care, and Sports Neurology Director: Kristine H. O’Phelan, MD, Miami, FL

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Program Description: This session will provide instruction for best practice management of common disorders encountered in neurocritical care practice. These include traumatic brain injury, acute spinal cord injury, status epilepticus, and acute neuromuscular dysfunction. Specific attention is given to targeting improved functional outcomes for our patients and avoiding common pitfalls of management. This program complements C27: Neurological Intensive Care I: The Essentials and C53: Neurological Intensive Care III: Vascular Diseases, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to identify markers of severity of illness in patients with acute traumatic brain injury, acute spinal cord injury, and acute neuromuscular dysfunction; explain the pathophysiology of secondary brain injury in acute traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injury and give examples of therapies to mitigate this risk; and describe an approach to the patient with acute respiratory failure due to neuromuscular weakness. Lecture/Faculty: }} Management of Acute Neuromuscular Diseases in the NSICU Neha Dangayach, MD, New York, NY }} Management of Acute TBI and SCI in the NSICU Kristine H. O’Phelan, MD, Miami, FL }} Management of Status Epilepticus in the NSICU Jan Claassen, MD, PhD, New York, NY Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, Nurse, Advanced Practice Provider


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

Course

C40

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Autoimmune Neurology I Basics and Beyond: Autoimmune Encephalitis and Paraneoplastic Neurological Syndromes of the CNS and PNS

Topic: General Neurology Director: Maarten Jan Titulaer, MD, PhD, Rotterdam, Netherlands

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Program Description: Recent years have been very exciting for autoimmune neurology: many new diseases have been discovered, providing possibilities to treat patients previously considered untreatable. Faculty will describe the full range of neural autoantibodies and their relevant clinical disorders (neurological, psychiatric, neuropediatric, and oncological), from encephalitis to the neuromuscular junction; including clinical pearls aiding diagnosis of autoimmune and paraneoplastic neurologic disorders, also covering differential diagnosis, investigations, and treatment. This course will cover the basics, and go somewhat beyond, but be less advanced than the Autoimmune Neurology II course. Although both courses stand alone, overlap is minimized, and physicians are encouraged to complete both courses. This program complements C55: Autoimmune Neurology II Advanced: Autoimmune Encephalitis at the Frontiers of Neuroscience, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to understand the autoantibody nomenclature; recognize autoimmune neurologic disorders; know the neurologic and cancer associations of the autoantibodies; know the pitfalls in antibody testing; know the appropriate oncological evaluations for paraneoplastic neurologic disorders; and know some treatment regimens for autoimmune neurologic disorders. Lecture/Faculty: }} Classical Paraneoplastic Neurological Disorders Andrew McKeon, MD, Rochester, MN }} Autoimmune Disorders of the Peripheral Nervous System Eric Lancaster, MD, PhD, Philadelphia, PA }} Autoimmune Encephalitis—The Cell Surface and Synaptic Antibodies Josep O. Dalmau, MD, PhD, FAAN, Barcelona, Spain Core Competencies:  Patient Care, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement, Medical Knowledge

Sunday, April 22, 2018

C53

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Neurological Intensive Care III: Vascular Diseases

Topic: Neuro Trauma, Critical Care, and Sports Neurology Director: Lori A. Shutter, MD, PT, Pittsburgh, PA

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Program Description: The practice of neurocritical care requires knowledge of brain pathophysiology and vascular diseases of the nervous system. The lectures in this session will provide in-depth reviews of essential topics for any neurologists caring for critically ill patients following acute ischemic and hemorrhagic intracranial events, including ischemic stroke, cerebral reperfusion, subarachnoid hemorrhage, intracerebral hemorrhage, and cerebral sinus thrombosis This program complements C27: Neurological Intensive Care I: The Essentials, and C38: Neurological Intensive Care II: From the Brain to the Muscles, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to discuss the ICU care of ischemic stroke and reperfusion issues, address the medical management of subarachnoid patients, and identify the ICU needs of patients with intraparenchymal hemorrhagic lesions. Lecture/Faculty: }} Introduction Lori A. Shutter, MD, PT, Pittsburgh, PA }} ICU Management of Ischemic Stroke and Reperfusion Nerissa U. Ko, MD, San Francisco, CA }} Medical Management of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Sherry Chou, MD, Pittsburgh, PA }} Critical Care of Intraparenchymal Hemorrhage Asma Moheet, MD, Los Angeles, CA Core Competencies:  Practice-Based Learning and Improvement, Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, Nurse

Neurohospitalist

Sunday, April 22, 2018

Course

Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

AAN.com/view/AM18 203


Program Tracks

Neurohospitalist Track

Course Sunday, April 22, 2018

C55

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Autoimmune Neurology II Advanced: Autoimmune Encephalitis at the Frontiers of Neuroscience

Topic: General Neurology Director: Maarten Jan Titulaer, MD, PhD, Rotterdam, Netherlands

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Program Description: Recent years have shown many discoveries of new antibodies. These new antibodies have broadened the horizon of these diseases, bordering with psychiatry, pediatrics, intensive care medicine, and (chronic) epilepsy. Many physicians struggle to keep up with all the new developments. Faculty will cover the newest developments, discuss caveats at diagnosis, test results, and treatment decisions. This course will be more advanced than the Autoimmune Neurology I course, and expects some basic knowledge of antibodies and the related syndromes. Overlap is minimized, and physicians are encouraged to complete both courses. This program complements C40: Autoimmune Neurology I Basics and Beyond: Autoimmune Encephalitis and Paraneoplastic Neurological Syndromes of the CNS and PNS, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to identify the different disorders; adequately assess consultations at the psychiatry, pediatric neurology, and epilepsy wards; be able to avoid the pitfalls associated with antibody testing; and identify the appropriate tumors associated with the different syndromes. Lecture/Faculty: }} Neuropsychiatry and Encephalitis Josep O. Dalmau, MD, PhD, FAAN, Barcelona, Spain }} Epilepsy and Encephalitis Maarten Jan Titulaer, MD, PhD, Rotterdam, Netherlands }} Imaging and Encephalitis John Probasco, MD, Baltimore, MD }} Difficult Cases and Clinical Pearls Josep O. Dalmau, MD, PhD, FAAN, Barcelona, Spain John Probasco, MD, Baltimore, MD Maarten Jan Titulaer, MD, PhD, Rotterdam, Netherlands Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

204 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

Course Monday, April 23, 2018

C66

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Update on Medical Management of Stroke

Topic: Cerebrovascular Disease and Interventional Neurology Director: Natalia Sana Rost, MD, MPH, FAAN, Boston, MA

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Program Description: For patients presenting with signs and symptoms of acute stroke, the window for diagnosis and intervention is narrow and treatment options are often limited. This program is designed to address the challenges in management of acute stroke and to provide attendees with the essential set of skills for rapid clinical decision-making that is based on the latest advances in cerebrovascular disease. Critical milestones in the management timeline of acute stroke and resources necessary to deliver best practices in stroke care will be outlined. Upon Completion: Participants should be familiar with the latest advances in medical management of acute stroke, including the best practices in selecting patients for thrombolytic and antithrombotic agent use; management of fluctuating neurological exam and hyperacute stroke complications; referral for early endovascular and surgical interventions; and resource utilization (such as TeleStroke and advanced neuroimaging) to guide precision-diagnosis and management options that are known to improve stroke outcomes. Lecture/Faculty: }} Hyperacute Stroke: All That On-Call Neurologists Need to Know Natalia Sana Rost, MD, MPH, FAAN, Boston, MA }} Beyond Thrombolytics: Medical Management of Acute Stroke and Its Early Complications Jose Biller, MD, FAAN, FACP, FAHA, Maywood, IL }} Difficult Decision-Making in Acute Stroke: Tools and Resources for Management of Unstable Patients Natalia Sana Rost, MD, MPH, FAAN, Boston, MA }} Special Cases in Acute Stroke: Challenging the Norm Jose Biller, MD, FAAN, FACP, FAHA, Maywood, IL Core Competencies:  Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Patient Care, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement Teaching Style:  Didactic, Interactive, Audience Participation, CaseBased CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

Course Monday, April 23, 2018

C78

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Therapeutic Temperature Modulation in the ICU

Topic: Cerebrovascular Disease and Interventional Neurology Director: Stephan A. Mayer, MD, Detroit, MI

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Program Description: Therapeutic temperature modulation (TTM) is an essential therapy for minimizing brain injury in the ICU. Faculty will review the latest technology, data, and protocols for TTM in the treatment of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury after cardiac arrest, elevated intracranial pressure, and neurogenic fever; explain how to minimize complications from TTM; and describe the implications of TTM on prognostication after severe brain injury. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to know when TTM is indicated and when it is not, employ ICU-based protocols and algorithms for the safe and efficient application of TTM, and understand the impact of TTM on neurological recovery and prognostication. Lecture/Faculty: }} How to Cool in the ICU Neeraj Badjatia, MD, Baltimore, MD }} TTM for Cardiac Arrest Stephan A. Mayer, MD, Detroit, MI }} TTM For Fever Control David M. Greer, MD, FAAN, Boston, MA }} TTM for Trauma and ICP Neeraj Badjatia, MD, Baltimore, MD }} Emerging Indications: Sepsis, Stroke, and Status David M. Greer, MD, FAAN, Boston, MA }} Prognostication in th Era of TTM Stephan A. Mayer, MD, Detroit, MI Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic CME Credits:  2

Course Tuesday, April 24, 2018

C96

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Status Epilepticus

Topic: Epilepsy/Clinical Neurophysiology (EEG) Director: Stephan Schuele, MD, FAAN, Chicago, IL

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Program Description: Status epilepticus (SE) is a true neurologic emergency. In recent years, there has been a wealth of new information changing our practice on the clinical diagnosis, use of EEG, etiology, and treatment for the various phases and forms of SE. This session will provide a comprehensive overview of the evaluation and treatment of SE and update on newest research and clinical trials. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to diagnose status epilepticus in urgent and unusual presentations; integrate clinical and EEG findings to make a correct diagnosis; recognize and treat cases of nonconvulsive status, avoiding both under-recognition and over-treatment; have a command of the utility and practicalities of EEG monitoring in the management of SE in very ill ICU patients; and utilize several more "aggressive" treatments effectively for the most refractory SE cases. Lecture/Faculty: }} Classification and Etiology of Status Epilepticus Frank W. Drislane, MD, FAAN, Newton, MA }} Treatment of Early Status Epilepticus Thomas P. Bleck, MD, FAAN, Chicago, IL }} Quantitative EEG and Guidelines for ICU VEEG Monitoring Lawrence J. Hirsch, MD, FAAN, New Haven, CT }} Treatment of Refractory Status Epilepticus Stephan Schuele, MD, FAAN, Chicago, IL Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Neurohospitalist

Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

AAN.com/view/AM18 205


Program Tracks

Neurohospitalist Track

Course Tuesday, April 24, 2018

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C106 Critical Care EEG Monitoring Topics:

Epilepsy/Clinical Neurophysiology (EEG); Neuro Trauma, Critical Care, and Sports Neurology Director: Suzette M. LaRoche, MD, FAAN, Asheville, NC

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Program Description: This course will review important aspects of continuous EEG (cEEG) monitoring in critically ill patients. This will include a review of clinical indications as well as practical considerations for implementation of cEEG. Interpretation of cEEG in the critically ill presents unique challenges compared to routine EEG, so faculty will explain how to identify seizures and differentiate from other periodic and rhythmic patterns as well as artifacts. Quantitative EEG analysis is being increasingly used for detection of seizures and other acute changes but is relatively new to many neurologists, so faculty will review basic QEEG concepts and clinical use in critically ill patients. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to recognize appropriate patients who may benefit from cEEG monitoring, appreciate the nuanced interpretation of cEEG data and differentiate seizures from other periodic and rhythmic patterns as well as recognize the value and limitations of quantitative analysis of cEEG and apply this to their practice settings Lecture/Faculty: }} Indications and Practical Aspects Faculty }} Interpretation of Raw EEG Patterns in the Critically Ill Suzette M. LaRoche, MD, FAAN, Asheville, NC }} Quantitative EEG for Identification of Seizures and Other Acute Changes Faculty Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, PracticeBased Learning and Improvement Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

