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VOLUME ONE

A M BE R JAC K S ON

PROFESSIONAL AND EMPLOYABILITY JOURNAL


VOLUME 1 GENERATING FASHION


TATTON PARK September 18th 2012

I do love trips. I hate travelling to these places, but when I’m there I usually love it. Tatton Hall has to be one of the most inspirational visits I have had in a long time. The house was amazing. I didn’t really care for the Biennial exhibition (maybe one or two things caught my eye, but that’s it). I have taken loads of photos of what has inspired me. I’m going to select only a few for this entry with only a very basic annotation, but I’m always willing to show my sketchbook to whoever asks to see it as there is more in there. There was a few recurring themes in the building including symmetry, gold, chinoiserie artefacts and décor. I am very excited by the symmetry idea.

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This is the only photo I managed to get of this part of the garden, but it shows the inspirational symmetry and shapes.

This dome shows some very interesting construction techniques and structure. It very easily shows me how a dome shaped garment could be supported, as well as interesting design lines.

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There were so many beautiful examples of plaster work throughout

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the house. These have given me ideas for texture, colour and motif.

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Repeat.

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BIENNIAL EXHIBITION September 18th 2012

For the third year running Tatton Hall has hosted it’s own Biennial exhibition within the grounds and house This year’s exhibition is called “Flight of Fancy”. It “explores the aeronautical history and the human urge to fly” I wasn’t very impressed with the works. They were great, but at this point I’m not sure how much will inspire my designs. That part of the project is still a while off so I’m not going to worry about that right now, I’ll just take what I can from the exhibition and see if it inspires anything further down the line.

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Fungi growing on one of the exhibitions outside. More interesting than what was on display in my opinion. Texture, shape, silhouette. Empty Nest by Hilary Jack

Cosmic Cloud by Tessa Farmer is quite interesting because every item shown within the piece is a representation of objects and living things that have gone up to space. I’m not a massive follower of space travel so I was quite surprised by some of what has been up in space. It could make for an interesting topic to research, but I’m not sure if it is what I’d want for this project.

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Pont de Singe by Olivier Grossetete I loved watching this broken display bobbing around. It was calming and I could have watched it all day. I could say that I would translate this by making a balloon skirt or dress, but that’s too predictable isn’t it? I think I will just enjoy it for what it is.

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PATTERN CUTTING MAKING A PATTERN FROM AN OBJECT

Today I experienced pattern cutting in a way I haven’t previously. We were asked to bring in an object with an interesting shape to translate it through to a f lat pattern. Most people in my group brought in rather simplistic shaped glass tumblers. I wish I had done the same. I decided to bring in a book-end in the shape of the letter “A”. I didn’t have anything else I thought, but in hindsight I could have easily used a bowl like other people had done. I could use the excuse of “I like to be different and challenge myself ” when in reality I simply didn’t think it through enough. Oh well. I still enjoyed the task. And I should have taken more photos. I get too stuck into things, but it is something I will make sure I do in future.

Why am I so negative today?

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I covered a section of my object in masking tape, overlapping the previous piece of tape each time. I then overlapped the first vertical layer by using the same technique, but this time horizontally. Once I had done this, and after a quick discussion with my tutor, I sectioned off pieces that would eventually make pattern pieces. I wanted to keep the pieces simple, but I didn’t want only 3 pieces which I could have done. Saying that, I didn’t want to over complicate it, so I added some more sections to the outer section. I added in balance notches (I suspect I did them wrong, so I will make sure I don’t do them the same again...if they were actually wrong...) I then used my craft knife to cut through the masking tape and pull the pieces off the object. So much harder than it seems, but I got there in the end. The pieces were very messy looking, but at least I got them off the object. Hooray for me.

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Here are my masking tape pieces. They look so messy, I know...

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Here they are again, but now they are stuck onto a piece of paper. I cut them out of this paper, and then proceeded to draw round them on a new piece of paper. This was to be my final pattern.

