Page 11

Q&A Q. Are evangelicals and churches still invested in financially supporting missions? Pastors who responded to this question reported that their congregations spent 13.5% of their church budgets on missions, on average. The majority of church missions budgets include long-term, career (LTC) missionaries (80%) and at least one domestic activity (75%). Churches that spend on missions almost always spend on both domestic missions and LTC missionaries. Also, a significant percentage of lay people (41%) personally support LTC missionaries with their finances. Older evangelicals are more likely to personally support LTC missionaries: from our pool of lay respondents, half (52%) of the Silent Generation (those born in the 1920s to 1940s) said they personally support LTC missionaries with financial gifts; in contrast, only 32% of those in Gen Y (those born in the 1980s and 1990s) reported personal financial gifts to LTC missions. Another finding was that the majority (67%) of lay people were skeptical about administration fees and needed to be convinced that these fees helped to promote ministry effectiveness. 62% of pastors said the same for their churches their support for missionaries. Also, despite the emphasis on the Bible and on Bible translation as a defining mark of Evangelicalism, pastors said that Bible translation was, on average, a low priority for their congregations.

Q. How is missions being promoted in local churches? Pastors (59%) and lay people (51%) said it is usually a pastor who is the most prominent missions mobilizer in the local church. About half (47%) of pastors and one third (30%) of lay people identified the senior or lead pastor in that role. Less frequent service attenders were more likely to identify a pastor as the main mobilizer. The cancellation of Sunday evening services has increased competition for Sunday morning worship service time and means missionaries have significantly fewer opportunities to connect with congregations. Most pastors (89%) and lay people (86%) said they personally connected with their local church’s long-term, career missionaries in the last 12 months through one type of communication or another, while two fifths of lay people (41%) and three fifths of pastors (30%) indicated they do not pray for long-term career missionaries unless prompted. It was also noted that about one quarter of pastors (24%) and lay people (29%) said their local church either held or helped organize a mission conference in the last 12 months.

Q. If people are interested in reading more on the study, where can they find this information? To date, four of five planned reports have been published. They can be found on the Evangelical Fellowship of Canada’s website. 1. Canadian Evangelicals and Short-Term Missions 2. Canadian Evangelicals and Long-Term, Career Missions: Calling, Sending and Training 3. Canadian Evangelicals and Mission Priorities 4. Canadian Evangelicals and Missions Promotion in the Local Church

A fifth and final report is forthcoming. Following the publication of the final report, anonymized datasets will be made available to Canadian Christian higher education institutions for further research. u

Q. Are churches encouraging their youth to enter int missions? The study showed that most pastors (90%) and lay people (67%) agree that local churches should challenge young people to consider long-term, career missions. Although two thirds of lay respondents agreed that the local church should be challenging young people, only 19% strongly agreed.

FRESH WAYS OF LOOKING AT GOD’S GLOBAL MISSION

11

...fresh ways of looking at God’s global mission

Perspectives August 2017  

fresh ways of looking at God’s global mission Perspectives is published twice a year for the Jaffray Centre for Global Initiatives at Ambro...

Perspectives August 2017  

fresh ways of looking at God’s global mission Perspectives is published twice a year for the Jaffray Centre for Global Initiatives at Ambro...