206 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

Course Tuesday, April 24, 2018

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C116 Cerebrovascular Disease I: Prevention

Topic: Cerebrovascular Disease and Interventional Neurology Director: Larry B. Goldstein, MD, FAAN, FAHA, Lexington, KY

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Program Description: Faculty will cover specific, rotating topics related to the prevention of a first or recurrent stroke, including changing epidemiology and lifestyle modifications, platelet antiaggregants, and patent foramen ovale. There will be ample time for discussion and questions. This program complements C129: Cerebrovascular Disease II: Update on Guidance-Based Diagnosis and Management of Hemorrhagic Stroke, C151: Cerebrovascular Disease III: Update on Neuroimaging Modalities and Endovascular Therapies for Acute Ischemic Stroke, and C166: Cerebrovascular Disease IV: Telestroke. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to discuss recent changes in stroke epidemiology, recommend appropriate lifestyle changes for stroke prevention, understand the indications and choice of platelet antiaggregants, and discuss risks and benefits of closure of a patent foramen ovale in patients with cryptogenic stroke. Lecture/Faculty: }} Changing Epidemiology and Importance of Lifestyle Larry B. Goldstein, MD, FAAN, FAHA, Lexington, KY }} Platelet Antiaggregants for Stroke Prevention Larry B. Goldstein, MD, FAAN, FAHA, Lexington, KY }} Patent Foramen Ovale in the Setting of Cryptogenic Stroke Steven R. Messe, MD, FAAN, FAHA, Philadelphia, PA Core Competencies:  Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Patient Care, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement Teaching Style:  Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

Course Tuesday, April 24, 2018

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Course Tuesday, April 24, 2018

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

C124 The Palliative Care Guide in Neurology: Best C129 Cerebrovascular Disease II: Update on Practice in Communication, Advance Care Planning, and End-of-life Care of Patients with Brain Tumors and Other Life-limiting Neurological Disorders

Guidance-Based Diagnosis and Management of Hemorrhagic Stroke

Topic: Cerebrovascular Disease and Interventional Neurology Director: Philip B. Gorelick, MD, MPH, FAAN, Grand Rapids, MI

J

Topics:

Neuro-oncology; Pain and Palliative Care Director: Tobias Walbert, MD, PhD, Detroit, MI

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Program Description: This program is intended to teach neurologists the broad principles of palliative care, with a focus on how to apply those principles in the practice with brain tumor patients, as well as other life-limiting neurological disorders. Faculty will cover an introduction to the history and goals of palliative care, distinction of palliative care from hospice care, communicating with the patient and the patient’s family (how to disclose bad news and how to provide honest, yet compassionate, information), understanding the concept of quality of life, and fostering trust and avoiding perceptions by the patient of abandonment and how to initiate advance care planning. The principles will focus on neuro-oncology patients, as well as other patients with life-limiting neurological disorders. Special attention will be given to practical decision making, symptom management, and advance care planning. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to communicate a serious diagnosis to a patient in an honest yet compassionate manner, identify the key components of palliative care and hospice, discuss end-of-life issues with patients and assist them in developing advance directives, and manage the palliative care needs of a patient with brain tumors. Lecture/Faculty: }} The Role of Hospice and Palliative Care: Advance Care Planning in Neurology Tobias Walbert, MD, PhD, Detroit, MI }} Difficult Conversations Made Easier Alan C. Carver, MD, New York, NY Core Competencies:  Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement, Professionalism, Systems-Based Practice

Program Description: Intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) is frequently encountered by neurologists in practice. Proper diagnostic and management skills are necessary as ICH is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. In this course a case-based approach to ICH will be emphasized. Two major types of ICH, subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and intraparenchymal hemorrhage (IPH), will be featured. A case presentation will be followed by guideline-based information regarding diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of SAH and IPH. This program complements C116: Cerebrovascular Disease I: Prevention, C151: Cerebrovascular Disease III: Update on Neuroimaging Modalities and Endovascular Therapies for Acute Ischemic Stroke, and C166: Cerebrovascular Disease IV: Telestroke, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to properly diagnose, manage, and prevent subarachnoid hemorrhage and intraparenchymal according to major guideline statements. New study data that may influence every day neurologic practice also will be discussed. Lecture/Faculty: }} Diagnosis and Management of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Venkatesh Aiyagari, MD, Dallas, TX }} Diagnosis and Management of Intraparenchymal Hemorrhage Andrew M. Naidech, MD, FAAN, Chicago, IL Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Trainee, Pharmacist, Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist

Neurohospitalist

Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

AAN.com/view/AM18 207


Program Tracks

Neurohospitalist Track

Course

Course

Wednesday, April 25, 2018 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Wednesday, April 25, 2018 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C137 What Do I Do Now?: Emergency and

C145 Severe TBI: From ICU to Rehabilitation

Inpatient Management of Migraine and Other Headache Disorders

Topic: Headache Director: Stephanie J. Nahas, MD, FAAN, Philadelphia, PA

J

Program Description: A combined case-based and didactic approach will illustrate empiric and evidence-based diagnosis and management strategies for patients presenting with headache in the urgent or inpatient setting. Topics to be covered include migraine, trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias, secondary headaches, and others. Four illustrative cases will serve as the backbone of this course. Each faculty member will bring one case for discussion, and the last case may be submitted from a member of the AAN. One faculty member will lead each case discussion, but all will participate as part of a panel. If interested in submitting your case, please email stephanie.nahas@ jefferson.edu by February 1, 2018. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to discuss the diagnostic approach to patients with headache in the emergency department or hospital and explain the process and rationale for selecting therapy. Lecture/Faculty: }} Introduction Stephanie J. Nahas, MD, FAAN, Philadelphia, PA }} Case #1 Stephanie J. Nahas, MD, FAAN, Philadelphia, PA Mia T. Minen, MD, New York, NY William B. Young, MD, FAAN, Philadelphia, PA }} Case #2 Stephanie J. Nahas, MD, FAAN, Philadelphia, PA Mia T. Minen, MD, New York, NY William B. Young, MD, FAAN, Philadelphia, PA }} Case #3 Stephanie J. Nahas, MD, FAAN, Philadelphia, PA Mia T. Minen, MD, New York, NY William B. Young, MD, FAAN, Philadelphia, PA }} Case #4 Stephanie J. Nahas, MD, FAAN, Philadelphia, PA Mia T. Minen, MD, New York, NY William B. Young, MD, FAAN, Philadelphia, PA Core Competencies:  Patient Care, Medical Knowledge Teaching Style:  Panel Discussion, Audience Participation, CaseBased, Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee 208 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

Topics:

Neuro-rehabilitation; Aging, Dementia, Cognitive, and Behavioral Neurology; Neuro Trauma, Critical Care, and Sports Neurology Director: Susanne Muehlschlegel, MD, MPH, Worcester, MA

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Program Description: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the most common, disabling neurologic disorders. Severe TBI continues to be the leading cause of death and disability after trauma accounting for most of the 52,000 TBI-related deaths in the US annually. Severe TBI presents many difficult clinical and research challenges in diagnosis and treatment, including early diagnosis and management to limit secondary injury, as well as prognostication. This course will focus on severe TBI from the acute care stage in the ICU to rehabilitation. Faculty will discuss the mechanisms of brain damage after TBI, with emphasis on secondary brain injury, as well as best practices for acute management and prognostication after severe TBI. Speakers will present up-to-date guideline-based management strategies; cutting-edge clinical and research neuroimaging methods including diffusion tensor imaging; describe emerging research in biomarkers, prognostication, and decision-making; and address current controversies of diagnosis and treatment. Upon Completion: Participants should be familiar with the variety of pathophysiologic mechanisms associated with TBI and how to prevent or minimize secondary brain injury with up-to-date acute management recommendations emphasizing relevant guidelines; and be comfortable using clinical information and imaging techniques to aid in prognostication after severe TBI. Lecture/Faculty: }} Severe TBI in the ICU: Management and Prognosis Susanne Muehlschlegel, MD, MPH, Worcester, MA }} Imaging in Severe TBI Brian Edlow, MD, Boston, MA }} Pharmacological and Rehabilitative Approaches to Neurological Sequelae of TBI Faculty Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, PracticeBased Learning and Improvement Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, NeuroIntensivist


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

Course

Course

Wednesday, April 25, 2018 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Wednesday, April 25, 2018 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

C151 Cerebrovascular Disease III: Update on

C166 Cerebrovascular Disease IV: Telestroke

Topic: Cerebrovascular Disease and Interventional Neurology Director: Philip B. Gorelick, MD, MPH, FAAN, Grand Rapids, MI

J

Program Description: Since the approval of intravenous (IV) alteplase and the clearance of mechanical clot retrieval devices for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke (AIS), stroke management has substantially changed. Through case-based presentations, faculty will facilitate discussion of indications for IV alteplase, how neuroimaging may help select patients for AIS therapies, and update the use of endovascular interventions. This program complements C116: Cerebrovascular Disease I: Prevention, C129: Cerebrovascular Disease II: Update on Guidancebased Diagnosis and Management of Hemorrhagic Stroke, and C166: Cerebrovascular Disease IV: Telestroke, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to identify indications for intravenous alteplase in acute ischemic stroke treatment, apply neuroimaging modalities to select patients for acute ischemic stroke treatment, and be familiar with indications for endovascular interventions. Lecture/Faculty: }} Indications for Intravenous Alteplase Philip B. Gorelick, MD, MPH, FAAN, Grand Rapids, MI }} Neuroimaging—the Precision Medicine of Acute Ischemic Stroke David S. Liebeskind, MD, FAAN, Los Angeles, CA }} Update on Endovascular Intervention for Acute Ischemic Stroke Tudor G. Jovin, MD, Pittsburgh, PA Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, Pharmacist

Topic: Cerebrovascular Disease and Interventional Neurology Director: Eric Anderson, MD, PhD, Gulfport, FL

JI

Program Description: This course will provide a structured education towards the practical incorporation of telestroke into practice. Through case studies presented by physicians already using specific aspects of remote care technology in practice, we will cover the evidence for and clinical applicability of telestroke, telestroke across the care continuum, economics of telestroke, hospital contracting, and reimbursement/financial models. This program complements C116: Cerebrovascular Disease I, C129: Cerebrovascular Disease II: Update on Guidance-Based Diagnosis and Management of Hemorrhagic Stroke, C151: Cerebrovascular Disease III: Update on Neuroimaging Modalities and Endovascular Therapies for Acute Ischemic Stroke. Upon Completion: Participants will understand the scope of technology employed in telestroke across the continuum, the economics that drive stroke care through telemedicine, as well as the concerns and limitations for the appropriate practice of remote stroke care. Lecture/Faculty: }} Introduction: The Current State of Telestroke Eric Anderson, MD, PhD, Gulfport, FL }} Telestroke Quality, Integration, and Limitations Lawrence R. Wechsler, MD, FAAN, Pittsburgh, PA }} The Economics of Telestroke Bart M. Demaerschalk, MD, MSc, FRCPC, Phoenix, AZ Core Competencies:  Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement, Professionalism, Systems-Based Practice Teaching Style:  Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Neurohospitalist

Neuroimaging Modalities and Endovascular Therapies for Acute Ischemic Stroke

AAN.com/view/AM18 209


Program Tracks

Neurohospitalist Track

Course Thursday, April 26, 2018

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

C177 So You’ve Diagnosed Your Patient with

a Neuroinfectious Disease, Now What? Practical Pearls in the Treatment and Management of Neuroinfectious Diseases

