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Blogging Blissfully Easy

David Karp David Karp (born July 6, 1986) is an American web developer and entrepreneur living in New York City. He is the founder and CEO of the short-form blogging platform, Tumblr he was named to the MIT Technology Review TR35 as one of the top 35 innovators in the world under the age of 35 Karp grew up on the Upper West Side of Manhattan. He attended The Calhoun School from age 3 through 8th grade, where his mother teaches science He went on to attend Bronx Science for one year before dropping out at the age of 15 and started homeschooling. Karp began interning for animation producer Fred Seibert at 14 , and from there went on to work as a software consultant for UrbanBaby, an online parenting forum. Karp left UrbanBaby in 2006 and began working on Tumblr later that year. The site launched in November 2007

december 2012


THE PROPHET'S ♼

the Prophet Muhammad (prophet Muhammad peace be upon him)

Muhammad was born in Makkah in the year 570. Since his father died before his birth and his mother died shortly thereafter, he was raised by his uncle who was from the respected tribe of Quraysh. He was raised illiterate,unable to read or write, and remained so till his death. His people, before his mission as a prophet, were ignorant of science and most of them were illiterate. As he grew up, he became known to be truthful, honest, trustworthy, generous, and sincere. He was so trustworthy that they called him the Trustworthy. Muhammad was very religious, and he had long detested the decadence and idolatry of his society.

THE PROPHET'S lifestyle Talk softly - Eat sensibly Walk humbly - Act fearlessly Dress Properly - Breathe Deeply Sleep Sufficiently - interact Politely Work Patiently - Think Truthfully Believe Correctly - Behave Decently Learn Practically - Plan Orderly Earn Honestly- Spend Intelligently Sacrifice REGULARLY - Worship Dedicatedly Serve parents Happily - Respect neighbours Appropriately

december 2012


Britain's ♼

Britain's Social Customs

Time

British people place considerable value on punctuality. If you agree to meet friends at three o'clock, you can bet that they'll be there just after three. Since Britons are so time conscious, the pace of life may seem very rushed. In Britain, people make great effort to arrive on time. It is often considered impolite to arrive even a few minutes late. If you are unable to keep an appointment, it is expected that you call the person you are meeting. Some general tips follow.

Dress Everyday dress is appropriate for most visits to peoples' homes. You may want to dress more formally when attending a holiday dinner or cultural event, such as a concert or theatre performance.

Introduction and Greeting It is proper to shake hands with everyone to whom you are introduced, both men and women. An appropriate response to an introduction is "Pleased to meet you". If you want to introduce yourself to someone, extend you hand for a handshake and say -Hello, I am....". Hugging is only for friends.

Dining When you accept a dinner invitation, tell your host if you have any dietary restrictions. He or she will want to plan a meal that you can enjoy. The evening meal is the main meal of the day in most parts of Britain. Food may be served in one of several ways: "family style," by passing the serving plates from one to another around the dining table; "buffet style," with guests serving themselves at the buffet; and "serving style," with the host filling each plate and passing it to each person. Guests usually wait until everyone at their table has been served before they begin to eat. Food is eaten with a knife and fork and dessert with a spoon and fork.

december 2012


CROSSING BRIDGES

CROSSING BRIDGES There is a difference between growing old and growing up; the former happens whether or not we want it, but to achieve the latter it takes more than just time and gravity. JARED CARL MILLAN talks about what it means to be an adult

december 2012


CROSSING BRIDGES

With all these talk about growing up and wanting to grow up, one would think that the transition between adolescence to adulthood would be one linear path, a street that would quite literally have only point A and point B. There is in fact some truth to that; one way or another we are thrust into that part in our lives whether or not we want it, forced to live with the change even as we try to ignore the particular, live in the past. I now sit in a yet crowded Starbucks café trying to type down all the notes for this column—or the lack thereof—and I find it particularly hard to continue writing this piece because what I am now trying to say is vey much different from what I had wanted to write about when I mapped out in my head the direction this column would take. You see, I have always found it difficult to write about the things I barely know, and I had planned for this column to talk, however vaguely and ineffectively, about being an adult. And although I am by no means anymore a teenager, I still am quite unsure if I am indeed an adult. In college I had been asked to create at different points during my stay a curriculum vitae, and in each instance I had treated it like any other college student would treat a compulsory task: half-assed, with only a sense of obligation dictating you to do it. But I do remember writing a particular curriculum vitae quite unlike all the rest I had ever made. I had just gotten out of college and I was trying to look for internship programs in which to occupy my time in the interim. I cannot remember now for which company I had submitted the document to, what firm or magazine or publishing house that had received it but never read it. But making that particular two-page document will forever be indelible in my mind; it was created under very different circumstances, a task I had to do not borne out of moral obligation nor educational prudence, but of existential imperative. The decision was not anymore bound to the institution in which I studied; I did not do it to please a professor or a parent or myself; if I were to continue, if I were to

