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Volume 4, No. 9, September 2009

A Magazine for NRIs

£ 2.00(UK), $ 4.00 (USA), Rs. 30.00 (India)

Indian Tourism Miles to go, Promises to Keep

Special: ‘Pravasi Film Festival is a perfect platform for NRI filmmakers’ - Manoj Bajpai Extensive Coverage of Diaspora


|E D I T O R I A L | PRAVASI TODAY VOLUME 4 No. 9 SEPTEMBER 2009. Rs. 30.00 Patrons: Dr. Satyendra Srivastava, Dr. Ashok Chakradhar, Santosh Taneja. Advisors: Anil Joshi, Dr. Rajesh Kumar, Sudershan Bhatia. Editor: Dr. Padmesh Gupta. Resident Editors: Pankaj Dubey, India, Ved Mitra Mohla, MBE. Editorial Board: Naresh Bharatiya, Dr. Ramesh Gupta, Titiksha, Dr. Nikhil Kaushik. Assistant Editors: Jaganniwas, Gyaneshwar Dayal. Managing Editors: Divya Mathur, Neerav Pradhan, R.C. Agarwal. Creative Support: Naresh Shandilya. Literature & Research: Rakesh Srivastava. Manager Production: Rajiv Vats. Layout Designer: Manishankar. Business Development Manager: Prashant Kumar. Representatives: Jai Verma, Shail Agarwal. Contact Overseas: UK - Ved Mitra Mohla, 356, Vale Road, Ash Vale, GU125LW, Surrey. CANADA - Shyam Tripathi, 6 Larksmere Court, Markham, ON L3R 3RI. USA - Dr. Sudha Om Dhingra, 101, Cuymon Court, Morrisville NC-27560. HOLLAND - Dr. Pushpita Awasthi, P.O. Box 1080, 1810 KB. Delhi Office: 51, 2nd Floor, Rani Jhansi Road, Jhandewalan, New Delhi-55. Phone: 011-24504648, Fax: 011-43520752, Mobile: 9899552099. E-mail: pravasitoday@gmail.com Website: www.pravasitoday.com. Proprietor, Publisher and Printer: Saroj Sharma, 51, IInd floor, Rani Jhansi Road, Jhandewalan, New Delhi-110055. Printed at: Delhi Press, E-3, Jhandewalan Estate, New Delhi 110055. DISCLAIMER: The articles published in Pravasi Today carry the personal views of writers. The publisher and the editor is not responsible incase of any debate. Matters related to the magazine can be brought in courts within the jurisdiction of Delhi.

Dr. PADMESH Gupta

Let’s Not

Miss the Tourism Bus Undoubtedly, India has gone up notches in attracting tourists from around the world and has more external revenue coming compared to other Asian countries like Thailand and Malaysia. Historically, culturally and aesthetically, India has much more to offer than any other nation of the world. Yet, it cannot be denied that it fails in providing the right infrastructure for international tourists in comparison with several other countries. There is a general feeling that tourists prefer visiting Thailand, Malaysia and other Asian countries rather than India, as these countries provide better hotels and transport system at competitive rates. Other than the safety and security of foreign tourists, the issue of access to heritage tourist sites from metropolitan cities is very important and needs to be improved. According to world tourist destination ranking in 1998, India stood 47th in the world ranking, which dropped to 54 in 2002. It was 44 in 2004, 41 in 2005 and 42 in 2006; statistics no Indian will be proud of! India’s share in international tourist arrivals, though increasing in recent years, was still quite low at 0.52 percent in 2006. The opening of a tourism office in Beijing last month has opened a new gateway. But India has miles to go before it catches up with China, which has 50 million foreign visitors each year. The government of India has realised after the success of the ‘Incredible India’ campaign that the potential of tourism in India is immense. Now, India has to work on better tourism products with world-class infrastructure. Private airlines and tourist companies across the world selling attractive packages to foreigners have played an important role in attracting tourists over the years. There are so many heritage sites and areas that are still to be discovered by tourists. The government needs to run an intense campaign to develop the virgin areas of possible tourism to expand the area of tourism in India. Tourist traffic can grow significantly, not only in terms of numbers, but also in terms of quality if only India is able to provide quality products, better services and improved infrastructure. Roads, ports and airports, now being developed through public-private participation, should get the top priority. India is perhaps the only country that offers the widest variety for a tourist - beach to hiking holidays, spiritual to medical tourism. The onus is now on the government to cash in on the cultural diversity that the country provides to the world, by maintaining the same.

PRAVASI TODAY | SEPTEMBER 2009

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CONTENTS Manoj Bajpai A Realistic Perspective Amidst Tinselworld’s Glitter Pankaj Dubey

IGlobal Tourism Are We in Incredible State of Self-Denial? Bhuvaneshwari Das Iyer

Make Money! CA Gopal K Agarwal

Indian Festivity in Trinidad & Tobago

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Rakhi sawant is uncertain of her choice!

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Fashion Statement Dr. Maithili Ganjoo Choudhary

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Gyaneshwar Dayal

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REGULAR FEATURES LETTERS TO EDITOR ....................

PG 6

NEWS DIARY .................................

PG 8

BUSINESS NEWS .......................... PG 12 ROUND UP ..................................... PG 28 NRI ACHIEVERS ............................ PG 39 TOURISM ........................................ PG 40 SPORTS .......................................... PG 46

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2009


Letters to Editor We have no right to judge someone for who they are or what they are. So be it before anyone want to talk about people being gay. Talk about something that makes you happy and don't worry about what other people do with their life. At the end of the day, it is their life. We should not say it's a disease, this is the way God made them, it's not their fault. Josh Patel, US Racism in any way is not acceptable, it leaves

targeted by racism have their lives ruined by it and

everyone burdened with distress. People who are

those people who society conditions to be the agents of this oppression are dehumanized by the

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process too. So, people should think twice before doing discrimination.

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Allan, Canada I agree with the write-up on Rajmata Gayatri Devi. She was a woman of substance and grace. She was the representative of Indian royalty in the west; her death is like the end of the last romance of the India's royals. It's sad to see just in days of vc rd tks fl[kk;k lc xqM+&xkscj] vc fcuk dqN cksys--ckgj! PRAVASI TODAY | SEPTEMBER 2009

her death the family has started fighting over her money. Shanti Sharma, U.K 6

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|N E W S D I A R Y |

HAPPENINGS

CLINTON TO ADDRESS IITians in Chicago Former American President Bill Clinton will be among many top leaders to address the seventh Pan-IIT Global Conference being held in Chicago in October. Kapil Sibal, Union Minister for Human Resource Development; Sam Pitroda, Indian Knowledge Commission chairman; Aneesh Chopra, America's chief technology officer; and Meera Shankar, Indian ambassador in the US, will be among other keynote speakers at the Pan-IIT Global Conference to be held in Chicago from Oct 9-11. According to conference chairman Ray Mehra, 'Entrepreneurship and Innovation in a Global Economy' is the theme of this year's techie summit. Over 3,000 IITians from around the world will attend the annual gathering to be opened by Kapil Sibal. Chopra will deliver the keynote address. Mehra said the Pan-IIT summit will take a holistic approach to problems in areas like health and energy in India. The conference will also discuss its proposal called Panch Ratnas submitted to the Indian government to revolutionize higher education in the country. Pan-IIT's Panch Ratnas include implementation of wholesale policy reforms in education, quality control and increase capacity, and 'quantum improvement in faculty service conditions, deployment of technology for teaching and collaborative research, and the establishment of an industry-academia interface, according to Mehra. There are 35,000 IITians in the US.

INDIAN ‘MAHARAJAS’ in London EXHIBITION ON TREASURES OF INDIAN ROYALS An exhibition on a treasure trove of Indian royals and their lifestyle will be organized at the famous Victoria and Albert Museum in London. The exhibition is titled 'Maharaja: The Splendor of India's Royal Courts', which will run from October 10 this year to January 17, 2010. This will bring together over 250 glorious objects, many on loan to the UK for the first time from India's royal collections. Beth McKillop, Keeper, Asian Department of V&A Museum, told the exhibition would include three thrones, a silver gilt howdah, gem-encrusted weapons, court paintings, photographs, a Rolls Royce, Indian turban jewels and jewelry commissioned from Cartier and Van Cleef & Arpels in the 20th century. The exhibition, which took two-and-half years to put together, would be later on moved to Germany and the United States of America where there is a great interest among the people about "Indian Maharajas", McKillop said. The exhibition will cover the period from the 18th century when the great era of the Maharajas began to the end of British rule in 1947.It will show the changing role of the Maharajas in a historical and social context and look at how their patronage of the arts both in India and Europe resulted in splendid and beautiful commissions designed to enhance royal status and identity.

PRAVASI TODAY | SEPTEMBER 2009

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HAPPENINGS

|N E W S D I A R Y |

UK HINDUS FOR Climate Protection In the UK, Hindu leaders have pledged to work together for long-term plans aimed at environment conservation. The religious leaders have decided to set a benchmark for using a range of products and services. The measures include creating awareness through endorsement of conventional food and promotion of sustainable lifestyle. These plans will be developed and implemented over the next nine years - a timeframe chosen to encourage long-term planning. The leaders met at the Oxford Centre for Hindu Studies (OCHS) as part of an international initiative led by the Alliance of Religions and Conservation (ARC) and the OCHS. The initiative is supported by the United Nations Development Program. Working with 11 different faiths worldwide, the ARC helps people to develop long-term plans for environmental protection. Earlier, ARC's meeting was held in April this year. Ranchor Prime, researcher on Hindu environmental issues said: "Food has always been at the heart of the Hindu way of life. Now with food, and especially the environmental cost of meat, right at the top of the global climate change agenda, Hindus feel they have something to say. One of their key concerns is to change public perceptions of the cow as simply a source of food."

RAGGING Virus in JNU "Ragging -free" campus of Jawaharlal Nehru University, received a severe jolt when four Master of Computer Applications students were expelled from the campus hostel after being caught ragging their juniors. The JNU administration will also issue show-cause notices to another group of MCA students who have been accused of ragging freshers for the past ten days. This is perhaps the first time that a ragging incident has been reported on the JNU campus since the inception of the institution 40 years ago in 1969. An FIR has also been lodged against the eight MCA students, enrolled at the JNU School of Computer and Systems Sciences. The victim, a resident of Tapti Hostel on the campus, had written to the authorities charging that freshers were being "tortured mentally and physically for many days" However, the accused students would continue to attend classes till the inquiry is completed. Apart from those allegedly caught red-handed, the victim identified through photographs another set of four MCA seniors who had ragged him earlier. Show-cause notices will be sent later. The authorities have assured all support to the victim.

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INDIA

NCW SETS UP NRI CELL for Abandoned Women TO ALLEVIATE THE GRIEVANCES OF ABANDONED WOMEN Flooded with a number of complaints from women married to 'overseas' husband who abandon them shortly after the marriage can now breath a sigh of relief. National Commission for Women (NCW) has launched a special cell to receive and process grievances related to these women. Speaking on the occasion, NCW Chairperson Girija Vyas said, "Through this cell, we would also speak to all Indian missions abroad so that they maintain a register of Indian married couples in their country and check on them from time to time." She also stressed on the fact that to curb the nemesis, they are "trying to rope in local association and NGOs to help women who run into trouble in those countries." According to a report presented in the Parliament by the Ministry of Overseas Indian Affairs (MOIA), about 55 complaints have been registered against NRIs for leaving their wives in 2008. The number this year has already reached the double figure of 42. The Commission was nominated as the mediating agency at the national level by MOIA on the recommendation of the Parliamentary Committee on Empowerment of Women. The first overseas office at Indian Embassy in Britain has already started its functioning. Highlighting the role the embassies can play to assuage the stressed women, she said, "We urged that most embassies should keep some space for setting up a branch there. Maybe, that one person could give a phone call on a monthly basis to the women who arrive in the country after marriage to check if they are well."

India should Honour NRI MPs with GRATIS VISA: TARLOCHAN SINGH

OZ UNIVERSITIES WORRIED with Downfall in Number of Indian Students

TENURE OF VISAS TO SIKHS FROM AFGHANISTAN SHOULD BE INCREASED FROM THE PRESENT THREE MONTHS

REPERCUSSIONS OF UNABATED ATTACKS ON INDIAN STUDENTS IS SENDING SHIVERS TO OZ UNIVERSITIES

With a number of NRI Member of Parliament making their presence felt in a number of countries like Canada, UK, Malaysia and Singapore, Tarlochan Singh, chairman of the Minorities Commission as well as the chairman of the Media Committee of the Commonwealth Games 2010, said that India should honour them by offering 'Gratis visas' to them. He also said that the NRI lawmakers from all around the world should be freely offered visas by the Indian government. Singh said that the Indian government should also issue visas to Sikhs from Afghanistan for a longer period, increasing it from the present tenure of three months. He also pointed out that the British government has already given citizenship to Sikh refugees from Afghanistan. He was also of the view that the Sikhs blacklisted after Operation Bluestar be allowed to visit the Golden Temple as a goodwill gesture so that they could join the mainstream NRI community. | SEPTEMBER 2009

According to a report in 'The Age', universities in Australia are fearing a steep decline in the number of Indian students' enrolments by 50 per cent for the next year. "What's aggravated the situation is the Indian media making it sound like racism rather than opportunistic crimes," La Trobe University's international office acting director , Abizer Merchant, was quoted as saying to the newspaper. La Trobe has approximately 1200 Indian students in its campus. According to Merchant, with this sort of mass action, Indian student registration for next year were set to halve to 300 following an incessant drop in enquiries and applications since the attacks continued in the months of May and June. But on the financial front, the university is not worried because of an upsurge in the enrolments of the Chinese students. Other universities such as Australian Catholic University, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT) University, Swinburne University, Ballarat University are also facing the music.

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NEWS MAKER

|N E W S D I A R Y |

SHENOY APPOINTED to Tourism Board

INDIAN-AMERICAN GIVEN Key Agriculture Post

Andy shenoy, Indian-American businessman and political activist have been appointed to the Tourism Advisory Board of the Empire State Development Corporation by New York Governor David Paterson. Shenoy is the only Indian-American to serve on the advisory board, has earned the reputation throughout New York state and in the US for his work promoting economic ties between the state and several Indian states. "New York state is one of the top travel destinations for tourists from around the world. We must do all we can to enhance the image of our state. The world, especially India, loves New York," said Shenoy, president of Trivision Group Inc. "We must continue to strengthen our ties with India and the South Asian community. This is a relationship that provides a mutual benefit for everybody," he said

NOTORIOUS NRI CYCLIST Banned from Riding Cycle LONDON: An Indian-origin cyclist who bizarrely attacked pedestrians in the east Midlands town of Leicester for seven years has been banned from riding a cycle. Gurnaik Singh Dogra, 37, became notorious in Leicester for riding at pedestrians and punching or kicking them as they went past. Nearly 40 people have complained about him since 2002, but police believe other victims did not come forward. Dogra has now been issued an order that bars him from riding his bike in a large part of the city. He appeared at Leicester Magistrates' Court this week where he was jailed for 12 weeks for two counts of assault and one offence of threatening behaviour. He admitted the offences. The ban order, which will last for five years, will come into effect when Dogra is released from prison. The order means that Dogra can be arrested and possibly jailed if he is caught riding or even pushing his bike through the streets, reports from Leicester said. One of his unnamed victims who was attacked as he walked along London Road, said: "He kicked me and it was hard enough to knock me to the floor. He needs to get help, really. There's obviously something wrong with him and he seems to have been doing this for a long time. There's no logic to it." | SEPTEMBER 2009

Rajen Anand, an eminent Indian-American is given a key agriculture post; thus giving him the responsibility to improve the nutrition status of people in the country. Anand has been appointed as executive director of the USDA Centre for Nutrition Policy and Promotion by the Obama Administration. The Centre is best known for the development of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans and the My Pyramid food guidance system. "President Obama and I are firmly committed to improving the health and nutrition of the American people, and I am pleased to welcome Dr. Anand back to USDA because he has a deep and broad understanding of dietary guidance, nutrition and how public policy is made," the US Agriculture Secretary, Tom Vilsack, said while announcing his appointment. "As a former professor and civil servant, Dr. Anand will be a huge asset to our management team," he added. A Democrat and a close supporter of the Clinton's, Anand had served in the same department during the Clinton Administration and he supported Obama after Hillary Clinton withdrew from the race. In the Clinton Administration, Anand joined the centre in 1995 as its Deputy Director and was promoted to executive director in 1997.In this capacity, Anand will lead a staff comprised of nutritionists, economists, mathematicians, and food and social scientists as well as a new evidence analysis library.

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|B U S I N E S S N E W S |

INDIA

RULES FOR SHIPPING Unaccompanied Baggage to India NRIs returning to India can send their household and personal articles to India as cargo, or unaccompanied baggage. It is mandatory for the baggage to be dispatched within a month of the NRIs return to India. The laws permit the baggage to land in India between two months to 12 months before the NRI returns, upon permission from the Assistant/Deputy Commissioner of Customs. Unaccompanied baggage invites a levy of 35% plus two precent education cess. Indian customs can be requested to detain the passengers baggage for re-export when he leaves India or till he pays the duty on his import. Such baggage is subject to inspection by Customs officials. A passenger who loses his baggage or has the baggage mishandled by the airlines, is entitled to have the same delivered free of cost to his home. The Customs Declaration Form is required to be submitted at the terminal so that all formalities are completed by officials when the bags arrive. The airlines need to give a certificate to the effect which would be countersigned by Customs to claim the free allowance portion. The passport and keys to the baggage need not be handed over to the customs in this case.

BOOSTING Trade INDIA, ASEAN SIGN TRADE AGREEMENT India and the Association of South East Asian Nations signed a Free Trade Agreement, which took near six years to negotiate. The FTA, relating only to goods, was signed by Union Commerce and Industry Minister Anand Sharma and his ASEAN counterparts at a ceremony in Bangkok after the two sides held annual consultations. The accord, India's first with a trade bloc, will cover 11 countries with a combined Gross Domestic Product of over $2 trillion. The combined population is of the order of 1.6 billion. India and Vietnam, according to Dr. Rebecca, had already agreed to sign a Memorandum of Understanding on this issue. The implementation of the FTA would, therefore, take off from January 1 next year, as now agreed upon, she emphasized. The press statement said the mutually agreed tariff liberalization would "gradually" cover 75 per cent of the two-way trade, beginning from January 2010. India-ASEAN trade was of the order of $40 billion in the 2007-08 accounting year. The regional bloc was now India's fourth largest trading partner. Dr. Rebecca said the ASEAN would now seek a fast-track approach for talks with India for a single follow-up accord on liberalizing the two-way flow of services and investments. The hope is to finalize the deal in about a year's time. The ASEAN's expectation was that the agreed tariff cuts under the FTA, as now signed, would be fully implemented by the end of 2013 and 2016 in respect of two normal tracks. A timeline had also been agreed upon for the "sensitive list" of items, she said. Under the trade pact, India has included 489 items from agriculture, textiles and chemicals in the negative list, meaning these products will be kept out of the duty reduction. The Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce and Industry (FICCI), which has accompanied Sharma, leading a business delegation, said that the agreement would provide access to the large ASEAN market to India.

PRAVASI TODAY | SEPTEMBER 2009

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GLOBAL

|B U S I N E S S N E W S |

MICROSOFT BANNED from Selling MS Word A U.S. judge has ordered Microsoft to stop selling its Word document creation application in the country in 60 days after finding that the software contains technology that violates a patent held by a third party. Judge Leonard Davis, of the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Texas, has issued an injunction (PDF Link) that "prohibits Microsoft from selling or importing to the United States any Microsoft Word products that have the capability of opening .XML, .DOCX or DOCM files (XML files) containing custom XML." Microsoft had been sued by i4i, a collaborative content solution and technology company. Its founder, Michel Vulpe, owned a patent covering a way of reading XML (Extended Mark up Language) documents. XML is the basis of Microsoft's controversial Open XML document formats. The company has said it plans to appeal, and i4i actually sells XML products for Word, making that company reliant on the ecosystem. An agreement, probably one involving Microsoft signing a big cheque will be reached.

SIX ECONOMIES Out of Recession

"If new tax law comes, I won't give money"- SWRAJ PAUL

A ray of light showed up at the end of the recession tunnel as France and Germany announced unexpected returns to the growth path, which means that four of the world's five largest economies and six of the top 10 are now not under the grip of recession. Adding to the sense of optimism, the US Federal Reserve left rates unchanged, saying that the world's largest economy was showing signs of leveling out. Both France and Germany had been predicted by most economists to face a decline of about 0.3% in their GDPs for the second quarter (April-June) of 2009, but they surprised themselves and the rest of the world by announcing that they've actually recorded growth of 0.3% each. Among the five largest economies of the world, measured in purchasing power parity (PPP) dollars - which is more of an apples to apples comparison - China and India are already growing at healthy rates, although lower than their own pace for the last few years. Japan too has climbed out of recession and so has Germany. These economies and the US account for 47% of world GDP in PPP terms. The Euro zone as a whole is also now projected to have contracted by just 0.1% compared to the 2.5% fall in GDP in the first quarter (January-March). The growth rates reported by Germany and France may seem like nothing to get excited about, but considering that German GDP shrunk by 3.5% in the first quarter and France's by 1.3%, it is quite a smart turnaround. Among the world's other large economies, Brazil is also now no longer in recession having grown by 1.5% in the second quarter. Among the world's large economies, UK, which is the seventh largest and Italy, the tenth, remain in recession, like the US. The UK economy shrank 0.8% in the second quarter, while Italy's was down 0.5%. | SEPTEMBER 2009

Indian-born steel tycoon Lord Swraj Paul, a high-profile supporter of Labour, says he will stop bankrolling Britain's ruling party if he is forced to give up his non-domicile tax status under a proposed legislation. He is supported by other high-profile Indian-origin businessmen like Sir Ghulam Noon. Billionaire Paul, founder and chairman of the Caparo Group of Industries, is a long-standing Labour backer, and had promised to bankroll the cash-starved party at the coming general elections due by June 3, 2010. But the 78-year-old Punjabi, who was made Deputy Speaker of the House of Lords by Prime Minister Gordon Brown last year, issued a stark warning ahead of a debate in Parliament on Monday over a bill that would stop political funding from so-called 'non-doms'. "This is a strange bill before Parliament, but I will follow the law. If the law comes in, I won't give money," Paul said in comments published in The Observer newspaper Sunday. "It should be remembered that I still pay a lot more tax than a lot of other people in the country. The problem is that every case is different. There are non-doms who pay full tax in this country. I fit in that category. So to make a general statement on non-doms is a futile exercise," he said. A third important Indian-origin 'non-dom' donor to the Labour party is Lakshmi Mittal, the world's eighth richest man who has reportedly donated a million pounds to Labour over the years.

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|I N T E R V I E W |

Manoj Bajpai A Realistic Perspective Amidst Tinselworld’s Glitter Pravasi Today profiles Manoj Bajpai, who despite the accolades he has won for his acting talents and success in the tinsel world, remains rooted to a realistic perspective… Manoj Bajpai is not a typical muscle-flexing or shirt-doffing Bollywood hunk. He has earned his acting credentials doing theatre and is an actor who is known for his histrionic nuances. Bajpai's ambitions and dreams to make his place under the arc lamps drove him from a sleepy town in Bihar to work his way up from TV roles to small character roles in films like Bandit Queen. And then Satya happened, and Manoj became synonymous with just one name-Bhiku Mhatre. Lest he should get typecast doing similar roles, Manoj displayed intelligence by shunning the roles that were of the Bhiku Mhatre mould and went ahead to prove his mettle in films Kaun, Shool, Dil Pe Mat Le Yaar and Zubeida that offered him the scope to convey myriad emotions. Manoj Bajpai, who has also agreed to be a part of PRAVASI FILM FESTIVAL ORGANISING COMMITTEE for his bit of creative contributions, has a warm conversation with Pankaj Dubey, Resident Editor, Pravasi Today. Excerpts... PD - How do you find the idea of organising the 'Pravasi Film Festival'? Manoj Bajpai - I must ask, why has this come so late? It's a fantastic idea to create a platform for filmmakers of Indian origin from across the world. This will give them a chance to showcase their creative work before the audience of the country they actually belong to. We all know that our heart dwells where our roots are. It's a very good initiative by Pravasi Today and I am all game for this. I wish you the 'Best of Endeavour' for this project. PD - What film projects do you have in hand at the moment? Manoj Bajpai - There is Nanda Anand's Return to PRAVASI TODAY | SEPTEMBER 2009

Rajapur, where I play a Prince from Rajasthan who gets attracted to a married American. It's a unique kind of a love story where they don't even touch each other. It's made by an American independent filmmaker; these are the people who make a movie with their own money and then try to sell it. I don't know when they are going to release it. Then there is another independent project, Rajeev Virani's Whisperers, which also stars Rahul Bose, and should be releasing soon in India. Then there is a movie called 90 minutes by Padmini Kapilla, where I play a football coach. I am also going to work in an E Niwas film, Nilami. Besides, I have Prakash Jha's Rajneeti, Sunjay Gupta's Acid Factory, Madhur Bhandarkar's Jail and a plethora of films from the south. 14 çoklh VqMs | flrEcj

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|I N T E R V I E W |

I am serious, but only about my work and the work that I choose. When it comes to saying no to anybody, I am very straightforward. Reading a lot of news is my source of evaluating things in a bigger perspective, even while it comes to acting. PD - What do you do when you are not shooting? Manoj Bajpai - I watch movies. I watch all kinds of world cinema. I love newspapers and as I can afford them, I get lots of newspapers and literally lick all of them. I try to educate myself in social, political, financial and spiritual news through the papers, so that I am not away from the society. This is my source of evaluating things in a bigger perspective, even while it comes to acting. PD - How did you bag Return from Rajapur and Whisperers? Manoj Bajpai - I get a lot of offers but these two I liked, so I took them up. Whisperers I got maybe because the director is from Mumbai. It's a psychological thriller. It is about the rise and fall of a person, and what he goes through during this period. It is like looking into the mirror and seeing the real you. PD - You mostly play very serious characters. How do you manage to play them differently? Manoj Bajpai - I don't think I play only serious characters. In Dil Pe Mat Le Yaar, I had a comic character; Bhiku Mhatre (Satya) was full of life; Kaun was loud and funny. I am serious, but only about my work and the work that I choose. When it comes to saying no to anybody, I am very straightforward. No force in this world can stop me. About the character I have played in Swami, he doesn't have any grudge against anybody. He is very down to earth, and very thankful to all those who do anything for him. I too am a very simple person and have lived in a very simple background. I come from a village and have seen similar people, so I don't have to venture far to look for such a character. My father is a very simple and harmless person, in love with his own wife. That pretty much sums it up. ! PRAVASI TODAY | SEPTEMBER 2009

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|C O V E R S T O R Y |

Global Tourism

Are We in Incredible State of Self-Denial?