Topic: Infectious Disease Director: Felicia Chow, MD, San Francisco, CA

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Program Description: This case-based interactive course will focus on the management of patients with infections of the nervous system and associated neurological complications. An interdisciplinary panel of experts from both neurology and infectious diseases will share their approach to challenging neuroinfectious diseases cases. An emphasis will be placed on an up-to-date, evidence-based approach to complicated cases combined with on-the-ground experience from clinical experts in the field. Upon Completion: Participants will have increased familiarity and confidence with the evaluation and management of neuroinfectious diseases, including selection of antimicrobial therapy; CNS penetration and neurological toxicities of antimicrobial therapy; timing and duration of corticosteroid therapy for neurological infections; management of common complications of CNS infections (e.g., increased intracranial pressure, hyponatremia, vasculitis); utility of laboratories for monitoring response to therapy. Lecture/Faculty: }} Case One Kelly Dooley, MD, PhD, Baltimore, MD Usha K. Misra, MD, FAAN, Lucknow, India }} Case Two David Koelle, MD, Seattle, WA Maria A. Nagel, MD, Aurora, CO Core Competencies:  Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement Teaching Style:  Interactive, Expert Panel, Audience Participation, Case-Based CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

210 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

Course Thursday, April 26, 2018

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C190 Neuro-oncologic Predicaments in the Hospital Setting

Topic: Neuro-oncology Director: Na Tosha N. Gatson, MD, PhD, Danville, PA

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Program Description: Emergent issues in neuro-oncology are variable and require timely recognition of their level of acuity. Delays in management and transitions in care could lead to costly outcomes that impact hospital stay as well as patient neurologic function and rehabilitation. This course is formatted as a combination of cases and didactic learning with audience participation to cover relevant acute inpatient issues in neuro-oncology. Topics covered will address the following clinical presentations: increased intracranial pressure, salt-balance, autonomic dysregulation, immunosuppression, cancer treatment effects, stroke, seizure, and acute decline in mental status. Each topic will have a representative case presented, followed by a didactic approach to working through a three-tiered differential, and finish with an evidence-based discussion of management and identification of areas for quality improvement. Upon Completion: Participants should be familiar with the differential diagnoses and inpatient management of common and uncommon neuro-oncologic clinical presentations in adults, and identify areas for process improvement in these conditions. Lecture/Faculty: }} Neuro-oncologic Predicaments in the Hospital Setting Na Tosha N. Gatson, MD, PhD, Danville, PA Javier Gonzalez, MD, Columbus, OH Anthony Noto, MD, Danville, PA Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, SystemsBased Practice Teaching Style:  Didactic, Audience Participation, Case-Based CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, oncologist


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

Course 1:00 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

C196 Brain Death Skills Workshop: How to

Perform a Brain Death Evaluation, Avoid Pitfalls and Convey the News to the Family $ (registration required)

Topic: Neuro Trauma, Critical Care, and Sports Neurology Director: Panayiotis N. Varelas, MD, PhD, Detroit, MI

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Program Description: In 2010, the AAN published straightforward guidance for the declaration of death by neurological criteria (brain death, BD), but policies and practices continue to vary significantly across the US and worldwide, increasing the risk for false brain death declarations and erosion of the public trust on our ability to pronounce death reliably. Therefore, there is a great need for health care providers to improve practices surrounding the declaration of BD. This workshop will include 3 consecutive sessions: didactics including videos, simulation of BD in mannequins (or difficult cases-vignettes), and question and answer discussion regarding BD controversies and presentation of BD results to families. Upon Completion: Participants will become familiar with the process of conducting a complete BD evaluation, be able to address difficult cases and avoid pitfalls, and be able to conduct a thorough and compassionate discussion with the relatives of the patient and improve their understanding of BD. Lecture/Faculty: }} Brain Death Evaluation Lecture and Video David M. Greer, MD, FAAN, Boston, MA }} Breakout Session: Mannequin Simulation Faculty }} Breakout Session: Difficult Cases: Vignettes Gene Y. Sung, MD, MPH, Los Angeles, CA }} Breakout Session: Difficult Cases: Vignettes Ariane Lewis, MD, New York, NY }} How to Approach Families and What to Tell Them Ariane Lewis, MD, New York, NY }} Controversies in Brain Death: Questions and Answers/ Discussion Faculty Core Competencies:  Patient Care

Thursday, April 26, 2018

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

C201 Differential Diagnosis of Neurologic Infections

Topic: Infectious Disease Director: Marie Francisca Grill, MD, Scottsdale, AZ

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Program Description: Differential diagnosis of patients with possible neurologic infections will be presented to discuss diagnostic considerations, imaging, cerebrospinal fluid interpretation, PCR testing and other microbiologic tests, as well as mimicking disorders. Specific topics will include cases highlighting coverage of encephalitis, meningitis, and myelitis. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to improve their ability to form a more precise differential diagnosis of possible neurologic infections, and to recognize specific laboratory tests and imaging findings that can guide the differential diagnosis accordingly. Lecture/Faculty: }} Encephalitis Avindra Nath, MD, MBBS, FAAN, Bethesda, MD }} Chronic Meningitis Israel Steiner, MD, Petah Tiqva, Israel }} Myelopathies Marie Francisca Grill, MD, Scottsdale, AZ Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, General Neurologist

Neurohospitalist

Thursday, April 26, 2018

Course

Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive, Mannequin Simulation CME Credits:  4 Recommended Audience:  Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist

AAN.com/view/AM18 211


Program Tracks

Neurohospitalist Track

Course Thursday, April 26, 2018

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

C203 Endovascular Treatment of Acute Stroke and Cerebrovascular Disease

Topic: Cerebrovascular Disease and Interventional Neurology Director: Dileep R. Yavagal, MD, FAAN, Miami, FL

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Program Description: Endovascular therapy is now the standard of care in conjunction with IV tPA for acute ischemic stroke. This course will discuss the scientific evidence, well as tested clinical protocols for stroke systems of care, and clinical case scenarios to drive home critical learning for the student and practitioner. Faculty will also review rapid advances that have occurred in endovascular therapy to aneurysms, AVMs, and dural AVFistulas. Most notably, faculty will review the most important data including meta-analysis and real-world registry data that have accrued since the landmark RCTs for endovascular mechanical thrombectomy in 2015. Furthermore, faculty will review the indications, safety, and efficacy of several new devices and recent clinical trial data available for endovascular treatment of hemorrhagic CVD. The latest consensus and ongoing trials in the controversial area of carotid stenting and intracranial stenting will also be discussed in detail. Upon Completion: Participants will be able to discuss the application of mechanical thrombectomy in AIS as the new standard of care. They will be able to review the latest endovascular techniques for aneurysms, AVMs, and dural AVFs; their indications for application in patients; and scientific evidence from the latest clinical trials. Participants will also be able to discuss how to tailor application of neuroendovascular therapies in individual case scenarios. Lecture/Faculty: }} Mechanical Thrombectomy with IV Thrombolysis: How to Most Effectively Implement the New Standard of Care for Acute LVO Stroke? Dileep R. Yavagal, MD, FAAN, Miami, FL }} Current Imaging Selection in Stroke: Within 6 Hours, Wake-up and Beyond David S. Liebeskind, MD, FAAN, Los Angeles, CA }} Advances in Endovascular Treatment of Brain Aneurysms, AVMs, and Dural AVFs Italo Linfante, MD, Miami, FL }} Current Indications for Carotid and Intracranial Stenting Dileep R. Yavagal, MD, FAAN, Miami, FL Core Competencies:  Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement, Professionalism, Systems-Based Practice Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive, Panel Discussion CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, Stroke, Interventional Neuology 212 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

Course Thursday, April 26, 2018

6:30 p.m.–9:30 p.m.

C211 Case Studies in the ICU

Topic: Neuro Trauma, Critical Care, and Sports Neurology Director: Nicholas Joseph Silvestri, MD, FAAN, Buffalo, NY

J

Program Description: Neurologic complications in ICU patients often have a substantial negative impact on their outcome. Neurologists are being asked increasingly to evaluate patients in intensive care units. They are often called to assess unusual neurologic manifestations of other primary diseases, evaluate the consequences of critical care therapy, offer a prognosis, or determine brain death. Using a casebased approach, faculty will provide the core elements of modern neurologic critical care and suggested approach to the management of some of the most commonly encountered problems. Topics will include: approach to neurologic problems in the ICU, including failure to awaken after cardiac arrest; brain death; neuromuscular considerations in the ICU; difficulty-to-wean off artificial ventilation; and epilepsy, including status epilepticus. Interactions between faculty and participants will be encouraged. Upon Completion: Participants should have a comprehensive understanding of the general aspects of critical care of neurologic patients and common neurologic problems encountered in the ICU setting, be able to incorporate evidence-driven data into their recommendations, and be able to evaluate and treat common disorders in the ICU and provide an opinion regarding prognosis. Lecture/Faculty: }} Case Studies in Coma and Brain Death David M. Greer, MD, FAAN, Boston, MA }} Case Studies in Epilepsy and Status Epilepticus Julie Roth, MD, Providence, RI }} Case Studies in Neuromuscular Disorders in the ICU Nicholas Joseph Silvestri, MD, FAAN, Buffalo, NY Core Competencies:  Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement, Professionalism, Systems-Based Practice Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Interactive CME Credits:  3 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee


H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

Course Friday, April 27, 2018

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

C218 Infections of the Nervous System I: Diagnostic Testing of Neurological Infections

Topic: Infectious Disease Director: Tracey Cho, MD, FAAN, Boston, MA

J

Program Description: This program will provide an overview of the laboratory and imaging studies available for timely and accurate diagnosis of a range of infections of the nervous system. Faculty will provide updates on the appropriate use of currently available tests, including sensitivity and specificity, as well as comment on emerging diagnostic modalities. Case discussions with audience questions will be encouraged. This program complements C226: Infections of the Nervous System II: Neuro-ID Emergencies and C239: Infections of the Nervous System III: Advanced Topics in Infectious Neurology, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to effectively order and interpret laboratory and imaging studies for timely and accurate diagnosis of infections of the nervous system. Lecture/Faculty: }} Diagnostic Laboratory Testing for CNS Infections Michael R. Wilson, MD, San Francisco, CA }} Diagnostic Imaging for CNS Infections Tracey Cho, MD, FAAN, Boston, MA Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Course Friday, April 27, 2018

7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

C220 Drugs and Toxin-induced Neurologic Emergencies

Topic: General Neurology Director: Sara E. Hocker, MD, Rochester, MN

J

Program Description: Drugs and toxins can result in a variety of neurologic emergencies. Neurologic emergencies may result from drugs administered in the hospital and the outpatient setting, or from neurotoxic effects of environmentally significant chemical hazards, manufactured drugs, and naturally occurring compounds. Faculty will review specific complications of drug therapies encountered in the intensive care unit, drug-induced movement disorders, and neuro-toxicology emergencies. These categories have significant overlap. The session is expected to be highly case based and interactive and will offer manageable approaches to toxic syndromes rather than an encyclopedic review. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to evaluate, diagnose, and treat neurologic emergencies resulting from drugs administered in the hospital or from neurotoxic effects of environmentally significant effects of environmentally significant chemical hazards, manufactured drugs, and naturally occurring compounds. Lecture/Faculty: }} Drug-induced Disorders Seen in the ICU Sara E. Hocker, MD, Rochester, MN }} Drug-induced Movement Disorder Emergencies Faculty }} Neurotoxicology and Neurologic Emergencies Faculty Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2

Neurohospitalist

Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

AAN.com/view/AM18 213


Program Tracks

Neurohospitalist Track

Course Friday, April 27, 2018

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Course Friday, April 27, 2018

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C226 Infections of the Nervous System II: Neuro- C230 Neurologic Complications of Medical and ID Emergencies