I will sometime soon use the pattern pieces on calico and make up my object in fabric form. It should be interesting and enjoyable. I think I will try this exercise again when I have a better object.

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HA-HA Bridge by Brian Fell

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YORKSHIRE SCULPTURE PARK September 29th 2012

I wasn’t too fussed about the Sculpture Park. The sculptures on display didn’t really excite me so I don’t know how much I will be inspired by the visit. As a visit just on it’s own it was enjoyable though and perhaps I will be able to use the images again another time.

In hindsight I wish I drew more, but there was so much to see that I didn’t want to miss out on perhaps seeing something that would inspire me. That didn’t happen, but I also think that if I had drawn some of the sculptures I saw it wouldn’t have made a difference to how much inspiration could be taken from them.

I did a few drawings of the Miro exhibition because photos were not allowed to be taken in the building.

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H EN RY MOOR E

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Reclining Figure: Arched Leg A very soft and almost feminine smooth shape but masculine detailing.

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Large Totem Head

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These sculptures could simply be pasted onto a figure and developed into interesting shapes

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Anthony Caro Promenade

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Is it bad that I was mostly interested in this building..?

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STREET STYLE

Basically, we had a little group project to go around Manchester and take streetstyle photographs of people. I’m not the most confident of people. I can’t see myself walking up to a stranger and asking to take their photo,so I’m glad I was put in a group with people who are able to do that. Initially we did it separately in our own time, but then we did some more as a group a few days following. We didn’t manage to categorise them as a group, so I have attempted to do it by myself here.

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URBAN CAMO

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SY N T H ET IC SH EL L

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PICK-UP-A-PARKA

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APHOTIC ANDROGOMY

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SHIRT MANIPULATION

I thought it would be really easy to just go up to a mannequin, chuck a shirt on it and pin the hell out of it. I would create something amazing and so inspired and everyone would be in awe and the Queen would present me with an MBE for my dedication to fashion. Okay, so maybe not all that, but I definitely thought it would be easy, and it was but I was so aware of everyone else’s work around me so I felt intimidated and a bit shy. After the session it turned out that a few people felt the same, so I didn’t feel like such a weirdo at the end. Anyway. I babble too much. I’m not really going to go into much detail on the creations, if any detail at all, because I tried not to think too much about the task, so what’s the point in fabricating some explanation for them now? I think that some of the stuff I managed to produce is quite good. They are something I can bounce ideas off when it comes to designing. Some...not so much, but I learned a new way not to do it, so that’s a positive look on it. I have a mannequin in my room (although not as nice as the ones in the studio) so when I feel like I have some time in my evenings and I want something productive to do, I will definitely do this task again.

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ONE

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T WO

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Nine

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THR EE

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Nine

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FOU R

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FI V E COLLABORATION

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PATTERN CUTTING BASIC BODICE BLOCK

After the shirt manipulation task I began to make a bodice block on the stand. I’ve made bodice blocks before, but they were created by f lat pattern making, which I enjoy but it was interesting to try it on the stand.

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Finished block pieces ready to trace on to fabric and sewn up.

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PLATT HALL October 4t h 2012

As a fashion designer in the making, I need to be able to research in a certain way - in the most productive way. We have been given numerous sheets and books to read regarding research, and one of the big parts of the research is looking at historical and generic garments, and to look at the detailing, shape, structure. It is then these elements that we can pick up on and place them onto our designs. I really enjoyed my visit to Platt Hall. It was a decent size building with a good collection. I have heard that you can book in to see the archives as they can’t show everything, so there may be some amazing things that I haven’t seen yet. That is something to keep in mind for future projects. I took more photos than drawings, because I have a bad habit of doing that which I am slowly getting out of.

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The architectural details within the building were just so beautiful that I appreciated them just as much as I did the costume.

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FIRST CUT EXHIBITION Susan Cutts Just ignore that they are made from paper - it cheapens it a bit for me. Just imagine them in beautiful colours and fabrics.They look so delicate. I quite like them, but if it were my work I would improve them and push them into something wearable.

