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NEW TEACHER

INDUCTION PROGRAM

(NTIP)

A GUIDE FOR NEW TEACHERS


Program Elements of the New Teacher Induction Program The New Teacher Induction Program ( NTIP ) for AMDSB is comprised of 4 induction elements:


Orientation to AMDSB: New Teacher Resources Orientation to our School Board is provided in a variety of ways: ➢ ➢ ➢ ➢ ➢ ➢ ➢

Avon Maitland DSB First Class NTIP website New teacher orientation Summer PD sessions On-going Professional learning opportunities for NTIP teachers throughout the year Mentoring by experienced teachers Release days for job embedded growth through classroom visitations and professional dialogue Copies of the New Teacher Binder are available to new teachers at the beginning of the school year, or by contacting the Executive Assistant responsible for NTIP

Elements of Orientation to the School Board ➢ ➢ ➢ ➢

New teacher orientation Resource Binders are distributed to new teachers at the New Teacher orientation workshop Professional reading materials are distributed to each new teacher On-line access to a variety of resources, and workshops are available Access to the NTIP site on First Class

What is in the New Teacher Binder? ➢ ➢ ➢ ➢ ➢ ➢ ➢ ➢

Orientation section, outlining AMDSB mission statement, and goals Ethical Standards for the Teaching Profession NTIP responsibilities in a nutshell NTIP Individual Strategy Form (ISF) Professional development- Core content and sample conversation starters Models and roles of mentors Are you ready? Calendar of monthly tasks, and activities for your school panel


Orientation to the School Elements of Orientation to the School ➢ Orientation to the school is a critical element for the New Teacher ➢ Orientation models are site based determined ➢ Schools adopt an induction model that reflects the school goals, and Professional learning community goals ➢ A checklist is developed to ensure that key school related information is covered Elements of Orientation to a School can include:


SCHOOL ORIENTATION CHECKLIST FOR NEW TEACHERS


Mentoring Mentorship Mentoring is an on-going relationship that extends throughout the first year of a new teacher’s professional practice. Mentors are the vehicles to connect with other professionals and resources. They connect the new teachers with other professionals in the learning community. Mentors provide the on-going support to enable new teachers to improve their skills and confidence. ➢ ➢ ➢

Trust and rapport are essential for the mentor- new teacher relationship to thrive and flourish Effective mentors adopt a variety of roles based on the needs of the new teacher Mentors reflect continuous learning

Choosing a Mentor Working with the right mentor will provide you with access to invaluable expertise and welcome support during your challenging, but rewarding first year of teaching. Most successful teachers speak of mentors they had in their first few years of teaching. Many still have mentors and all good teachers continue to develop professional relationships for collaborative learning. When you are considering your options for a mentor, be open to possibilities. Your ideal mentor may or may not be of the same gender, age, race, faith or orientation as you. Remember that your mentor will not be involved in evaluating you in any way and that your professional interactions will remain confidential.


What to Consider when Selecting Your Mentor: Your mentor must be a Member of the Ontario College of Teachers. Selecting an experienced teacher to serve as your mentor will be one of the most crucial initial steps that you will take as you undertake your teaching profession. Your principal may be able to recommend an experienced teacher who will serve as your mentor, or you may have knowledge of a teacher from your own networking sources. If possible, your ideal mentor will be in your own school and in your own division or subject area so that daily, weekly or impromptu discussions can take place. If it is at all possible, the selection of your mentor should enable you to meet regularly. When choosing a mentor ask yourself these questions: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

What do I need to know and from whom can I learn? Is there someone whom I admire or wish to emulate? With whom do I feel comfortable? Who is supportive? Whom do I respect?

By considering these questions you will likely find a mentor who will be able to guide you through a successful first year and beyond. Your mentor will be a facilitator and a support. He or she should not tell you what to do. Don’t agree to work with a mentor whom you haven’t first met. If you do not feel comfortable with him or her in your first meeting, keep looking–there is a suitable mentor for you.


