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Digital Design - Module 02 Semester 1, 2018 Amelia Wells

912256 Chelle Yang, Studio 2


Week Three

Reading: Kolerevic B. 2003. Architecture in the Digital Age

Kolerevic described three fundamental type of fabrication techniques in the reading. Outline the three techniques and discuss the potential of Computer Numeric Controlled fabrication with parametric modelling. (150 words max)

Two-dimensional fabrication involves the use of a moving cutting head on sheet material. Forms of two-dimension fabrication are lasercutting, plasma-arc cutting and water-jet cutting, which vary in their capabilities to work with particular materials and produce certain line thicknesses. Subtractive fabrication functions by removing material from a volume to form a particular shape, through the use of electro, chemically or mechnically reductive methods. Subtractive milling may be axially, surface or volume constrained. Drill bits and axes may be adjusted for coarser or finer finishes and to accommodate a larger range of forms. Additive fabrication involves the creation of a three-dimensional form by a layer-by-layer process of adding material. The 3D model is sliced horizontally into many two dimensional layers. Additive fabrication is primarily beneficial for the pre-fabrication of curvilinear geometries in building. Parametric modelling allows many iterations of a design to be rapidly produced, and CNC fabrication allows the direct fabrication of a digital model, allowing a larger capacity for freedom of creativity.

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Week Three

Surface Creation

When iterating my surfaces, I found there to be a lot of dynamism when one surface was able to dominate the other surface - for example leaning over it, or having a larger surface area. I found it most interesting when there was a sense of symmetry, but still an evident hierarchy, as the symmetry created a visual cohesion, however there maintained a to-and-fro movement.

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Week Four Panels & Waffle

I chose to use two similar panelling units for each surface, so there was cohesion between the two. The larger surface features two cut-out in an arrow formation, creating a strong directional light and shadow. This is because the larger surface dominates the overall form. The second panel leans backward and is much smaller, therefore directional light is not as significant. Rather, the perforated panels open up quite a lot, to connect the structure to the outside environment in a more intimate manner.

The two sides of the waffle structure arch towards each other, and maintain a level of symmetry. However, the furthest side dominates the structure as it leans forward more thus breaking the symmetry and providing movement. The waffle can furthermore be rotated in several different directions and maintain an upright position, consequently allowing new entrances and possibilities to emerge.

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Week Four

Laser Cutting

Creating a laser-cutting file allowed me to individually prepare each component of my model to ensure it was the correct shape. Issues I encountered with laser-cutting included flipping the unrolled panels the wrong way, which could have been prevented with a test print. However, the panels were easily reversible.

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Week Five

Booleaning the form was an interesting process, and I found that using cylinders and spheres gave some jagged, unrefined edges. Thus, I decided to use cones, as their hollowed-out forms interestingly mimicked classical arches in a somewhat abstract representation.

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Week Five

Isometric

My structure uses booleaned cone forms. It has then been sectioned with a hollow cylindrical cut. The cylindrical section cut was chosen as it reveals the overall central organization created with point attraction. This curved shape furthermore mimics and enhances the unexpectedly soft curved form of the booleaned cones. The hollowed out core allows light to permeate the space, forming a new sense of space and circulation. The booleaned forms now are able to interact with each other and frame new viewpoints. The arches formed by the booleaned cones suggests a sense of classicism, however this is abstracted by the way they are ‘carved’ out of a thick wall - thus, they seem almost like cave entrances. To contribute to the overall structure, the cones create an upwards, reaching movement. The layered rings further funnel the movement inward and upward, and creates a strong, vacuum-like interior space. The structure seems at once very permeable, but also just as trapping.