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SHIRT CONSTRUCTION WORKSHOP

And why do I always forget to take photographs? Sadly because of my incompetence with cameras I will have to explain this part with the use of this diagram on the right. I have started to make a basic women’s skirt to fit a size 12. This task is to help with both machine techniques as well as learning about the construction of a shirt as we will need to refer to it somehow in our final garment. The diagram on the right shows the layout of the pattern pieces to make the least fabric waste possible. If I take nothing from this workshop other than the importance of good pattern layout, then I’m happy. However, I’m sure I’ll take more than that. These workshops will continue for a few weeks...and I’m going to try and take photographs as I go along, but I get too stuck into things, so let’s not hold our breath.

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GROUP TUTORIAL - LOUISE ADKINS ONE

In all honesty I didn’t quite know what to expect from a tutorial at university level. I’ve had group tutorials during my foundation year, but it felt different. This tutorial had much more honest feedback which, although at the time made me feel a bit rubbish, really will help. Someone else in my group wrote my notes down for me as Louise was giving me feedback, so I have included a scanned image of those them, as well as another sheet that Louise wrote as she was talking.

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WHITE ON WHITE

The inspiration for my white colour palette has come from the plaster work on the ceilings at Tatton Hall It is a very interesting palette for me to work with. I normally work with dark colours, vibrant colours, clashing colours. So white is going to be a nice, fresh approach for me and I feel very excited about it.

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I am looking at different tones of white, and challenging what is white really? For instance, look at this example by Rodarte. The first impression by most people I think is that it is a white collection, but of course it isn’t because it is blue/grey and cream. I think it is the paleness that gives it that effect to me.

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Because of white being such a pure and non-fussy palette to work with, I am able to venture into a variety of textures and fabrics in a way that it is unlikely to be over-the-top if they were put together. It still means that I will be selective and considerate when looking at fabrics.

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TAILORING

I am looking at tailored garments. I don't want to look at boring, predictable, suit-type tailoring. I want to look at something exciting and new to really make me think outside of the box. I came across a designer I have never heard of before, Belle Sauvage. I think she is brilliant. If you have the time, go look at her stuff on her website belle-sauvage.co.uk

I also came across some more (perhaps) well known collections.

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BELLE SAUVAGE

FALL/WINTER 2012

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SPRING/SUMMER 2013

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JEAN-CHARLES DE CASTELBAJAC

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SPRING/SUMMER 2013

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I love the shoulders in this collection, the use of so many different colours and patterns. I think it really is great, and I will possibly look a bit more into transparent/plastic fabrics to further my white colour palette.

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WORTH COUTURE

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FALL/WINTER 2012

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I thought this was a good example to bring together my white-on-white palette and the tailoring research. It is quite theatrical, perhaps too theatrical for my tastes at the moment, but I still think it is a great collection because of the colour, so the designs allow for a variety of fabrics to come into play.

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SKIRT BLOCK

Same techniques as the bodice block but this time I used calico to make the shape rather than Stitch and Tear.

FRONT

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BACK

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Finished block ready to trace on fabric and sew up

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She struggles with superficiality of fashion despite having the ability and an affinity with it. She has always looked for something deeper through humanity, anthropology and the spaces and environments our bodies inhabit.

Dr ANNIE SHAW SEAMLESS KNITTING

Looks for meaning through making and materiality. She is keen in three-dimensional in a broad sense. Here are my notes from the lecture today. I thought it was a very good presentation and I am impressed with Annie’s research.

She rejects celebrity and trend-driven fashion. She believes that designers have a responsibility to drive originality through research and practice. She is interested in new technologies driving change which challenge the endless and mindless reinvention within fashion. She believes that all new design should be explored in a post-sustainable way because fashion is at the forefront of generating stuff we don’t need. She is interested in collaboration, interdisciplinary, curated consumption of design, experience design and design as a community. PHD Research Looking back to look forward Technology vs craft Hand knitting vs machine knitting Old vs new Fast vs slow All design has a context and culture in which it lives. She isn’t interested in fast fashion, so she looked at slowing things down.