Surgical Therapies

Topic: Infectious Disease Director: Tracey Cho, MD, FAAN, Boston, MA

J

Program Description: Infections of the nervous system can present acutely and cause permanent neurologic disability or death. Prompt diagnosis and appropriate treatment can mitigate the morbidity and mortality of acute CNS infections. Faculty will focus on acute meningitis and encephalitis, with an emphasis on diagnosis and management of these relatively common infectious syndromes. Syndromic approach to diagnosis and case discussions with audience questions will be encouraged. This program complements C218: Infections of the Nervous System I: Diagnostic Testing of Neurological Infections and C239: Infections of the Nervous System III: Advanced Topics in Infectious Neurology, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to recognize, differentiate, and manage common acute infections of the nervous system. Lecture/Faculty: }} Meningitis Christina Marra, MD, FAAN, Seattle, WA }} Acute Encephalitis: From Infections to Autoimmunity Arun Venkatesan, MD, PhD, Baltimore, MD Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Topic: General Neurology Director: Sara E. Hocker, MD, Rochester, MN

J

Program Description: Neurologic complications of medical and surgical therapies frequently are major sources of morbidity for patients admitted to the hospital. Drug therapies, critical care, and cardiac surgeries and procedures in particular are major sources of neurologic complications. Faculty will review specific neurologic complications of drug therapies, intensive care, and cardiac surgeries and procedures. This program complements C237: Neurologic Complications of Medical Disease, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to identify neurologic syndromes resulting from commonly used drugs; recognize neurologic syndromes commonly associated with intensive care; and have an approach to the evaluation of altered mental status, abnormal movements, or focal deficits following cardiac surgeries or procedures. Lecture/Faculty: }} Neurologic Complications of Cardiac Surgeries and Procedures Sara E. Hocker, MD, Rochester, MN }} Neurologic Complications of Critical Care Christopher Lawrence Kramer, MD, Chicago, IL }} Neurologic Complications of Drug Therapies Sara E. Hocker, MD, Rochester, MN Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

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H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

Course Friday, April 27, 2018

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

C239 Infections of the Nervous System III:

Advanced Topics in Infectious Neurology

Topic: Infectious Disease Director: Tracey Cho, MD, FAAN, Boston, MA

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Program Description: This program will provide an overview of advanced topics in infections of the central nervous system. Faculty will provide updates on the appropriate approach to diagnosis and management of a neurological Lyme disease and infectious causes of stroke. Case discussions with audience questions will be encouraged. This program complements C218: Infections of the Nervous System I: Diagnostic Testing of Neurological Infections and C226: Infections of the Nervous System II: Neuro-ID Emergencies, but covers independent topics. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to identify current diagnostic algorithms and treatment recommendations for a variety of advanced infections and infectious complications affecting the central nervous system. Lecture/Faculty: }} Brain Abscess Kelly Baldwin, MD, Danville, PA }} Neuro-HIV Felicia Chow, MD, San Francisco, CA Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2

Neurohospitalist

Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

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Los Angeles Friday April 20, 2018 10:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m. LA CONVENTION CENTER

See How We’re Giving Back to the Los Angeles Community Designed to connect neurology patients, families, caregivers, and students throughout the Los Angeles area to local and national experts to learn the latest research advances and get their toughest questions answered.

Encourage Your Patients to Attend The Brain Health Fair is a free public event! If you have patients in the area, let them know about this fun-filled, educational event—everyone’s welcome!

Seeking Physician Volunteers While this event is designed for the public, we are looking for volunteers—including Spanish-speaking physicians— to help out during the event in many different ways. Contact wvokaty@aan.com if you’re interested.

Learn more at BrainHealthFair.com


Spanish-language Track Overview

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e’re expanding our Spanish-language curriculum! Look for education courses and experiential learning area talks on a variety of topics, including MS, epilepsy, stroke, CNS infection and tropical medicine, and more—taught entirely in Spanish. Sunday, April 22, 2018

Thursday, April 26, 2018

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C59  Simposio Español: Actualización Sobre el Tratamiento de la Esclerosis Múltiple

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C194  Spanish Symposium: Update on Stroke Therapy

Monday, April 23, 2018 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C95  Spanish Symposium: Update on CNS Infections and Tropical Medicine

Tuesday, April 24, 2018

3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m. X Neurological Exam Tips and Tricks: En Español

Friday, April 27, 2018 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. C233  Actualización Científica Durante el Congreso Anual II

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C132  Actualization Científica en Español Durante el Congreso Anual I

Wednesday, April 25, 2018

Spanish-language

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. C171  Spanish Symposium: Update on Epilepsy Therapy for Pharmacoresistant Epilepsy

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Program Tracks

Spanish-language Track

Course

Course Sunday, April 22, 2018

C59

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Simposio Español: Actualización Sobre el Tratamiento de la Esclerosis Múltiple

Topic: MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease Director: Lilyana M. Amezcua, MD, Los Angeles, CA

JK

Program Description: Los avances en la esclerosis múltiple han producido tratamientos más complejos que requieren que los médicos generales se familiaricen con los cambios y las posibles consecuencias de las terapias modificadoras de la enfermedad de alta eficacia en el cuidado de la EM. A través de presentaciones de casos comunes y más desafiantes presentados en español, el profesorado facilitará una discusión con la audiencia hispanohablante de escenarios de la vida real y la evaluación del tratamiento. Cada caso será seguido por una descripción general y actualización sobre el tema. Este curso se presentará en español. Upon Completion: Los participantes deben familiarizarse con el diagnóstico de la EM, sus imitadores comunes y diversos tratamientos modificadores de la enfermedadque sera presentada en español. Lecture/Faculty: }} MS Diagnosis and Treatment of Relapses Victor M. Rivera, MD, FAAN, Houston, TX }} MS Disease Modifying Treatments Marcelo Matiello, MD, Boston, MA Core Competencies:  Patient Care, Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist

Monday, April 23, 2018

C95

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Spanish Symposium: Update on CNS Infections and Tropical Medicine

Topics: Infectious Disease; MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease Director: Oscar H. Del Brutto, MD, FAAN, Miami, FL

J K Program Description: Infectious diseases of the central nervous system affect millions of people in tropical areas, where most of these conditions are linked to poverty and underdevelopment. In addition, increased tourism and immigration have turned some formerly geographically restricted infections into widespread conditions. Parasites and viruses are top ranked among infectious diseases in the tropics. In addition, tropical neurology is not confined to infections, since other conditions such as nutritional and toxic disorders, as well as bites from snakes and other poisonous animals represent significant causes of disease in rural areas of these regions. Infections and other tropical diseases of the nervous system cause pleomorphic and nonspecific clinical syndromes, including seizure disorders, subacute or chronic meningitis, acute or subacute encephalitis, space-occupying brain lesions, stroke, and myelopathy. In this course we will review the most common tropical diseases in the tropics. This program will be presented in Spanish. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to recognize and treat the most common infections and other diseases affecting the nervous system in tropical areas. Lecture/Faculty: }} Viral Infections of the CNS in the Tropics Faculty }} Advances in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Neurocysticercosis Oscar H. Del Brutto, MD, FAAN, Miami, FL }} Non-infectious Tropical Diseases of the Nervous System Gustavo C. Roman, MD, FAAN, Houston, TX Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

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H = Advocacy D = Career J = Clinical Knowledge

A = Edutainment B = History E = Personal Development

F = Practice Management G = Research K = Spanish Language

I = Technology C = Wellness

$ = Additional Fee Required  L = Leadership University

Course Tuesday, April 24, 2018

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

C132 Actualización Científica en Español Durante el Congreso Anual I

Topic: General Neurology Director: Alejandro Tobon, MD, San Antonio, TX

GK

Program Description: Esta plataforma ofrece a los participantes la oportunidad de escuchar en español un resumen de los estudios científicos mas relevantes presentados durante el Congreso Anual de Neurología. Los tópicos son revisados por un grupo de expertos quienes analizan la información científica proveída por los investigadores y su relevancia clínica. Este curso se presentará en español. Upon Completion: Se espera que los participantes obtengan un mejor entendimiento de los estudios científicos mas relevantes presentados durante el Congreso Anual. Lecture/Faculty: }} Actualización Científica Durante el Congreso Anual I Jose Gutierrez, MD, New York, NY Joel Armando Salinas, MD, Boston, MA Alejandro Tobon, MD, San Antonio, TX Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Didactic

use of stereoencephalography for a more accurate localization of epileptogenic areas in non-lesional focal epilepsies and the use of neuromodulation techniques such as Responsive NeuroStimulation and Deep Brain Stimulation of thalamic nuclei. The program will be complemented with presentation of challenging cases that illustrate the use of these new pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic therapies. These cases will also be used to facilitate discussion among the faculty and with the audience. This program will be presented in Spanish. Upon Completion: Participants should be able to recognize the role of third generation AEDs in the management of epilepsy; decide on the use of various surgical strategies in the the presurgical evaluation and surgical management of non-lesional focal epilepsy; and have an understanding of when to chose one of the neurostimulation modalities (Response Neurostimulation System vs vagus nerve stimulation vs deep brain stimulation of anterior thalamic nuclei). Lecture/Faculty: }} Update in Pharmacologic Treatments of Epilepsy Faculty }} Update on Non-Pharmacologic Therapies in Epilepsy Andres M. Kanner, MD, FAAN, Miami, FL }} Challenging Cases of Treatment-Resistant Epilepsy: An Open Discussion Jose E. Cavazos, MD, PhD, FAAN, San Antonio, TX Core Competencies:  Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Medical Knowledge, Patient Care, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement, Professionalism, Systems-Based Practice Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive, Panel Discussion CME Credits:  2

CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Recommended Audience:  Epileptologist, Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee

Course Wednesday, April 25, 2018 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

C171 Spanish Symposium: Update on Epilepsy

Therapy for Pharmaco-resistant Epilepsy

Topic: Epilepsy/Clinical Neurophysiology (EEG) Director: Andres M. Kanner, MD, FAAN, Miami, FL

JK

Spanish-language

Program Description: Approximately 30% to 40% of patients with epilepsy fail to achieve seizure remission with antiepileptic drug therapy. In the last decade, there have been important innovations in pharmacologic, surgical and neuromodulation therapies. The aim of this program is to highlight the latest advances in the pharmacologic treatment with third generation AEDs, the new strategies of epilepsy surgery relying on less invasive techniques, such as laser ablation and the AAN.com/view/AM18 219


Program Tracks

Spanish-language Track

Course Thursday, April 26, 2018

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C194 Spanish Symposium: Update on Stroke Therapy

Topic: Cerebrovascular Disease and Interventional Neurology Director: Carlos S. Kase, MD, FAAN, FAHA, Atlanta, GA

JK

Program Description: Este programa educativo tiene por objeto presentar una actualización de la información sobre la terapia del ictus cerebrovascular. El formato incluye 2 presentaciones sobre el estado actual de la terapia del ictus isquémico y hemorrágico, seguidas por una sesión interactiva de discusión de casos seleccionados por los ponentes o por miembros de la audiencia. Este curso se presentará en español. Upon Completion: Al completar el programa, los participantes debieran estar al día en los aspectos básicos de la terapia del ictus isquémico y hemorrágico, incluyendo la última información relacionada con el manejo neurointervencionista del ictus isquémico agudo, opciones para el tratamiento del ictus relacionado a la presencia de un foramen oval permeable, y manejo de la presión arterial en la etapa inicial del ictus hemorrágico intraparenquimatoso. Lecture/Faculty: }} Spanish: Update on Stroke Therapy Carlos S. Kase, MD, FAAN, FAHA, Atlanta, GA Enrique C. Leira, MD, MS, FAAN, Iowa City, IA Jose Gabriel Romano, MD, FAAN, Miami, FL Core Competencies:  Patient Care Teaching Style:  Audience Participation, Case-Based, Didactic, Interactive CME Credits:  2 Recommended Audience:  Neurohospitalist, Specialist Neurologist, Trainee, Advanced Practice Provider, General Neurologist

Experiential Learning Area Thursday, April 26, 2018

3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Neurological Exam Tips and Tricks: En Español Topic: General Neurology Speakers: Faculty Experiential Learning Area: HeadTalks

DJK

Program Description: A yearly fan favorite, this program will focus on the useful aspects of the neuro exam in Spanish.