‘Incredible India’ undoubtedly showcases the country’s rich and unrivalled heritage, monuments and tourist attractions. But does the tourism sector in India have what it takes to be globally competitive? Pravasi Today seeks some answers...

BHUVANESHWARI DAS IYER

It is undeniable that no other country can offer the sheer geographical, historical and cultural heritage to a tourist that India does. India, the cradle of Hinduism, Buddhism and Sikkhism has far more to offer to a tourist than any other country of the world. Each of the 28 states of India contains more historic and religious monuments for the tourist than many countries in Europe, America or Africa. Incredible as it may sound, the Government of India's "Incredible India" campaign to boost the tourism industry has strangely failed to move beyond familiar motifs. Tourists hardly know that India has hundreds of tourist attractions other than the Taj. For instance, how many in the West are aware of the Ajanta and Ellora Caves of Maharashtra, the ancient temples of Mahabalipuram (Mamallapuram) near Chennai, the Jagannath and Sun Temples in Orissa, the Golden Temple in Amritsar or the centuries-old royal palaces of Jaipur, Jaisalmer, Delhi and Mysore? A few other instances suffice to drive home the point: India has a coastline stretching over 6,000 PRAVASI TODAY | SEPTEMBER 2009

kilometres, but only a small number of tourists visit Goa for swimming, surfing and sunbathing. Delhi and its immediate environs have even more ancient historic and religious monuments than Rome, but the number of tourists visiting Delhi is only a fraction of the tourists who throng Rome each summer. Why do more tourists visit small city-states and commercial centres like Hong Kong and Singapore than India? Why are Dubai and Kathmandu more popular tourist destinations than Delhi or Khajuraho? The answer is simple: India, despite all the hoopla of promoting tourism and selling the country as an exotic destination, simply does not welcome tourists. Before we delve into semantics, statistics relating to tourist inflows would also be instructive - they do reveal another side of the picture, after all. Tourism is the largest service industry in India, with a contribution of 6.23% to the national GDP and 8.78% of the total employment in India. India witnesses more than five million annual foreign tourist arrivals and 16 çoklh VqMs | flrEcj

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|C O V E R S T O R Y |

527 million domestic tourism visits The tourism industry in India generated about US$100 billion in 2008 and that is expected to increase to US$275.5 billion by 2018 at a 9.4% annual growth rate. The Ministry of Tourism is the nodal agency for the development and promotion of tourism in India, also running the 'Incredible India' campaign. According to World Travel and Tourism Council, India will be the world's leading tourism hotspot, having the highest 10-year growth potential. The Travel & Tourism Competitiveness Report 2007 ranked tourism in India sixth in terms of price competitiveness and 39th in terms of safety and security. However, India's tourism sector currently lags behind less endowed countries and faces serious challenges including shortage of hotel rooms. In 2007, there were only 25,000 tourist-class hotel rooms in the whole of India. Among other factors hindering the growth of the tourism industry in India are stringent visa requirements and congested airports. Despite short- and medium-term setbacks, tourism revenues are expected to surge by 42% from 2007 to 2017.

Planning Commission estimates reveal that an investment of Rs 10 lakh (Rs 1 million) creates 78 jobs in the tourism sector and just 18 jobs in the manufacturing sector and 45 jobs in the agriculture sector. Considering the huge employment potential, and also due to the need to scale up supplies to meet the demand, the potential needs no reiteration. Sadly, there seems to be little concerted effort in this direction. The hotel industry, an integral part of the tourism sector, has been clamouring to be included just like airports, seaports, and railways, etc. In fact, under Section 10 (23) g of the Income Tax Act, hotels were added to the infrastructure list so that the interest received by financial institutions and banks for loans extended to hotels were tax exempted. However, the section itself was discontinued with effect from April 1,

“Incredible India” has strangely failed to move beyond familiar motifs. Tourists hardly know that India has hundreds of tourist attractions other than the Taj. PRAVASI TODAY | SEPTEMBER 2009

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|C O V E R S T O R Y |

2007. Current income tax regulations deny deductions to hoteliers on the ground that the activity of a hotel does not constitute an operation as specified in Schedule XIV of the Income Tax Act. Hoteliers have also been directed to explain the eco tourism activity in their project. These stifling regulations and a byzantine regime of bureaucracy have quite naturally, showed up in the form of India being off most tourists' radar. Despite its unquestionable and unrivalled cultural and monumental richness, India seems to revel in weaving a web of never-ending predicaments for the tourist. Beginning from the service aboard Air India, which leaves much to be desired, till their arrival on Indian soil, tourists have to endure things they wouldn't in other lands. Then there is the constant reminding that they are 'foreigners', right from the moment of arrival to the time of departure The ubiquitous queue marked 'Foreigners' at immigration control is perhaps India's unique 'contribution' to world tourism. Except at major international airports where taxi services are adequately organised, experience for overseas tourists, at all other airports, is nothing short of veritable nightmare. If not part of a pre-arranged package-tour group and not already booked in a hotel, choosing a hotel becomes a daunting task. It is another of those little Indian fallacies to presume that all tourists who come to India, especially those from the 'gora' lands of Northern America, Europe or Oceania are loaded with moolah and do not have to think twice before opting for five-star luxury. The alternatives, more often than not, are a tale of

PRAVASI TODAY | SEPTEMBER 2009

hazards for most overseas tourists as food, hygiene and the general standard of cleanliness of hotels, other than five-star, leave a lot to be desired. It is doubtful if tourism policymakers have given any serious thought to this. The imposition of luxury tax on five-star hotels by state governments also does not help the tourist. This tax varies from six per cent to about 20 percent of the hotel cost. All tourists are not millionaires, but states seem to treat holidays as luxuries to be taxed and gorged upon. It is easily forgotten that tourists bring in much-needed foreign exchange. Recently, both the Central and state governments have levied an exorbitant increase in admission charges for foreigners to major tourist attractions. As an attempt to bolster declining tourist income it can only prove counter-productive -tourists rightfully feel that they are being exploited. With many Indian national monuments and tourist attractions becoming part of the world heritage, this retrograde step makes a mockery of India's claims of being a global society. This is sheer discrimination against foreign tourists, nothing less. India's tourism problems can only be resolved through radical reforms, and through the involvement of genuine, committed professionals and experts, not by hordes of nincompoops and neophytes. Be it an appalling lack of facilities at Indian airports (they don't even stand comparison to major Asian ones), providing reasonably priced hotels (say, Rs1200 to Rs2,000 per night) with international standards of cleanliness and hygiene, improvement of existing facilities at popular tourist resorts, major reforms are both unavoidable and urgent. There is no reason why after embracing globalisation and having achieved credible success in several fields, India cannot develop its colossal tourism potential.

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|D I S C U S S I O N |

Indian Diaspora across the Globe: The Experience as a Minority Community The roundtable on Indian Diaspora echoes the apprehensions of NRIs in changing world order...

A round table on "Indian Diaspora across the Globe: The Experience as a Minority Community" was held at the Yasser Arafat Hall, Jamia Millia Islamia on 17th August, 2009. Scholars from varied fields came together to debate and present experiences of the Indian Diaspora spread across different countries of the world. The round table began with a welcome address by Prof. M. Mujtaba Khan, Director, Centre for Dalit PRAVASI TODAY | SEPTEMBER 2009

and Minority Studies, JMI. He brought out the importance of the Indian Diaspora globally as well as highlighted some of the discrimination suffered by the Indian diasporic community due to their ethnic origin. Giving the example of United Airlines frisking of former Indian President Kalam at Delhi Airport and the recent event of bollywood actor Shahrukh Khan being detained at the Newark Airport in the USA, he said that Indian ethnicity and especially Muslim identity created a cause for their discrimination. Prof A. K. Dubey, Chairperson, Centre for West Asian and African Studies, School of International Studies, Jawaharlal Nehru University also welcomed the delegates on behalf of the Organisation for Diaspora Initiatives (ODI). Moderating the proceedings, Prof. Dubey highlighted the differences in minority status of old and new diaspora. He pointed out that policy of active dissociation of India with its diaspora, enabled them to depend on themselves and not to look outside for any support. The chairperson of the round table was the former secretary of MOIA Shri J. C. Sharma. In his introductory remarks, he raised the question of minority and said that in India the criteria of religion remains the base for delineating the communities. In abroad the category is based on the origin of the person. Prof. Man Mohini Kaul of the Centre for South East Asian Studies, in the School of International Studies, Jawaharlal Nehru University spoke on the policy implications of the plural society in Malaysia with reference to the Bhumiputra policy and the last general elections held in 2008. Dr. Vivek Kumar of the Center for Studies in Social Systems of the School of Social Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University spoke on the importance of the structure and process dichotomy in the study of the Indian diaspora. He highlighted three facets: the problem of acceptance of the diasporic community in the host nations, the problem of polity and representation of the same and lastly the glass ceiling faced by the professionals in the diaspora. The presentations were followed by a general discussion on the policy initiatives to be undertaken by the government of India in light of the various experiences highlighted in the round table. P T BUREAU

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|A U S T R A L I A |

Australia Assures India The Prime Minister of Australia is now concerned about the widespread attacks on Indian students there Finally, the Australian government seems to be waking up to tackle the menace of hooliganism that Indian students have been experiencing in Australia for last several months. Realisation now seems to have dawned that Australia cannot annoy India beyond a point and would stand to lose if Indian public opinion turns against the country. The recent visit by Indian External Affairs Minister S.M. Krishna to Australia was marked by some general assurances from the highest quarter, the Prime Minister of Australia himself. Describing India as 'a rising power', Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd assured External Affairs Minister S.M. Krishna that his government was taking all steps to ensure the safety and security of Indian students. Rudd and Krishna held talks for 20 minutes and discussed a range of bilateral issues, including the security of nearly 100,000 Indian students in that country. After talks with Prime Minister Rudd, Krishna underlined his satisfaction at the steps taken by the Australian government to prevent attacks on Indian students. "I am satisfied with the assurances give to me by Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd," Krishna said. "Prime Minister Rudd is fully aware of the sensitivity of the issues concerning students. He informed about the remedial measures already taken by the government. I am satisfied that the Australian government at federal and state levels is fully geared to meet the situation," he said. During his five-day Australian visit, Krishna also met New South Wales Premier Nathan in Sydney. Rudd had also assured Krishna that 'firm action' would be taken against those responsible for attacks on Indian students. Rudd also told Krishna that inputs from the Indian community would be included in the action plan for international students that are being devised by the Australian government. During his trip, Krishna had interacted with Indian students and the Indian community to know first-hand problems faced by them. The attacks on Indian students began in May, creating outrage in India and the diaspora community Down Under. Krishna also participated in the Annual Post Forum Dialogue Meeting of the 16-nation Pacific Island Forum (PIF), in which India is a dialogue partner, in Cairns in northeast Australia. The forum discussed issues like climate change and sustainable development. P T BUREAU PRAVASI TODAY | SEPTEMBER 2009

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|S R I L A N K A |

Patch up now! The war may be over in Sri Lanka but the crisis is far from over

The Tamil Diaspora and a number of organisations are holding protest marches and their websites are relentlessly publishing calls for the international community to intervene against the mistreatment and harassment of the civilians. The UN and the other aid organisations have yet to embark on the huge task ahead of them to relocate, resettle and reconcile the civilian casualties. The Tamil diaspora is organising protest marches around the world to let the world know that even after the fall of LTTE, the Sri Lankan government is not very keen to accommodate its Tamil populace. Sensing the urgency and need for reconciliation, the US has asked the Sri Lankan government and the American Tamil community to seek opportunities to engage one another on political reconciliation and the reconstruction of Sri Lanka.

The call was made by US Assistant Secretary of State for South and Central Asian Affairs Robert Blake and US Charge d'Affaires in Sri Lanka James Moore in a meeting with 16 representatives of US-based organisations representing members of the Tamil diaspora. The US has stressed upon the Sri Lankan government that to achieve a lasting peace, it must promote justice and political reconciliation for all parties, dialogue with all parties, including Tamils inside and outside Sri Lanka on new mechanisms for devolving power, and improve human rights. Blake and Moore welcomed the opportunity to listen to the concerns and perspectives of the American Tamil diaspora community and to share the steps the US is taking to address the humanitarian crisis. The US has provided $56 million in humanitarian assistance in 2009. While the Sri Lanka government has made some progress easing camp congestion, registering internally displaced persons (IDPs), and expanding access by humanitarian organisations, much remains to be done. The US is urging the safe and speedy return of IDPs, continued access for international humanitarian organisations, and the registration and provision of national identification cards to IDPs, to help promote freedom of movement. Mistrust and mutual hatred still remain high in Sri Lanka. Hardliners on both sides are making the lives of ordinary civilians in Sri Lanka miserable. Tamil diaspora, community leaders and spokespersons are calling for the Tamil community to "re-group and realise their leaders’ dream". They fear now that with the Tigers silenced, they would be systematically eradicated, as there is no one to protect them. The Sri Lankan governing elites are in no way reconciliatory, either. There have been recent reports that during the celebrations following the government's victory over the Tigers, many Tamil businessmen were forced to give money towards the celebrations. Tamils have all reasons to be alarmed and view such incidents as "discrimination and harassment". In this scenario, the US initiative is a welcome step, though how far it will go is a guess no one would hazard.

PRAVASI TODAY | SEPTEMBER 2009

P T BUREAU

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|T R I N I D A D A N D T O B A G O |

Indian Festivity in Trinidad & Tobago The festival of India is festival. A contemponot a new concept, but rary art exhibition, the to have it in Trinidad is first ever in Trinidad, definitely something will feature the works special where 40 per of 14 illustrious artists cent of the population in India. Called is of Indian origin and "Kalpana" (Imaginathe people are emotiontion), it consists of 29 ally and culturally close paintings from a list of to their mother top artists which country. The festival includes M.F. Hussain, was quite a hit with the Amrita Shergill, Jamini people of all ethnic Roy, Krishen Khanna, groups as they have Bhupen Khakhar and been visiting the shows Jogen Choudhury. A Festival of India, showcasing Indian in large number. The craftsmen of art, craft and culture is being held in Trinidad and Tobago India will hold the Trinidad and Tobago for the first time spotlight in the prohas a population of 1.3 and no prize for guessing; it is a big hit gram. "In India, we million people and 44 with all ethnic groups in the island percent of which have a rich tradition of comprise the Indian arts and crafts, hundreds Diaspora, whose forefathers came from India, of years. They are all award-winning craft persons principally Uttar Pradesh and Bihar. They came here and they will be demonstrating hand block painting, to work on the sugar plantations and also to beef up Kantha embroidery, miniature paintings, wood a failing agricultural production. Indian High carvings and stone carvings," Mishra said. Commissioner Malay Mishra said that the event, Apart from this, a conference on Hindi was also which commenced on 15th August and marks India's organized to give a fillip to the language in the 62nd Independence anniversary, was to continue for Island. On Aug 16, the Indian high commission and a month."On Aug 15, India got her Independence the Ministry of Overseas Indian Affairs in collaboraand on Aug 31, Trinidad and Tobago got hers. We tion with the University of the West Indies hosted a celebrate this month and in commemoration of that seminar, "Indian Diaspora in the Caribbean". The celebration, we are observing `Festival of India' for speakers and audience were both enthusiastic about the first time in Trinidad and Tobago," he said. the language and had variety of views to preserve the The festival was inaugurated at the Mahatma Indian identity and its language in the Caribbean Gandhi Centre for Cultural Cooperation at Caroni, island. Central Trinidad.There are five elements to the GYANESHWAR DAYAL PRAVASI TODAY | SEPTEMBER 2009

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|T R I N I D A D A N D T O B A G O |

Trinidad & Tobago

Time to Quit Some 160 years ago, when British rulers sent Indian labourers to other colonies, a resident of village Lakhimpur near Azamgarh in UP had migrated to the Caribbean island of Trinidad and Tobago. His great grandson has been holding the office of the leader of opposition there since 1976, except for a period of 1995-2001 when he was the Prime Minister of the country. The position of Basdeo Panday, the most distinguished NRI of T & T, has been recently challenged by a poll conducted by North American Caribbean Teachers Association (NACTA) in late March 2009 and its repercussions have been very serious. The findings of the poll, based on an interview with 462 individuals, reveal that the voters overwhelmingly want Basdeo Panday to step down as Leader of the Opposition and as Leader of the United National Congress, so as to give his party a chance in the next elections. Voters feel as long as Panday is involved in the politics of the UNC, the party can't win an election. A majority of voters said they would not support an opposition led by Panday. 87% of those polled feel the UNC needs to be reformed. Asked if they would support the UNC in the next election if it is led by Panday, only 11% said yes; a steep drop from the 30% popular support the UNC obtained in the last general election

Basdeo Panday, the most distinguished NRI of T&T, ex-PM and currently the leader of opposition is now facing public wrath for not doing enough to revive his party

PRAVASI TODAY | SEPTEMBER 2009

in 2007. Only seven percent of voters feel Panday should remain as leader of the UNC. According to the NACTA poll, voters vehemently oppose a plan by Panday to expel members who have been calling for him to step down as the leader. Particularly another opposition party Congress of People (COP) supporters oppose any team-up with the UNC led by Panday or any of his loyalists, feeling they will be manipulated by Panday to prevent change. In a nutshell, the poll shows not only Panday but UNC MPs who are defending him also have been losing popular support. As far as Panday's reaction to the poll in concerned, he dismissed the findings, stating that he never pays attention to the NACTA poll as its findings were usually wrong. However, the dispute took a new turn on 6th August 2009 when Panday purported to service the constituents of Chaguanas West MP, Jack Warner, by using the office of Chaguanas Deputy Mayor, Orlando Nagessar, at the Chaguanas Borough Corporation (CBC). It remains to be seen which way the wind blows. But it is clear that Panday, his colleagues and MPs belonging to his family, Mickela Panday and Subhas Panday now face heavy criticism for not being seen in their constituencies for months. RAMESH KUMAR SHARMA

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|R O U N D U P |

REMITTANCE of Premium The Reserve Bank of India permits payment of premium in one of the following ways: 1. By payment out of funds held in Non-Resident (external) or foreign currency (Non- Resident ) account with any bank in India. 2. By cheques drawn by nonResident policy holder on bank accounts held in India in his own name (either solely or jointly) with another member of the family) whether or not the account has been designated as non-resident. 3. By cheque drawn on account maintained by resident parent or spouse of policyholder in their own name or joint names with other close relatives. 4. By the absolute Assignee in India wherever such policies have been absolutely assigned to a resident in India. 5. By the employers in respect of policies issued to their employees who have been deputed abroad by them 6. Premiums can be paid in cash by a resident parent or spouse of the non-resident policyholder subject to his/her submitting a letter stating the relationship with the policyholder. 7. Premiums due on policies issued to Indian students who have gone abroad for higher studies may be collected in rupees out of the Resident Bank Account in India or any of their representatives in India by cash or cheques. As per the present rules, policy cannot be exported out of India. It can be retained in LIC office, to be handed over to you, when you visit India next or can be sent to resident of India to be named by you or to your banker for safe custody. Claims of any nature arising under the policy will be settled in Indian currency in India. The payment of policy moneys in foreign currency can be made on getting approval from Reserve Bank of India. Present Exchange Control Regulations permit policy moneys payment in foreign currency proportionate to the premiums paid in foreign currency by direct remittance or from the non-resident (external) account or foreign currency Non Resident Account with a bank in India.

LIC BECOMES NRI Friendly Life Insurance Corporation caters to the life insurance needs of Non-Resident Indians and Indians working abroad. NRIs holding valid passport issued by the Govt. of India and who are Indian national can take LIC policies in Indian Rupee currency either during their short visit to India from any of its branch offices spread all over India or can avail insurance from country of his temporary residence on 'mail order basis'. In order to calculate how much one has to pay, he/she has to click on "Premium Calculations" to get installment premium for the selected plan at his age, for the sum to be assured and the term for which policy is desired online from LIC's site. Facility for payment of premium in quarterly, half yearly and yearly modes are available. One has to enclose copy of his passport towards age. To obtain insurance on your own life, you can use "Proposal for Insurance on Own Life" which you can conveniently download right away from "On Line Forms" .For other plans, download appropriate Proposal Form from "On Line Forms". You can complete the Non-Resident Questionnaire available at "On Line Forms".

PRAVASI TODAY | SEPTEMBER 2009

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|R O U N D U P |

GUIDELINES FOR NRIS investing in Indian Companies Non-Resident Indians (NRIs), and Persons of Indian Origin (PIOs) are allowed to invest in Indian companies in the primary and secondary capital markets in India through the portfolio investment scheme (PIS). Under this scheme, NRIs can acquire shares/debentures of Indian companies through the stock exchanges in India. The upper limit for overall investment for NRIs is 10%, of the paid up capital of the Indian company. The limit is 20% of the paid up capital in case of public sector banks, including the State Bank of India. The maximum limit of 10% can be raised to 24% subject to the approval of the general body of the company passing a resolution, to that effect. An NRI can make investment in non-convertible debentures but they need to require necessary permission (submit application) from Reserve Bank (Central Office) by the concerned Indian Company in form ISD. Overseas Corporate Bodies can make such investments only in domestic public / private sector mutual funds. They can also make investments in money market mutual funds. Transfer of shares/debentures of Indian companies by NRIs to other nonresidents does not require permission of Reserve Bank of India. However, the transferee NRI would need permission for purchase of such shares for which an application is required to be made to Reserve Bank in form FNC. Indian companies have been granted general permission to accept investments on non-repatriation basis, in shares/convertible debentures by way of new/rights/bonus issue provided the investee company has not undertaken agricultural/plantation activity and/or real estate business excluding real estate development i.e. development of property and construction of houses.

PRAVASI TODAY | SEPTEMBER 2009

NRI HOUSING LOAN by State Bank of Travancore State Bank of Travancore provides housing loan for construction, purchase/repair/ renovation/alteration of a house or for purchase of a plot for the construction of a house for self occupation on return to India. All Non Resident Indians holding Indian passports with a regular monthly income of not less than Rs. 10,000 and spouses and close relatives of Non-Residents, who are residents jointly with the non-resident Indian are eligible to get loan under this category. The loan amount is 60 times the Net Monthly Income (NMI) / Average Monthly Income (AMI) for person up to 45 years and 48 times for persons above 45 years of age. However, the repayment obligation is restricted to a maximum of 60% of the NMI/AMI. The margin is 20% up to Rs.30 lac, and 25% above Rs.30 lac and up to Rs. 3 crore. Repayment will begin on completion of the house or 18 months from the disbursement of the first installment of the loan, whichever is earlier. Repayment can be made either through remittance from abroad or transfer from NRE/FCNR/NRO accounts or by resident relatives. Rental income if any received should go towards repayment of loan. Repayment can be from local sources after returning to India permanently

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|E C O N O M Y |

Make Money! Creating wealth is an art and science at the same time. If investments are made properly, the rewards could be huge

with a high level of inflation, It ought to be known by all that this segment will give very low nobody creates wealth purely Nobody creates and sometimes even negative through savings. For creating wealth purely returns. wealth, those savings need to be through savings. For Twenty percent of wealth invested. There are four avenues must be allocated to real estate, of investment namely - fixed creating wealth, savwhich gives very high returns interest bearing investments, ings need to be inbut is illiquid, requires large bullions like gold and silver, real vested in the avenues sums of money and is difficult estate and equity markets. fixed interest bearing to manage and therefore has Basically, wealth creation comes down to allocation of our investments, bullions high-risk profile. 10 to 15 percent may be invested in savings in various abovelike gold and silver, bullion markets, which is liquid mentioned segments, called asset real estate and eqand gives sufficient returns; the allocation. The growth trajecuity markets. balance 55 to 60 percent should tory of these assets varies with be invested in equity market. time depending on the economic With the recession looming growth cycle. The risk perceplarge in most parts of the world and India being an tion also varies in each segment. Ideally, 20 percent emerging economy, we expect good returns in this of an individual’s wealth needs to be invested in fixed segment. Let’s have a closer look. income bearing avenues, having low risk profile; but PRAVASI TODAY | SEPTEMBER 2009

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|E C O N O M Y |

Currency Derivative Market PUBLIC ISSUES OF MAJOR The Indian capital The Dollar Rupee ($/INR) PUBLIC SECTOR UNDERmarket is highly incontract as being offered by TAKINGS (PSU’S) NSE and MCX is a very good This year’s union budget carries fluenced by foreign product for the investors. The a huge deficit to the tune of Rs institutional invesinvestors in this segment can four lakh crores. In order to tors (FII) inflows and bridge this gap, the government range from small and medium exporters/importers who is likely to come out with many therefore has a very require hedging in $/INR lucrative public issues of PSUs, strong correlation synchronising with their foreign at an attractive price-earning exchange flows over a period of (PE) ratio, to the benefit of with a rupee-dollar time. These investors do not small investors. This will serve movement. FII inhave easy access to existing the twin purposes of making flows may see higher funds available with the governbanks’ over-the-counter (OTC) trading platforms. This exment and also help in the revival rupee demand makchange platform is more of the capital market. With the ing the dollar weak, transparent with a very low rush of many public issues, indicating a strong margin requirement. many new investors will come Secondly, the Indian capital to the market. We should avail buying support in market is highly influenced by the benefit of investing in good capital markets. foreign institutional investors issues. Some of the forthcoming (FII) inflows and therefore has a PSU public issues are NHPC, very strong correlation with a $/INR movement. SAIL, Oil India Ltd. and some other Navratnas. With the inflow of FII money, the higher rupee demand will make the dollar weak, indicating a SYSTEMATIC INVESTMENT PLAN (SIP) strong buying support in capital markets. This is a THROUGH MUTUAL FUNDS very good indicator for movement in the capital In the case of a volatile market as has been seen in market. Exchanges also provide free technical the last few years, through SIP one can very easily analysis software on the internet for the benefit of smoothen the highs and lows of the market. Taking investors in this segment, an opportunity we should last year’s example, even if one started investing in use. the market when the Sensex was at its peak of 20,000 INTEREST RATE FUTURES (IRF) points, and continued investing regularly through This is a new product being launched by exchanges SIP mode, one could have obtained the benefit of shortly and is helpful for investors in managing investing at low Sensex level below 7,000 points. interest rate volatility. In lay terms, it is simply a Secondly it took longer time during its fall and futures market for the government securities/bonds. regained its current level at a fast pace. Now, with This will give a fillip to these illiquid government the Sensex being at around securities. Although initially it seems to be a compli16,000 points, one can safely cated product, a closer focus can help us understand consider one’s average investit. Viewing future interest rate scenarios, we can very ments at a reasonably good level. well either hedge our exposure in fixed interest bearing investments or take the benefit of arbitrage opportunity available in this segment. Initially, any market is difficult to penetrate but arbitrage opportunities are also available to early starters. This writer therefore, advises taking benefits of this CA GOPAL K AGARWAL opportunity. md@voguestock.net PRAVASI TODAY | SEPTEMBER 2009