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Looked at garments from the past. They weren’t thrown away. They were made with love and care and mended with love and care. Generic fashion is usually from an occupational source, military, functional, cultural. She looked at gansys as they are seamlessly knitted. Primitive clothing was made up of squares, triangle, rectangles, rather than the patterns we’re used to. Emotional investment – You won’t chuck it away. A solution is to have less, wellmade and you will appreciate it more. She went on to look at The Scottish Fisheries Museum and the Cromer museum to look at fishermen work clothes from the past. She used a computerised knitting machine that can seamlessly knit a sweater in around 20 minutes. She used this to make many miniature gansys (I can’t remember the exact number...) to experiment with. She used many techniques:Rubber dipping Washing in the sea Washing I the river Deep fried (a connection to fast food and fast clothes) Decorated Embellished Felting Cut and Sew Fair Isle Found decoration Sailor’s collars Using images of makers She went on to exhibit these gansys in many places, even to China

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Inspire yourself. Inspiration can be found anywhere. You have to live your inspiration. Get inside a designer’s head for their process and their inspiration, not for their end product. 97


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BALLOONS

I was very interested in the sunken balloon in the lake at Tatton Hall. This was picked up on at my tutorial, so I have done a bit of research into balloon inspired garments.

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“BALLOON COUTURE” BY REI HOSOKAI

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ANTONIO BERARDI FALL/WINTER 2008

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LAN VIN

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I don’t know how much further this will go, but I don’t want to venture too far into this part of the research because there is only so much out there...and I can’t even blow up balloons so there’s not much in the way of experimenting that I can personally do.

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GROUP TUTORIAL - LOUISE ADKINS TWO

This time round I had a few more strands of research - White on White, Balloons, Tailoring, Shells. Presenting my sketchbook to the group was much easier during this tutorial because of the new research I have. And Louise is right about needing to draw to see what you’re looking at...so I’m getting into the swing of drawing in public..

Louise has said that I could be designing next week. I’m not sure if I feel confident enough to do that because this is a new level of working, so I will have to be ready.

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MANCHESTER MUSEUM SHELLS

It was suggested in my tutorial that I go to the Manchester Museum to look at the shell collection they have there. I thought that the museum had a good variety of other objects so it is definitely a place where I will go for research on future projects. I have tried to draw a variety of different shells for shape and texture. I don’t think there is much more I can say about these. They have defiantly inspired me and it was a very worthwhile afternoon.

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MANCHESTER MUSEUM

Museums can be pretty boring really can’t they? Similar to grand estates where it is almost like once you’ve seen one you’ve seen them all. But I do still enjoy them. For this visit as well as looking at shells for my project research I looked at the butterf ly and moth collections. More for my own enjoyment than for anything else. I won’t dip into this too much for now because I may pick up on it again for another project, but I just thought they are very beautiful to look at. Turns out that most of what I thought were butterf lies ended up being moths...so I should read the information labels more!

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SHOP R EPORT

I wasn’t sure what a shop report was before doing my own. I had a few ideas of what I could do. Learning from other people’s experiences I decided not to go into shops and take photos because shop people really don’t like that...so instead I went to the shops, got an idea of what the garments looked like, and then copied the image off the shop websites. My drawings don’t show the colour, and you can’t see the texture of the fabric, but I thought a f lat drawing was better than a copy and pasted photograph as it gives me a chance to improve an area of drawing that will be needed in the future, as well as giving me an idea of the construction.

I looked specifically at shirts, or shirt related garments and picked out a select few. I looked in a variety of high street shops. Here are a few of my pages.

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It won’t inform my design, apart from maybe some idea of construction. My designs won’t be like these, I would like to get a bit more creative than this level. I suppose it just gives me an idea of what is out there right now, so I don’t relate to it as much as possible...

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BODICE BLOCK ADJUSTMENT

So I got round to sewing up my bodice. I noticed a few dodgey parts around the neckline and the hem. During the pattern cutting workshop this afternoon I managed to get my bodice onto a stand and really see where I had gone wrong.