If you are having difficulty choosing a mentor speak to your department head, your federation branch president or steward, or your principal. Safe Exit Strategy In some cases the mentor/new teacher relationship is not successful and a new mentor must be chosen. If this happens, give the name of your new mentor to your principal and to Paula Wallis at the Ed Centre. No explanation is required. Mentoring Models may include: Broker Model ➢ Consultant type relationship One- to One Mentor Matching ➢ Mentor is site based; needs are matched based on the needs of the new teacher Group Mentoring ➢ Mentor works with 2 or more new teachers, or a new teacher has more than one mentor Informal Mentoring ➢ New teacher informally connects with a variety of staff members as need arises these themes, as well as needs identified by the NTIP teachers.


Professional Learning Opportunities The professional learning needs of a new teacher will vary, based upon prior experiences. The Ministry of Education has identified key elements of professional development to which new teachers must have access. The NTIP Advisory Committee has structured workshops throughout the school year based upon these themes, as well as the needs identified by the NTIP teachers. Starting points for discussion in the following domains: Training is available for mentors • Classroom Management • Planning, Assessment and Evaluation • Communication with Parents • Literacy and Numeracy • Student Success • Safe Schools and Bullying Prevention • Teaching Students with Special Education Needs • Equity and Inclusive Education • Teaching English Language Learners A NTIP icon is available on First Class for all eligible new teachers, and his or her mentor. Contact the Executive Assistant in charge of NTIP if this is not already in place for your NTIP teacher/ mentor. Links to other professional resources and web sites are electronically accessible.

• • •

• • •

Courses are available for all teachers through Curriculum Department Summer workshops are available Professional Learning workshops are scheduled throughout the year to assist new teachers in their growth Training is available for mentors Professional literary resources are provided for group study and dialogue Release time is available for job embedded growth


The Sixteen Competency Statements with Eight Competencies Highlighted for New Teachers Commitment to Pupils* and Pupil Learning

• • • •

Professional Knowledge • • • • Professional Practice

• • • • •

Leadership in Learning Communities

Ongoing Professional Learning

Teachers demonstrate commitment to the well-being and development of all pupils. Teachers are dedicated in their efforts to teach and support pupil learning and achievement. Teachers treat all pupils equitably and with respect. Teachers provide an environment for learning that encourages pupils to be problem solvers, decision makers, lifelong learners, and contributing members of a changing society. Teachers know their subject matter, the Ontario curriculum, and education related legislation. Teachers know a variety of effective teaching and assessment practices. Teachers know a variety of effective classroom management strategies. Teachers know how pupils learn and factors that influence pupil learning and achievement. Teachers use their professional knowledge and understanding of pupils, curriculum, legislation, teaching practices, and classroom management strategies to promote the learning and achievement of their pupils. Teachers communicate effectively with pupils, parents, and colleagues. Teachers conduct ongoing assessment of pupils’ progress, evaluate their achievement, and report results to pupils and parents regularly. Teachers adapt and refine their teaching practices through continuous learning and reflection, using a variety of sources and resources. Teachers use appropriate technology in their teaching practices and related professional responsibilities. Teachers collaborate with other teachers and school colleagues to create and sustain learning communities in their classrooms and in their schools. Teachers work with professionals, parents, and members of the community to enhance pupil learning, pupil achievement, and school programs. Teachers engage in ongoing professional learning and apply it to improve their teaching practices.

Note: Principals must provide a comment for each of the eight highlighted competencies as a minimum requirement in the Summative Report Form for New Teachers. * In the Education Act, students are referred to as “pupils”.


LEVEL OF PERFORMANCE

COMPETENCIES Satisfactory Teachers demonstrate commitment to the well being and development of all pupils.

Teachers are dedicated in their efforts to teach and support pupil learning and

achievement.

Teachers treat all pupils equitably and with respect.

Teachers provide an environment for learning that encourages pupils to be problem solvers, decision makers, lifelong learners,and contributing members of a changing society.

The teacher demonstrates considerable commitment to the well-being and development of all pupils. The teacher shows continued growth in this competency.