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|L E G A L |

Taxing NRIs Pravasi Today’s legal and financial expert looks at various dimensions of income from the legal angle with respect to taxing Non-resident Indians... Generally speaking, the word ‘income’ covers receipts in the shape of money or money’s worth which arise with certain regularity or expected regularity from a definite source. It is not all receipt that form the basis of taxation under the Act. Broadly, an analogy is drawn of a tree and the fruits of that tree. The tree symbolises the source from which one gets fruits which symbolise ‘income’. The receipt arising from the sale of tree itself is, therefore, considered a capital receipt which is not income; but the receipts flowing from this source viz., fruits are income. Applying this analogy, it can be said that while the receipt arising from the sale of a house is not income, the receipt arising from the realisation of rent is income. In the same way, receipt from the sale PRAVASI TODAY | SEPTEMBER 2009

of a machine is not income but from the sale of produce brought out from the machine is income. In these cases, however, if a person deals in purchase and sale of house, properties or machines, these assets do not remain a source and the profit derived from activities of purchase and sale become income. The source need not necessarily be tangible as the return for human exertion is also income. The above is a broad generalisation. While a distinction is generally made between the capital receipt and revenue receipts, as illustrated above, the Act has widened the scope of income by expressly including within the meaning of ‘income’ the receipts that do not fall under the broad concept explained above. For instance, the Act specifically makes the profit arising from the sale of certain 30 çoklh VqMs | flrEcj

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|L E G A L |

capital assets also subject to tax under certain circumstance. The winnings from lotteries, cross-word puzzles, races, card games etc. which do not arise from any definite source and do not have the element of regularity have also been specifically clarified to be ‘income’ under the Act. It is not the gross receipts but only the net receipts arrived at after deducting the related expenses incurred in connection with earning such receipts that are made the basis of taxation. Income tax is charged under the Indian Income Tax Act, 1961, It is an annual tax on income levied by the Central Government. Tax is charged in respect of the income of the financial year (known as previous year) in the next financial year (known as assessment year) at the rates fixed for such assessment year in the Finance Act passed each year by the Parliament. The tax is charged in respect of the income of the previous year and the same is chargeable in the assessment year. “Previous year” means the financial year i.e. the period beginning on 1st April and ending on 31st March. The return of income for this period is due in the next financial year called the Assessment Year in which the proceedings for assessment commence either by filing of return voluntarily by the income earner or by the Income Tax Department initiating action for calling the return. The income earned in the period beginning on 1st April 1995 and ending on 31st March 1996 will, for instance, be assessable earliest in the next financial year i.e. the year 1996-97. The Act categorises the income of a person under different heads and provides for the manner of computation of taxable income of each head, which are: • Salaries • Income from house property PRAVASI TODAY | SEPTEMBER 2009

• Profits and gains of business or profession • Capital gains; and • Income from other sources The total of the income under each head as worked out in accordance with the provisions of the Act is termed as ‘gross total income.’ The Act provides for certain deduction from such gross total income. Deductions are allowed for promotion of charitable activities, promoting exports and other activities resulting in the inflow of foreign exchange, for development of industries and for other socioeconomic objectives. Incentives for promotion of savings are provided in the form of deduction in tax liability by grant of rebate at certain percentage on certain savings made out of taxable income. After reducing the ‘gross total income’ by the amount of incentives deductions mentioned in the preceding paragraph, the balance is the amount on which tax is to be calculated at the rates prescribed by the relevant Finance Act. This amount is termed as total income and is the base for taxation. For certain categories of taxpayers, a basic exemption limit is provided and tax is calculated only on that part of the total income which is in excess of such exemption limit. If such ‘total income’ is below the basic exemption limit, no tax is chargeable. For instance, under the Finance Act, 2000, no tax is payable by an individual if his total income is below Rs. 50,000/-.

SUBRATA BISWAS

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|C U L T U R E W A T C H |

Fashion

Statement

It was during my time and it remains today the occasion to flaunt your dress. The sociologist in me egged to feel the pulse of the fashion and what better place than the premier university of the capital of a confident, rising economy... It was the prospect of meeting one of my old college classmates that brought me to the campus of Delhi University. I must be visiting the place after at least fifteen years. While I was still struggling with the deluge of memories which normally get associated with the years spent in college, I saw a hue of colors emerging from the classrooms. Suddenly I got reminded that the new session of the University had begun and it was natural that the young students would turn up in the latest and contemporary PRAVASI TODAY | SEPTEMBER 2009

dresses. It was during my time and it remains today the occasion to flaunt your dress. The sociologist in me egged to feel the pulse of the fashion and what better place than the premier university of the capital of a confident, rising economy. Armed with the eyes of a researcher, I tried to read meanings into the myriad of styles of clothing that adorned the young bodies. Girls flaunted stockings of every kind and texture, skin-tight pants, 32 รงoklh VqMs | flrEcj

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|C U L T U R E W A T C H |

glittery bracelets; whereas boys wore jeans, hugging shirts, friendship bands and the works. The contemporary fashion is a reflection of the late fifties and sixties. With the technological revolution the world has become a seamless entity and fashion has become the biggest gainer in the bargain. India no longer is detached from the latest trends in fashion and accessories.

symbol of rage, fear and pity. A whole generation of boys and girls, therefore, grew up in studded jeans, torn shirts and pants held together with safety pins which the girls, at times, varied with slit skirts and tight fitting pants. The ‘punk dressing’ conveyed double messages. On one hand it symbolized a wounded child and on the other, restlessness and boredom. Either way the message was that of a

Youth also is a symbol of protest. In the decade of ‘50s, leather jackets and pants were the choice of teenagers which made them appear tough and rebellious. In fact, following the Second World War, during the decades of ‘50s and ‘60s a new trend emerged – that of clothes designed specifically for teenagers. In the United States, during these decades half the population was under thirty years of age. The affluence of the American society was on the ascendance and the teens spent their money on products that gave them status and identity. In a way it was like breaking away from the earlier generation which was brought up in a middleclass environ. The ‘punk’ look of ‘70s originated in England and soon engulfed the whole world as a

disconnect with the older generation. What the wearer probably never thinks is that ‘clothing is a language in itself which through its symbols conveys a lot about the wearer to the viewer.’ Before people even converse, their clothing makes a statement revealing their personality. As a form of language, clothes can range from conventional to eccentric. In young adults, jeans remain a popular choice. It, in a way, symbolizes that they are all members of the same group and their primordial identities get subsumed in the larger overarching identity.

PRAVASI TODAY | SEPTEMBER 2009

DR. MAITHILI GANJOO CHOUDHARY m_ ganjoo@hotmail.com.

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|B O L L Y W O O D |

Austen’s Emma! Yep sonam kapoor will play Emma in the bollywood adaptation of Austen’s novel The Saawariya girl is making headlines for all the right reasons, adding to her new found fame as it seems. It is official that she will be staring in the bollywood adaptation of Jane Austen’s comedy about a too clever brat whose penchant for matchmaking other people almost ruined chances of her own match. The movie is set in Delhi with Emma Indianised as Aisha. "She'll be Aisha Kapoor, not Emma Woodhouse," said Sonam who confessed to be "a big Jane Austen fan". "I've read all her novels. They all are so girly and tie up just perfectly in the climax," she said. Being co-produced by her father Anil Kapoor and directed by Rajshree Ojha, the film's shooting will start soon. The actress is also very excited as it will be produced by Sonam's sister Rhea under their dad's film banner. In this film, Sonam will be romancing three men. The cast includes Abhay Deol, VJ Cyrus Sahukar and Arunoday Singh. But, while Sonam will be the centre of attention of the three hunks, the PRAVASI TODAY | SEPTEMBER 2009

film also assumes significance since it will be a female dominated crew. Most of the people associated with this film are young women and Sonam just can't wait for this party to begin. "I'll play a typical south Delhi girl with a Modern School background," revealed Sonam. "You may see me jogging in Lodhi Garden or shopping in a mall." In the novel, Emma lives with her rich but eccentric father in an English village. "Ours will be a rich family with a bungalow on Aurangzeb Road but my real father won't play my father in the film," she said. Played by the likes of Oscar-winner Gwyneth Paltrow in the past, being Emma won't be easy.But Sonam's confident. "Inwardly, I may be like Bittu (her character in Delhi 6) but outwardly I'm more like Aisha Kapoor," she said Looks like the Delhi 6 girl has a long way to go; but it is sure from her previous performances that she seems to quickly gaining popularity among the audiences worldwide. P T BUREAU

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|NEW RELEASE| The film has sabstance, don’t get misled by the title, watchable for sure

Dhan te nan... Yeah… that’s

Kaminey for you Finally, a movie with substance .Yes, Vishal Bhardwaj did it! A movie that can make Hollywood take a bow. Kaminey is like a roller- coaster ride which won’t allow you to blink even once and you definitely don’t need popcorn or cola. The film is brainy, smart and balmy. Kaminey is the first film that credits its viewers with some intelligence. It demands attention from the word GO and allows you to sit back. The movie’s dirty damp world is populated by bookies, triggerhappy drug mafia, corrupt cops and power-hungry politically ambitious goons. In the skirmish of these characters unwinds the story of Guddu and Charlie (Shahid Kapur), twin brothers who have nothing in common, not even their speech defects. Charlie, who lisps (pronounces ‘sa’ as ‘fa’), is looking for a ‘fortcut’ to make big ‘paifa’ and become a bookie, while Guddu, who stammers, has a clear life plan chalked out. He works for an NGO spreading AIDS awareness but – in a delightful irony – ends up impregnating his girlfriend Sweety (Priyanka Chopra). And as he tears down the chart of his life-plan, Guddu has no choice but to unwillingly marry Sweety, not so much out of love for her or the child, but out of fear of her politician brother Bhope Bhau (Amol Gupte), a thickset, full-blooded Marathi manoos who wants to marry off his sister to an influential builder for political mileage. The drama hits feverish pitch when the brothers end up with the wrong baddies and the only way to sort out the mess is to finally meet. Will Charlie give up his getrich-quick dreams to ensure a happy end to Guddu's `fo fweet' love story? Will Guddu PRAVASI TODAY | SEPTEMBER 2009

stop hating his twin for his errant ways and display some bhai-bhai emotion? Kaminey mostly draws its magic from the dazzling music score (Vishal Bhardwaj) and ground-breaking cinematography (Tassaduq Hussain) creating a whole new playground for criminals, thugs and goons to revel in. But it is the performances that leave you spellbound. We haven’t seen Shahid Kapur act as good as he does in Kaminey. Shahid has mastered the speech defects and also put on a different body language for the twin characters, most apparent in a scene where Guddu and Charlie have a fight. Priyanka Chopra too internalises her character of a feisty, love-struck Maharashtrian girl flawlessly. Scriptwriter Amole Gupte (Taare Zameen Par) makes a dhamaal debut as the wily neta who is ready to sell his ideology (Maharashtra only for Maharashtrians) for a substantial sum of money. Newcomer Chandan Roy Sanyal is memorable as Mikhail, Charlie's edgy gangster buddy. There are some weak links as well in Kaminey. The flashback about Guddu’s and Charlie’s past revealing why they hate each other is just not convincing. Or when an emotional Guddu begins to tell Sweety about his childhood crush is embarrassingly cheesy. Kaminey overall, is a bit violent, funny and emotional, which makes it entertaining and totally paisa vasool. SHAILY LAMBA

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|B C O O K E RR EY V| I E W |

Young in India -

On the threshold of a sexual revolution? Broad minded is the man who is comfor table with many of the things that the writer do or has done in her life, which includes drinking smoking or having had sexual experiences.

MARRYING ANITA A quest for love in the New India Writer: Anita Jain Published by: Bloomsbury Classification: Non Fiction Price: GBP 7.99

‘‘Marrying Anita’’ is a candid, straightforward, and intelligent memoir that combines the author's search for a soulmate with her experiences of adjusting to a life in contemporary India. It is a strikingly honest account of her single life in New York as well as in Delhi told in first person. This book is an interesting account of the changing cultural moores of India and the westernisation of Indian youth experienced by a non-resident Indian returning to India. Anita Jain is a 30 plus Harward educated journalist who lives alone in New York. She tries her best to find herself a groom in New York but fails, then coming to India in search of a suitable husband. Jain's move occurs during the summer of 2005, coincidentally at the same point in her life when her father had moved to US at the age of 33. Jain has moved to India reversing the migration pattern of her father. The writer has used her search for a husband as the best way to tell the story of ‘New India’. What the book is interesting for is the new generation NRI's version of ‘New India’. More and more of the new generation of NRIs wonder about and seek to explore the opportunities that exist in India for them both professionally and personally. The impetus for this book seems to be providing a window into the rapidly changing world of youth in India. What is interesting is writer’s dating experiences in India in comparision with those in the West. The writer is capable to find ‘broad minded’ and ‘modern enough’ guys in ‘New India’. The writer seems to opine that the young people in Indian cities are currently at the threshold of a sexual revolution. What the writer wishes to establish may not be representative for the youth in general in India, but her account is important in the sense that an Indian women having wide cross cultural experience tries to see India in her perspective; and what she finds is new. For a woman writer showing courage to this level is not generally found in Indian setting. Even in fiction, a women’s character with such liberal tendencies gets derailed in her emotional and social life. Such a ‘liberated’ woman in Indian literature faces continuous social resistance, and also finds herself always trapped in moral dilemmas. As a result, she gets nothing - neither fruits of a ‘liberated’ life nor a ‘normal’ life. But, what seems to be ‘new’ for India is that there is a breed who is free from both – social resistance as well as resistance of the self. Jain’s narrational skills are exceptional. ‘Marrying Anita’ is a memoir with elements of travel narrative, and shows the path of revival of this genre is this era of ‘reality shows’. RAKESH SRIVASTAVA (prakeshs1974@yahoo.co.in)

PRAVASI TODAY | SEPTEMBER 2009

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|N R I A C H I E V E R S |

Hindu Priest in OBAMA'S COUNCIL ANJU BHARGAVA IS APPOINTED AS A MEMBER OF FAITH-BASED ADVISORY Anju Bhargava, a banker and a Hindu priest has been appointed by the US President Barack Obama as a member of a faith-based advisory council of the White House which hopes to remove the ignorance about Hinduism and spread the "real meaning" of the rituals associated with the religion. Anju Bhargava is the second Indian American appointed to the council which is part of the White House Office of Faith Based and Neighborhood Partnerships and includes religious, secular leaders and scholars from different backgrounds as its members. She began her career over two decades ago as a banker and has held senior level positions in corporate America, focusing on business transformation, organizational development and risk management. Currently, she is also working with Rutgers Business School as a Fellow of Department of Accounting, Business ethics and information systems. She is also the president of Asian Indian Women in America (AIWA) and has worked widely in areas such as employment, career development, cultural acculturation, integration, health, education and general. Bhargava was the only Indian-American to serve in the Community Builder Fellowship, former US President Bill Clinton's White House initiative (1998-2000). For the past 20 years, she has been the Hindu representative for Livingstone's Interfaith here. Clergy Association and is a member of the Collective Hindu Initiative. The Indian National Trust for Art and Cultural Heritage (INTACH) is organizing a special function to felicitate Bhargava for her achievements on August 16.

PRAVASI TODAY | SEPTEMBER 2009

MEP to get KRISHNA MENON AWARD An Indian-origin Member of the European Parliament Claude Moraes has been chosen for the V K Krishna Menon Award 2009 for his contribution to political, social and economic advancement of the deprived sections of the Asian community. "We had many other nominations for the award, but Claude won hands down because of his integrity, conscientiousness, courage and mastery of his brief," Dr. Cyriac Maprayil, Director of the V K Krishna Menon Institute, said announcing the award. "He is respected too, for his oratorical prowess and his very engaging personality. It is significant that when many Labour MEPs throughout the UK were defeated in the last election, Claude more than comfortably retained his seat," he said. Claude Ajit Moraes was elected to the European Parliament from London in 1999 and again in 2004 and most recently in 2009, when he led the London list of candidates. One of the first Asian MEPs elected to the European Parliament, Claude was previously Director of the Joint Council for the Welfare of Immigrants (JCWI), a national refugee charity.

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|T O U R I S M |

Jharkhand Tourism Experience Adventure Naturally! Jharkhand provides excellent opportunities to adventure freaks, from parasailing to rock climbing. With its natural sites being developed by the state government for adventure activities, it is envisaged as one of the major adventure tourist destination in the country...

Life is either a great adventure or nothing - Helen Keller Of late, Jharkhand has realised the importance of shrugging off living a mundane life by embracing and developing herself as a key adventure tourist destination. In Jharkhand, the forests and its natural neighbors act hands in glove in tempting you to pay attention towards them. Surrounded by lush green Hills, Jharkhand is renowned for its rich mineral wealth, untouched beauty of the wooded forest, amazing wild life, and magnificent waterfalls. The rich and diverse culture and breathtaking scenic splendour of Jharkhand draw large number of tourists every year. Among the newly emerging facets of Jharkhand is its vibrancy as a rising hot destination for adventure tourists. The State Government of Jharkhand and its Tourism Department is taking all initiatives in establishing the state as a major adventure destination of India. One of the steps in this regard has been the opening of the Jharkhand Adventure Tourism PRAVASI TODAY | SEPTEMBER 2009

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|T O U R I S M |

Institute, which would offer training courses in various adventure sports to adventure lovers. Clearly, Jharkhand has set its sights on professionalism in its thrust towards putting the region on the tourist map of the world. The State Government of Jharkhand has ambitious plans to develop the state as a major adventure tourism destination. The government has earmarked Rs. 20 crore for the promotion of adventure tourism in the state. It plans to offer scuba diving, rafting, canoeing, sailing, kayaking, snorkeling, paddleboat, paragliding, parasailing, mountaineering, trekking, jungle safaris and a host of other adventurous activities. More than 15 potential spots have already been identified, which would be developed as adventure sites. The list includes Sita Falls, Dimna Lake, Kanke Dam, Buridih Lake, Chandil Lake, Massanjore, Maithon Dam, Sahebganj, Tilaiya Dam, Tenughat, Betla, Kelaghagh Dam (Simdega), Rukka Dam, Hazaribagh and Chandwa. Some of the spectacular places worth a visit for adventure tourists in the state are Latehar, Ranchi, Giridih, Jamshedpur, Hazaribagh et al. Latehar has always been the number one destination for adventure tourism in the state. Parasnath and Satpahar Hills are considered to be one of the well-known destinations for those who want to avail the opportunity of paragliding and parasailing. Parasnath Hills, considered to be one of the highest Hills in the state are among a number of favourable destinations where tourists can enjoy some of the adventure sports which include hiking, trekking and backwoods camping. On the other hand, Lower Gahgri, Rajadera and the waterfalls of Lodh are some of the best cherishable adventure tourism spots in the country. One can also feel the experience of yachting in Rukka dam. PRAVASI TODAY | SEPTEMBER 2009

Water Sports A water reservoir some eight kilometers north-east of Giridih is one of the best site for water related adventure sports and bird-watching. A watch tower and 600 feet high Hillock offers a panoramic view of Khandoli site. Khandoli Park is a water reservoir which doubles up as an ideal site for bird watching and various water sports. It is probably the most accomplished water sports destination in the state. Elephant and camel safari and a number of other amusement facilities are available there including boating, rock-climbing, parasailing and kayaking. Water surfing too is available at Khandoli dam. One is not supposed to be an expert in trailing

in waters to avail the facilities of various water games. Naïve tourists are always given a helping hand in the form of expert instructors who train them in learning preliminary steps such as the exercise of crossing the river, rafting etc. Water of the scenic stream flowing down the peaks of Parasnath Hills has some medicinal values too. The Kayak and other water sports courses can be availed at the Dimna Lake Island which is located 15 kilometers away from Jamshedpur. With the monsoon opening all its outlets, Jamshedpur turns into an ideal location for one who is interested in 41 çoklh VqMs | flrEcj

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|T O U R I S M |

river rafting. With 'fluctuations' in the flow of water resulting in small and slow tides, and high currents, tourists can manouever in the waters and deftly handle the raft; instilling in them the force to reach the zenith of excitement. A potamophobic person who loves trailing on slow waters can enjoy the game of kayaking. The Tata Steel Adventure Foundation (TSAF), based in Jamshedpur, conducts various water sports courses in the state. During the rainy season, TSAF provides the tourists with the facility of river rafting on the bank

of Subarnarekha River, located near Jamshedpur. Later on, in the month of September, the tourists can delight themselves through water surfing in the lakes of Dimna. Other countable water sports sites in the state include the Masanjore Dam in Dumka, Tilaiya Dam in Koderma, Kanke Dam in Ranchi, Chandil Dam in Saraikela, Tenughat Dam in Bokaro and Maithan Dam in Dhanbad. Aero Sports What if one gets an opportunity to fly like a bird in the air? Parasailing is an exciting aero sport harnessed to a half cut orange shaped parachute called 'parasail', which is towed to a jeep on land or by a motor boat above water up to a height of 300 feet with the help PRAVASI TODAY | SEPTEMBER 2009

of a rope. At this height there is no engine, no sound, no pilot, only excitement and thrill. The flight is controlled entirely by the operator from jeep or boat. One must also mind the fact that a parasail is remarkably different from a regular parachute; in that it is projected to first ascend and then descend. On the other hand, parachutes are contrived only to descend. In huge demand because of the high octane level one traverses into while parasailing, the state has tapped its potential by conducting it at the air strip at Sonari Airport in Jamshedpur. Getalsud Dam near Ranchi, another parasailing venue, (a 40 minutes drive from the capital city) is another glorious feather in the orbit of adventure tourism in the state. The hot air balloon is the oldest successful humancarrying flight technology and is a great adventure sport. It is organized to attract tourists, who themselves enjoy the beauty of nature from the sky. Proper training is also provided to handle the flight. Some of the other spots in Jharkhand for aero sports are Dhalbhumgarh near Jamshedpur, Ranchi, Deoghar, Bokaro and Giridih. Rock & Wall Climbing Rappelling, river crossing and trekking are a part of mountaineering training, which inculcates team spirit, crisis handling abilities and leadership. Khandoli Hill with its vast range of rocks, offers varied challenges to beginners as well as to experts. Basic training is provided during the camp by skilled instructors of the academy. Tourists can enjoy the various hues of trekking in the rocky Hills of Giridih. A Hill walking mountain biking event is also organized in the winters of December on the terrains of 3000 feet high Dalma Hills located near Jamshedpur. A must-trekking spot in the state is the Christian Hills in the district of Giridih. One can also trek from 42 รงoklh VqMs | flrEcj

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|T O U R I S M |

Bengabad to Pachamba through the forests. Some of the other rock climbing destinations in the state include Turi and Tumung (30 kilometers away from Jamshedpur), the famous Tagore Hill in the capital city's Morabadi area. Under the aegis of the Tatas, the state is also home to an artificial sports climbing wall of international standards. The 15 meter high and six meter wide wall is located at JRD Tata Sports Complex. In the dossier of adventure spots in the state are the Gumro Hills (near Fatehpur), Ishri falls in Govindpur (near Giridih road), Trikut Hill in Deoghar and Third Dyke near Maithon Dam among others. Apart from it, a number of adventure courses have also been designed for various tribal and rural groups, the underprivileged and the physically challenged ones. These programmes are organized by TSAF in the winters in the wild surroundings of Jamshedpur. The state government has set up Jharkhand Adventure Tourism Institute to pave the way for fast tracking the process of modeling the state as a fledgling and burgeoning tourist spot. A spot assessment committee has also been developed to look into the arena of the scopes in the state for casting it as an adventure tourist spot. On the other hand, Tata Steel Adventure Foundation, a private organization has also taken the task of presenting the state as one of the most viable and suitable destinations for adventure connoisseurs. Jharkhand is the place to head if one wants to have a complete adventure trip. So, be a part of an exhilarating and adventurous trip to Jharkhand. It will surely raise your adrenaline level. AMIT GUIN

DEPARTMENT OF TOURISM Government of Jharkhand, FFP Bhawan, 2nd Floor, Dhurwa, Ranchi-1, Jharkhand. Ph: +91-651-2400981, Tel Fax: +91-651PRAVASI TODAY | SEPTEMBER 2009

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Gwalior a perfect blend of cultural heritage and modernity Here a rich cultural tradition has been interwoven into the fabric of modern life. The princely past of Gwalior lives in palaces and museums and the past merges with the present to offer the visitor a city of enduring greatness... Gwalior, the fort city of India, is said to be a perfect blend of Orientalism and Occidentalism. It sends its solicitation to the tourists from all over the world to come and enjoy the legendary land. "The pearl in the necklace of the forts of hind" is how the great Mughal emperor Babur described about the massive fort in the city. The history of this place is enshrouded in the mystery of legend, named after a saint, who cured the local chieftain from leprosy. The history of Gwalior dates back to the eighth century. A cradle of dynas-

PRAVASI TODAY | SEPTEMBER 2009

ties, Gwalior changed hands from the Tomars to Lodhis of Delhi, and then this city slipped into the hands of the Muslims and British who finally handed the reign of this city to the great Scandias, who still have great influence in Gwalior. The enchantments of Gwalior are the forts and palaces which are its major attraction. The presence of these historical treasures makes this city a megalomaniac one. Gwalior houses the fort complex, from the regal charm of Jai Vilas Palace to awe inspiring Man Mandir Palace to Gurjari Mahal. Jai Vilas Palace, built in 1809, is patterned on the style of the 'palais de versailles' in France, combining Tuscan, Italian and Corinthian styles of architecture. This palace is

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|T O U R I S M |

the current residence of the the unique architectural pattern Scandias. It houses a museum of the doorway. Tansen, the expowhere one can get to see artifacts Chaturbhuj Mandir, again nent of Dhrupad from all over the world. dedicated to Vishnu, was built in Next on the card of palaces, is the 876 AD at the north-east style was counted Man Mandir Palace, also known entrance of the fort. amongst one the as Chitra Mandir. Gwalior, being a cultural hot Gurjari Mahal was basically a spot is having a special affinity nine jewels of the gift by Raja Man Singh to his towards Hindustani classical royal court, went most favorite queen Mrignaini. music. Tansen, an exponent of It is the most preserved part of Dhrupad style (counted amongst on to evolve the the fort and now has a museum one the nine jewels of the royal that showcases Hindu and Jain Gwalior gharana. court) went on to evolve the sculptures belonging to the Gwalior gharana, whose contemancient times. porary exponent is the world Gwalior is not just a place of forts and palaces, it renowned sarod player Amjad Ali Khan. The tomb has some of the best museums in the country. One constructed in remembrance of this great voice is the of which is Gujari Mahal Archaeological Museum, venue of Tansen Sangeet Samaroh at Gwalior. This which houses some of the rare antiquities, dating festival invites huge attention of the tourist from all back to the first century. Not to miss is over the world. Night long sessions of classical Shalbhanjika, the statue of tree goddess kept inside music rendered by eminent personalities from the the museum (it can be seen only on request). The country brings this city alive and vibrant. This museum is open from 10 till 5 in the evening. And Annual Tansen Sangeet Samaroh is held every winter people having taste for music can visit Sarod Ghar in the months of November and December. museum, the home of legendary Ustad Hafiz Khan. The ancient capital city of Gwalior being rich in This has been converted into a museum. heritage has successfully metaphored into a neoKeeping in line with the heritage city, Gwalior is Indian city, bustling with activities. Laskar and famous for the temples too, renowned for their Patankar Bazaar specializes in souvenirs with architectural patterns. Most of the temples in the traditional touch, while on the other hand, there are city are located inside the fort. One such is Teli Ka government emporiums from where you can buy Mandir, which witnesses a unique blend of collection of artifacts of Madhya Pradesh. Here, one Dravidian and Indo Aryan styles of architecture, can quench the thirst for dokra figurines and tribal built in the ninth century. Its decoration reflects the jewelry to hand woven saris and fabrics. If one is influence of Nagara style of architecture and this looking for traditional Chanderi sari then go Chowk temple is dedicated to Lord Shiva. at Bara. Not to miss is the Saas - Bahu temple, a two CHITRA GOPAL pillared temple dedicated to Lord Vishnu which has PRAVASI TODAY | SEPTEMBER 2009

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2009


|S P O R T S | The former Indian Captain makes a comeback in One-Days after two years in oblivion...