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Week Six Task 01

Lofts

1.1

1.2

1.3

Key

1.4

{0,0,0}

{65, 74, 150}

{64, 37, 150}

{60, 50, 150}

{90, 50, 0} {86, 53, 150}

Grid Points {-79, 25, 0}

{90, 100, 60}

{65, 74, 0} {-71, -85, 0} {-85, 74, 0} {86, 42, 0} {60, 100, 0}

{-85, -76, 0}

{79, 25, 0}

{86, 83, 0}

Paneling Grid & Attractor Point

{Index Selection}

{Index Selection}

2.1

2.2

{165, 147, 180}

{Index Selection}

{Index Selection}

2.3

2.4

{8, 152, 0}

{17, 12, 0}

Paneling

{No Attractor point}

{Attractor Point Location}

{Attractor Point Location}

{Index Selection}

3.1

3.2

3.3

3.4

Attractor / Control Points (X,Y,Z) Attractor / Control Curves

{79, -85, 150}

Task 01 Matrix When iterating Task 1, I wanted to create two sides which were symmetrical and whole, yet I wanted to maintain a dynamic between them that might influence circulation around the space. So, I chose surfaces which were very similar but had a sense of movement. I kept the point attractors neat and simple, as I wanted to maintain fluidity, and I chose two panels which were similar but slightly different. Both were pyramids with cut-outs, so an overall triangulated theme was evident. I chose the pyramid panels, as I found that from many angles my surfaces actually looked more like triangles, so I wanted to continue this illusion.

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Week Six Task 02

Grid manipulation

1.1

1.2

1.3

Key

1.4

{0,0,0}

Attractor / Control Points (X,Y,Z) Attractor / Control Curves Grid Points

{98, -78, 0}

{84, -60, 0} {0, -25, 0}

{-26, 27, 0}

{-84, -60, 0}

{0, 35, 0} {0, 86, 0}

{-26, 72, 0} {55, 78, 0}

Sphere distribution

{Attractor Point Location}

{Attractor Point Location}

{Attractor Point Location}

{Attractor Point Location}

2.1

2.2

2.3

2.4

{-55, 75, 0}

{55, 75, 0}

{55, 75, 0}

Sphere trasnformation

{Scale adjustment}

{Point attractor}

{Curve attractor}

{Random attractor}

3.1

3.2

3.3

3.4

{Randomized scale}

{Randomized scale}

{75, 75, 0}

{0, 0, 0}

{Corner attractor point}

{Central attractor point}

Task 02 Matrix When iterating Task 2, I wanted to explore curvilinear shapes as I knew we would be 3D printing them. I found cylinders to be interesting, however I found their intersections to be messy and difficult to manipulate. I chose cones as the pointed top helped avoid messy intersections, and I found they overlapped against one another very harmoniously. I ultimately chose a central point attraction as I felt this would bringout the circular nature of a cone and allow a different perception of the cone, in which the apex is not the focus - rather the apex is removed altogether.

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Week Six

Final Isometric Views

Task 01 Exploded Isometric

Task 02 Isometric

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Appendix

Process

Above, I had trouble creating a successful mesh with my panels. The two right hand panels were badly constructed, and therefore didn’t mesh well. The two left hand panels have been corrected.

The issue I faced is that the poorly-meshed panels would split apart when unrolled, deeming them impossible to build.

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This is an example of the corrected mesh, using Weaverbird to apply the ‘picture frame’ cutouts and therefore minimising extra polylines.


Appendix Task 1 Process

Above is the script I used, including the Weaverbird picture frame command. This attaches to the individual mesh I created.

Here is the process of unrolling the successful panels. I used DupEdge and ptTabs, and then manually corrected the tabs/any extra lines. This created the linework for laser-cutting.

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Appendix

Additional photography of Task 1

This is upright view demonstrating the internal waffle structure.

A view from above, demonstrating the interaction between the surfaces.

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Front view showcasing the main surface.


Above are experiments with cylindrical forms, before booleaning. I used randomized point attractors.

Above are some of the results produced. I didn’t like the interaction between the booleaned hollows, and felt the edges were too sharp and without true structure.


Above are variations using the cones. I tried different point attractors and randomized it, as well as no point attractors at all. I further used different shapes to boolean a new overall structure, rather than use the cube, as I found the cube was limiting how much I could reveal of the conical shapes.

This is the script I used to replaced the spheres from the workshop with cones. I had to cap holes in order to boolean the forms properly. I also applied cylinders using a similar script.

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M2 Journal | Digital Design 2018  
M2 Journal | Digital Design 2018  
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