Course Friday, April 27, 2018

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

C233 Actualización Científica Durante el Congreso Anual II

Topic: General Neurology Director: Jose E. Cavazos, MD, PhD, FAAN, San Antonio, TX

GK

Program Description: Esta plataforma ofrece a los participantes la oportunidad de escuchar en español un resumen de los estudios científicos mas relevantes presentados durante el Congreso Anual de Neurología. Los tópicos son revisados por un grupo de expertos quienes analizan la información científica proveída por los investigadores y su relevancia clínica. Este curso se presentará en español. Upon Completion: Se espera que los participantes obtengan un mejor entendimiento de los estudios científicos mas relevantes presentados durante el Congreso Anual. Lecture/Faculty: }} Actualización Científica Durante el Congreso Anual II Jose E. Cavazos, MD, PhD, FAAN, San Antonio, TX Nicte I. Mejia, MD, Boston, MA Edgar A. Samaniego, MD, Iowa City, IA Core Competencies:  Medical Knowledge, Patient Care Teaching Style:  Didactic CME Credits: 2 Recommended Audience: General Neurologist, Neurohospitalist, Non-Neurologist, Specialist Neurologist, Advanced Practice Provider, Trainee

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P L E A S E J O I N T H E A M E R I C A N B R A I N F O U N D AT I O N AT O U R

COMMITMENT TO CURES EVENT featuring the 2018 Public Leadership in Neurology Award recipient Dr. Temple Grandin and program emcee, comedian Michael Pritchard. Proceeds from this event help us in our commitment to Outsmart Brain Disease and fund crucial research by the best and brightest scientific minds.

J O I N U S AT O U R E V E N T A N D S T O P B Y O U R B O O T H T O L E A R N HOW YOU CAN HELP. VISIT WWW.AMERICANBRAINFOUNDATION.ORG

Commitment to Cures

Los Angeles | April 25, 2018

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Preliminary Scientific Schedule The AAN Annual Meeting brings together a diverse group of scientists from around the globe and from a wide range of specialties and subspecialties to present and discuss the very latest science in the world of neurology. The 2018 Scientific Program reflects this vast neurology spectrum. You’ll find everything from the latest updates on diagnostic and treatment techniques to prevention strategies throughout the meeting’s more than 2,700+ platform and poster presentations. Note: All below dates, times, and program information are tentative, and subject to change. The finalized scientific program will be available in February 2018.

Saturday, April 21 4:15 p.m.–5:30 p.m. Hot Topics Plenary Session

Sunday, April 22

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. S1: “Best of” Session: Cerebrovascular Disease 9:15 a.m.–12:00 p.m. Presidential Plenary Session 11:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m. Poster Session I 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. S2: Aging and Dementia Platform Session S3: Movement Disorders Platform Session S4: Neuroepidemiology Platform Session S5: General Neurology Platform Session 3:30 p.m.–4:10 p.m. S6: Pain and Palliative Care Platform Session 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. S7: MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease Platform Session S8: Epilepsy/Clinical Neurophysiology (EEG) Platform Session S9: C erebrovascular Disease and Interventional Neurology Platform Session

Tuesday, April 24 8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. S18: “Best of” Session: Headache Platform Session 9:15 a.m.–11:30 a.m. Clinical Trials Plenary Session 11:30 a.m.–7:00 p.m. Poster Session III 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. S19: C erebrovascular Disease and Interventional Neurology Platform Session S20: N  euromuscular Disease/Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG) Platform Session S21: Neuro-oncology Platform Session N3: N  euroscience in the Clinic: Challenges in Genetic Diagnosis in Neurology Invited Science Session: Movement Disorders 3:30 p.m.–4:20 p.m. S22: Autonomic Disorders 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. S23: MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease Platform Session S24: N  euromuscular Disease/Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG) Platform Session

N1: Neuroscience in the Clinic: Autism Mythbusters

S25: Movement Disorders Platform Session

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. S10: “ Best of” Session: Epilepsy/Clinical Neurophysiology (EEG)

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. S26: “Best of” Session: Movement Disorders

Monday, April 23

9:15 a.m.–11:30 a.m. Contemporary Clinical Issues Plenary Session 11:30 a.m.–7:00 p.m. Poster Session II 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.  S11: MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease Platform Session S12: Research Methodology and Education Platform Session S13: C erebrovascular Disease and Interventional Neurology Platform Session S14: Neuro-ophthalmology/Neuro-otology Platform Session 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. S15: Sleep Platform Session S16: Movement Disorders Platform Session S17: Epilepsy/Clinical Neurophysiology (EEG) Platform Session N2: N  euroscience in the Clinic: Antisense Oligonucleotide (ASO) Therapy 222 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

Wednesday, April 25

9:15 a.m.–11:30 a.m. Frontiers in Neuroscience Plenary Session 11:30 a.m.–7:00 p.m. Poster Session IV 1:00 p.m.–1:50 p.m. S27: Practice, Policy, and Ethics Platform Session 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. S28: Child Neurology and Developmental Neurology Platform Session S29: Movement Disorders Platform Session S30: N  euromuscular Disease/Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG) Platform Session S31: Headache Platform Session 3:30 p.m.–4:00 p.m. S32: Global Health Platform Session


3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. S33: Behavioral Neurology Platform Session S34: Child Neurology and Developmental Neurology S35: MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease Platform Session N4: Neuroscience in the Clinic: Opioid Use and Abuse: The Overlapping Neurobiology of Pain and Addiction, and the Path Toward Better Treatments Invited Science Session: Sleep 4:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. S36: Neuro-rehabilitation Platform Session

Thursday, April 26

8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. S37: “Best of” Session: Neuromuscular Disease/Clinical Neurophysiology (EMG) Platform Session 9:15 a.m.–11:30 a.m. Controversies in Neurology Plenary Session 11:30 a.m.–7:00 p.m. Poster Session V

Friday, April 27 8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. S46: “ Best of” Session: MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease 9:15 a.m.–11:30 a.m. Neurology Year in Review Plenary Session 11:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m. Poster Session VI 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. S47: Aging and Dementia Platform Session S48: Neuro Trauma and Sports Neurology Platform Session S49: General Neurology Platform Session 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

S50: MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease Platform Session

S51: Epilepsy Platform Session S52: C erebrovascular Disease and Interventional Neurology Platform Session N7: N  euroscience in the Clinic: REM Sleep Behavior Disorder–Past, Present, Future

1:00 p.m.–2:00 p.m. S38: History of Neurology Platform Session 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.  S39: Cerebrovascular Disease Platform Session S40: Infectious Disease Platform Session S41: Neurocritical Care Platform Session N5: N  euroscience in the Clinic: Treatment of Progressive Multiple Sclerosis 3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.  S42: Headache Platform Session S43: MS and CNS Inflammatory Disease Platform Session S44: Movement Disorders Platform Session S45: Neuromuscular Disease/Clinical Neurophysiology(EMG Platform Session) N6: N  euroscience in the Clinic: Neurologic Complications of Cancer Immunotherapy: A New Frontier in Neuro‑inflammation Invited Science Session: Neuro Trauma

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Experience Unique Opportunities for Students, Residents, and Fellows The AAN Annual Meeting offers a unique experience for students, residents, and fellows with boundless opportunities to get exposure to a variety of interests and career disciplines, and network with leading neurologists and neurology professionals from around the world.

Registration

Medical Student Poster Hall Tour

FREE for Medical Students

Students will be invited to sign up to tour the poster hall in a small group with a neurologist. This unique experience allows you to explore the various research topics with a very knowledgeable guide.

Annual Meeting registration is FREE to medical students, graduate students, and PhD candidates who present a student ID card or are AAN members. Sign up for an AAN complimentary student membership at AAN.com/view/membership.

Only $245 for Junior Residents and Junior Fellows Annual Meeting registration is only $245 (a more than $800 savings compared to nonmember neurologist registration!) before the March 29, 2018, early registration deadline. Gold Registration—Upgrade to Gold Registration to receive a copy of Annual Meeting On Demand. Some courses require pre-registration, may have a separate registration rate, and are subject to closure due to reaching maximum capacity.

Volunteer Opportunities Serve as a program monitor or a workshop volunteer and receive gratis registration. See page 232 » for full details.

Mark Your Calendar! Medical Student Digital Scavenger Hunt Saturday, April 21 – Tuesday, April 24, 2018

Every day, students can participate in this digital scavenger hunt by attending three events from a daily list and posting pictures to social media. The first three people to tweet or post will receive a prize.

New Young Investigator Program

Sunday, April 22 – Friday, April 27, 2018

New Medical Student Symposium: Careers in Neurology Sunday, April 22, 2018

Attend this half-day event to explore the exciting opportunities that a career in neurology can offer. This program is specifically designed for medical students to attend and discover their career potential as well as network with other students. Scholarships are available.

Futures in Research Luncheon

Monday, April 23, 2018, 12:00-1:30pm Brings together medical students, trainees, and junior faculty in neurology with leading clinician investigators to learn about a career in research. The program features presentations, a panel of contributors from various research backgrounds, and networking discussions on how to determine a type of career in research, select training programs, and identify funding opportunities. Attendees are invited to participate in Mentoring Sessions.

Faculty and Trainee Reception

Monday, April 24, 2018, 6:00 p.m.–9:00 p.m. Network with your peers and share ideas, honor award recipients during the award presentation, find information about residency programs or on pursuing fellowships and/or careers in neurology academics, research, or practice, and explore exhibits by private practice groups and recruiters/headhunters regarding job opportunities.

Saturday, April 21 – Monday, April 22, 2018 Programming exclusively for young investigators: support your budding career in research with training and mentoring specifically for medical students and residents. Components include training, mentoring, and networking designed to address the specific needs of pre- and early-career researchers. Scholarships and opportunities to present your research are available.

224 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

Look for Annual Meeting guide at www.aan.com/view/studentsRF


PRESENTAMOS NUESTRO CURRÍCULO EN ESPAÑOL Conozca estos programas impartidos completamente en español, durante la Reunión Anual de 2018 en Los Ángeles: • Actualizaciones científicas de la • Terapia de esclerosis múltiple Reunión Anual • Infecciones del SNC y Medicina Tropical • Examen neurológico • Epilepsia • ¡Y más! • Derrames

Convocatoria a médicos que hablen español para Brain Health Fair 2018 Buscamos expertos de habla hispana para presentar los últimos avances en neurología, en español, durante esta feria gratuita y familiar para pacientes neurológicos, sus familias y responsables de su cuidado en el área de Los Ángeles. El evento se celebra el día 20 de abril. Póngase en contacto con Laurie Dixon escribiendo a ldixon@aan.com para ofrecerse como voluntario.

IMPULSANDO A LA NEUROLOGÍA. IMPULSÁNDOLO A USTED.

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Connect at Social Events There’s no better way to combine an evening of great fun and entertainment with unparalleled networking than to experience the 70th Anniversary Celebration, Neurobowl®, Closing Party—or all three. Whether you attend the Annual Meeting at the beginning or the end, these exciting social events are not-to-be-missed.

Neurobowl® Saturday, April 21, 6:00 p.m.–8:00 p.m. Who will win this year’s coveted Neurobowl Trophy? Come find out during this exciting Annual Meeting event, hosted by AAN former president Thomas R. Swift, MD, FAAN, along with Kapil D. Sethi, MD, FRCP, FAAN, and Bert B. Vargas, MD, FAAN. Enjoy delicious food and beverages as the best and brightest in neurology compete for the coveted Neurobowl trophy in an entertaining game-show format.