Wall is BACK! The Wall of Indian cricket Rahul Dravid has made a successful comeback in the one-day cricket team. His entry in the team is the result of hard work, dedication, commitment and sincerity towards the cricket. These qualities have made him one of the greatest cricketers in the history of cricket. "He has been dropped from the one-day side two years back in 2007 as his credentials as a one day player were questioned. But in the second edition of Indian Premier League (IPL) played this year, he proved his critics wrong by displaying high standard of cricket prowess. Even his staunch opponents were shocked to see him batting in a different avataar. His style, speed and flamboyancy in the 20-20 format were highly appreciated. Rahul Dravid started his career in 1996 against England. Initially, he was not considered for one-day cricket as he was labeled as a test cricketer. But over the period of time he has brought significant improvement in his one-day game; as a result of which he was later clubbed with the core one-day players like Sourav Ganguly and Sachin Tendulkar He had never been an explosive batsman in the one-day cricket. It is because of his flawless technique and sound understanding of the game that has made him an indispensable player of the team. It is his dediPRAVASI TODAY | SEPTEMBER 2009

cation towards the game because of which he has achieved remarkable success and emerged as one of the top most players. In the words of former Indian batsman, Sanjay Manjrekar, "Rahul Dravid has been a selfless player and always played in the interest of the team." While dropping Dravid out of the team two years back, the then chairman of selection committee Mr. Dalip Vengsarkar commented, "He has to prove his fitness and form in Ranji Trophy match to force his way back into the one-day team." But in the last 2020 World Cup played in England, the defending champion had failed miserably and could not make it to the semifinal. The failure of the middle order was one of the reasons for its debacle. The selection committee has realized the importance and need of a strong middle order. The out-of-form Rohit Sharma and no other player of such caliber and potential in sight turned the attention towards Dravid. It is a fact that no team in the world has achieved success without the likes of Michael Bevan, Damien Martyn, Mike Hussey and Jacques Kallis, who were the mainstay of their team as middle order batsman. These players were the pillars of their team and played pivotal role in the success of their team. Dravid truly belongs to this category. Rahul Dravid provides stability and balance to the team while rotating the strike regularly. He should be replaced only when the player of his capability could step in his shoes. Jai Ho Rahul Dravid! ANUBHAV SHARMA

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2009


|P R A V A S I F I L M F E S T I V A L |

Indian diaspora cinema has apparently had more enduring global success portraying genuine diaspora issues. Is this a beginning of a new sojourn for Pravasi cinema? Pravasi Today seeks some answers‌

Indian Diaspora and Cinema PANKAJ DUBEY

The crossover success of Mira Nair's Monsoon Wedding (2001), whose characters speak English, Hindi and Punjabi, lies in the skill with which the film acquaints a Western audience with the sights and sounds of the new global India. Set in a burgeoning New Delhi suburb, the film uses a lavish Punjabi wedding as an occasion for reunion of family members scattered across the globe. The past two decades of the twentieth century have seen a new movement in mass media with the work of South Asian Diaspora filmmakers in the West. Asian films no longer lurk at the periphery but have entered the mainstream, with the stupendous success of films like Bend It like Beckham (2002). British Asian filmmaker Gurinder Chadda turns this BritishAsian film about a clash between traditional values PRAVASI TODAY | SEPTEMBER 2009

and the modern world into a fantastic feel-good movie. Chock-a-bloc with wonderful characters, the plot features Jess' long-suffering mother, her promiscuous sister, and her fellow teammates. The protagonist Jess, an enthusiast soccer player has to battle ethnic and social prejudices. Gurinder Chadda is the first Asian woman to have made inroads into the mainstream movie sphere of the West. Her films focus on class, race, and gender issues and on marginalised outsiders, the working classes of the Western metropolises, made up mainly by people of colour from Britain's former colonies in Asia and Africa. Take Bride and Prejudice. The novel revolves around the conflict between Darcy and Elizabeth arising from their social status, whereas the Bollywood version portrays cross cultures acting as negative barriers 48 çoklh VqMs | flrEcj

2009


|P R A V A S I F I L M F E S T I V A L |

between Darcy and Lalita. The desi version of the renowned Jane Austen novel opened the eyes of mainstream cinemagoers to colourful Bollywood! On the other hand in The Namesake, a mother's role was sensitively essayed by Tabu, portraying the socio-cultural angst and challenges of many firstgeneration Indian women living abroad, torn between tradition and modernity, an age-old issue for Indian mothers having to raise their children in foreign lands. Endless reels of film have been dedicated to the trials and tribulations of the Indian diaspora, whether Somnath Sen's evocative Leela or Mira Nair's critically acclaimed The Namesake. Deepti Naval, in Leela and Tabu in The Namesake have to deal with their children wanting to live their own lives and merging into an American way of life. The strong emphasis on maternal dilemma is very much a reality for Asian mothers who have to raise their children abroad. Mainstream celluloid has only recently managed to capture what generations of expatriates have felt for years. Like the character, Gogol in The Namesake, there are instances of young Indians straying from their inherent identity, almost wanting to deny their roots, a fear that haunts many Asian parents. What if they are not interested in their native culture? What if they lose themselves completely in a new way of life? “No one today is purely one thing.” When a social scientist said this long back, he was un-mistakenly foreseeing the homogenisation and globalisation of culture where assimilation of ethnic identity becomes a focus. Identity can be seen as fundamentally a group phenomenon, binding group members on the basis of exclusive common characteristics. Viewed in this context, identity is invoked as something allegedly deep, basic and foundational. Hybridity in the name of PRAVASI TODAY | SEPTEMBER 2009

cultural dynamism is becoming the issue of expression within the Indian community residing abroad. Construction of immigrant cultures and their identity, and their negotiation of space are widely reflected in the NRI cinema. A dysfunctional family grappling with its identity has become the leitmotif for Indian and NRI directors making films on Indians settled abroad. On the footsteps of Bend it Like Beckham, Bride and Prejudice, American Born Confused Desi, Where's the Party Yaar, American Chai and One Dollar Curry come two films on similar themes. It Could Be You, a comedy by Mumbai-based Taranjeet Singh and American Blend, a dramedy (a comedy drama) by US-based director Varun Khanna. The politics of location and identity does sell, reflected in the box office through scores of movies by NRI directors, who have successfully penetrated mainstream cinema with their hits. Shekhar Kapur's Elizabeth (1998) dared to probe the court intrigues of the British monarch to score a bulls-eye after raising some right royal eyebrows about an Indian directing this royal saga. Deepa Mehta's Elements, her trilogy of Fire (1996), Earth (1998) and Water (2005) made international waves. Sharad and Raju Patel scored with The Bachelor Party (1986) and a number of children's films. Tarsem's psycho-thriller The Cell (2000), a largely dreamlike film; the fantastical subconscious thoughts of a serial killer, was a big hit too. Ashok Amritraj has produced action-thrilleradventure hits like Jean Claude Van Damme in Double Impact (1991) and Sylvester Stallone in Get Carter (2000). In the quest to overlook Hollywood, the moot question is: has diaspora cinema been able to transcend Bollywood? (The author is a resident editor of Pravasi Today and Co-Director of Pravasi Film Festival). 49 çoklh VqMs | flrEcj

2009


A n` f "Vdks . kA

ftUuk dh ubZ rLohj

jke tsBeykuh tSls odhy us iqLrd ds yksdkiZ.k ds dk;ZØe esa nks fcanqvksa ds :i esa çLrqr fd;kA D;k ftUuk lsdqyj Fks\ nwljk D;k os foHkktu ds fy, ftEesnkj Fks\ jke tsBeykuh dgrs gSa fd tloar flag nksuksa ckrksa ls badkj djrs gSaA jke tsBeykuh Hkh mudk leFkZu djrs gSaA bu lokyksa vkSj tokcksa dh iM+rky t:jh gSA

^ftUuk Hkkjr& foHkktu ds vkbZus esa* iqLrd ds yksdkiZ.k ds dk;ZØe esa x;k rks utj iqLrd ds doj ij :d x;hA ;s dkSu lk ftUuk gS\ geus rks vDlj ftUuk dh tks rLohj ns[kh gS oks cq<+s ] >qjhZnkj psgjs okys O;fDr dh gS tks dHkh galk Hkh gksxk ,slk fo'okl ugha gksrkA ftldks ns[kdj yxrk Fkk fdlh vR;ar vgadkjh O;fDr dh fouk'kdkjh ;kstuk cukrs gq, ;g QksVksxzkQ fy;k x;k gksxkA ij iqLrd ij Nik fp= ,d Loifuy ukStoku tSlk fn[krk gS tks laHkor% fganq&eqfLye ,drk ds lius ns[k jgk gksA tloar flag us ftUuk ds i{k esa vkSj usg: iVsy ds fojks/k esa rdks± ds iqfyans bdV~Bs djus ls igys ftUuk dk Hkksyk&Hkkyk] eklwe Loifuy ukStoku ds :i esa fn[krk ;g fp= [kkstkA ;knsa O;fDr dk ihNk ugha NksM+rhaA ;g O;fDr ds ckjs esa Hkh lp gS vkSj lekt ds ckjs esa HkhA ftUuk dk O;fDrRo Hkh ,slk ,d pfj= gS tks Hkkjrh; jktuhfr esa ckj&ckj rwQku mBk nsrk gSA njvly ftUuk dks ,dvk;keh O;fDrRo eku fy;k x;k FkkA f}jk"Vªokn dk çfrfuf/k pfj=] foHkktu vkSj mlls gq, dRysvke dk ftEesnkjA xka/kh] usg:] iVsy tSls lkfRod] vfgald] lk/kuksa dh ifo=rk esa fo'okl j[kus okys vkSj vkn'kZoknh usrkvksa dh rqyuk esa ftUuk O;ogkfjd] fgalk esa fo'okl djus okys ;su dsu izdkjs.k viuk mís'; gkfly djus okys FksA vaxzst ,d ,sls jSQjh Fks ftuds fy, vius fgr ç/kku Fks pkgs mldk Hkkjrh; turk ds fy, dqN Hkh ewY; D;ksa uk gksA ftUuk dk O;fDrRo cgqvk;keh FkkA mudk lkjk jgu&lgu fczfV'k FkkA os /kkfeZd eqlyeku ugha FksA mUgsa jktuhfrd dSfj;j ds çkjaHk esa lsdqyj ewY;ksa dk çfrfuf/k ekuk tkrk FkkA tloar flag dh fdrkc ftUuk ds lsdqyj gksus ds lkFk ,d vkSj eqík mBkrh gS fd D;k ftUuk gh foHkktu ds fy, ftEesnkj Fks ;k usg:] iVsy dh mrkoyh] muds }kjk dsUæhÏr jk"Vª dh ladYiuk ij tksj vkSj dSfcusV fe'ku dks Lohdkj uk fd;k tkuk foHkktu ds eq[; dkj.k FksA vxj ,slk Fkk rks eq[; ftEesnkjh ftUuk dh ugha gqbZA 'kk;n ;gh fufgrkFkZ gS bl iqLrd dk] ftls jke tsBeykuh tSls odhy us iqLrd ds yksdkiZ.k ds dk;ZØe esa nks fcanqvksa ds :i esa çLrqr fd;kA D;k ftUuk lsdqyj Fks\ nwljk D;k os foHkktu ds fy, ftEesnkj Fks\ jke tsBeykuh dgrs gSa fd tloar flag nksuksa ckrksa ls badkj djrs gSaA jke tsBeykuh Hkh mudk leFkZu djrs gSaA bu lokyksa vkSj tokcksa dh iM+rky t:jh gSA

PRAVASI TODAY | SEPTEMBER 2009

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2009


A n` f "Vdks . kA

ftUuk lsdqyj Fks mldk vk/kkj mudk çkjafHkd jktuhfrd dSfj;j] mudh ifÜpeh thou i¼fr ;k fganqvksa ds lkFk mudk O;ogkfjd laca/k tSlh phtksa dks ekuk tkrk gSA ij loky gS fd vkidh jktuhfr dk dksj D;k gS\ vki futh thou esa ekuork dh ckr djrs gSa vkSj lkoZtfud thou esa ;q¼] dRysvke vkSj "kM~;a= dhA usrkvksa dks vxj vius fopkjksa vkSj LFkkiukvksa ds ifj.kke ugha irk rks os fdl ckr ds usrk gSaA ,e-ts- vdcj us dk;ZØe esa dgk Hkh fd 'kj.kkfFkZ;ksa ds f'kfoj esa tkdj vkSj mudh gkyr ns[kus ds ckn ftUuk LrC/k jg x, vkSj dgk fd yksx eq>s dk;ns vkte ds :i esa ugha dRys vkte ds :i esa ;kn djsaxsA gtkjksa cykRdkj] ikap yk[k yksxksa dh gR;k vkSj Ms<+ djksM+ yksxksa dk foLFkkiu vxj fdlh dh tgjhyh uhfr;ksa ds pyrs gks tk, rks 'kk;n tkfe;k ds midqyifr }kjk xkfyc dh mí`r iafDr cgqr ekStwa gS fd ^esjs dRy ds ckn mlus tQk ls dh rkSck* brus dRys vke ds ckn ftUuk dks irk pyk fd og D;k ekax jgs Fks vkSj D;k ikfdLrku dk lkB lkyk bfrgkl mudh uhfr;ksa ds nq"ifj.kke dh dgkuh ugha gS\ v;wc [kka] ;kák [kka] ft;k my gd vkSj eq'kjZQ dh vk/kqfudrk vkSj ccZjrk esa vkidks ftUuk ds dSDVl dh lh xa/k utj vk,xhA th tsBeykuh lkgc] loky dbZ gSa & D;k ftUuk dk fgalk esa fo'okl Fkk\ gkaA D;k mudk dkuwu O;oLFkk esa fo'okl Fkk\ D;k os eqfLye jkT; ds fufgrkFkZ le>rs Fks\ muds 15 vxLr 1947 dks fn, vYila[;dks dks fd, okns D;k gq,\ D;k mUgksaus fcuk lksps le>s Mk;jsDV ,D'ku tSlh ?kks"k.kk dj dRysvke dks nkor nh vkSj oks vkx yxk nh ftls cq>kus ds fy, xka/kh uksvk[kyh esa tku dh ckth yxkdj ?kwers jgs\ ';ke csusxy dgrs gSa fd ,d O;fDr ds :i esa vxj ftUuk dks fn[kkuk pkgwa rks foHkktu ds fy, ftEesnkj O;fDr ds :i esa fn[kkuk gh gksxkA dk;ZØe esa etsnkj oDrO; ekdZ Vyh dk Fkk tks vkerkSj ij [kjh ckr dgus ds fy, tkus tkrs gSaA mudk dguk Fkk fd foHkktu ds fy, fdlh dks ftEesnkj ugha Bgjk;k tk ldrk] uk vaxzstksa dks] uk ftUuk dks uk dkaxzsl dksA okg] bruh cM+h ,sfrgkfld nq?kZVuk ds fy, fdlh dks ftEesnkj uk ekusaA vaxzst tks BgjsA ukeoj flag us rks ftUuk dks egkHkkjr dk d.kZ gh ?kksf"kr dj fn;kA lekt vkSj ns'kksa dks ,slh cgl vkSj foe'kZ ls xqtjuk gh pkfg,A ,sfrgkfld pfj=ksa ls /kwy gVkus ls muds dks.kksa vkSj rsojksa dks Bhd ls le>us esa enn fey ldrh gSA ckr ;g gS fd ftUuk ,d fLifyV ilZuSfyVh Fks ftuds O;fDrxr fo'oklksa vkSj jktuhfrd ,tsaMk esa fojks/kkHkkl FkkA ftuds mís';ksa] dk;Zç.kkyh vkSj fo'oklksa esa lkeatL; ugha FkkA tks ldkj ls 'kq: dj udkj dh jktuhfr ds /kqzo ij igqapsA ij D;k fdlh dks ,slh fdrkc fy[kus ds fy, ikVhZ ls fudky nsuk pkfg, tks vkids uk;d] [kyuk;dksa dh u, fljs ls iM+rky djrk gks\ ;k mu ij rkuk'kkgh rjhds ls çfrca/k yxk nsuk pkfg,\ ;g dguk fd dk;ZdrkZ blls de esa rS;kj ugha gksrs] lgh ugha gSA fotujh usr`Ro rFkkdfFkr dk;ZdrkZvksa }kjk ugha gkadk tkrk cfYd mUgsa foe'kZ vkSj fopkj dh jktuhfr ds fy, rS;kj djrk gSA bl lanHkZ eas Jhdkar oekZ dh dfork dh dqN iafDr;ka cM+h çklkafxd gSa µ pqi D;ksa gks fe=ks\ @ D;k gqvk exèk esa @ D;k gqvk\ pqi D;ksa gks\ @ D;k dke ugha vk;k tgjeksgjk\ @ D;k exèk esa dksbZ ugha jgk\ @ dHkh&dHkh @ exèk dks u tkus D;k gks tkrk gS--- @ u dksbZ cksyrk gS @ u eqag [kksyrk gS @ flQZ 'kdVkj @ tM+ dks Nw @ isM+ dh dYiuk dj flgjrk gS @ fe=ks @ tks lkspsxk @ flgjsxkA PRAVASI TODAY | SEPTEMBER 2009

gtkjksa cykRdkj] ikap yk[k yksxksa dh gR;k vkSj Ms<+ djksM+ yksxksa dk foLFkkiu vxj fdlh dh tgjhyh uhfr;ksa ds pyrs gks tk, rks 'kk;n tkfe;k ds midqyifr }kjk xkfyc dh mí`r iafDr cgqr ekStwa gS fd ^esjs dRy ds ckn mlus tQk ls dh

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rkSck* brus dRys vke ds ckn ftUuk dks irk pyk fd og D;k ekax jgs Fks

vfuy tks'kh 2009


A v k o j . k d Fk k A

i;ZVu dk

u;k uD'kk cukuk gksxk vthr f}osnh

Hkkjr vxj i;ZVu ds {ks= dh viuh reke laHkkoukvksa dk nksgu djuk pkgrk gS] rks mls lcls igys fons'kh i;ZVdksa dks gksus okyh eqf'dyksa dh ,d lwph cukuh gksxh vkSj fQj ,d&,d dj mudk lek/kku djuk gksxkA ftu yksxksa us u, fljs ls nqfu;k ds lkr vk'p;Z [kksts gSa] mUgksaus Hkh rktegy dks blesa 'kkfey fd;k gSA iqjkuh lwph esa Hkh rktegy 'kkfey Fkk vkSj Hkkjr dh ;k=k ij vk, vesfjdh jk"Vªifr fcy fDyaVu us tc rkt dks ns[kk Fkk rks mudk dguk Fkk fd nqfu;k esa nks rjg ds yksx gSaA ,d oks] ftUgksaus rktegy ns[kk gS vkSj nwljs oks] ftUgksaus rktegy ugha ns[kk gSA rktegy tc bruk [kwclwjr gS vkSj ,slh vtwck pht gS] rc Hkh phu dh nhokj ns[kus tkus okyksa esa ls vk/ks yksx Hkh bls ns[kus D;ksa ugha vkrs gSa\ nqfu;k ds nks&pkj ns'k gh ,sls gSa] ftuds ;gka lH;rk dh fujarjrk dk;e gSA ;kuh ftudh lH;rk jkse] felz vkSj csfcyksfu;k dh rjg [kRe ugha gks xbZ gSA fQj Hkh bl nqfu;k dh lcls iqjkuh lH;rkvksa esa ls ,d PRAVASI TODAY | SEPTEMBER 2009

dks ns[kus mrus yksx D;ksa ugha vkrs] ftrus feV xbZ lH;rkvksa ds HkXuko'ks"k ns[kus tkrs gSa\ bZ'oj dk viuk ?kj blh ns'k esa gS] mls Hkh ns[kus cgqr yksx ugha vkrs gSaA nqfu;k ds dbZ laiUu ns'kksa ds jkt/keZ ckSf¼Te dk ewy ?kj Hkkjr esa gS] fQj Hkh dkQh la[;k esa ckS¼ i;ZVd ;gka ugha vkrs gSaA ;s dqN ,sls loky gSa] ftudk tokc [kksts cxSj i;ZVu ds fodkl dh mEehn fnok LoIu ls T;knk dqN ugha gksxhA gj lky flracj ds eghus esa i;ZVu fnol eukuk i;kZIr ugha gksxkA bl ekSds ij bZekunkjh ls dqN vlgt lokyksa ds tokc [kkstus gksaxsA dqN vkadM+ksa ij utj Mkysa rks rLohj vkSj T;knk lkQ gks tkrh gSA Hkkjr esa gj lky 50 yk[k ls dqN T;knk fons'kh i;ZVd vkrs gSaA phu esa ;g la[;k yxHkx nks djksM+ gSA Hkkjr 52 çoklh VqMs | flrEcj

2009


A v k o j . k d Fk k A

esa flQZ 25 gtkj VwfjLV Dykl ds gksVy :e gSa] tcfd phu esa ;g yxHkx ikap yk[k gSaA ;s nks vkadM+s ,sls gSa] ftuls Hkkjrh; i;ZVu dh vlyh rLohj fn[kkbZ nsrh gS vkSj bl fo"k; esa D;k djuk gS bldk vanktk Hkh yxrk gSA Hkkjr vxj i;ZVu ds {ks= dh viuh reke laHkkoukvksa dk nksgu djuk pkgrk gS] rks mls lcls igys fons'kh i;ZVdksa dks gksus okyh eqf'dyksa dh ,d lwph cukuh gksxh vkSj fQj ,d&,d dj mudk lek/kku djuk gksxkA vxj lcls cM+h eqf'dy VwfjLV Dykl ds gksVy :El dh deh gS rks bls iwjk djus ds fy, ;q¼Lrj ij ç;kl djus gksaxsA ij vQlksl dh ckr gS fd ;q¼Lrj rks nwj lkekU; Lrj ij Hkh blds ç;kl ugha gks jgs gSaA fnYyh esa dkWeuosYFk [ksyksa dk vk;kstu vxys lky gksus okyk gS] ysfdu u, gksVy cukus dh dbZ ifj;kstuk,a fljs ugha p<+ ldhaA tehu vkoaVu esa gksus okyh nsjh vkSj djhc pkj ntZu fdLe dh nwljh eatwfj;ksa ds tatky esa my> dj gksVy dh dbZ ifj;kstuk,a ne rksM+ pqdh gSaA ge mEehn djrs gSa fd dkWeuosYFk [ksyksa ds nkSjku fons'kh i;ZVu esa dbZ xquk T;knk btkQk gksxk] ij ;g r; ekfu, fd ge i;ZVdksa dks Bgjkus ds fy, rS;kj ugha gSaA T;knkrj fons'kh i;ZVd vius ns'k ls gh ,Mokal cqfdax djds pyrs gSaA vxj cqfdax ugha gqbZ rks os dgha vkSj pys tkrs gSaA dkWeuosYFk xsLe ds nkSjku Hkh ,slk gh gksxkA VwfjLV Dykl gksVy ds dejksa dh deh ds vykok Åij eSaus i;ZVdksa dh la[;k dk loky mBk;k FkkA brus cM+s ns'k dks ns[kus flQZ 50 yk[k fons'kh i;ZVd vkrs gSaA tcfd blls T;knk i;ZVd gj lky ekynho] ekWjh'kl vkSj cSadkd ns[kus tkrs gSaA bldh D;k otg gS\ bldh igyh vkSj Li"V otg ;g gS fd Åij ftu ns'kksa ds uke crk, x, gSa] muesa flaxkiqj] vkLVªsfy;k] Ýkal] dukMk vkfn dbZ uke vkSj tksM+ dj dg ldrs gSa fd bu ns'kksa us viuh czkafMax vkSj ekdZsfVax cgqr dk;ns ls dh gSA bu ns'kksa us vius ,sfrgkfld LFkyksa] [kwclwjr Lekjdksa] çkÏfrd txgksa vkfn dh [kwc ekdZsfVax dh gSA nqfu;k dks buds ckjs esa crk;k gSA yksxksa dh :fp buesa iSnk dh gSA ysfdu Hkkjr esa ,slk ugha gqvk gSA vxj rktegy dks NksM+ nsa rks 'kk;n gh fdlh vkSj pht ds ckjs esa yksxksa dh :fp iSnk dh xbZ gksA Åij eSaus ckSf¼Te dk ftØ fd;k gSA dbZ lkyksa ls ge lqu jgs gSa fd ljdkj cqf¼LV lfdZy fodflr djus okyh gSA ij bldk lcls 'kq#vkrh dke vHkh ugha gqvk gSA ;g cqf¼LV lfdZy fcgkj vkSj mÙkj çns'k dh lkr&vkB txgksa dks tksM+ dj cukuk gSA ysfdu bl fn'kk esa dksbZ igy ugha gqbZ gSA ckS¼ /keZ dks ekuus okys dqN ns'kksa dh enn ls gokbZ vM~Mksa vkfn dk fodkl t:j gqvk gS ij cqfu;knh <kaps fodflr ugha fd, x, gSaA pkgs x;k dh ckr djsa] tgka cq¼ dks Kku feyk Fkk ;k PRAVASI TODAY | SEPTEMBER 2009

dq'khuxj dh ckr djsa] tgka mudk egkifjfuokZ.k gqvk Fkk] dgha Hkh vkidks <ax ds gksVy ugha feysaxs] <ax dh lM+d ugha feysxh vkSj bu lM+dksa ij pyus okyh lokfj;ksa dk Hkh ?ku?kksj vdky feysxkA ,sls esa dSls mEehn dh tk ldrh gS fd viuh vkLFkk dh bl tehu dks pweus fons'kh i;ZVd vk,axsA dsaæ vkSj jkT; ljdkjksa nksuksa dh ftEesnkjh gS fd og cqf¼LV lfdZy dks fodflr djsA vPNh lM+dsa cuk,A NksVs&cM+s gokbZ vM~Ms rS;kj fd, tk,aA vPNs gksVy cuk, tk,a vkSj fQj baVjusV vkSj nwljs lk/kuksa ds tfj, budh czkafMax vkSj ekdZsfVax gksA tc ge vPNs gksVy dh ckr djrs gSa rks bldk vfuok;Z eryc Qkbo LVkj gksVy ugha gksrk gSA Hkkjr dh foMacuk ;g gS fd ;gka ;k rks Qkbo LVkj gksVy gSa ;k fcYdqy lM+d Nki gksVy gSaA tcfd gdhdr ;g gS fd Hkkjr vkus okys T;knkrj i;ZVd Qkbo LVkj gksVy esa Bgjus okys ugha gksrs gSaA muds fy, e/;e ntZs dk gksVy cukuk gksxkA tc cqfu;knh <kaps dh ckr pyh gS rks yxs gkFk ;g Hkh crk nsa fd lQkbZ vkSj lqj{kk nks ,sls rRo gSa] tks fons'kh i;ZVdksa ds fygkt ls lcls t:jh gSaA tgka rd lQkbZ dk loky gS rks mldh vius ns'k esa ?ku?kksj deh gSA çnw"k.k