be a person in this earth, if I wanted to become the person that I want to be I needed to cross the bridge, jump off the ledge, live. To live then meant that I create that one document and start from there. To live then meant that I start making decisions for my life, neither good decisions nor bad decisions, but simply decisions I make for myself, by myself. And that I believe was one of the very first signs that were me I am not anymore young, also not yet old, but that I’m getting there. I can tell you that making it I was overcome with a dread I had not had acquainted myself with, and I was a kid whose life have always been permeated by a sense of dread, a kid who has always been confronted with apprehension and anxiety and angst at every corner. As it happens, there were not that many things to put into the document. I had always been a recluse. Extracurricular activities in my college had always been a nuisance to me. Involvement to causes and organizations and clubs and any other entity other than myself I deem a joke. I did not overachieve. I did not put out. I tried as much as possible not to draw attention to me as deemed necessary. And because of that, the details in my curriculum vitae were perfunctory at best. It did not make my pride swell or heart sing the way I had thought it should, but I suspect that is part of that package. I do not have anything to live for anymore. And because of the nature of this particular discourse I thought it only fair to say at the outset that I am not in any way depressed. Nor have I been contemplating the thought of killing myself, at least not any more than the routine self-loathing every one of us is guilty of. I just mean that if I were to die this instant I would die a happy man. Let me expound. There had always been for my siblings and me a set of rules that we were to follow, rules which to this day we still do, ordained by our parents early in the lives of their children. Eat your breakfast. Brush your teeth. Take a nap. Do your homework. Do well in school. Don’t eat junkfood. Memorize the

multiplication table. Sleep at 9AM. As we grew older the rules started to become less audible; we were reminded less often. Those rules did not disappear completely, we knew that. My parents just expected us to have them ingrained in our minds, and they have been. Of course those rules changed over the years. “Take a nap” morphed into “rest once in a while”; “do your homework” morphed into “learn to prioritize”; “don’t eat junkfood” morphed into “don’t smoke or drink or do drugs unless you are responsible enough to live with the repercussions”; “do well in school” morphed into “graduate from elementary school” to “earn a high school diploma” to “earn a degree.” Growing up, I suspect I had never been given the chance to worry about the direction my life would take me five or ten or twenty years in the future; I had always known in my mind and heart with even the vaguest sense that my parents had brought me up well enough to know how to fend for myself, know how to choose the right decisions and live with the consequences. I suspect that the rules that were once my training wheels would ever vanish, that the morality my parents and grandparents and aunts and uncles would lose their relevance over time. The point I think is to live with them not because somebody of authority expects you to do it or you feel compelled to do it; you live with these rules because you want to. You live without these rules because you do not want to. That is the point of being an adult: you live with a set of rules you make for yourself, an amalgam of mythologies and moralities and existential imperatives that would form the mold against which you pattern your life. My adolescence ended when finished college, when I fulfilled my parents’ wish that I earn a college degree. My adolescence ended when I started applying for jobs not because somebody wants or expects me to. My adolescence ended when I started to struggle to keep a tight rein on my life. And adulthood begins I guess when I no longer consciously have to remind myself to take responsibility of my life.

december 2012


Sign Language

Sign language is the result of a biological and cultural interaction in humans, a creative adaptation to a sensorial limitation which transforms the resources available and a human’s potential to communicate through a visual modality.

december 2012


YouTube

Coinciding with the era of Multimedia and Technology managed Arabia be stationed in the early list of the most watched programs YouTube, this is what announced magazine "Forbes - Middle East" through the menu for more than 25 programs popular on YouTube in the Arab world, where able Arabia that tops the list of most 25 programs popular on YouTube, check these programs 443.5 million views, and 2.4 million subscribers, watched by over 1357 clip uploaded on the site. According to the study, there are 326.7 million of the total number of views for programs Arabia, representing 73.6 per cent of the total number of programs, followed by programs to 105 million Jordanian watch, then programs Egyptian 11.7 million views.

Saudi Arabia took control of the 17 centers from the list, and came in first place "ish who" provided by Badr Saleh, as the number of observations to 99.7 million views. Followed in second place "nails", who scored 41.9 million views, while third place was awarded to not a lot" Saudi View 45.7 million, and Jordan acquired 6 centers on the list. As for Egypt, received only two, although there are many programs that began over (Youtube) but moved to television later. The witness site (YouTube) process of downloading 60 clip every minute, and watched more than 4 billion users, and is available with 54 languages, and has one trillion Show at the end of 2011, these figures have turned the attention of advertisers in the world programs (YouTube) and its productions, where he found that the best 98 campaign out of 100 ad published advertisements across the site, paving the way for Arab programs to be strongly present in this new industry.

december 2012


YouTube

december 2012


Quotes Wise Quotes About Life All life is an experiment. Ralph Waldo Emerson Be wiser than other people if you can. But do not tell them so. Earl Chesterfield An optimist is a person who sees a green light everywhere. The pessimist sees only the red light. But the truly wise person is color blind Dr. Albert Schweitzer. An investment in knowledge always pays the best interest. Benjamin Franklin. All human beings, by nature, desire to know. Aristotle. All difficult things have their origin in that which is easy and great things in that which is small. Lao-Tzu A candle loses nothing by lighting another candle. Erin Majors. A smooth sea never made a skilled mariner. English proverb. Out of clutter, find simplicity. From discord, find harmony. In the middle of difficulty lies opportunity. Albert Einstein. No one can make you feel inferior without your consent Eleanor Roosevelt. Be the change you wish to see in the world. Mahatma Gandhi. Give a man a fish, he'll eat for a day. Teach a man to fish, he'll eat for a lifetime. Ancient Chinese proverb. He who knows others, is learned. He who knows himself, is wise. Lao-Tzu I don't think much of a man who is not wiser today than he was yesterday. Abraham Lincoln. I prefer the errors of enthusiasm to the indifference of wisdom. Anatole France.

december 2012


Quotes

december 2012


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english pr

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