Exhibit Hall Networking Reception Monday, April 23, 4:30 p.m.–6:00 p.m. Open to all Annual Meeting attendees, this new event extends hall hours to give attendees an opportunity to mingle with exhibitors. Light snacks and beverages are served in the Exhibit Hall, Monday, April 23, 4:30 p.m.–6:00 p.m.

2018 Run/Walk for Brain Research Tuesday, April 24, 6:30 a.m.–8:30 a.m. Support research in neurology and join us for a 5k run or one-mile walk in Los Angeles. Both occasional and seasoned runners, as well as walkers, will enjoy this beautiful event for a good cause. All proceeds will go to help support brain research. The race is open to all meeting attendees and their families. Water and refreshments will be available following the race. The registration fee is $50 until March 29.

Closing Party Happy Hour Friday, April 27, 5:30 p.m.–7:00 p.m.

70th Anniversary Celebration Sunday, April 22, 7:00 p.m.–11:00 p.m. Celebrate the AAN’s 70th Anniversary at Universal Studios! The first 4,000 Annual Meeting registered attendees* get a free ticket to the event. Tickets include transportation to and from the event, food and beverages all evening, access to rides, and studio tour. Pick up your ticket and lanyard at the Los Angeles Convention Center by 2:00 p.m., Sunday, April 22. Pre-reserved gratis tickets that are not picked up will be released for a rush line and you will incur an administration fee. Additional tickets may be purchased for $115. For more information, visit AAN.com/view/70anniversary * Limit one free ticket per registered Annual Meeting attendee.

Exhibit Hall Opening Luncheon Sunday, April 22, 11:30 a.m.–1:00 p.m. Attend the opening lunch to mingle with fellow attendees and preview the latest products and services available in the neurologic industry. Lunch will be served. The exhibits will be open at this time. 226 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

Celebrate the end of a great meeting at a special early-evening happy hour event! Enjoy drinks, games, and socializing with colleagues, and swing out to your favorite jazz standards with a live performance by NEUROJAZZ, a five-piece ensemble led by AAN member Phillip Pearl, MD, FAAN. Each registered meeting attendee will receive one free ticket to this event. Guest tickets are available through registration for $50.

Reunion/In Conjunction With Meetings Reconnect with your peers and program directors, and network with your fellow alumni at various department reunion meetings occurring throughout the Annual Meeting. These In Conjunction With (ICW) Meetings, are designed for functions that include Annual Meeting attendees but are not planned by or sponsored by the AAN. If your department is interested in hosting its alumni meeting during the 2018 Annual Meeting, reserve your meeting today at AAN.com/view/ ICW or by contacting Grace Henderson at ICW@aan.com or (612) 928-6103.


Bring the Entire Family! Why make the trip to the Annual Meeting alone? Vibrant and exciting Los Angeles is the perfect family-friendly destination—full of activities for you to share with your family. Enjoy the enhanced Family Room in the Los Angeles Convention Center: • Private mothers’ area for nursing mothers • Changing stations • Special lounge area where everyone in the family can come and relax • Livestreams of courses, Plenary Sessions, and more

Check with your hotel concierge on or before arrival for details on child care options throughout the city. Take the whole family to some of the best fun and entertainment Los Angeles has to offer, including: • Universal Studios Hollywood • Disneyland • Santa Monica Beach & Pier • Marina Del Rey beaches and water sports • Getty Center Art Museum for Kids • California Science Center • La Brea Tar Pits • Much more!

Visit AAN.com/view/FamilyFriendly to learn more about all the fun opportunities awaiting your family!

ADVANCING NEUROLOGY. ADVANCING YOU.

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On Demand Enhance your Annual Meeting experience with Annual Meeting On Demand. There is no better place than the AAN Annual Meeting for a high-quality educational experience in neurology. With the robust offering of concurrent courses available during the meeting, it is impossible to attend each one. Annual Meeting On Demand delivers captured content from the Annual Meeting to your computer or favorite mobile device so that you can experience all that the meeting has to offer. Annual Meeting On Demand is a CME accredited comprehensive digital library with more than 500 hours1 of presentations from the 2018 AAN Annual Meeting including syllabi for 200+ programs. Features of Annual Meeting On Demand include: • Online access to content within 24 hours of live presentations • Integrated online CME testing • An advanced search engine that delivers a direct link to the specific presentations and slides containing your search terms • Downloadable PDFs of presentation slides and syllabi summaries • Downloadable MP3 files provide the option of listening to any (or all) lectures while driving, traveling, or any occasion where audio is most convenient. • A complimentary portable hard drive2 for offline viewing when internet is not available. 1 Specific presentations within a session may not be available or may be audio only if the presenter has confidential patient information or otherwise declines to be recorded. 2 Hard drive does not include all the functionality available online, such as Advanced Search, MP3/PDF Downloads, Bookmarks, Recently Viewed and CME testing.


Annual Meeting Attendee Pricing: Gold Registration Upgrade to gold registration and receive all sessions at the meeting* as well as access to Annual Meeting On Demand. With so many concurrent sessions, Gold Registration is the best value for attendees who want to experience the full value of the meeting. * Some courses require pre-registration, may have a separate registration fee, and are subject to closure due to reaching maximum capacity.

Select Gold Registration when you register for the meeting!

Syllabi USB Upgrade! All attendees will receive complimentary online access to all Annual Meeting Syllabi for one year. Upgrade to a Syllabi On Demand USB drive for permanent use. Syllabi On Demand is a quick reference tool with summaries for 200+ programs from the 2018 Annual Meeting. Order Online: AAN.com/view/Register

Not attending the 2018 Annual Meeting? You can still pre-order On Demand products prior to the meeting and receive a special discount. Learn more by calling or visiting online. Order Online: orders.ondemand.org/aan/premeet Order by Phone: (800) 501-2303 or (818) 844-3299 Pre-meeting discounts expire April 20, 2018.

Gold Registration BEFORE March 29, 2018

AFTER March 29, 2018

STUDENTS

$199

$199

SENIOR & HONORARY

$399

$399

JUNIOR

$444

$534

NON-NEUROLOGIST MEMBER

$619

$769

MEMBER

$1,119

$1,379

NONMEMBER

$1,819

$2,259

Syllabi USB Pricing Syllabi On Demand (USB upgrade)

MEMBER, SENIOR, & HONORARY

$39

NONMEMBER

$59

JUNIOR AND NONNEUROLOGIST MEMBER

$29

Non-Attendee Pricing Annual Meeting On Demand

Syllabi On Demand

MEMBER, SENIOR, & HONORARY

$649

$199

NONMEMBER

$949

$299

JUNIOR AND NONNEUROLOGIST MEMBER

$199

$99


General Information Accreditation/CME/Core Competencies Accreditation The American Academy of Neurology Institute (AANI) is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

AMA Credit Designation The American Academy of Neurology Institute designates this live activity for a maximum of (*) AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. *See individual program descriptions in this booklet for the maximum number of credits per program.

CME/Participation Records AANI has mechanisms in place to record, and when authorized by the participating physician, verify participation in the CME activity. To receive CME for the Annual Meeting live program, participants must: (1) Have their badge printed on-site and be verified as eligible for credit; (2) Attend the program(s); and (3) Submit the evaluation form for the program(s). CME is given only when all three steps are completed. AAN member CME and participation transcripts are available approximately four to six weeks following the close of the meeting via the AAN’s NeuroTracker™ at AAN.com/view/NeuroTracker. Nonmembers’ CME credits and participation transcripts will be sent automatically via email.

ABPN Statement The American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology has reviewed the AAN Annual Meeting and has approved this product as a part of a comprehensive lifelong learning program which is mandated by the ABMS as a necessary component of maintenance of certification.

Core Competencies The AANI develops its activities/educational interventions in the context of the desirable physician attributes; specifically, of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Core Competencies which include: }} Patient Care }} Medical Knowledge }} Interpersonal and Communication Skills }} Practice-based Learning and Improvement }} Professionalism }} Systems-based Practice For more information on the definitions of the ACGME core 230 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

competencies, please consult the following webpage: ACGME.org. Once again, the Annual Meeting CME offerings, at the program and lecture level, are identified according to these competencies. Through identifying individual programs by competencies, attendees can easily identify and attend programs that meet each core competency. AMA CME Definition/Educational Content of Certified CME The AMA HOD and the Council on Medical Education have defined continuing medical education as follows: CME consists of educational activities which serve to maintain, develop, or increase the knowledge, skills, and professional performance and relationships that a physician uses to provide services for patients, the public, or the profession. The content of CME is the body of knowledge and skills generally recognized and accepted by the profession as within the basic medical sciences, the discipline of clinical medicine, and the provision of health care to the public. (HOD policy #300.988)

Certified CME is defined as: 1. Nonpromotional learning activities certified for credit prior to the activity by an organization authorized by the credit system owner, or 2. Nonpromotional learning activities for which the credit system owner directly awards credit Accredited CME providers may certify nonclinical subjects (e.g., office management, patient-physician communications, faculty development) for AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™ as long as these are appropriate to a physician audience and benefit the profession, patient care, or public health. CME activities may describe or explain complementary and alternative health care practices. As with any CME activity, these need to include discussion of the existing level of scientific evidence that supports the practices. However, education that advocates specific alternative therapies or teaches how to perform associated procedures, without scientific evidence or general acceptance among the profession that supports their efficacy and safety, cannot be certified for AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™.

Content Validation The AANI, as an ACCME accredited provider, is responsible for validating the clinical content of CME activities that it provides. Specifically, (1) All the recommendations involving clinical medicine in a CME activity must be based on evidence that is accepted within the profession of medicine as adequate justification for their indications and contraindications in the care of patients. (2) All scientific research referred to, reported, or used in CME in support or justification of a patient care recommendation must conform to the generally accepted standards of experimental design, data collection, and analysis.


Disclaimers/Disclosures Disclaimer The primary purpose of the Annual Meeting is to meet the educational needs of its members and address practice gaps by providing practice oriented and scientifically based educational activities that will maintain and advance competence and performance in the field of neurology. A diversity of opinions exists in the medical field and the views of the Annual Meeting faculty do not represent those of the AAN/ AANI or constitute endorsement by the AAN/AANI. The AAN/AANI disclaims any and all liability for the claims that may result from the use or nonuse of information, publications, therapies, and/or services discussed at the Annual Meeting. The activities conducted and content distributed at the Annual Meeting are for educational purposes only and do not constitute standard of care or substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. In all cases, the selected course of action should be considered by the treating provider in the context of treating the individual patient. Use of the content provided is voluntary. The AAN/AANI provide this information on an “as is� basis and makes no warranty, expressed or implied, regarding the information. The AAN/AANI specifically disclaim any warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular use or purpose. The AAN/ AANI assume no responsibility for any injury or damage to persons or property arising out of or related to any use of this information or for any errors or omissions. Attendee assumes any and all liability associated with attendance/participation at the Annual Meeting.

Relationship Disclosure and Conflict of Interest Resolution According to AANI and ACCME policies, everyone who is in a position to control the content of an education activity must disclose financial relationships with any commercial interest to the provider. An individual who refuses to disclose relevant financial relationships is disqualified from being a planning committee member, a teacher, or an author of CME, and cannot have control of, or responsibility for, the development, management, presentation, or evaluation of the CME activity. In addition, the AANI must implement a mechanism to identify and resolve all conflicts of interest prior to the education activity being delivered to learners. The resolution of conflict is handled by the Education and Science Committees. Disclosures for everyone in the position to control Annual Meeting content can be found on the AAN Annual Meeting website. In addition, education and science faculty disclosures can also be found in the syllabi, slides, handouts, and/or are given verbally from the podium.