53 çoklh VqMs | flrEcj

2009


A v k o j . k d Fk k A

Hkkjr ljdkj ds i;ZVu ea=ky; dks rktegy] xksok vkSj [ktqjkgks ls vkxs ns[kuk pkfg,A mÙkjk[kaM ds eafnjksa ls ysdj ogka dh Qwyksa dh ?kkVh dk Hkh çpkj djuk pkfg,A nqfu;k ds lcls iqjkus 'kgj cukjl dh xfy;ksa ls ysdj eFkqjk&o`ankou rd dks i;ZVu ds ekufp= ij fn[kkuk pkfg,A vkSj xanxh ;gka ds 'kgjksa dh igpku gSA gj 'kgj esa daØhV ds taxy rks mx jgs gSa ij budh xanxh vkSj çnw"k.k nwj djus ij ;kstukdkjksa dk /;ku ugha gSA lqj{kk ds ekeys esa Hkkjr dk fjdkMZ vPNk jgk gSA gkykafd ;gka Hkh dqN txgksa ij fons'kh efgykvksa ds lkFk cqjk cjrko gqvk gS] ftlls ns'k dh Nfo [kjkc gqbZ gS ij vkerkSj ij ;gka fons'kh i;ZVd lqjf{kr gksrs gSaA ij dqN vkradoknh ?kVukvksa dks uthj cuk dj nqfu;k esa Hkkjr dh Nfo fcxkM+us dk ç;kl Hkh py jgk gSA bls dkmaVj djuk Hkh ljdkj dh ftEesnkjh gSA czkafMax vkSj ekdZsfVax dh ckr flQZ cqf¼LV lfdZV dh ugha gSA nf{k.k esa dsjy oSdfYid fpfdRlk dsaæ ds :i esa mHkjk gSA LokLF; i;ZVu dh vlhe laHkkouk,a bl jkT; esa gSaA blds ckjs esa Hkh nqfu;k dks crk;k tkuk pkfg,A nf{k.k Hkkjr ds eafnj LFkkiR; dyk dk csgrjhu uewuk gSa] buds lkSan;Z vkSj budh ,sfrgkfldrk ls nqfu;k ifjfpr gh ugha gksxh] rks bUgsa dSls ns[kus vk,xhA Hkkjr ljdkj ds i;ZVu ea=ky; dks rktegy] xksok vkSj [ktqjkgks ls vkxs ns[kuk pkfg,A mÙkjk[kaM ds eafnjksa ls ysdj ogka dh Qwyksa dh ?kkVh dk Hkh çpkj djuk pkfg,A nqfu;k ds lcls iqjkus 'kgj cukjl dh xfy;ksa ls ysdj eFkqjk&o`ankou rd dks i;ZVu ds ekufp= ij fn[kkuk pkfg,A njvly tc rd /kkfeZd i;ZVu] LokLF; i;ZVu] 'kS{kf.kd i;ZVu vkfn lcdks feyk dj ,d lexz ;kstuk ugha cusxh] gekjs i;ZVu lsDVj dk fodkl eaFkj xfr ls pyrk jgsxk] blesa cM+h rsth ugha vk,xhA vc tjk ,d utj ;g ns[k ysa fd D;ksa i;ZVu lsDVj bruk vge gS vkSj D;ksa bldk fodkl csgn t:jh gSA Hkkjr ds ldy ?kjsyw mRikn ;kuh thMhih esa bldk fgLlk djhc lk<+s Ng Qhlnh gSA ;kuh lfoZl lsDVj] tks lcls rsth ls Hkkjr esa c<+ jgk gS] mlesa VwfjTe ,slk lsDVj gS] ftldh lcls T;knk fgLlsnkjh thMhih esa gSA Hkkjr esa dqy jkstxkj dk yxHkx ukS Qhlnh VwfjTe lsDVj esa gSA Hkys fons'kh i;ZVdksa dh la[;k de gks] ij ?kjsyw i;ZVd cM+h la[;k esa fudyrs gSaA gkykafd ?kjsyw i;ZVd T;knkrj rhFkkZVu ds fy, fudyrs gSa] ysfdu budh la[;k gj lky c<+ jgh gS vkSj ;g la[;k djksM+ksa esa gSA vHkh Hkkjr dk i;ZVu m|ksx djhc ,d lkS vjc MkWyj dek jgk gS] ftlds ckjs esa vuqeku gS fd nl lky ckn bldh dekbZ 275 vjc MkWyj ls T;knk gks tk,xhA Hkkjr ds fy, [kq'kh dh ckr ;g gS fd nqfu;k Hkj dh i;ZVu ,tsafl;ksa us bldh laHkkoukvksa dks le>k gS vkSj bls oSf'od i;ZVdksa dh ilan ds fygkt ls NBs LFkku ij j[kk gS ij fpark dh ckr ;g gS fd lqj{kk ds fygkt ls bls 39osa LFkku ij j[kk x;k gSA vxj lqj{kk ds gkykr ;k de ls de bl ckjs esa cuh /kkj.kk ugha lqèkkjh xbZ rks Hkkjr fons'kh i;ZVdksa dh ilanhnk txg ugha cu ik,xkA ! PRAVASI TODAY | SEPTEMBER 2009

54 çoklh VqMs | flrEcj

2009


A ekW j h'klA

vkxkeh pquko vkSj tu&vis{kk,a

Li"Vr% ekWjh'kl dh turk dks bl le; csekuh xBcaèku dh jktuhfr drbZ jkl ugha vk jghA og ns'k esa ,slk izHkkoh ifjorZu pkgrh gS tks Hkz"Vkpkj mUewyu dj lds vkSj i;kZoj.k laj{k.k dh fn'kk esa Bksl dk;Z dj ldsA lalnh; yksdra= dk pkj n'kdksa dk bfrgkl jp pqds ekWjh'kl eas vxys o"kZ 2010 ds izkjaHk esa vke pquko gks jgs gksaxsA ekWjh'kl esa Hkz"Vkpkj mUewyu dks ysdj ;qok 'kfDr vkUnksfyr gS vkSj i;kZoj.k laj{k.k dh fn'kk eas fdl xBcaèku dh ljdkj Bksl dk;Z dj ldsxh yksx bldk vkdyu djus esa tqVs gSaA o"kZ 1995 ds vke pquko eas ekWjh'kl yscj ikVhZ uhr xBcaèku vlsEcyh dh dqy 62 lhVksa eas ls 35 lhVsa thrdj gkf'k;s ls fudy dj mcjk FkkA mYys[kuh; gS fd ekWjh'kl yscj ikVhZ 1959 eas gq, igys vke pquko esa Hkkjh cgqer ls thr dj lÙkk:<+ gqbZ Fkh vkSj 1963 ds vke pquko esa bls dkepykÅ cgqer feyk FkkA 1967 ds vke pquko eas yscj ikVhZ uhr xBcaèku lÙkk:<+ gqvk vkSj blds usr`Ro ds pyrs gh ekWjh'kl us 1968 esa Lora=rk izkIr dh] og jk"VªeaMy dk lnL; cukA ijUrq rRdkyhu izèkkuea=h f'kolkxj jkexqyke dk izHkkeaMy Hkh 1976 ds vke pquko eas yscj ikVhZ ds dke ugha vk;k vkSj mldk ,d Hkh izR;k'kh pquko ugha thr ldkA 1983 vkSj 1987 ds pqukoksa esa ;g ikVhZ ekWjh'kl lks'kfyLV ewoesaV uhr xBcaèku dk vax cuhA lks'kfyLV ewoesaV ds vfu:¼ txUukFk bl vofèk esa izèkkuea=h jgsA 1991 ds pquko eas yscj ikVhZ uhr xBcaèku Hkys gh ek= rhu lhVsa thr ik;k gks fdarq blus igyh ckj vlsEcyh eas izHkkoh foi{k dh Hkwfedk fuHkkbZA 1995 ds vke pquko es ekWjh'kl yscj ikVhZ eas u;s mRlkg dk lapkj gqvk vkSj mls dqy 62 lhVksa esa ls 35 lhVsa izkIr gqbZA iw.kZ cgqer izkIr gksus ds mijkUr Hkh yscj ikVhZ us viuh iqjkuh izfr}U}h ekWjh'kl fefyVsaV ikVhZ (ftls 25 lhVsa feyh Fkha) ds lkFk xBcaèku cuk;k vkSj ml le; foi{k eas ek= nks fuokZfpr lnL; jg x;sA ekWjh'kl ds lafoèkku eas cgqr FkksM+s ls varj ls gkjus okys izR;kf'k;ksa dks Hkh lnu esa euksuhr djus dk izkoèkku gSA mUgsa feykdj ml le; dqy 66 lhVksa esa foi{k ds ikl ek= 6 lhVsa FkhaA yscj ikVhZ ds uohupanz jkexqyke ml le; PRAVASI TODAY | SEPTEMBER 2009

ekWjh'kl ds izèkkuea=h cusA ekWjh'kl dh turk us nks izfr}U}h nyksa ds xBcaèku ls Lo;a dks Bxk lk ik;kA o"kZ 2000 ds vke pquko esa turk us yscj ikVhZ ij xqLlk mrkjk vkSj 62 lhVksa esa ls blds xBcaèku ds 6 izR;k'kh gh fot;h gks ik;s vkSj ekWjh'kl fefyVsaV ewoesaV tks fiNys vlsEcyh l= esa yscj ikVhZ dk xBcaèku lg;ksxh Fkk Hkkjh cgqer ls fot;h gqvkA o"kZ 2005 ds vke pquko eas fQj ifjfLFkfr iyVhA yscj ikVhZ us NksVh ikfVZ;ksa ds lkFk lks'ky vyk;Ul uke ls xBcaèku cuk;kA ;g xBcaèku 38 lhVsa thrdj lÙkk:< gqvk vkSj uohupanz jkexqyke fQj ls izèkkuea=h cusA Li"Vr% ekWjh'kl dh turk dks bl le; csekuh xBcaèku dh jktuhfr drbZ jkl ugha vk jghA og ns'k esa ,slk izHkkoh ifjorZu pkgrh gS tks Hkz"Vkpkj mUewyu dj lds vkSj i;kZoj.k laj{k.k dh fn'kk esa Bksl dk;Z dj ldsA ;|fi 1980 ds n'kd ls ;gka ouksa ds foLrkj vkSj l?kuhdj.k dk dk;ZØe py jgk gS ijUrq 590 O;fDr izfr oxZ fdyksehVj tu ?kuRo okys ekWjh'kl dks l?kure vkoklh; cfLr;ksa esa clkdj gh bl dk;ZØe dks iw.kZr% lQy cuk;k tk ldrk gSA laHkor% i;kZoj.k 2010 ds pquko eas ,d cM+k eqík gksxkA u;s jktuSfrd ny ds xBu dh fn'kk esa Hkh turk lfØ; gSA u;k jktuSfrd ny uke ls xfBr ,d laxBu ns'k esa uojDrizokg dh ckr dj jgk gS vkSj dgrk gS fd rktk jDr ds lkFk ubZ ih<+h dks ns'k ds usr`Ro dk mÙkjnkf;Ro laHkkyuk gksxkA u;s ny dh lnL;rk ds fy, yksxksa dks vkeaf=r fd;k tk jgk gSA bu ifjfLFkfr;ksa esa ekWjh'kl ds vkxkeh pquko ds ifj.kke jktuSfrd fo'ys"kdksa ds fy, pkSadkus okys gks ldrs gSaA

jes'k dqekj 'kekZ 55 çoklh VqMs | flrEcj

2009


A ppkZ es a A

ttksa dh laifÙk ds loky ij ljdkj dks ekr [kkuh iM+h gSA jkT;lHkk esa is'k gksusokyk fo/ks;d Vy x;k gSA jkT;lHkk ds lkaln c/kkbZ ds ik= gSa vkSj ljdkj Hkh fd ftlus fcy okil ys fy;k ysfdu lcdks vk'p;Z gS fd ljdkj bl rjg dk fcy ykbZ gh D;ksa\ ;g og ljdkj gS] ftlus lwpuk ds vf/kdkj dks viuk fot;&ea= cuk;k FkkA vc ttksa dh laifÙk ds ckjs esa lwpuk ekaxh tk, vkSj ;gh ljdkj ml lwpuk dks nckus esa tqV tk, rks mls D;k dgk tk,xk\ ttksa ds pyrs ;g ljdkj cnuke D;ksa gksuk pkgrh gS\ og viuh gh larku dk xyk D;ksa nckuk pkgrh gS\ lwpuk dk vf/kdkj bl ljdkj dh Hkkjr dks loZJs"B nsu gSA ;fn ;g fo/ks;d ikfjr gks tkrk rks ;g fufoZokn ekuk tkrk fd lwpuk ds vf/kdkj ds dkuwu dh ekSr gks xbZ gSA NksVs&eksVs vQljksa vkSj NksVs&eksVs ekeyksa ij ljdkj fdlh dks lwpuk ns ns] rks blesa og dkSu lk rhj ekj nsrh gS\ vlyh elyk rks ;g gS fd ns'k esa tks lcls rkdroj gS vkSj tks lcls vf/kd çfrf"Br gS] mlds ckjs esa vke turk dks lwpuk ikus dk vf/kdkj gS ;k ugha\ bl egRoiw.kZ vf/kdkj ls ;g ljdkj ns'k dh turk dks oafpr D;ksa djuk pkgrh gS\ blds dkj.k D;k gSa\ bldk ,d cM+k dkj.k ;g Hkh

lkap dks vkap D;k

PRAVASI TODAY | SEPTEMBER 2009

56 çoklh VqMs | flrEcj

gks ldrk gS fd og eaf=;ksa dh laifÙk Hkh fNikuk pkgrh gksA pquko vk;ksx ds lkeus lkjs mEehnokjksa dh laifÙk dh [kqyh ?kks"k.kk djuh iM+rh gS ysfdu pquko rks ikap lky esa ,d ckj vkrs gSaA dksbZ Hkh O;fDr ea=h] eq[;ea=h] ç/kkuea=h ;k jk"Vªifr cuus ds ckn ikap lky rd tedj Hkz"Vkpkj dj ldrk gSA ml nkSjku mldh laifÙk dh [kqyh ?kks"k.kk dgha Hkh vfuok;Z ugha gSA gka] fNih ?kks"k.kk dh O;oLFkk gSA ea=h vkSj tt viuh laifÙk dk C;kSjk Øe'k% ç/kkuea=h vkSj eq[; U;k;kèkh'k ds ikl tek djok ldrs gSaA bl C;kSjs ij inkZ iM+k jgs vkSj ;g lwpuk ds vf/kdkj dh ifjf/k esa u vk,] ;gh og xqIr dkeuk gS] ftlus ljdkj dks çsfjr fd;k gksxk fd ;g ckd+k;nk ,d foèks;d gh ys vk,a igys ttksa dks NqM+k ysa vkSj fQj mudh vkM+ esa eaf=x.k rks vius vki gh NwV tk,axsA bl rjg dk fo/ks;d ykus dk nwljk dkj.k gekjs vius tt yksx gSaA os fQtwy gh Mjs gq, gSaA mUgsa Mj gS fd ;fn mudh laifÙk dh [kqyh ?kks"k.kk gksus yxh rks os Bhd ls U;k; ugha dj ik,axsA eqdnes esa tks Hkh gkjsxk] og lacaf/kr tt dks mldh laifÙk ds C;kSjs esa Qalk,xkA lkjh U;k;ikfydk dh çfr"Bk gh pkSiV gks tk,xhA ;g rdZ fujk/kkj ugha gS ysfdu ,slh laHkkoukvksa ds fo:¼ vusd Bksl 2009


A ppkZ es a A

dne mBk, tk ldrs gSaA ttksa dks dqN ugha dj ldsaxsa blls cM+k et+kd gekjs tt t:jr ls cnuke djus dh ea'kk tgka Hkh fn[ks] D;k gksxk\ ;g lwpuk ds vf/kdkj dh T;knk la o ns u 'khy gS a ,s l k ogka dBksj lt+k dk çko/kku fd;k tk vaR;sf"V gSA ;g lafo/kku dk mYya?ku gSA ldrk gSA blh rjg dh lqj{kk eaf=;ksa ;g lekurk ds vfèkdkj dh /kfTTk;ka gksuk lgh Hkh gS D;ksafd dks Hkh nh tk ldrh gSSA ;g lqj{kk mM+kuk gSA ;g U;k; dk vieku gSA og mues a ls T;knkrj cs g n çR;sd O;fDr dks feyuh pkfg,A ysfdu U;k;k/kh'k gh D;k U;k;k/kh'k gS] tks gekjs tt t:jr ls T;knk laonsu'khy lkjh nqfu;k dks U;k; ds uhps ykuk pkgs bZekunkj gSa ysfdu ;fn os gSa ,slk gksuk lgh Hkh gS D;ksafd muesa ls vkSj [kqn dks U;k; ds Åij dj ysA tt bZ e kunkj gS a rks mUgs a Mj T;knkrj csgn bZekunkj gSa ysfdu ;fn os dks fganh esa ^U;k;ewfrZ* dgrs gSa ;kus og bZekunkj gSa rks mUgsa Mj dkgs dk\ lkap U;k; dh lk{kkr~ ewfrZ gSA og U;k;ewfrZ dkgs dk\ lkap dks vkap dks vkap D;k\ mUgsa rks vkxs gksdj gh D;k gS] tks nwljksa ij rks U;k; ykxw D;k\ mUgs a rks vkxs gks d j viuh laifÙk;ksa dh ?kks"k.kk djuh pkfg,] djs vkSj [kqn dks mlls cjh dj ys\ D;k tSls fd phQ tfLVl ts-,l- oekZ us dh ;g nq[kn ugha fd Qjojh 2009 esa viuh laifÙk;ksa dh FkhA ;fn [kqyh ?kks"k.kk esa os vkukdkuh mPpre U;k;ky; us lwpuk vk;ksx dks ?kks"k.kk djuh pkfg,] tSls djrs gSa rks bldk eryc ;g gS fd nky ttksa dh laifÙk dk C;kSjk nsus ls euk esa dqN dkyk gSA iwoZ eq[; U;k;k/kh'k dj fn;k vkSj fnYyh mPp U;k;ky; ls fd phQ tfLVl ts-,l,l-ih- Hk:pk us ,d ckj dgk Fkk fd dgk fd bl eqís ij og QSlyk djssa blh oekZ us dh FkhA ;fn yxHkx 20 çfr'kr ttksa dh bZekunkjh ls ekywe iM+rk gS fd gekjs ttksa dh lansgkLin gSA fupys Lrjksa ij rks ;g vlyh eU'kk D;k gS\ muls vPNs rks [kqyh ?kks"k.kk esa os çfr'kr dgha T;knk gSaA vHkh dqN fnu gekjs usrk yksx fudyssA mUgksaus viuh vkukdkuh djrs gSa rks igys gfj;k.kk ds ,d tt us 15 yk[k laifÙk dh [kqyh ?kks"k.kk ds QSlys dks :- uxn idM+ok, FkssA ;g jkf'k xyr lg"kZ eku fy;kA os pkgrs rks 2003 ds bldk eryc ;g gS fd tt ds ikl igqap xbZ FkhA ,d eq[; mPpre U;k;ky; ds ml QSlys dks U;k;k/kh'k ds ifjtuksa }kjk uks,Mk esa dkuwu cukdj myV ldrs Fkss ftUgksaus nky esa dqN dkyk gSA Hkw[kaMksa dh canj&ckaV dk ekeyk Hkh viuh xnZu vkjs ds uhps j[k nh] os vc mNyk FkkA dqN le; igys dydÙkk ds ttksa dks D;ksa cp fudyus nsaxs\ U;kf;d Hkz"Vkpkj us v[kckjksa ds eq[ki`"Bksa dh 'kksHkk c<+kbZ FkhA blhfy, jkT;lHkk dk lkjk lnu bl eqís ij ,der gks x;kA xkft;+kckn esa Hkfo"; fuf/k dkaM esa ttksa dk gkFk Hkh ekywe dkaxzsl ds dqN lnL;ksa us rks Li"V fojks/k Hkh fd;kA yxrk gS] iM+k gSA bl rjg dh ?kVuk,a gksrh gSa ysfdu ;s viokn gSaA ljdkj vkSj dkaxzsl ikVhZ esa vktdy rkyesy Bhd&Bkd ugha lkyksa&lky gtkjksa&yk[kksa eqdneksa ds QSlys ,d ne lgh gksrs gSA ojuk D;k otg gS fd 'keZ&vy&'ks[k dh rjg jkT;lHkk esa gSaA gkjus vkSj thrusokys mu QSlyksa dks rgs&fny ls Lohdkj Hkh ljdkj xPpk [kk xbZ\ vc ;fn ;g foèks;d nqckjk yk;k djrs gSaA blhfy, gekjs ns'k esa U;k;kèkh'kksa dh bTTkr lcls tk, rks mlesa ttksa vkSj eaf=;ksa ij lwpuk dk vfèkdkj t+jk T;knk gSA lkalnksa] eaf=;ksa vkSj i=dkjksa ls Hkh T;knk! ;fn tt vkSj T;knk dM+kbZ ls ykxw fd;k tk,] yksx viuh laifÙk Nqikuk pkgsaxs rks mudh bl bTTkr ij vkap D;ksafd pqukoh mEehnokjksa ds eqdkcys vk, fcuk ugha jgsxhA os dgha vfèkd ftEesnkjh vkSj 'kfDr ttksa dh bl bTTkr ds dkj.k gh ljdkj us vius foèks;d ds inksa ij cSBs gksrs gSaA dks ttksa ds chp ?kqek;k vkSj mudh jk; yhA mudh jk; dks fcy dh /kkjk 6 (1) esa tksM+k vkSj mudh laifÙk ij iwjk inkZ Mky fn;kA os viuh laifÙk dk C;kSjk eq[; U;k;kèkh'k dks ns t:j nsaxs ysfdu ml ij dksbZ O;fDr] dksbZ vnkyr] dksbZ laLFkk fdlh Hkh çdkj dk loky ugha iwN ldsxhA ml ij ppkZ MkW- osnizrki oSfnd ;k tkap dk rks loky gh ugha mBrkA Lo;a eq[; U;k;k/kh'k Hkh PRAVASI TODAY | SEPTEMBER 2009