Development Needed

Unsatisfactory

The teacher demonstrates some commitment to the well-being and development of all pupils. The teacher would benefit from intensive support to further develop this competency.

The teacher demonstrates limited commitment to the well-being and development of all pupils. The teacher requires extensive improvement in this competency.

The teacher demonstrates limited dedication in his or her efforts to teach and support pupil learning and achievement. The teacher requires extensive improvement in this competency.

The teacher demonstrates considerable dedication in his or her efforts to teach and support pupil learning and achievement. The teacher shows continued growth in this competency.

The teacher demonstrates some dedication in his or her efforts to teach and support pupil learning and achievement. The teacher would benefit from intensive support to further develop this competency.

The teacher treats all pupils equitably and with respect to a considerable extent. The teacher shows continued growth in this competency.

The teacher treats all pupils equitably and with respect to some extent. The teacher would benefit from intensive support to further develop this competency.

The teacher treats all pupils equitably and with respect to a limited extent. The teacher requires extensive improvement in this competency.

The teacher provides an environment for learning that encourages pupils to be problem solvers, decision makers, lifelong learners, and contributing members of a changing society to a considerable extent. The teacher shows continued growth in this competency.

The teacher provides an environment for learning that encourages pupils to be problem solvers, decision makers, lifelong learners, and contributing members of a changing society to some extent. The teacher would benefit from intensive support to further develop this competency.

The teacher provides an environment for learning that encourages pupils to be problem solvers, decision makers, lifelong learners, and contributing members of a changing society to a limited extent. The teacher requires extensive improvement in this competency.

4


SMART Goals The following method is an effective goal setting model available to assist you in the process. • Specific – What should be achieved? When employees are given specific goals, they tend to perform higher than when they are told to do their best or when they receive no guidance at all. Increasing goal specificity reduces ambiguity about what is expected and focuses the search for appropriate behaviors. Specificity helps employees focus on important tasks. Measurable – How will you know if the goal has been reached? What criteria will be used to ascertain whether the goal has been reached? Having measurable goals means that the employee will be able to evaluate his/her own progress. •

Action Plan – Which actions will you take to achieve the goals? How will the goal be accomplished? Will the manager list the steps of the action plan, or will the employee do that? How might the employee’s developmental level affect this step? •

• Realistic – Are they achievable? If goals are set too high, employees may lose their motivation, and will give up when they fail to achieve these unrealistic goals. Are the expected results within the employee’s control? Although goals should be attainable, they should also be challenging. Increasing the difficulty of employees’ goals can increase their perceived challenge and enhance the amount of effort expended to achieve them. Thus, more difficult goals tend to lead to increased effort and performance, as long as they are seen as feasible. • Time Frames - By When? When will the action be completed/the goal achieved? Will there be intermittent progress reviews?


SMART Goals Template When setting goals for yourself or with an employee it is always best to create SMART goals. These are goals that are: •

Specific – What should be achieved?

Measurable – How will you know if the goal has been reached?

Action Plan – Which actions will you take to achieve the goals?

Realistic – Are they achievable?

Time Frames - By When?


Use of Joint Release Days Joint release days are available for the NTIP teacher and his or her mentor. Please contact the Executive Assistant in charge of NTIP for the release time code. This job embedded learning practice provides an opportunity for new teachers and their mentors to engage in job embedded learning practices which have proven to enhance teacher development and student success. How to Use Your Joint Release and Coaching Time: The following are some possible activities for the use of this time: • Orientation sessions • New teacher/ mentor demonstration lessons • Teacher / Mentor Coaching • Joint planning • Collection and organization of data • School visits Reviewing resources • Team teaching • Attending an approved conference together • Reviewing resources with your mentor • Learning about effective instructional strategies, and examining various assessment and evaluation tools • Group new teacher / mentor meetings • Observing lessons and de-briefing * All release time must be approved in advance, at the Board level *


New Teacher Individual Strategy Form


New Teacher Induction Program  

A guide to assist new teachers in the Avon Maitland District School Board.

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