Unlabeled Use Disclosure The AANI requires all Annual Meeting presenters to disclose if a therapy/product is not labeled for the use being discussed or if the therapy/product is still investigational. Unlabeled use disclosures can be found in the program materials.

Grants Some Annual Meeting education and scientific programs are supported in part by educational grants from commercial entities. Disclosure of the educational grant is done through acknowledgment statements on the program materials, signs outside of the room, and verbally from the podium. Although educational grants are received, all programs are developed and implemented solely by the Education Committee and Science Committee. The terms, conditions, and purposes of the commercial support are documented in a written agreement between the AANI and commercial supporter. The AAN uses grant funds to support and enhance existing, as well as new, education programs.

Services Luggage Check Limited luggage check is available in the business center at the Los Angeles Convention Center. Check with your concierge at your hotel to make your arrangements.

Transportation Due to the proximity of the hotels to The Los Angeles Convention Center, the AAN will provide shuttle service for select hotels. The housing website AAN.com/view/bookhotel indicates whether a hotel is walkable or in the shuttle zone. Please use this information when making your housing selection.

Shuttle Bus Pass Complimentary shuttle buses will only be available to those who have made their reservations within the official AAN housing block, and will be indicated on name badges. Attendees staying outside of the block must purchase a shuttle bus pass from AAN, if wishing to use the shuttle.

Wireless Connection Wireless Internet hotspots will be available at the Los Angeles Convention Center.

First Aid Station A first aid station is located on the lobby level of the Los Angeles Convention Center. The station is staffed by licensed medical professionals and fully equipped with supplies, including automatic external defibrillators (AED). The station is operational throughout the duration of the Annual Meeting.

Prayer Room A prayer room will be available in the Convention Center for attendees looking for a quiet space for thought, reflection, and prayer.

Child Care Information A variety of child care options are available in Los Angeles. Check with the concierge at your hotel on or before your arrival to make your arrangements.

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General Information Mothers/Family Room A private room will be available for nursing mothers. Please note that this room will not be staffed.

Guidelines Photography and Recording of Programs The AAN strictly prohibits all unauthorized photography (flash, digital, or otherwise), audio and/or video recording during the Annual Meeting. Equipment will be confiscated. Photography is allowed only in the Poster Sessions.

Consent to Use of Images All portions of the Annual Meeting may be photographed, videotaped, or recorded for future rebroadcast, distribution, promotion, or other commercial purpose. By attending the Annual Meeting you are consenting to being recorded, photographed, and videotaped without acknowledgment, payment, or remuneration of any kind. Any recordings, photographs, or videos of any nature are the sole property of AAN and its successors and assignees.

Cell Phones The AAN requests that attendees turn cellular phones and pagers to vibrate mode upon entering all Annual Meeting programs.

Language The official language of the Annual Meeting is English. No simultaneous translation is available.

No Smoking The Los Angeles Convention Center is a nonsmoking facility. For the health and comfort of everyone, smoking is prohibited at Annual Meeting functions, which include all education and scientific activities and social functions.

AAN Press Room Only authorized media may use the Press Room at the Annual Meeting. Journalists must check in at the Press Room and provide proper credentials. For more information, contact Renee Tessman at rtessman@aan.com or (612) 928-6137.

232 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

Continued

Volunteer Opportunities Education and Scientific Program Monitors Monitors are needed for all education program offerings and scientific platform sessions to assist directors, faculty, session co-chairs, and staff as required. The AAN will give discounts to registration fees as well as grant CME credit for the monitored program. Space is available on a first-come, first-served basis for current Junior and Student AAN members. For an application form or more information, contact Laurie Dixon at ldixon@aan.com or (612) 928-6154.

Skills Workshop Volunteers Volunteers are needed to participate in the Neurophysiologic Intraoperative Monitoring Skills Workshop on Saturday, April 21, the Neuromuscular Ultrasound Skills Workshop on Sunday, April 22, the EMG Skills Workshop: Basic on Tuesday, April 24, the Clinical Uses of Botulinum Toxin for Dystonia Workshop on Wednesday, April 25, and the Clinical Uses of Botulinum Toxin for Spasticity Workshop on Thursday, April 26. Skills workshop subjects will receive a waived meeting registration and workshop fee as well as payment of $40 per noninvasive session and $60 per invasive session. Space is available on a first-come, first-served basis for current Junior and Student AAN members. For more information, contact Laurie Dixon at ldixon@aan.com or (612) 928-6154.

Weather/Attire April brings warm temperatures to Los Angeles. Daily maximum temperatures usually range from 70 degrees to 76 degrees Fahrenheit. The minimum temperature usually falls between 52 degrees Fahrenheit and 56 degrees Fahrenheit. The AAN promotes business casual attire for the duration of the Annual Meeting. Consider bringing a light jacket or sweater to Annual Meeting activities since meeting room temperatures and personal comfort levels vary.


Hotel and Reservations Why Book a Hotel Room Through the AAN? }} Only guests who book within the block can use the complimentary shuttle service

}} Friendly booking terms: No change fees or full prepayment upon booking

}} Greater networking opportunities exist in hotels within the block

}} Easy to modify reservations

}} Housing representatives are available in advance and on-site for assistance with official hotels }} Reservations within the block are better protected from hotel relocation

}} Future housing and registration fees will stay low by booking at the official hotels. Future cost savings for all depends on strong in-the-block bookings.

Discounted hotel rates are available until March 2, 2018, or until the block is filled. After this date, reservations are subject to availability. Hotel fees will be posted and charged in American dollars.

Save on Hotel Reservations Annual Meeting hotel reservations are processed by Convention Management Resources (CMR). The AAN makes it easy and convenient to book your hotel rooms for the 70th Annual Meeting. Booking online allows you to: }} Take advantage of the AAN’s special hotel rates }} View room descriptions, photos, and availability }} Access maps of hotel proximity to Annual Meeting locations AAN Online Hotel Reservations are available:

Look for this seal to ensure you are booking through the AAN’s official housing vendor, CMR, and avoid fraudulent sites by only booking on sites where you see this seal.

Online: AAN.com/view/BookHotel Phone: US/Canada (800) 676-4226 or International (415) 979-228 Monday–Friday: 6:00 a.m.–6:00 p.m. PT (Credit Card reservations only)

Deposits

}} All hotels require a credit card guarantee of $300 (US dollars) per room and $500 (US dollars) per suite. Deposits will be credited towards your first night’s room and tax. }} No hotel reservation will be processed without a credit card guarantee. }} Deposits are refundable up to seven days prior to arrival, after which there will be no refunds. }} Credit cards will be charged for one night’s room and tax if you fail to arrive on the confirmed date of arrival or if you fail to cancel your reservation at least seven days prior to arrival.

Group Accommodations Deadline: March 2, 2018 Blocks of 10 or more sleeping rooms are considered a group. Submit your written request to aanam.cmrushelp.com and you will be contacted by an AAN Housing Consultant.

Additional Tax/Assessments }} Rates do not include the 15.695% hotel tax. }} An $8 per night assessment fee is included to offset the expense of the meeting.

Confirmations, Changes, and Cancellations You will receive your hotel confirmation from CMR. This is the only confirmation you will receive. }} Please check your arrival and departure dates on the confirmation carefully. }} After March 2, 2018, contact CMR to book a room. After this date, however, rooms are subject to availability. Note: Some hotels may charge a penalty for changes made to your departure date after you have checked in.

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Choose your accommodations to match the Los Angeles you want to experience!Â

Arts District This high-art, high-class neighborhood boasts fashionable restaurants and historic landmarks. All of these are on the shuttle route.

Highlights: }} Disney Concert Hall }} The Broad }} Museum of Contemporary Art }} Union Station }} Grand Central Market }} Broadway Theatre District L.A. Live The closest neighborhood to the Los Angeles Convention Center, this lively sports and entertainment hub surrounds Staples Center and Microsoft Theater with an array of sports and music venues, night clubs, restaurants, a bowling alley, museum, and movie theaters. All of these hotels are walkable.

Highlights: }} Staples Center }} Microsoft Theater }} Grammy Museum

234 2018 AAN Annual Meeting

Hotels: }} JW Marriott at LA Live }} Ritz-Carlton LA Live }} Courtyard by Marriott LA Live }} Residence Inn LA Live }} Luxe Hotel }} Hotel Indigo }} Hotel Figueroa

Hotels: }} Hilton Checkers Hotel }} InterContinental Los Angeles Downtown

}} The LA Hotel Downtown }} Millennium Biltmore }} Omni Hotel Los Angeles }} Sheraton Grand Los Angeles }} The Standard, Downtown LA }} Westin Bonaventure


Fashion District

Book Your Hotel:

Los Angeles’ premier shopping destination with a unique flair. All of these are on the shuttle route.

Highlights: }} Gallery Row }} LA Flower Market }} Jewelry District }} The Santee Alley }} LA Fabric District

AAN.com/view/BookHotel

Hotels: }} NoMad LA }} The Los Angeles Athletic Club }} Freehand Los Angeles }} LEVEL Furnished Living }} O Hotel

Classic Hollywood: The entertainment capital of the world, and an essential part of the Los Angeles experience for millions of visitors. All of these are on the shuttle route.

Highlights: }} Dolby Theatre }} TCL Chinese Theatre’s Forecourt of the Stars

}} Hollywood Walk of Fame }} Hollywood Bowl }} Pantages Theatre }} El Capitan and Arclight Theaters }} Universal Studios }} Hollywood Sign

Hotels: }} Dream Hotel }} Hilton Garden Inn Los Angeles/ Hollywood

}} Hollywood Roosevelt }} Loews Hollywood }} W Hollywood

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3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

Internet Cost Per Day

Inhouse Restaurants

On Shuttle Route**

$313.00 / $333.00

1 BLOCK

$16.95

3

Walkable

$297.00 / $297.00

2 BLOCKS

NO CHARGE

1

Walkable

$239.00 / $239.00

2 MILES

NO CHARGE

1

Yes

$309.00 / $309.00

7.7 MILES

NO CHARGE

4

Yes

$259.00 / $259.00

1.1 MILES

NO CHARGE

1

Yes

$283.00 / $283.00

1.2 MILES

NO CHARGE

1

Yes

$269.00 / $269.00

8 MILES

NO CHARGE

1

Yes

$369.00 / $369.00

6 BLOCKS

NO CHARGE

1

Walkable

$325.00 / $325.00

3 BLOCKS

NO CHARGE

1

Walkable

$199.00 / $209.00

3.1 MILES

NO CHARGE

1

Yes

3M ile sO ut

Distance to LACC

2M ile sO ut

2

3M ile sO ut

1

Los Angeles Convention Center 201 S. Figueroa St, Los Angeles JW Marriott Los Angeles L.A. LIVE Headquarters Hotel—900 W Olympic Blvd Courtyard by Marriott L.A. LIVE 901 W. Olympic Blvd DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel 120 S Los Angeles St Dream Hollywood 6417 Selma Ave Freehand Los Angeles 416 W 8th St Hilton Checkers Los Angeles 535 S Grand Ave Hilton Garden Inn Hollywood 2005 N Highland Ave Hotel Figueroa 939 S Figueroa St Hotel Indigo Downtown 899 Francisco St Hotel Normandie LA 605 Normandie Ave lnterContinental Downtown 900 Wilshire Blvd Kawada Hotel 200 Hill St LEVEL Furnished Living 888 S Olive St Loews Hollywood Hotel 1755 N Highland Ave The Los Angeles Athletic Club 431 W 7th St Luxe City Center Hotel 1020 S Figueroa St Millennium Biltmore Hotel Los Angeles 506 S Grand Ave NoMad LA 649 S Olive St O Hotel 819 S Flower St Omni Los Angeles Hotel at California Plaza 251 S Olive St Radisson Hotel Los Angeles Midtown at USC 3540 S Figueroa St Residence Inn by Marriott Los Angeles L.A. LIVE 901 W Olympic Blvd Sheraton Grand Los Angeles 711 S Hope St The Hollywood Roosevelt 7000 Hollywood Blvd The L.A. Hotel Downtown 333 S Figueroa St The LINE Los Angeles 3515 Wilshire Blvd The Mayfair Hotel 1256 7th St The Ritz-Carlton, Los Angeles 900 W Olympic Blvd The Standard, Downtown LA 55O S Flower St The Westin Bonaventure 404 S Figueroa St W Hollywood 6250 Hollywood Blvd