57 çoklh VqMs | flrEcj

2009


A ifjn` ' ;A csgn nnZ&ihM+k ls rM+QM+krs jksxh ds fy, ;g laHko ugha gS fd oks vius MkWDVjksa ls ;kpuk dj ik,a fd oks ,d batsD'ku ,slk yxk nsa fd ftlls mudh rRdky e`R;q gks tk, vkSj mudh ihM+ke;&nnZukd ftUnxh dh 'kkfUre; bfr gks ik,A

ekSr dk dkuwuh vf/kdkj MkW- lR;sUnz JhokLro esjs ,d fiz; lkfgR; lsoh fe= Fks ftUgksaus fgUnh lkfgR; dks dqekjsUnz ikjl ukFk flag ds uke ls dkQh jpuk,a nhaA lkBosa n'kd esa eqacbZ esa LFkkfir ifjey ds ge lc lnL; Fks tgka gesa egkdfo fnudj vkSj 'kk;jksa ds 'kk;j dSQh vkteh lkgc dk Hkh lkfgfR;d lg;ksx izkIr gksrk jgkA ge lc u, lkfgR; ls lac¼ FksA dksbZ chl o"kZ ckn ikjl ls esjh ,d ckj fQj HksaV gqbZ FkhA eSa dSfEczt fo'ofo|ky; dk ,d izfrfufèk gksdj fnYyh essa gks jgs fo'o fgUnh lEesyu esa x;k FkkA ogha eq>s crk;k x;k Fkk fd vktdy ikjl fnYyh esa gh gSa vkSj vius csVs] tks tokgjyky usg: fo'ofo|ky; esa ,d izksQslj Fks] ds lkFk jgrs Fks vkSj cgqr chekj gSaA eSaus ikjl ls feyuk cgqr vko';d le>kA ,d rks iqjkus fe= Fks] fQj fgUnh ds os vdsys ys[kd Fks tks lkfgfR;d :i ls uDlyoknh vkUnksyu ls tqM+s gq, FksA eSaus dSfEczt esa uDlyoknh vkUnksyu ls mn~Hkwr lkfgfR;d jpukvksa ds ,d lsfeukj dk vk;kstu vius fo|kfFkZ;ksa ds fy, dkslZ esa fd;k FkkA vkSj fgUnh lkfgR; ds foLrkj ds lanHkZ esa uDlyoknh vkUnksyu ds ,d lkfgR;dkj ds :i esa ikjl dh jpuk,a dkslZ esas j[kh FkhaA rks tc eSa ikjl ls feyus usg: fo'ofo|ky; ds izksQsljksa ds DokVZj esa x;k rks dbZ ?kaVksa muds lkFk fcrk,A oks Lo;a eqEcbZ fo'ofo|ky; esa izkè;kid jg pqds Fks vr% dSfEczt ds vè;;uksa ds ckjs esa tkuuk pkgrs FksA eq>s yxk Fkk fd ;g tkudj fd mudh Hkh jpuk dks uDlyoknh vkUnksyu ds lanHkZ esa i<+k;k tkrk gS rks oks cgqr larq"V gq, FksA eq>s dSfEczt okil ykSVuk Fkk vkSj esjs ugha dgus ij Hkh ikjl eq>s ckgj fjD'ks rd NksM+us vk, FksA fQj tc ge fonk ds {k.kksa esa ,d&nwljs ds xys fey jgs Fks rks ikjl us esjs dkuksa esa dgk& lR;sUnz eSa cgqr chekj gwaA efLr"d dk V~;wej ugha Bhd gksxkA eSaus vius ifjokj ds yksxksa ls dg j[kk gS fd esjs bykt vkijs'ku ds fy, vkSj iSls ugha [kpZ djsaA ctk; eq> ij [kpZ djus ds ifjokj dh PRAVASI TODAY | SEPTEMBER 2009

vkSj t:jh vko';drkvksa ij cph gqbZ jde [kpZ gks--- tc dqN fnuksa ckn fe= dUgS;kyky uUnu us Qksu fd;k fd ikjl ugha jgs] rc eSaus lkspk fd ml O;fDr us viuh ekSr lacaèkh gd dk mfpr mi;ksx fd;k gSA ;g lc eSa blfy, fy[k jgk gwa fd vktdy baXySaM esa bl ckr ij dsoy cgl gh ugha py jgh gS cfYd dkuwuh vnkyrh yM+kbZ;ka yM+h tk jgh gSaA ikjl dh rjg ;gka ds ej.kklUu jksfx;ksa ds fy, mudh viuh e`R;q dh iwjh ftEesnkjh muij ugha jg ikrhA csgn nnZ&ihM+k ls rM+QM+krs jksxh ds fy, ;g laHko ugha gS fd oks vius MkWDVjksa ls ;kpuk dj ik,a fd oks ,d batsD'ku ,slk yxk nsa fd ftlls mudh rRdky e`R;q gks tk, vkSj mudh ihM+ke;&nnZukd ftUnxh dh 'kkfUre; bfr gks ik,A MkWDVjksa ds fy, ,slk djuk xSj dkuwuh gS vkSj gj og O;fDr tks bl izdkj dh gR;k ls tqM+k gksrk gS mls naM fn;k tk;sxkA MkDVj ls ysdj ifjokj ds mu yksxksa dks Hkh nafMr fd;k tk;sxk tks Hkh jksxh dh gR;k djus esa lgk;d jgk gSA blh dkj.k ls dbZ yksxksa us fLoVtjySaM esa tkdj tgka dqN txgksa ij MkDVj bl izdkj ls ej.kklUu jksxh dh bfr yk ldrs gSa&viuk vUr vkSj vius fpfdRlk ds nq[k vkSj vlá ihM+k dk vUr djok;k gSA dVq lR; ;g gS fd vktdy ubZ vkS"kfèk;ksa vkSj vU; izdkj dh lqfoèkkvksa ds dkj.k yksx cgqr fnu thrs gSa vkSj buesa cgqr cM+h la[;k mu yksxksa dh gS tks o`¼ gSa vkSj ftuesa cgqr ls xgu :i ls chekj Hkh gSaA bu yksxksa dh nok bykt ij csgn iSls [kpZ gksrs gSa vkSj mldh otg ls us'kuy gsYFk lfoZl dh frtksjh [kkyh gksrh jgrh gSA dsoy blh lfoZl dh ugha ijUrq bU';ksjsal dEifu;ka dh Hkh ekyh gkyr ij izgkj gksrk gSA fQj Hkh us'kuy gsYFk lfoZl ftldk dke gS cPpk ftl le; ls eka ds isV esa lkal ysus yxrk gS rc ls ysdj vfUre lkal rksM+us rd ftEesnkjh dk fgLlk gksrk gSA vkt tc fczVsu esa jk"Vªh; isa'ku ds lanHkZ esa vk;q dh vofèk 58 çoklh VqMs | flrEcj

2009


A ifjn` ' ;A

65 o"kZ ls 70 o"kZ djus dh ;kstuk cukbZ tk jgh gS] rc gsYFk lfoZl dh yxkrkj c<+rh [kpZ dh vko';drkvksa ls yksx fpfUrr gSaA euq"; dks thfor j[kus dh vfèkdrj mez dh fn'kk esa yxHkx gj ns'k esa u, ls u, btkn gks jgs gSa dsoy ubZ nokvksa ds gh ugha ij mu lHkh lw{erj e'khuksa ds Hkh ftu ij euq"; dk thuk vkèkkfjr gksrk tk jgk gSA u dsoy dSalj] ,M~l] Mk;csfVd vkfn ?kkrd chekfj;ksa ds fy, gh cfYd bUlku ds thou dks lqjf{kr djus okyh gj fLFkfr ds fy, HkhA vkSj bu lHkh izxfr;ksa ds fy, iSls dh t:jr gksrh gSA blfy, bl ns'k esa gsYFk lfoZl dks bruk egRo fn;k tkrk gSSA nqfu;k esa ftu rhu foHkkxksa esa lcls vfèkd dkexj yksx lfØ; gSa os gSa phu dh lSfud O;oLFkk esa Hkkjr dh jsy usVodZ esa vkSj fczVsu dh gsYFk lfoZl esaA bu ij dgha Hkh dVkSrh tSls dh gh ugha tkrhA u dh tk ldrh gSA blhfy, tks ikfVZ;ka bl ns'k esa lÙkk laHkkyus dh fn'kk esa vkfFkZd O;oLFkkvksa dh ckr djrh gSa os gsYFk lfoZl esa gj izdkj dh dVkSrh dh ckr Vkyrh jgrh gSaA oks tkurh gSa fd vxj gsYFk lfoZl dh ^iwtuh; xkS ekrk* dks tjk Hkh Nq,axs ;k dVkSrh dh gh otg ls mldh lsokvksa esa dkaV&NkaV dh ckr Hkh djsaxs rks ;gka gaxkek ep tkrk gSA vkSj bu lcdks tks ckr pkfyr djrh jgrh gS og gS fd euq"; dk thou egRoiw.kZ gS vkSj mls cuk, j[kus ds fy, lc dqN djuk tk;t gSA blhfy, ;gka thou dks [kRe djus ds dkuwuh vfèkdkj dh ekax tc Hkh mBkbZ xbZ gS mls c<+kok ugha fn;k x;k gSA dksbZ Hkh MkWDVj ;k vLirky ;k nok[kkuk ;fn fdlh ej.kklUu O;fDr dks [kRe djus dh fn'kk esa dksbZ dke djrk gS rks gR;k djus okys lgk;d Hkh gR;kjs gks tkrs gSaA blhfy, tc ,d csgn chekj efgyk Msch iMhZ us gkml vkQ ykMZ rd tkdj dkuwuh yM+kbZ yM+h vkSj fot;h gqbZ fd ;fn og fLoVtjySaM esa tkdj MkWDVjksa dh lgk;rk ls vius thou dk [kkRek djk ys rks mlds ifr dks fczVsu esa ltk u nh tk; ;g ekudj fd og ^vflLVsM LohlkbM* esa ,d Hkkxhnkj PRAVASI TODAY | SEPTEMBER 2009

jgk gSA ;gka dh loksZPp vnkyr us :fyax nh fd ;gka ds vfèkdkfj;kssa dks ,sls yksxksa dks ltk nsus ds igys ;g Li"V djuk gksxk fd fdu fLFkfr;ksa esa vkSj D;ksa ;g ltk nh tk jgh gSA nwljs 'kCnksa esa ,slk fj'rsnkj ,slh vkRegR;k fd, x, jksxh dk xSj&dkuwuh lgk;d ugha gks tkrkA ;g cgqr cM+h :fyax gSA rks ;fn dksbZ jksxh ;g tku ys fd mldk cpuk vlaHko gSA vr% mldh ihM+k dks ,sls [kRe djuk gh ,d jkLrk gS rks ftu yksxksa us fe=ksa&fj'rsnkjksa us mlesa enn nh ;k gkFk caVk;k gS og rqjUr eqtfje ugha lkfcr gks tkrsA rks bl U;kf;d vkns'k ls ;|fi ,slh vkRegR;kvksa ds f[kykQ dkyk dkuwu rks ugha cnyk gS ij tks funksZ"k ekus tk,axs dkuwu dh vka[kksa esa mUgsa bl lanHkZ esa lglk nks"kh ugha Bgjk;k tk,xkA fQj Hkh dqN yksxksa dk er gS fd Hkhrj gh Hkhrj vfèkdkjh oxZ blls [kq'k gSA fiNys o"kZ gsYFl lfoZl ij ljdkjh [kpZ 94 fcfy;u ikSaM dk jgkA bl jde dk ,d cM+k fgLlk mu yksxksa ij [kpZ gqvk tks o`¼ gSa vkSj ?kkrd :i ls chekj gSaA ,sls yksxksa dks ftyk, j[kuk fdruk mfpr gS] bl uSfrd la?k"kZ ls turk Hkh tw> jgh gS vkSj vUnj gh vUnj vfèkdkjh oxZ HkhA lcls cM+k lR; ;g gS fd ge fdlh dks ejrk ns[kuk ugha pkgrsA eq>s ;kn gS tc esjh fcYyh eatw chl o"kZ thdj csgn chekj gks xbZA eSa mls tkuojksa ds bejtsalh gkfLiVy esa ys x;kA fpfdRldksa us dgk ;g fcYyh cM+s nnZ ls ihfM+r gSA eSaus viuk ØsfMV dkMZ nsrs gq, dgk Iyht bls cpk yhft,A bykt ds fy, iSlksa dh eq>s ijokg ugha gSA yksxksa us eq>s dqN nsj ckgj cSBus ds fy, dgkA fQj tc eq>s Hkhrj cqyk;k x;k rks crk;k x;k fd gesa ,d batsD'ku nsdj mlds thou dh ihM+k dks lekIr djuk gh iM+kA tks MkDVj eq>s jksrs laHkkys Fkh eu dks 'kkfUr ns jgh Fkh] ;g dg jgh Fkh fd tc eatw dks batsD'ku fn;k tk jgk Fkk rks mldh ejrh gqbZ vka[kksa esa geus ns[kk fd og 'kkUr gks jgh gS] vkSj mldh rM+QM+kgV ?kVus yxh gS èkhjs&èkhjs--! 59 çoklh VqMs | flrEcj

2009


A ifjn` ' ;A

ogh

jkx

iqjkuk

Hkw[kk u ejsA csjkstxkjh dh ekj dks gYdk fd;k tk lds vkSj vc rks vnkyr us Hkh ,d ekeys esa QSlyk lqukrs gq, Li"V ifjokjksa esa cPpksa dh ns[kHkky vkSj mudh f'k{kk O;oLFkk esa dksbZ :i ls ;g tryk fn;k gS fd yk[kkssa fons'kh vkizoklh fczVsu esa deh u vk,A nwljs egk;q¼ ds ckn ds o"kks± esa vke yksxksa dk vkdj bldh tudY;k.k lqfo/kkvkssa dk ykHk mBkrs gq, lgk;rk thou Lrj csgn fxjk Fkk vkSj lekt O;oLFkk fNUu&fHkUu gks HkÙkksa ls viuh tscsa Hkjrs gSaA U;k;k/kh'k bZ;u fVªxj us jgh FkhA vr% ml le; tudY;k.kdkjh O;oLFkk dh LFkkiuk vkizoklu laca/kh ljdkj dh uhfr;ksa dh dM+h vkykspuk djrs ,d Mwcrs gq, ns'k ds fy, cgqr cM+h ckr FkhA gq, ;g iz'u Hkh mBk;k fd tc ;g irk yx tkrk gS fd vusd nwljk ekeyk fczVsu esa fonsf'k;ksa dk cM+h la[;k esa 1960 ds fons'kh xSjdkuquh rjhdksa ls ;w-ds- esa vk, gSa rks mUgsa ns'k ls ckn ds o"kks± esa izos'k dk gSA mu o"kks± esa ^,EiykW;esaV okmpj* fudky ckgj djus esa nsjh D;ksa dh tkrh gSA uked fczfV'k ;kstuk ds rgr cgqr cM+h la[;k esa jk"VªeaMy ds ekeyk eknd nokvksa laca/kh Fkk vkSj ,d v'osr yqfl;u eSd&dfy;jys dk FkkA ysfdu ekuuh; U;k;k/kh'k us mlds bl ns'kksa ds yksxksa dks izos'k fn;k tkrk FkkA ;fn ml le; fczVsu dks vijk/k rd gh bls lhfer u jgus nsdj mlds tek;dk ls bl ckgj ds yksxksa dh vko';drk vkSj mi;ksfxrk izrhr gksrh Fkh rHkh rks mUgsa vkus ds fy, izksRlkgu fn;k x;kA can iM+s ns'k esa ,d i;ZVd ds :i esa o"kZ 2004 esa fczVsu esa vkus ls dkj[kkuksa dks iqu% pkyw djus ds fy, ifjogu O;oLFkk] ysdj vc rd dh mldh thou'kSyh vkSj dkuwu Hkax djus dh fpfdRlk ,oa vU; tuksi;ksxh dk;ks± ds fy, fonsf'k;ksa dh leLr gjdrksa dk laKku ysrs gq, ns'k dh detksj vkizoklu uhfr;ksa dk eqn~nk mBk;k gSA u flQZ yscj ljdkj fojks/kh i{k ls vko';drk FkhA ;fn os lgk;rk ds fy, cqyk, tkrs Fks rks Li"V gS muds fy, Hkh ;g vkthfodk miktZu dk ekè;e FkkA ftudks tqM+s dk;ZdrkZvksa vkSj vU; yksxksa us Hkh muds bl dfFkr lkgl dke djuk Fkk mUgsa dgha jguk Hkh FkkA mUgsa Hkh LFkkuh; yksxksa dh ljkguk dh gS] cfYd muds oDrO; us vkizoklu fojks/kh vkSj uLyoknh rRoksa ds vuFkd vfHk;ku esa tkus&vutkus tku dh gh rjg mu leLr lqfo/kkvksa dh vko';drk Fkh] ftuds fcuk xqtkjk ugha py ldrkA os fnu jkr dke djrs Fks] cgqr Qwad nh gSA de osru ikrs FksA eSa bruk tkurk gwa fd Hkkjr ls vk, gtkjksa ^ekbxzs'ku okWp* uke dh laLFkk tks fons'kh ukxfjdksa ds yksxksa dks mudh ;ksX;rk&{kerk ds vuq:i ukSdfj;ka ugha feyha fczVsu izos'k ij utj j[krh gS mlds laLFkkid lj ,UMª;w xzhu vkSj mUgsa etnwjh dk dke djuk iM+kA us U;k;k/kh'k ds oDrO; ij fVIi.kh djrs jgus ds fy, ,d&,d dejs esa g,q dgk& ^os vke turk esa O;kIr ^pDdh esa ?kqu Hkh filrk ikap&N% yksx jgrs FksA f'k¶Vksa esa dke fujk'kk&grk'kk dks gh vfHkO;fDr ns jgs gSaA gSA* vkSj xr vusd o"kks± esa djrs vkSj Fkd VwVdj dejs esa vkdj mUgksaus viwoZ lkgl iznf'kZr fd;k gSA* [kk&ihdj dqN ?kaVksa ds fy, foJke fczfV'k djnkrk laxBu dh vfHk;ku uLyoknh rRoksa }kjk ftu djrs vkSj fQj mB [kM+s gksrsA LFkkuh; la;ksftdk lwlh LDok;j us dgk] ^tt eqn~nksa dks ckj&ckj mHkkjk xksjk vaxzst mruk gh djrk Fkk] ftruk fVªxj us ns'k Hkj ds vusd djnkrkvksa dh tkrk gS muds iz f r fcz V s u vko';d&vfuok;Z gksrkA bl ij Hkh fparkvksa dks mHkkjk gS fd tc ljdkj og dkys fons'kh vkizokfl;ksa dh yxkrkj ns'k dks xgjs ½.k dh nyny esa ds ewyokfl;ksa ds eu lQyrk ij bZ";kZ djrkA f'kdk;r èkdsy jgh gS gj fdlh ,sjs xSjs dks /ku efLr"d ij ;g Hkz e gkoh djrkA rc Hkh vusd ckj tkrh; yqVk;k tk jgk gSA* ruko mHkjsA vc Hkh ;nk dnk mHkjrs bl izdj.k ls nks eq[; fo"k; Li"V gksrk jgk gS fd lHkh dkys gSaA ;k ;g dguk vf/kd lgh gksxk fd gksdj lkeus vkrs gSaA ,d gS 1948 esa fons'kh vkizoklh cqjs gSa vkSj mHkkjs tkrs gSaA ikfjr ^us'kuy vflLVsal ,DV* ds rgr fuLlansg] voS/k izos'k ikus okyksa dh t:jrean yksxksa dks vkfFkZd lgk;rk iznku ns'k vkSj mldh vFkZO;oLFkk Hkh deh ugha jgh gSA T;ksa&T;ksa fczfV'k djuk rkfd os thou dh ewyHkwr ij cks> gSaA laln }kjk u,&u, vkizoklu fo/ks;d vko';drkvksa dh iwfrZ dj ldsaA dksbZ PRAVASI TODAY | SEPTEMBER 2009

60 çoklh VqMs | flrEcj

2009


A ifjn` ' ;A

ikfjr fd, tkrs jgs gSa] yksxksa ds fczVsu vkxeu ij jksd yxkbZ tkrh jgh gS] la[;k dks lhfer djus ds mik; fd, tkrs jgs gSa] R;ksa&R;ksa voS/k izos'k djus okyksa dh la[;k c<+rh xbZ gSA blesa Hkh dksbZ lansg ugha fd cgqrksa us fczVsu dh tudY;k.k lqfo/kkvksa vkSj HkÙkksa dk Hkjiwj ykHk mBk;k gSA ij ;gka ;g Hkh Li"V dj nsuk ;qfDr;qDr izrhr gksrk gS fd fczfV'k xksjksa us Hkh bu lqfo/kkvksa dk mi;ksx Hkjiwj fd;k gSA vc eqn~nk ;fn ;g gS fd tks xSjdkuwuh <ax ls fczVsu esa vkdj jg cl jgs gSa vkSj dksbZ dke u djds ljdkjh lgk;rk izkIr djrs gSa] rks fu'p; gh tu vkØks'k le> esa vkrk gS] ysfdu lHkh fons'kh vkizokfl;ksa dks pksj mpDds vkSj yqVsjs dgus dh dksf'k'k] tks ,sls oDrO;ksa esa >ydrh gS] og [krjukd gSA ncko ;wjksih; la?k ds u, lnL; ns'kkssa ls vkus okys xksjksa dk gS ysfdu fu'kkuk dkSu\ ^pDdh esa ?kqu Hkh filrk gSA* vkSj xr vusd o"kks± esa uLyoknh rRoksa }kjk ftu eqn~nksa dks ckj&ckj mHkkjk tkrk gS muds izfr fczVsu ds ewyokfl;ksa ds eu efLr"d ij ;g Hkze gkoh gksrk jgk gS fd lHkh dkys fons'kh vkizoklh cqjs gSa vkSj ns'k vkSj mldh vFkZO;oLFkk ij cks> gSaA chp esa ;g f'kdk;r mHkjh Fkh fd vkizoklh fo'ks"k :i ls Hkkjrh; miegk}hi ls vk, yksx] LFkkuh; vaxzst lekt ds lkFk vkRelkr gksus dk iz;Ru ugha djrsA gky ds o"kks± esa vusd Hkkjrh; uxj ifj"knksa ds egkikSj cus gSaA lkaln pqus x, gSa] ;gka rd dh gkml vkWQ ykMZ~l rd ds lnL; cus gSaA blfy, ;g f'kdk;r vc tk;t ugha jghA tgka rd ,f'k;kbZ yksxksa ds vius lekt eas vf/kd fyIr gksus dk iz'u gS ;g LokHkkfod gS D;ksafd izlaxksa] ijaijkvksa vkSj mRloksa dh lekurk mUgsa tksM+rh gSA bl ij Hkh fczfV'k ijaijkvksa vkSj thou O;ogkj ds vuq:i jgrs gq, gh os viuh lekftd ,drk dks Hkh etcwr j[krs gSaA blfy, muds rkSj rjhdksa ij vk, fnu vkykspuk ds Lojksa dk mHkjuk oLrqr% xyr ifj.kkedkjh gks ldrk gSA /;ku nsus ;ksX; rF; vc ;s Hkh gSa fd vf/kdka'k ,sls fons'kh ewy ds yksx tks iw.kZ:is.k oS/k rjhdksa ls fczVsu esa vkdj cls gSa] dke djrs gSa] VSDl nsrs gSa] os Lo;a ugha pkgrs fd fczVsu esa voS/k vkizoklh ?kqlrs pys vk,aA fczVsu dh ljdkj] foi{kh nyksa ds usr`Ro vkSj izcq¼ fczfV'k tulekt dks eroDrO; nsrs le; ;g /;ku esa j[kuk gksxk fd ;fn dkuwu fdlh ds fy, dqN PRAVASI TODAY | SEPTEMBER 2009

vkSj fdlh ds fy, dqN ;k vyx&vyx lektksa ds fy, vyx&vyx dkuwu ugha cu ldrk] mlh rjg lqfo/kkvksa vkSj O;oLFkkvksa dk ykHk Hkh xksjksa vkSj dkyksa dks vyx&vyx djds ugha vkadk tk ldrkA dkuwu Hkax djus okyk] pkgs xksjk gks ;k dkyk] n.M dk Hkkxhnkj gksuk pkfg, vkSj vko';drk ds le; gj lgh O;fDr lgk;rk lqfo/kk dk HkhA gky esa ,d fnu ds fy, Ýkal ds rVorhZ uxj dSys tkuk gqvk FkkA dSys canjxkg ls ckgj fudyrs gh ntZuksa dkys psgjksa dks lM+dksa ds fdukjs tkrs ns[kkA 'kadk gqbZ vkSj lp lkfcr gqbZ fd vQxkfuLrkuh gSa] tks fczVsu dh vksj tkus okys ,sls Vªdksa dh izrh{kk esa jgrs gSa tks mUgsa <d Nqikdj voS/k lhek ikj djokrs gSaA Vªd okys iSlk dekrs gSa vkSj mu ,tsafl;ksa ds drkZ/krkZvksa ds tkus igpkus gSa tks bu vQxkuksa dks vk'oklu fnykrs gSa fd mUgsa lqjf{kr fczVsu igqapk fn;k tk,xkA yk[kksa ikSaM dk gS ;g voS/k O;kikjA vQxkfuLrku esa fczVsu vkSj vejhdk rkfycku ds fo#¼ ;q¼xzLr gSa ysfdu cjlksa ls mudh miyfC/k D;k gS dksbZ dqN ugha crk ik jgk gSA vLr&O;Lr thou ls mdrkgV vQxkuksa esa 'kj.kkFkhZ cudj fczVsu izos'k ikus vkSj lq[kh thou thus dh reUuk dks ;fn tUe nsrh gS rks vk'p;Z dSlk\ Hkkjr esa ekuk tkrk gS fd xr vusd o"kks± ds nkSjku yk[kksa ckaxyknsf'k;ksa dk voS/k Hkkjr izos'k tkjh jgk gSA os Hkkjr esa cls gSaA ;nk&dnk jktuhfrK bl eqn~ns dks mBkrs gSa] 'kksj epkrs gSaA ysfdu dqN ugha gksrkA lhek,a vlqjf{kr gksa] rks voS/k izos'k loZ= gksrk gSA ekuo fujarj ,sls LFkku ,oa ifjos'k dh [kkst esa jgrk gS tgka og lq[k ls th ldsA ysfdu tgka og Lohdkjk tkrk gS ogka ds fu;eksa] O;oLFkk] thoui¼fr vkSj lkekftd vis{kkvksa dk lEeku mldk drZO; curk gSA voS/k izos'k dgha Hkh ekU; ugha gks ldrkA ujs'k Hkkjrh;

(ujs'k Hkkjrh; th ds fiNys ekg izdkf'kRk ys[k ^yksdra= ij eaMjkrh jktuhfr* esa dqN va'k NwV x, FksA ftlds dkj.k ys[k dk rkjrE; VwV x;k FkkA HkwYk ds fy, {kekizkFkhZ & laiknd) 61 çoklh VqMs | flrEcj

2009


A dS l h dgh A

dgka tk,a xka/kh th ,d gksrh gS izse dh Hkk"kk] og fnyksa ij Nih gksrh gS] uksV ij ughaA xkaèkh th nq%[kh gSa ppk] D;k fd;k tk,\

v'kksd pÿËkj

& pkSa js pEiw! dk <wa< j;kS ,s\ & FkksM+h&lh txg <wa< jgk gwa ppkA & dkSu ds rkb±\ & xkaèkh th ds fy,A djSalh uksVksa ij muds fy, vc txg de iM+rh tk jgh gSA vkj-ch-vkbZ- ijs'kku gS fd bl vknj.kh; cqtqxZ dks dgka j[kk tk,\ & pkSa txg de dSlS ifj xbZ js\ & ppk lafoèkku dh vkBoha vuqlwph esa iaæg Hkk"kk,a FkhaA vHkh uksVksa ij iaæg

gh py jgh gSaA fQj gks xb± ckbZlA lkr Hkk"kk,a c<+kus dk ekeyk gh Vhl dk Fkk] vc Hkk"kkbZ igyoku vM+rhl vfrfjDr Hkk"kkvksa dk çLrko ysdj vk x, gSaA ;kuh] dqy gks tk,axh lkBA [kre gks tk,xk xkaèkhth dk BkBA crkvks dgka tkds fcNk,axs [kkVA gj uksV ij lkB Hkk"kkvksa dh lwph vk;k djsxhA vHkh rks uksV ij xkaèkh th MkaMh ekpZ fudkyrs fn[k jgs gSaA Hkk"kkvksa dh la[;k ns[kdj mUgsa viuh ;k=k fdlh vkSj fn'kk esa eksM+uh iM+sxhA os Hkh lkspsaxs fd Hkk"kkvksa dk ekeyk uktqd gksrk tk jgk gSA dkSu bl >esys esa iM+sA & dkbZ nksLr ds ;gka pys tk,aA & nksLr Hkh dgka gSa mudsA vius ifjfpr [k+kl yksxksa ds ikl tkuk ugha pkgrsA vke tu ls mEehnsa j[krs gSaA blhfy, rks eSa rqEgkjs ikl vkdj muds fy, txg <wa< jgk gwaA Hkk"kk,a uksV ij vius fy, txg <wa< jgh gSaA yksx Hkk"kkvksa esa vius fy, txg <wa< jgs gSaA txg vius fy, txg <wa< jgh gSA dksbZ fdlh dks txg ugha nsuk pkgrkA vkil esa ckr ugha djuk pkgrkA viuh&viuh Hkk"kk ds uke ij xqEekVk ekj fy;k gS vkSj lafoèkku ij p<+ cSBs gSaA xkaèkh th vYila[;dksa ds fgrS"kh Fks] bldk eryc ;g ugha fd os cgqla[;dksa dk fgr ugha pkgrs FksA os rks ns'k dks ,dla[;d cukuk pkgrs FksA ge lc ,d gSa rks ,d gh Hkk"kk cksysaA os fganh vkSj fganqLrkuh dh odkyr djrs FksA os Lo;a xqtjkrh Hkk"kh Fks] ij ;s ekurs Fks fd fganh gh iwjs ns'k dks tksM+ ldrh gSA vc mudk tksM+&tksM+ nq[k jgk gSA D;k tksM+sa] D;k ?kVk,a\ dksl&dksl iS ikuh cnys] vkB dksl iS ckuhA bl rjg ls rks Hkk"kkvksa dh la[;k gt+kjksa esa ugha yk[kksa esa cSBsxhA & uksV is Hkk"kk dkSu i<+S\ & dksbZ ugha i<+rk ppkA Hkk"kkvksa ds lwjek Hkh ugha i<+rsA lcds lc ;k rks fgUnh i<+rs gSa ;k vaxzsthA ij tura= gS ppk! djksM+ksa dh vkcknh esa ,d Hkh vkokt mBs rks lquh tkuh pkfg,A mis{kk ugha dh tk ldrh] ij vis{kk,a rRdky iwjh dj nh tk,a] ;g Hkh rks t:jh ugha gSA irk djuk gksxk fd fdls Hkk"kk dk ntkZ fn;k tk ldrk gS vkSj dkSu&lh flQZ cksyh gSA ,d gksrh gS izse dh Hkk"kk] og fnyksa ij Nih gksrh gS] uksV ij ughaA xkaèkh th nq%[kh gSa ppk] D;k fd;k tk,\ & cxhph iS mudkS Lokxr ,sA fgUnqLrkuh esa ckr dfjaxs mursA ij ts crk mu vM+rhl Hkklku esa viuh cztHkklk gS dS uk;a\ & cztHkk"kk dgka ls gksxh\ cztoklh lnk ds larks"khA Hkk"kk dks fookn dk dkj.k ugha ekursA foiqy lkfgR; gSA fgUnh dh tuuh ekuh tkrh gSA ysfdu vc 'kk;n bls fgUnh dh cksyh ekudj gh [kkfjt dj fn;k tk;A & lkfey djkA lkB dh txg bdlB gS tkaxhA & rks vki eq>s Hkh yM+kbZ ds eSnku esa mrkjuk pkgrs gSa\ jgus nhft, ppk] elys vius vki lqy>saxsA cgqr lkjh Hkk"kkvksa dh fyfi rks ,d gh gS & nsoukxjhA & rkS xkaèkh th rs dg nS] ijslku u gksa;A uksV iS cus jgsaA & gka] Hkk"kkvksa dks ;fn uksV ds dkxtksa ij LFkku ugha feyk rks os vius fny esa rks ! ns gh ldrs gSaA

PRAVASI TODAY | SEPTEMBER 2009

62 çoklh VqMs | flrEcj

2009


|| ehfM;k ehfM;k okp okp||

fgUnh CykWx% Kku vkSj laosnuk dk vlaxfBr {ks= fgUnh CykWxksa vkSj vaxzsth CykWxksa dks rqyukRed :i ls ns[ksa rks vUrj lkQ utj vkrk gSA ,slk dguk rks vfrlkekU;hdj.k gS fd fgUnh CykWxksa esa lQj fny ls 'kq: gksrk gS vkSj vaxzsth esa fnekx gkoh gksrk gS] ij ;g dFku izo`fr;ksa ds varj dh vksj t:j b'kkjk djrk gSA vfHkO;fDr ds ,d ekè;e ds :i esa CykWx vU; ekè;eksa ls vyx&gh bl ckr dks ysdj gS fd blesa vfHkO;fDr mUeqDr vkSj rkcM+&rksM+ izdkj dh gksrh gS] laiknd dh utj ls xqtjus dh fpark ds fcuk] vkSj gj izdkj ds ikBd dks ialn vkus dh fpark ds fcukA CykWxksa esa ^fojksèkksa ds lkeatL;* dh fpark mruh ugha gksrhA fQj Hkh] vaxzsth CykWxksa esa vfHkO;fDr vfèkd is'ksoj QkWesZV esa gSA vaxzsth esa tks cM+s CykWxj gSa] os CykWx dh fof'k"Vrk ;kuh furkUr futh vfHkO;fDr cuk;s j[kdj Hkh lacafèkr vkfFkZd] lkekftd] jktuhfrd] nk'kZfud] euksoSKkfud fo"k; ij vkSipkfjd Lrj ij fopkj foe'kZ dh ijEijk ls viuk lkrR; dk lacaèk cuk, j[krs gSaA fgUnh CykWxksa dh izo`fr dks bafxr djus dk iz;kl djsa rks blesa fo}rk dh fpark de gS vkSj tku iM+rk gS fd vfHkO;fDr ls oafpr ,d lekt epy mBk gS vkSj Lo;a dks mMsy nsuk pkgrk gSA blesa HkM+kl dk rRo gSA fgUnh CykWxksa dh ;gh 'kfDr vkSj ;gh detksjh Hkh gSA vaxzsth ds cM+s CykWxjksa esa] tks vPNh [kklh la[;k esa gSa] ckSf¼d foe'kZ dk Lrj Hkys Åapk gS] ij vaxzsth esa ekl Lrj ij Kku vkSj laosnuk dk Lo:i iqu:Riknd gSA fganh CykWxksa esa ledkyhu thou dh xfr'khyrk dk }U} gS] ;qod&;qofr;ksa ds eklwe lius gSa] dfFkr fodkl ds nkSj esa Nhurh izÏfr gS] uxjksa dh ?kuh cfLr;ksa esa vkneh ij fxjrs vkneh dh cspkjxh gSA pkSd&pkSjkgs vkSj pk; dh nqdkuksa tSls cgl&eqgkfclksa dh xehZ gSA vke thou ls tqM+ko vkSj ekSfydrk tgka fganh CykWxksa dh 'kfDr gS ogha tks'k ds lkFk gks'k dk vHkko bldh detksjhA ckSf¼d foe'kZ esa is'ksoj QkesZV vkSj O;kidrk dk vHkko gS blfy, Kku vkSj laosnuk dk mèoZxeu ugha gSA vfHkO;fDr dh Bld gS ij lfg".kqrk ughaA vkius ujsUæ eksnh ds fdlh ,d dne dh iz'kalk esa fy[kk ugha fd vkidks iwjk dk iwjk Qklhoknh crkus okys CykWxksa dk rkark yx tk,xk] vkius fdlh 'kks"k.k dh ckr dh ugha fd vki ekDlZoknh gks x,A cgl viuh QkWesZfVax ds fy, izpfyr jktuhfrd eqgkojksa ij voyfEcr gS] mlls vkxs ugha c<+ ikrh gSA fgUnh ds {ks= esa fgUnh CykWxksa ds :i esa mtkZ dk izLQksV gSA ;g fgUnh ds fy, ,d ,sfrgkfld volj gS] vxj fgUnh dk vfHktu bl iwjs ifjn`'; esa usr`Ro dh Hkwfedk fuHkk lds] vkSj Lo;a vius CykWxksa }kjk ifjiDork dk ,d lanHkZ <k¡pk [kM+k dj ldsA

fgUnh CykWxksa dh izo`fr dks bafxr djus dk iz;kl djsa rks blesa fo}rk dh fpark de gS vksj tku iM+rk gS fd vfHkO;fDr ls oafpr ,d lekt epy mBk gS vkSj Lo;a dks mMsy nsuk pkgrk gSA blesa HkM+kl dk rRo gSA

jkds'k JhokLro PRAVASI TODAY | SEPTEMBER 2009

63 çoklh VqMs | flrEcj 2009


A thou 'kS y hA

lksuk lksus lk nqyZHk vPNh uhan ds O;kogkfjd mik; viuk fcLrj] viuh lkal] viuk LoHkko] viuh 'kkafr] viuh uhanA

bUlksefu;k ;k vfuæk ,slh ck;ksyksftdy ijs'kkuh gS ftldk dkj.k T;knkrj lkbdksykSftdy gksrk gSA blesa jkr Hkj uhan ugha vkrh] ;k uhan tYnh&tYnh VwVrh gS] ;k uhan vkrh Hkh gS rks iwjh jkr lius vkrs jgrs gSa vkSj uhan esa Hkh vka[ks ?kwerh jgrh gSaA bl rhljh fLFkfr dks jse&jSfiM vkbZ ewoesaV dgrs gSaA vkt dh O;Lr thou 'kSyh O;fDr esa ,UxtkbVh vkSj LVªsl flpq,'ku iSnk djrh gS ftlls uhan esa ijs'kkuh gksrh gSA vxj ge ;g eku Hkh ysa fd ruko ls cpk ugha tk ldrk fQj Hkh FkksM+h lh tkx:drk] FkksM+s iz;kl o izf'k{k.k ls ruko dks bl izdkj vius fu;a=.k esa j[kk tk ldrk gS ftlls og uhan ij gkoh u gksus ik;sA uhan lacaèkh dqN fu;eksa dh tkudkjh vkSj mudk ikyu cgqr mi;ksxh lkfcr gks ldrk gSA O;fDr PRAVASI TODAY | SEPTEMBER 2009

vius [kkuk [kkus vkSj lksus ds fy, fcLrj ij tkus ds chp nks ?kaVs dk Qklyk j[ksA pk;] dkWQh] flxjsV] rEckdq ;k dksYM fMªad lksus ls 4&5 ?kaVs igys vkf[kjh ckj ysA lksus ls igys 15&20 feuV Vgyuk] gYdk Luku ;k de ls de BaMs ikuh ls gkFk iSj èkksuk cgqr mi;ksxh gSA fcLrj dks lkQ&lqFkjk j[ksa] fcLrj ij dHkh Hkh fdrkc ysdj u tk,a ;k de ls de dksbZ ,DlkbfVax pht u i<+saA vxj jkr dks uhan VwVrh gS vkSj uhan ugha vk jgh gS rks uhan ds ckjs esa dHkh ugha lkspsa vkSj u gh lksus dk iz;kl djsa cfYd vkrh&tkrh lkal ij eu ,dkxz djsa] gYdk E;wftd lqusa ;k dksbZ mckÅ fdrkc i<+saA eYVhus'kuy rFkk dkWy&lsUVj esa ekufld Je vfèkd vkSj 'kkjhfjd Je de gksrk gSA ;gka ftlesa fnekx rks Fkdrk gS ij 'kjhj ughaA blesa fnekx vkSj 'kjhj esa vkjke dk fjne ugha cSB ikrk ftldk uhan ij nq"izHkko iM+rk gSA ,sls esa lqcg ;k jkr le; fudkydj O;k;ke djuk ;k Vgyuk t:jh gSA rukoiw.kZ rFkk vfu;fer thou p;kZ esa ge xgjs rFkk isV ls lkal ysus ds cnys rsth ls NksVh&NksVh lkal eqag rFkk lhus ls ysus yxrs gSaA ;g LokLF; ds fy, lkekU; rkSj ij vPNk rks ugha gksrk gS] vPNh uhan esa Hkh ckèkd gksrk gSA blesa FkksM+s ls iz;kl ls ifjorZu yk;k tk ldrk gSA tSls vki vius n¶rj esa ?kj esa dHkh Hkh dgha Hkh nl feuV dk vH;kl djsaA viuh ,d gFksyh lhus ij nwljh ihB ij j[k dj ukd ,oa isV ls xgjh lkal ysa ,oa NksM+saA è;ku jgs lkal ysus ij isV Qwys vkSj NksM+us ij fipdsA tc vki isV ls lkal ysuk lh[k tk;saxs rks vki ns[ksaxs fd vupkgs fopkj J`a[kyk ij gh vkidk fu;a=.k gksus yxk gSA dbZ yksxksa dks lksrs le; fnekx esa vupkgs fopkj yxkrkj vkrs gSa ftl ij mudk fu;a=.k ugha jg ikrkA ,sls yksx vius fopkj dks u rks jksdus dk iz;kl djsa u gh ml ij è;ku nsa] cfYd gkFk&iSj <hyk NksM+dj vius lkal dks ns[ksa vkSj mls mYVh fn'kk esa fxusa ;k lkjs fnu dh ?kVuk dks ihNs ls fxusaA ;kn j[ksa ;fn fdlh rukoiw.kZ ?kVuk dks vki ihNs ls ;kn djrs gSa rks uhan esa enn feysxh gh] lkFk gh og ?kVuk Hkh ;kn ls èkwfey gksrh tk;sxhA mDr lHkh ckrksa dk g¶rk&nks g¶rk iz;kl djsa rks og vknr esa 'kqekj gksus yxsxkA ,slk ges'kk rks lEHko ugha gS ij dksf'k'k djsa fd vius gh fcLrj ij lks;saA viuk fcLrj] viuh lkal] viuk LoHkko] viuh 'kkafr] viuh uhanA funk Qktyh us fy[kk gS & ^^ubZ&ubZ gksa vka[ksa rks gj eatj vPNk yxrk gS--- lksdj ns[kk NksVs&cMs 'kgjksa esa--- tSlk Hkh gks vius ?kj dk fcLrj vPNk yxrk gSA**

vatq flUgk 64 çoklh VqMs | flrEcj

2009


| okLrq |

dSlk gks 'k;u d{k dqN mi;ksxh lq>ko

'k;u&d{k ?kj dk ,d cgqr egRoiw.kZ vax gS tgka euq"; vius thou dk ,d frgkbZ Hkkx fcrkrk gSA thou laxzke esa Fkdk&gkjk euq"; ;gka foJke dj fuR; ubZ ÅtkZ vkSj 'kfDr izkIr djrk gSA ;fn 'k;u&d{k mÙkj fn'kk esa gksxk rks og ?kj esa v'kkafr mRiUu dj ldrk gSA lksrs le; gekjk flj nf{k.k fn'kk dh vksj gh gksuk pkfg,A iwoZ dh vksj flj djds lksus ls fo|k izkIr gksrh gSA nf{k.k dh vksj flj djds lksus ls /ku rFkk vk;q esa o`f¼ gksrh gSA if'pe dh vksj flj djds lksus ls izcy fpark gksrh gS rFkk mÙkj dh vksj flj djds lksus ls gkfu gksrh gSA tSlk fd geus igys crk;k Fkk] euq"; ,d pyrk&fQjrk paqcd gS] nf{k.k dh vksj flj rFkk mÙkj dh fn'kk esa iSj djds gh HkkSxksfyd rFkk ekuoh; pqacd dh laxfr cSBrh gSA mÙkj fn'kk dh vksj flj djds lksus ls ekuoh; pqacd rFkk HkkSxksfyd pqacd dh ,d gh /kqzoh; fn'kk gks tkrh gS ftlls vusd 'kkjhfjd o ekufld jksx gks ldrs gSaA 'k;u&d{k esa Hkkstu ugha djuk pkfg,A 'k;u&d{k esa 'kS¸;k ij cSBdj Hkh Hkkstu ugha djuk pkfg,] blls LokLF; fcxM+rk gSA PRAVASI TODAY | SEPTEMBER 2009

'k;u&d{k esa nso ewfrZ;ka Hkh ugha j[kuh pkfg,aA 'k;u&d{k ds ckgj dh vksj vkokxeu Hkh ugha gksuk pkfg,A mlesa fp=ksa dk pquko cM+h lko/kkuh ls djuk pkfg,A 'k;u&d{k dh nhokjksa ij yxk, x, fp=ksa esa ;q¼] fouk'k] Mwcrh uko ;k tgkt] leqnzh rwQku] Mwcrs gq, lw;Z ds fp= ugha yxkus pkfg,aA izkÏfrd lkSan;Z ds vizfre uewuksa dks iznf'kZr djus okys fp= eu esa foJkafr dh l?kurk dks c<+krs gSa tSls nkEiR;&thou ds lq[kn&{k.k] f[kyf[kykdj galrs gq, cPps] vuwBh Nfo QSykrs gq, Qwy] 'kkar tyjkf'k (leqnz] >hy] unh)] mxrk gqvk lw;Z bR;kfn ds fp= foJkafr ds {k.kksa dks vkSj lq[kn cuk nsrs gSaA u`R;&Nfo;ka] foykflrk ds n`'; vkSj ekaly&lkSan;Z dks iznf'kZr djus okys n`'; Hkh 'k;u d{k dh 'kksHkk c<+k ldrs gSaA 'kkUr laxhr ygfj;ka okrkoj.k dks eknd cukus esa lgk;d fl¼ gks ldrh gSaA 'k;ud{k [kqyk gksuk pkfg, rFkk mlesa lkeku bR;kfn ugha Hkjk tkuk pkfg,A nkEiR; thou esa vf/kdrj ruko o la?k"kZ 'k;u& d{k esa okLrq&'kkL= ds fu;eksa dk mYya?ku djus ls gksrk gSA

iz-Vq- C;wjks 66 çoklh VqMs | flrEcj

2009


|C O O K E R Y |

ozr

R;ksgkj

vDVwcj] lu~ 2009 1 vDVwcj jä nku fnol

2 vDVwcj xk¡/kh ,oa 'kkL=h t;arh

3 vDVwcj

eksekst

'kjn~ iwf.kZek] lR;ukjk;.k iwtk&dFkk

4 vDVwcj

lkexzh% eksekst ds fy, % 200 xzke eSnk] 1 Vs- Liwu ?kh ;k rsy] 1&5 Vh- Liwu csfdax ikmMj] ued LoknkuqlkjA Hkjkou ds fy, % 2 I;kt] 8 dyh yglqu] 2 f'keyk fepZ] 1 Vs- Liwu canxksHkh] 2 xktj dn~nwdl dh gqbZ] vk/kk dVksjh gjh eVj] 100 xzke iuhj] 1 Vs- Liwu ?kh ;k rsy] 1&4 Liwu dkyh fepZ] 1 pqVdh yky fepZ] 1&2 dVksjh gjk /kfu;k] ued LoknkuqlkjA pVuh ds fy, % 2 VekVj] 5&6 lkcqr yky fepZ] 1&2 Vh Liwu thjk] 1&2 Vh Liwu esFkh nkuk] 2 pqVdh gYnh] 2 pqVdh ghax] ued Loknkuqlkj] 1 VsLiwu rsyA fdrus yksxksa ds fy, % 7

fof/k%

Luku&nku dh vkfÜouh iwf.kZek] egf"kZ okYehfd t;arh] dkfrZd Luku&fu;ekfn çkjEHk

7 vDVwcj djokpkSFk ozr] mlZ vehj [kqljks

8 vDVwcj ok;qlsuk fnol

11 vDVwcj vgksbZ v"Veh ozr

15 vDVwcj /kursjl] /kUoUrfj t;arh

eSnk dks Nkudj mlesa ued] csfdax ikmMj feykdj uje xwaFk ysa vkSj 1&2 ?kaVs ds fy, <d dj j[k nsaA Hkjkou ds fy, % lHkh lfCt;ksa dks ckjhd dkV ysa dM+kgh esa Hkh xje djsa] I;kt vkSj yglqu Mkydj dqN nsj HkwuasA blesa dVh gqbZ lfCt;ka Mky nsa] 3 feuV Hkwuus ds ckn dkyh fepZ] yky fepZ] ued vkSj gjk /kfu;ka feyk dj Hkwu ysa] vc dn~nwdl fd;k gqvk iuhj Mkydj vPNh rjg feyk ysa] 2 feuV rd Hkwurs jgasA vkidh Hkjkou dh lkexzh rS;kj gSA vc xqa/ks eSnk dh NksVh yksbZ ysdj iryk csy ysa] vc mlesa ,d pEep ls Hkjkou dh lkexzh Hkj nsa] fdukjksa dks eksM+dj can dj nsa vki pkgsa rks xqft;k dh rjg Hkh eksM+ ldrs gSaA bl çdkj lkjs eksekst rS;kj dj ysaA vc eksekst dks Hkki esa idkuk gSA blds fy, vkidks eksekst idkus okyk crZu ysuk iM+sxk ysfdu vki pkgsa rks bMyh LVSaM esa Hkh eksekst cuk ldrs gSa] vki bMyh ds LFkku ij ,d&,d eksekst j[k nsa vkSj crZu dks <ddj eksekst dks idk ysaA eksekst dks idus esa 10 ls 12 feuV dk le; yxrk gSA pVuh dh fof/k % VekVj dks /kksdj dkV yhft,] dM+kgh esa rsy xje djsaA xje rsy esa ghax] thjk vkSj esFkh nkuk Mkydj pVdus nsaA vc blesa gYnh] VekVj vkSj yky fepZ Mkfy;s] 3&4 feuV VekVj ds xyus rd idkb;s] BaMk gksus ij feDlj esa Mkfy;s] ued feykdj ckjhd ihl ysaA xekZxeZ eksekst pVuh ds lkFk loZ djsaA PRAVASI TODAY | SEPTEMBER 2009

16vDVwcj Jhguqeku t;arh ozrksRlo

17 vDVwcj nhikoyh egksRlo] Jhx.ks'k&y{eh dh LFkkiuk ,oa iwtk] dqcsj&iwtu] egkohj Lokeh fuokZ.kksRlo] Lokeh jkerhFkZ tUe ,oa iq.;frfFk] Lokeh n;kuan Le`fr fnol

18 vDVwcj vUudwV egksRlo] xkso¼Zu iwtk

19 vDVwcj HkS;k nwt

30 vDVwcj esyk [kkVw';ke] pkrqekZl ozr dk ikj.k

31 vDVwcj ljnkj iVsy t;arh

67 çoklh VqMs | flrEcj

2009


A i;Z V uA

rslsy%

uhnjySaM dk vkuUn }hi olar _rq esa Qwyksa dh /kjrh ij eaMjkrh gqbZ frrfy;ksa dk jaxhu >qaM ns[kdj ,slk eglwl gksrk gS tSls Qwyksa dh ia[kqfM+;ka gh >jdj /kjrh ij fxjus ls igys frryh cudj iwjs }hi esa eaMjkdj lkSan;Z dk vkuUn&lq[k Hkksx ysuk pkgrh gSaA uhnjySaM ds jk"Vªh; ou foHkkx }kjk }hi ds ?kkl ds eSnkuksa dk fo'ks"k j[k&j[kko gksrk gSA bls ^yLV gkWQ* vFkkZr vkuUn&dkuu ds :i esa Hkh yksx tkurs gSaA izkÏfrd :i ls jph gqbZ jsrhyh Åaph igkfM+;ksa us bl èkjrh dks lqUnj dVksjh esa cny j[kk gSA bl 'kkafrnk;h izkÏfrd lq[k dh xksn dks fo'o ds if{k;ksa us viuk ?kj cuk j[kk gSA vÝhdk ds ^Liwucfy* if{k;ksa dh rjg dqN vÝhdh tkfr;ksa dk Hkh ;gka fuokl gSA yxrk gS & mUgksaus if{k;ksa ls lh[kk gSA dqN ;gka if{k;ksa dk dyjoh lkSUn;Z ns[kus ds fy, lksyg ^cMZ&okfpax* dsUnz gSa ogka yxs gq, nwjchu ;U= esa ;wjks dk flDdk Mkyrs gh nwjchu dh vka[ksa--vka[kksa dks jkLrk nsrh gSa ftlls if{k;ksa ds jaxhu&ia[kksa dk tknqbZ lkSan;Z gok dh rjax ij ukprk gqvk fn[krk gS vkSj u`R; esa PRAVASI TODAY | SEPTEMBER 2009

if{k;ksa dk xku gh muds ia[kksa dh Fkki dk vkèkkj curk gSA ljdkj dh vksj ls gh ;gka Ïf=e ugjsa cuk;h x;h gSaA tgka ls leqnzh ty ds ekè;e ls Lokfn"V tho&tUrq--- dhM+s--- eNfy;ka }hi esa vk tkrs gSa tks ;gka vk;s gq, if{k;ksa dk vkd"kZd Hkkstu curs gSaA blfy, Hkh fo'o ds lsykuh if{k;ksa dk ;g dsUnz&LFky gSA yo.kh; ok;qeaMy ds dkj.k ouLifr dk Lokn vkSj jax Hkh 'kks[k vkSj vkd"kZd gksrk gSA olar ½rq esa Qwyksa dh èkjrh ij eaMjkrh gqbZ frrfy;ksa dk jaxhu >qaM ns[kdj ,slk eglwl gksrk gS tSls Qwyksa dh ia[kqfM+;ka gh >jdj èkjrh ij fxjus ls igys frryh cudj iwjs }hi esa eaMjkdj lkSan;Z dk vkuUn&lq[k Hkksx ysuk pkgrh gSaA rslsy }hi ij gfjlkxj O;fDrRo dk ifjp; djkus okyk 68 çoklh VqMs | flrEcj