Lowest Rates (Single/Double)*

3M ile sO ut

Hotel Name and Address

$325.00 / $325.00

9 BLOCKS

NO CHARGE

4

Yes

$165.00 / $165.00

2 MILES

NO CHARGE

1

Yes

$299.00 / $299.00

9 BLOCKS

NO CHARGE

0

Yes

$280.00 / $280.00

8.3 MILES

NO CHARGE

1

Yes

$239.00 / $239.00

1.1 MILES

NO CHARGE

1

Yes

$289.00 / $289.00

1 BLOCK

NO CHARGE

1

Walkable

$215.00 / $215.00

1.2 MILES

NO CHARGE

2

Yes

$379.00 / $379.00

8 BLOCKS

NO CHARGE

3

Yes

$229.00 / $229.00

7 BLOCKS

NO CHARGE

1

Yes

$249.00 / $249.00

1.5 MILES

NO CHARGE

2

Yes

$209.00 / $209.00

1.6 MILES

NO CHARGE

1

Yes

$319.00 / $329.00

2 BLOCKS

NO CHARGE

0

Walkable

$291.00 / $291.00

1 MILE

NO CHARGE

1

Yes

$299.00 / $299.00

8.1 MILES

NO CHARGE

3

Yes

$265.00 / $265.00

1.1 MILES

NO CHARGE

1

Yes

$258.00 / $258.00

3 MILES

NO CHARGE

1

Yes

$199.00 / $219.00

1.1 MILES

NO CHARGE

1

Yes

$439.00 / $439.00

1 BLOCK

NO CHARGE

2

Walkable

$265.00 / $265.00

1 MILE

NO CHARGE

1

Yes

$274.00 / $274.00

1.1 MILES

NO CHARGE

4

Yes

$329.00 / $329.00

6.4 MILES

NO CHARGE

1

Yes

*Lowest available rate shown. Availability in that room category may be limited, other room categories may be available at a higher rate. ** All hotels will be on the shuttle route for the Opening Party at Universal Studios

2M

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Classic Hollywood Hotels Other Conveniently Located Hotels

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Travel Information Save with Annual Meeting Travel Reservation Direct Through Airlines The Annual Meeting offers a number of ways to save money with different options to make your travel reservations. For 2% -10% discounted airline tickets to the Annual Meeting, use the below discount codes when booking directly through Delta or United Airlines. You must reference the AAN Annual Meeting and provide the appropriate airline discount codes listed below. Please note, flights booked with United Airlines will need to provide both the discount code and the agreement code. Airline Discount Code Phone Number Website Delta NMR2U (800) 328-1111 Delta.com United ZE8Q   Agreement ID: 235608 (800) 521-4041 United.com

Travel Website For travel forms and information updates, visit the AAN Annual Meeting website at AAN.com/view/AM18

Travel Tips Travel Documents/Passports and Entry Requirements Non-US visitors must have valid travel documents/passports to enter Los Angeles to provide proof of their citizenship. Document requirements vary depending on your country of origin, citizenship, the reason for your visit, and the length of your stay, and may include passport or a birth certificate, photo ID, and/or a visa. For more information, or to request a Letter of Announcement for the 2018 Annual Meeting, visit AAN.com/view/AMinfo.

Los Angeles International Airport The Los Angeles, CA, area is served by the Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) which is 15 miles from the Los Angeles Convention Center; Ontario International Airport (ONT) which is 43 miles from the Los Angeles Convention Center, and John Wayne Airport (SNA) which is 43 miles from the Los Angeles Convention Center and Hollywood Burbank.

Currency Los Angeles’ currency is the US dollar; currency exchange is available at banks and kiosks throughout the city and at the airport. Cash machines/ATMs are available in most banks, hotels, and shopping centers. For denominations under one dollar, the currency is coins.

Customs and Immigration From an international point of arrival, upon arriving in Los Angeles, you will be required to go through a US Customs and Border Protection (CBP) inspection. Before you land, your flight crew will distribute an Immigration and Customs Declaration Form for you to complete; forms are also available at the airport upon your arrival. You will need to present this form, along with your passport, visa (if any), and return tickets to the CBP officer.

Health Insurance Be sure to check with your health insurance provider about policy coverage away from home—particularly if you’re insured by an HMO and/or Medicare/Medicaid.

Luggage Restrictions for carry-on baggage and weight and size limits for checked baggage are different for international flights than for domestic flights. Be sure to check with your individual carrier as to weight and measurement restrictions and associated costs for overages.

Measurements Los Angeles uses the United States customary system for weights and measurements. If you choose to drive in Los Angeles be aware the speed limits are posted in miles per hour.

Medication If you are entering Los Angeles with prescription drugs and syringes: keep the medication in its original, labeled container; include medical certificate with syringes showing they are for medical use and have them declared to US Customs officials; bring an extra prescription in case your medication is lost and/ or to attest to your need to take such prescriptions; and carry the generic name of prescription medicines.

Mobile Phone Service Contact your service provider directly to inquire if service is available and/or the applicable rates.

Time Zone Los Angeles is in the Pacific Time Zone. In April, it will be three hours behind New York, two hours behind Chicago, eight hours behind London, and 16 hours behind Tokyo.

For more information, visit AAN.com/view/AMinfo. 238 2018 AAN Annual Meeting


Meeting Information and Contacts Hotel Reservation Deadline:

Meeting Registration and Housing

March 2, 2018

Phone: US/Canada (800) 676-4226 International (415) 979-2283

Early Registration Deadline:

Hours:

Monday–Friday 6:00 a.m.–6:00 p.m. PT

March 29, 2018

Online: aanam.cmrushelp.com

Registration, Hotel, and Travel Reservations:

For direct email and phone contacts, please contact Member Services at:

AAN.com/view/AM18

memberservices@aan.com Toll Free: (800) 879-1960 or International: (612) 928-6000

Annual Meeting Oversight Catherine M. Rydell, CAE Chief Executive Officer/Executive Director, AAN, AAN Institute Christine E. Phelps Deputy Executive Director, AAN Institute Kris Fridgen Senior Director, Education, Science, and Conferences Senior Director, Industry Relations Kevin Heinz Director, Annual Meeting and Conferences

Annual Meeting Program education@aan.com science@aan.com

Erin Jackson Senior Manager, Annual Meeting and Conferences Marissa Ohman Kelly Senior Specialist, Annual Meeting Events Ashley Hubbard Senior Education Specialist, Annual Meeting and Conferences Nate Kosher Science Program Manager, Annual Meeting and Conferences

Registration and Housing

aanam.cmrushelp.com Laurie Dixon Manager, Registration and Logistics

Brain Health Fair Wendy Vokaty Senior Manager, Leadership Programs and Special Events

Exhibits Gretchen Liedl Manager, Exhibits and Sponsorship

Sales and Sponsorship Andrew Halverson Associate Director, Industry Sales

Compliance Issues Susan Rodmyre Senior Director, Education John Hutchins Associate General Counsel

Resident and Student Activities Lucy Persaud Samaroo Senior Manager, Undergraduate/Graduate Education

Practice and Public Policy Issues advocacy@aan.com or practice@aan.com Jason Kopinski, CAE Deputy Executive Director, AAN Chief Health Policy Officer

Julie Ratzloff Manager, Housing and Special Events

In Conjunction With Events/Logistics icw@aan.com Grace Henderson Administrative Assistant, Annual Meeting and Conferences

AAN.com/view/AM18 239


BUILD YOUR LEADERSHIP SKILLS Secure your spot for one of these unique opportunities during the 2018 Annual Meeting. Visit AAN.com/view/LeadershipUniversity today! Saturday, April 21

Sunday, April 22

C7

C45 Being a Resilient Leader: How Do You Lead the Change?

Women in Leadership 7:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m.

This customized program will help participants understand how they uniquely influence and lead and reveal a personalized look at leadership style. Janice M. Massey MD, FAAN Orly Avitzur MD, MBA, FAAN Keri Bischoff, Gallup-Certified Strengths Consultants Julie Anderson, Gallup-Certified Strengths Consultants

C16 Leadership Challenges in Practice 12:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

This program discusses relationship development and communication techniques to improve leadership effectiveness within an organization of any size. Brad C. Klein MD, MBA, FAAN

C18 NEW! Educators’ Leadership Course 12:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

This course is designed to optimize the skill set of neurology clerkship and program directors Jaffar Khan, MD, FAAN

1:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

This course will empower neurologists to become leaders in their communities to increase personal engagement within one’s organization, practice, or institution Heidi B. Schwarz, MD, FAAN Jennifer Rose Molano, MD, FAAN

C46 The Most Important Tool in Your Black Bag: Gallup StrengthsFinders™ Assessment 1:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

In this customized half-day workshop, Gallup Certified consultants Keri Bischoff and Julie Anderson will share a language for understanding your unique strengths, which has powerful application for well being and happiness. Keri Bischoff, Gallup-Certified Strengths Consultants Julie Anderson, Gallup-Certified Strengths Consultants


Monday, April 23

Wednesday, April 25

C69 NEW! Continuing Your Leadership Journey: Uncharted Waters

C157 Advanced Leadership Training: Preparing for Your Career’s Insurmountable Opportunities

1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

After successfully completing the AAN’s leadership program, you set off equipped with new skills for leading. This course will refresh your skills and take your leadership to the next level. Barbara L. Hoese, Pentecore Coaching

C81 NEW! Mitigating the Impact of Unconscious Bias Workshop 1:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

During this informative, participatory, and engaging workshop, faculty will explore the science of unconscious bias, with a specific focus on the impact of bias and resulting disparities in the health care sector. Laraine Kaminsky, Global UK

Tuesday, April 24 C118 NEW! Leadership in the Era of Burnout: A Practical Approach to Becoming a True Physician Leader 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

The challenge of being a leader is complicated by a high rate of burnout. This course will examine how to lead effectively and at the same time promote wellness. Terrence L. Cascino, MD, FAAN

C105 Mentoring…Growing the Next Generation of Neurologist 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

This session focuses on the competencies required to build strong developmental relationships. Joanne L. Smikle, PhD, Smikle Training Services

1:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

This highly-interactive program will consider the strategies for finding and creating new opportunities for leadership in one’s career and life. Robert C. Griggs, MD, FAAN

C158 NEW! Leadership Strengths in Neurology: The Data, Tools and Practical Application of Strengths for Leadership, Team Building, and Personal Development 1:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Strengths data in the field of neurology will be shared to address your unique needs through interactive and guided discussions. Keri Bischoff, Gallup-Certified Strengths Consultants Julie Anderson, Gallup-Certified Strengths Consultants

The many challenges in today’s health care environment create a special need for great leadership. These courses provide great opportunities to build select skills to enhance your leadership abilities.

Ralph Sacco, MD, FAAN


2O18 AAN Annual Meeting

201 Chicago Avenue Minneapolis, MN 55415

71st AAN Annual Meeting

72nd AAN Annual Meeting

73rd AAN Annual Meeting

Philadelphia, PA May 4–10, 2019

Toronto, Ontario, Canada April 25–May 1, 2020

San Francisco, CA April 17–April 23, 2021

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Future AAN Annual Meeting Dates and Locations

AAN 2018 Annual Meeting  
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Your initial meeting overview, complete education program details, preliminary science program schedule, and helpful registration guide.