2009


A i;Z V uA

ukFkZ&lh dk fo'kky laxzgky; gS tgka vusd rjg dh eNfy;ksa] tho&tUrqvksa dh tkudkjh ds lkFk&lkFk gekjs vkt ds vkèkqfud le; ds iznwf"kr i;kZoj.k dh n`';&JO; :i esa tkudkjh nh tkrh gS fd rsy&[knkuksa vkSj leqnzh tgktksa ds ;krk;kr us fdl rjg ls bu ty&thoksa ij fgalk djuh 'kq: dj nh gSA ,dks es;j laLFkk ,sls vkgr leqnzh i{kh vkSj tho&tUrqvksa dh fpfdRlk vkSj j{kk djrh gS vkSj muds iqu% LoLFk vkSj lgt gksus ij mUgas leqnz vkSj izÏfr ds eqDr thou dk ukxfjd cuk nsrh gSA bl rjg ^,dks es;j* E;qft;e leqnzh thou ds izfr ,d vkUrfjd n`f"V iznku djrh gSA budk viuk fQYe&fFk;sVj gS tgka leqnzh tho&tUrqvksa vkSj if{k;ksa ls lacafèkr vuojr fQYesa fn[kk;h tkrh gSaA rslsy }hi ls FkksM+h nwj dh leqnzh ;k=k (vkèkk ?kaVk) djus ij gFksyh ds vkdkj ds vR;ar y?kq }hi ij Mp Hkk"kk esa ^lh gkUM (leqnzh dqÙkksa) vaxzsth esa dgsa rks lhy dk iukgxkg gS] tgka os lh es;ks ds lkFk Hkkstu ds uke ij le>kSrk fd;s gq, fuokl&LFkyh cuk;s gSaA ogka ij Hkh ;g laLFkk nkSjs yxkrh jgrh gS vkSj fdlh rjg ls Hkh vkgr bu lh&gkUM dk ikyu&iks"k.k gksrk gSA laLFkk ds vusd Ïf=e rkykcksa esa budh lsok gks jgh gS ftlesa ls vkB vaèks gSa ftudk ogka ds lsodksa }kjk uke j[kk x;k gS] ftuds iqdkjus ij os cPpksa dh rjg epyrs pys vkrs gSa vkSj os vius Hkkstu ds le; dks fofèkor igpkurs gSaA ^rslsy* rlYyh vkSj lkSan;Z dk }hi gS tgka vR;ar dLckbZ izÏfr ds NksVs&eksVs ukS dsUnz gSaA flVh lsaVj dh lkjh lqfoèkk,a vkSj pdkpkSaèk gSA Mp] bVkfy;u] pk;uht ds lkFk&lkFk vtsZUVhuk jsLrjka dh Hkjekj gSA ysfdu vtsZUVhuk jsLrjka esa ckaXykns'k ds cSjk vkSj jlksbZ;k ns[kdj vk'p;Z gqvkA xjhch] vlqj{kk vkSj Hkq[kejh ls rax vkdj mUgksaus thfor jgus ds fy, }hi esa 'kj.k yh gSA vtuch eqlyeku gksus ds dkj.k mUgsa PRAVASI TODAY | SEPTEMBER 2009

vkradoknh gksus ds tksf[ke Hkh lgus iM+sA ,d vksj ^rslsy* }hi cPpksa vkSj fd'kksjksa dk ØhM+kLFky gS rks nwljh vksj ;qokvksa ds fy, jksekuh vkSj jksekapd {ks= gSA txg&txg cPpksa ds [ksyus ds vkd"kZd ikdZ gSa rks in~;k=h vkSj lkbfdy pkydksa ds fy, LFkku&LFkku ij csap yxh gqbZ gSaA Lohe iSjkMkbt uke ls dkyksuks uke dk cPpksa dk fiz; izfl¼ euksjatu LFky gS tgka os rSjrs vkSj [ksyrs gq, Hkwy tkrs gSa fd lw;kZLr dc gqvkA fnu Hkj ds fy, ;gka pykus ds fy, fdjk;s ij lkbfdy fey tkrh gSaA cPpksa dh lkbfdyksa ds

lkFk&lkFk cPpksa dks cSBkdj dSjh djus okyh lkbfdy rd fdjk;s ij fey tkrh gSaA bl }hi dk viuk lkIrkfgd v[kckj gS tks lwpukvksa vkSj [kcjksa ds lkFk&lkFk jsLrjka] gksVy] ckj&Dyc ds vkd"kZd fuea=.k ls iw.kZ jgrk gSA rslsy }hi ds dfo;ksa us feydj vius vyx ls laxzg Hkh xro"kZ izdkf'kr djok;s gSa ftuesa 2004 esa fofy;e ts- fddVZ dh ^rsly dfork,a* pfpZr jghaA lSykuh] i;ZVd lIrkgkUr esa }hi esa viuk dSai yxkrs gSa gksVy ds dejs dks ?kj cukrs gSa ^pht* vkSj ^ehV* dk LFkkuh; vkuUn ysrs gSaA vxj cknyksa dh Ïik jgh rks jsrhys rV ij ?kaVksa ysVdj lw;Zrki dk vkuUn mBkrs gSa vkSj Lof.kZe èkwi dk rki viuh nsg esa ?kqykrs gSa ftlls muds eu ds lkFk&lkFk ru Hkh Lo.kZ nsg esa rCnhy gks tkrk gSA

izks- iqf"irk voLFkh 69 çoklh VqMs | flrEcj

2009


A la L d` f rA

jke dh 'kkafr 'kfDr ds fo|qRd.kksa ds lap; dk vk/kkj

^’kkUra* ‘kCn dks eè;dkyhu ekjdkV ds izdk’k esa Hkh ns[kuk pkfg,A ‘kkafr ftl rjg ls vkt gekjs fy, lcls cM+k ewY; gS] mlh rjg ls rRdkyhu rqylh ds fy, Hkh og ,d loZizFke vkSj ‘kk’or ewY; FkkA

eukst dqekj JhokLro lsoh jsftl us 'kkafr 'kCn ds Hkhrj foJkafr (gkeZuh)] larqyu (cSysal)] lejlrk (equilibrium)] lqthfork (longevity)] U;k;] lek/kku] vuarrk (Vkbeyslusl)] r`fIr (contentment)] Lora=rk ,oa ifjiw.kZrk (QqyfQyesaV) tSls xq.kksa dh vFkZPNfo;ka ns[kh gSaA ^'kkar* jke

ds Hkhrj bUgha lkjh fo'ks"krkvksa dh vksj è;ku vkdf"kZr djus okyk 'kCn gSA ;g laKk ugha] fo'ks"k.k gSA vFkkZr~ os (Jh jkepUnzth) lnk izlUufpÙk jgrs gSa] dksey opu cksyrs gSa] dBksj cksyus ij Hkh os izR;qÙkj esa dBksj opu ugha dgrsA Hkxoku dh ;g fo'ks"krk ukjn] Hk`xq vkSj ij'kqjke ds izlaxksa esa Hkh izR;{k gksrh gSA Jhjke dh ;g 'kkafr muds iwjs thou dk ifjp; gS ftls fujkyk us jke dh 'kfDr iwtk esa Hkax fd;kA f/kd~ thou tks ikrk gh vk;k nk fojks/k@f/kd~ lk/ku ftlds fy, lnk gh fd;k 'kks/kA ubZ dfork bl ek;us esa rqylh dh vis{kk okYehfd ds vf/kd utnhd gS fd mlesa jke ds Hkhrj dh ekuoh; mFky&iqFky vkSj gypy crkbZ gS] jke dks b'ojh :i ls 'kkar u crkdj ekuoh; vfLrRo ds vUrfoZjks/kksa vkSj tfVyrkvksa ds fnypLi o`Ùk rS;kj fd, x, gSaA ysfdu ^'kkUra* jke ds pfj= dk ,d ikfjHkkf"kd xq.k gS rks lghA jkt lqukbZ nhUg ouoklw@lqfu eu Hk;sm u gj"k gjklwA jke ds fy, 'kkafr ,d y{; ugha gS ftls fdlh fnu miyC/k ;k mÙkh.kZ djuk gS] og rks muds pfj= dk ,d ikfjHkkf"kr vuqrRo gSA o 'kkafr ds fy, jkLrk ugha cukrs] mudk jkLrk gh 'kkafr dk jkLrk gSA 'kkUr ds lkFk 'kk'ora dks lkFk&lkFk i<+us ls dgha jke dh ml fo'ks"krk dk Hkh irk yxrk gS tks LFkk;h 'kkafr esa jr gSA ;g vkt dh rjg 21 flrEcj ds ,d fnu varjjk"Vªh; 'kkafr fnol eukdj lEiUu gks tkus okyh fo'ks"krk ugha gSA bZ'oj gekjs vipkjksa dks ns[krk gS vkSj lgrk Hkh gS ysfdu mldh 'kkafr mldh mnklhurk ugha gS cfYd mldh ykBh Hkh mruh gh csvkokt gksrh gSA jke dh 'kkafr jke dh dk;jrk ugha cfYd muds eSugqM dk bErgku gS] loksZPp bErgkuA ckS¼ksa e 'kkafr dk vFkZ lgu djus dh rkdr vkSj /kS;Z ls Hkh yxk;k tkrk gSA Fksjkon vkSj egk;ku ckS¼ksa esa 'kkafr iw.kZrk izkIr djus ds fy, t:jh ikjferkvksa esa ls ,d gSA jke dh 'kkafr jke dk LoHkko gh ugha gS] og reke foijhrrkvksa dks >syrs gq, gksus ij Hkh mudh vksj ls fo'o dks fn;k gqvk ,d migkj gSA geus Åij ;g iwNk Fkk fd jke esa ;g 'ke dgka ls vk;k gSA jke ds vufrjsd vkSj vkRefuxzg dks ge ,d ,sls O;fDr dh gh igpku ekusaxs ftls vius gksus ds iz;kstu dk irk gSA og ge tSlk ugha gS fd ftlds ckjs esa vdcj bykgkcknh us dgk] ^nks eqjknsa tks feyha pkj reUuk,a dhA geus [kqn dYc esa vkjke dks jgus u fn;kA* og vyx gS mls ekywe gS fd og bl i`Foh ij v;ksè;k esa jkt djus ds fy, ugha vk;kA blfy, jkT;kjksg.k u gks ikuk naM ugha] mlds thou&iz;kstu dh flf¼ dh gh vksj ,d dne gSA ^'kkUra* 'kCn dks eè;dkyhu ekjdkV ds izdk'k esa Hkh ns[kuk pkfg,A 'kkafr ftl rjg ls vkt gekjs fy, lcls cM+k ewY; gS] mlh rjg ls rRdkyhu rqylh ds fy, Hkh og ,d loZizFke vkSj 'kk'or ewY; FkkA eè;dkyhu rqylh ds fy, Hkh og ,d loZizFke vkSj 'kk'or ewY; FkkA eè;dky esa eaxksyksa us 4 djksM+ yksx ekjs FksA foy M~;wjka us fy[kk gS fd Hkkjr dh eqfLye fot; bfrgkl dh laHkor% lcls fjfDre dFkk gSA vdcj] ftldks veR;Zlsu viuh iqLrd ^n vkxqZesaVsfVo bafM;u* esa veu dk Qfj'rk cukdj i'k djrs gSa] us fpÙkkSM+ esa 30]000 yksxksa dks ekjk FkkA ,slh fLFkfr esa rqylh ds fy, 'kkafr fuf'pr gh ,d izkFkfed ewY; jgh gksxhA ^'kkUr* dks lcls izFke mfYyf[kr djus okyk ;g dfo vkt ds ml nkSj esa vkSj Hkh egRoiw.kZ gks tkrk gS tgka tSfod ;q¼ gSa vkSj dksckYV ce HkhA vkt la;qDr jkT; vesfjdk tSls ;q¼[kksj ns'k gSa tks fo'o dk vk/ks ls T;knk lSU; O;; djrs gSaA jke dh lsuk oLrqr% jke dk yksd&laxzg gSA yksxksa ds Hkhrj rjg&rjg dh 'kfDr;ka fc[kjh iM+h gSaA 'kfDr ds fo|qRd.k fu#ik; gSa vkSj fody HkhA jke mudk leUo; djrs gSa] mUgsa ,dlw= esa cka/krs gSa rkfd ekuork fotf;uh gksA !

PRAVASI TODAY | SEPTEMBER 2009

70 çoklh VqMs | flrEcj

2009


A fgUnh la l kj A

xka/khth dh iqueqZfnzr iqLrdksa dk yksdkiZ.k

izHkkr >k ^^xkaèkh th us lknxh vkSj vuq'kklu ds lgkjs cM+s&cMs+ vlkèkkj.k dke cMs+ lkèkkj.k rjhds ls dj fn[kk, Fks--vkt ge Hkkjr dk fuekZ.k xkaèkh th dh lksp ds lkFk djuk pkgrs gSa ;k ik'pkR; ewY;ksa ds lkFk ;g gesa r; djuk gksxk---** mDr fopkj 18 vxLr 2009 dks f=os.kh lHkkxkj esa fnYyh dh eq[;ea=h Jherh 'khyk nhf{kr us egkRek xkaèkh }kjk fyf[kr iqLrdksa ^fgUn Lojkt* vkSj ^lR; ds iz;ksx vFkok vkRedFkk* ds yksdkiZ.k lekjksg esa O;Dr fd,A fgUnh vdkneh] fnYyh }kjk iqueZqfnzr bu iqLrdksa ds foekspu lekjksg esa ofj"B i=dkj Jh izHkk"k tks'kh us dgk fd vkt dh nqfu;k cukus okyh rhu fdrkcksa esa ls ,d iqLrd xkaèkh th dh ^fgUn Lojkt* gSA fgUnh vdkneh ds mikè;{k izks- v'kksd pØèkj us dgk fd ;g nksuksa iqLrdsa ;qxkardkjh gSa] bUgksaus Hkkjrh; lekt dh n'kk cnydj gesa ubZ jkgsa fn[kkbZ gSaA dk;ZØe ds nwljs l= esa ^vlyh Lojkt gh Lokèkhurk gS* vkSj r`rh; l= esa ^thou dh lPpkb;ka % vkRekoyksdu o l`tu'khyrk* fo"k; ij laxksf"B;ka vk;ksftr dh xbZA

ckyLo:i jkgh

MkW- izHkkdj Jksf=;

ch-,y- xkSM

rqylh t;arh v{kje~ }kjk 28 tqykbZ 2009 dks ykyk nhokupan VªLV] ubZ fnYyh esa rqylh t;arh dk vk;kstu fd;k x;kA blesa izeq[k :i ls MkW- izHkkdj Jksf=;] MkW- foeys'k dkafr oekZ] èkhjk oekZ] MkW- lhrs'k vkyksd] lkaln izHkkr >k] ckyLo:i jkgh] iq"ik jkgh] ch-,y- xkSM+] vfuy tks'kh] ujs'k 'kkafMY;] fouksn lanys'k] 'kf'kdkUr] ckxh pkpk] nsosUnz eka>h] vfuy oekZ ^ehr*] jkts'k tSu us Hkkx fy;kA eèkqjyrk HkVukxj }kjk rqylh ds Hktuksa dh laxhre; izLrqfr bl vk;kstu dh eq[; fo'ks"krk FkhA

tkikuh fo}ku fetksdkeh dks t;t;oarh lEeku 11 vxLr 2009 dks bafM;k gSfcVsV lsaVj esa tkikuh fo}ku çks- rksfe;ks fetksdkeh dks t;t;oarh lEeku dsaæh; x`gjkT;ea=h vt; ekdu ds gkFkksa fn;k x;kA çks- fetksdkeh tkiku esa jgdj fganh dh lsok dj jgs gSaA ;s fganh ds ys[kd vkSj ukVddkj gSaA bUgsa fganh dk varjZk"Vªh; jktnwr dgk tkrk gSA t;t;oarh laxBu fiNys dbZ o"kksZas ls fganh Hkk"kk ls tqM+s reke elyksa ij dke dj jgk gSA t;t;oarh ds nwljs lkykuk dk;ZØe dk vk;kstu Hkkjrh; lkaLd`frd lacaèk ifj"kn~ ds lg;ksx ls fd;k x;kA blds egkfuns'kd ohjsaæ xqIrk lesr dbZ x.kekU; yksx lekjksg esa ekStwn FksA t;t;aorh fganh dks Xykscy Hkk"kk cukus ds fy, dke dj jgk gSA fganh vdkneh ds mikè;{k çksQslj v'kksd pØèkj t;t;oarh ds laLFkkid lnL;ksa esa gSaA çksQslj v'kksd pØèkj us bl volj ij crk;k fd cnyrh nqfu;k esa fgnh dh pqukSfr;ka Hkh cny jgh gSaA rduhd ds lkFk bldk tqM+ko gks] rks lHkh dk Hkyk gksxkA PRAVASI TODAY | SEPTEMBER 2009

72 çoklh VqMs | flrEcj

2009


A fgUnh la l kj A

jk"Vªdfo eSfFkyh'kj.k xqIr t;arh lEeku lekjksg jk"Vªdfo eSfFkyh'kj.k xqIr dh t;arh 3 vxLr 2009 dks ubZ fnYyh fLFkr fgUnh Hkou ds lHkkxkj esa MkW- jRukdj ik.Ms; dh vè;{krk esa cM+s èkweèkke ls eukbZ xbZA MkW- ik.Ms; us vius izsjd mn~cksèku esa jk"Vªdfo ds izsjd dkO;ksa ij izdk'k MkykA jk"Vªdfo eSfFkyh'kj.k xqIr iqjLdkj&2009 MkW- Jherh laè;k dqekjh xqIrk dks muds }kjk jfpr ^cuk fy;k eSaus Hkh ?kksalyk* ds fy, ,oa Jherh jkds'k uafnuh xqIrk dks muds dkO;xzaFk ^iqjanjk* ds fy, iznku fd;k x;kA izFke jk"Vªdfo eSfFkyh'kj.k xqIr izoklh Hkkjrh; lEeku&2009 Jherh t; oekZ (fczVsu) dks muds dkO;xzaFk ^lg;k=h gSa ge* ds fy, iznku fd;k x;kA jk"Vªdfo eSfFkyh'kj.k xqIr fo'ks"k lkfgR; lEeku&2009 MkW- lhrkjke xqIr ^fnus'k* dks muds dkO;xzaFk ^ft;ks vkSj thus nks* ds fy, iznku fd;k x;kA

vuqokn ij ,d laiw.kZ iqLrd

bczkfge vydkth dks o"kZ 2009 dk fgUnhjRu lEeku

jktf"kZ iq#"kksÙkenkl VaMu dh 128oha t;arh 1 vxLr] 2009 ds volj ij fgUnh Hkou esa vk;ksftr ,d HkO; lekjksg esa jk"VªHkk"kk fgUnh ,oa vU; Hkkjrh; Hkk"kkvksa ds jaxeap dks ubZ igpku vkSj u, vk;ke nsus okys iqjksèkk jaxdehZ vkSj dyk&eeZK Jh bczkfge vydkth dks iafMr Hkhelsu fo|kyadkj Le`fr ^fgUnhjRu lEeku&2009* ls foHkwf"kr fd;k x;kA bl lEeku ds varxZr Jh vydkth dks 'kkWy] izrhd fpUg] iz'kfLr&i=] jtr&JhQy vkSj ,d yk[k #i;s dh jkf'k lEeku Lo:i HksaV dh xbZA Jh bczkfge vydkth us vius laf{kIr mn~cksèku esa dgk fd fFk;sVj ,d [kkst gS] viuh ftUnxh esa] ftUnxh ds ckjs esa rFkk ftUnxh ds iz;kstu dhA fFk;sVj flQZ ukVd ;k dksbZ [ksy ugha gS] og lekt dh 'kjkQr vkSj lPpkbZ dh [kkst gSA fFk;sVj djuk vuq"Bku djus tSlk gSA

izks- Ï".k dqekj xksLokeh dh iqLrd ^vuqokn foKku dh Hkwfedk* ij v{kje~ ds rRokoèkku esa jktdey izdk'ku ds lkStU; ls 12 vxLr] 2009 dks fgUnh Hkou esa ifjppkZ vk;ksftr dh xbZA bl dk;ZØe dh vè;{krk fofèk vk;ksx ds iwoZ vij lfpo ,oa izfl¼ ys[kd Jh cztfd'kksj 'kekZ us dhA oSKkfud ,oa rduhdh 'kCnkoyh vk;ksx ds vè;{k MkW- ds- fot; dqekj eq[; vfrfFk FksA cztfd'kksj 'kekZ us bl iqLrd dks xgu vkSj O;kid 'kksèk dk ifj.kke crk;kA oDrk ds :i esa lh&Msd ds funs'kd Jh oh-,u- 'kqDy us bl iqLrd dks vuqokn&foKku ls tqM+s rduhf'k;uksa ds fy, mi;ksxh crk;kA bXuw fo-fo- dh izksQslj MkW- (Jherh) jhrkjkuh ikyhoky us ubZ voèkkj.kkvksa ds fy, ikfjHkkf"kr 'kCnksa ds fuekZ.k vkSj ekudhdj.k dks vuqokn ds {ks= dh izeq[k pqukSrh crk;kA dk;ZØe esa ts-,u-;w- ds ,lksfl,V izksQslj MkWj.kthr lkgk us viuk oDrO; fn;kA dk;ZØe dk lapkyu dsUnzh; vuqokn C;wjks ds mifuns'kd fouksn lanys'k us fd;kA PRAVASI TODAY | SEPTEMBER 2009

73 çoklh VqMs | flrEcj

2009


|V I V I D H A |

The audience was in splits the whole summer when Rakhi Sawant was making history on Indian television by posing as a swayamvar where she was made to choose her groom out of 15 contestants. Out of which was an NRI businessman Elesh Parujanwala; whom she choose as her 'groom -to-be' as she didn't marry him but got engaged to parujanwala in front of media glares. Parujanwala was among the top three finalists who waited anxiously to be 30-year-old Rakhi's suitor. He finally won Rakhi's hand piping Manas Katyal, a 22-year-old event manager from Delhi and Chittiz Jain, the businessman from Delhi. Well it won't be wrong to say that everybody knew who she will chose at the end as Elesh was her favourite from the very start. Giving reasons why she selected Parujanwala, Rakhi said "He is honest." In the dramatic finale the audiences waited with bated breath for her final decision which was announced in a song and dance extravaganza that was transmitted live. The contenders had written poetry, serenaded her with songs, arm wrestled and even walked on burning coals to show their love for her. But now when she has earned her part of publicity and of course money, it seems Ms. Sawant might be changing her mind. Okay to be honest this was also expected; she is worried about him accepting her sexy image, his financial independence and, above all, she doesn't want him to be just known as 'Rakhi Sawant's husband'. Rakhi says she'll marry Elesh only when he becomes economically self-sufficient. Well we pray for Rakhi that all her wishes be granted and Elesh turns out to be the man of her dreams. May god bless the couple. P T BUREAU

But now when she has earned her part of publicity and of course money, it seems Ms. Sawant might be changing her mind.

Rakhi sawant is uncertain of her choice! PRAVASI TODAY | SEPTEMBER 2009

74 รงoklh VqMs | flrEcj

2009


uxj ikfyd fuxe] Xokfy;j

gekjh miyfC/k;ka !

dpjk izca/ku esa fo'oLrjh; lqfo/kkvksa dh igy

"

izns'k dh igyh ys.MfQy lkbV ij dpjs dk izlLadj.k izkajHkA

"

Bksl dpjk izca/ku iz.kkyh izkajHk A

"

?kj&?kj ls dpjk laxzg.k izkajHk A

!

efyu cfLr;ksa esa thou Lrj mUu;u A

"

mRFkku ifj;kstuk ds varxZr is;ty] LoPNrk (lhost flLVe) o lM+dksa dk fuekZ.k (12 djksM+ :-)A

!

izkstsDV mn; ifj;kstuk ds ek/;e ls nh?kZdkyhu is;ty ,oa lhost fuLrkj.k O;oLFkk A

"

15 cM+h ty laxzg.k Vafd;ka ds fuekZ.k izfØ;k 'kq: (ykxr 29 djksM+)

"

eksrh>hy fQYVj IykaV dk vk/kqfudhdj.k ,oa fr?kjk ij u;s o`gn fQYVj IykaV dh LFkkiuk izxfr ijA

"

ty izca/ku ij fujarj fuxjkuh gsrq cYd ehVjksa dh LFkkiukA

"

eqjkj ,oa Xokfy;j esa vfrvk/kqfud lhost VªhVesaV IykaV dk dk;Z iz'kLrA

!

ikjn'khZ iz'kklu dh igy

"

lEiw.kZ dk;kZy;ksa dk dEI;wVjhdj.k A

"

vke turk ds fy;s Vp LØhu dEI;wVj ,oa baVjusV ij dj] Hkou fuekZ.k Lohd`fr] tUe&e`R;q dh tkudkjhA

foosd ukjk;.k 'kstoydj egkikSj

?kj&?kj ls dpjk laxzg.k

txexkrs pkSjkgs

"

turk dh ijs'kkuh de djus ds fy;s pkj miuxjh; vk;qDr dk;kZy; izkajHkA

"

vfrvk/kqfud th-vkbZ-,l- esfiax iw.kZrk dh vksj A

!

uxj dh eueksgd lkt lTtk A

"

115 lM+dksa dk mUu;u (60 djksM+ :-)A

"

15 pkSjkgksa dk lkSUn;hZdj.k A

"

153 vR;ar izdk'koku gkbZekLV dh LFkkiuk A

!

Xokfy;jokfl;ksa ds xkSjo dk laj{k.k A

"

y{ehckbZ lekf/k ij v[kaM T;ksfr A

"

jk"Vªh; dcM~Mh] jk"Vªh; 'kwfVax ckWy rFkk jkT; Lrjh; ckWfDlax izfr;ksfxrk dh ijEijk izkajHkA

"

flaf/k;k xksYidi gkWdh (11 o"kZ ckn) jk"Vªh; QqVckWy izfr;ksfxrk (30 o"kZ ckn) 'kq: A

"

fot;kjkts flaf/k;k gkWdh LVsfM;e dk fuekZ.kA

ys.MfQy lkbZV izkajHk

lM+dksa dk pkSM+hdj.k o mUu;u

uxj fuxe tulEidZ foHkkx }kjk izlkfjr

lqfuf'pr is;ty

MkW- iou 'kekZ vk;qDr


RNI No.: DELBIL/2006/18344 POSTAL LICENCE: DL(C) - 14/1155/07-09

Experience Adventure-Naturally! Jharkhand beckons all adventure lovers - ride the waves or hang by a mountain cliff or just glide silently over the lush green mountains, to have the time of your life.

A new eexperience xperience DEPARTMENT OF TOURISM Government of Jharkhand, FFP Bhawan, 2nd Floor, Dhurwa, Ranchi-1, Jharkhand. Ph: +91-651-2400981, Tel Fax: +91-651-2400982

For more information, please log on to:www.jharkhandtourism.in, Seek tourism info. SMS JT to 56006, For Tourism related assistance dial + 91-651-2400501/502.

If undelivered please return to: Pravasi Today: 51, 2nd Floor, Rani Jhansi Road, Jhandewalan, New Delhi-55.


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