I cut the hem after drawing a line on the stand where the waist is. I would now say the waist doesn’t have a seam allowance on it, so I have noted that it needs to be re-added. I have also noted that my front neckline needs to be elongated by 1cm, and the back neckline needs to be reduced by 0.5cm.

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BE F OR E

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AFTER

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All of these notes have been added onto my block. If time allows me I will re-make the bodice to these new measurements. If not, I will do it towards the end of term because I think it is important to practise and to fix where I have gone wrong.

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Different kinds of research

ALISON WELSH

Fabric Research – Trade fairs, Fabric shops, recycling Pattern Cutting – Historical pattern books Old Garments – Not to copy from, but as a starting point Museums – So many to visit Measurements – Use existing garments to inform you Detail Mood – Images Concepts Colour Competitors – Awareness of what others are doing and what has already been done

RESEARCH FOR FASHION DESIGN

We had a lecture from Alison Welsh about how to research well. Great lecture I thought. It was interesting, inspiring and made me think about how I can research for successful design. It is a bit late to apply this to my current project, but it was still very helpful and it will no doubt change how I research for the next project.

Collect evidence of your research in a sketchbook – Use it to develop design ideas. Be as selective as possible – Don’t use everything! It all needs to compliment each other.

Fabric Research

What is new? What is different? What comes through from previous seasons? What is right for you? What are you interested in?

Get to know suppliers

Who is making it? The cost? Can you order it? How long will it take? Is it a British manufacturer/supplier?

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You need to understand fabrics:

Old Garments Platt Hall website. Find good quality, clear inspirational images. Draw from real, vintage garments to learn proportions. You can photograph and trace. (It is important you learn to draw garments as they are. Market level is irrelevant – all fashion companies will need these drawings!) Photograph details

What is the weight of the fabric? What is the fibre construction? What is the fabric type? Can you get samples/lengths? An you dye it?

Build a fabric sketchbook to help expand your knowledge. Use the facts above within the book. Do you need to test out the fabrics? Try out experiments before you design as part of the research process.

Costume museums Plat Hall The V&A Specialist museums Bath

Don’t buy for colour – Go for weight and qualities! You can change the characteristics of a fabric through washing, dying etc.

Get appointments to see the archives Do observational drawings to see how it hangs on the body, and to learn how to draw the garment type and fabric.

Pattern Cutting

Use the library – there are loads of pattern cutting books throughout the decades.

Use second hand garments from charity shops Use your own garments or a friend’s Use old items passed down in the family Avoid contemporary

Which pattern cutting books are right for your specialism? Are there books you need to buy? What is in the library? Do you need to order books in?

Measurements Chest measurements for scale and proportions Pocket size and placement Cuff/collar measurements Construction information Placement information

Analysis existing clothes for hang, cut and construction. - Understanding fit is important. Create a personal book list – Put into sketchbook where relevant.

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Mood

Use words Find images to inspire your mood Images that can explain the mood to other people To explain context for your garments. To understand the type of customer that would wear your clothes. Where would they wear them? Shots of their home, work place. Get to know the customer – Understanding the company/customer is fundamental It is best not to start with images of fashion

Concepts

It is an idea to work in teams I order to get ideas out

Colour

Find an image to inform your colour story.

Competitors

Which designers are producing garments similar to the ones you are planning to design. Know names of the company, band, line name, the range. Annotate this in your sketchbook. Where are the stores that stock the garments to you are interested in? Who is stocking the lines that interest you the most? Where can you see clothes like yours? Which labels are of interest to you and why? Make sure you are very selective! What you select is you. Collect things that will inspire you Present well Use own imagery where you can Lay everything out Put in sketchbook and use it – Draw next to it, draw on top of it!

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Make sure you are very selective!

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KNITWEAR INDUCTION

I was one of the 12 applicants to do the knitting workshops with Dr Annie Shaw. I have been interested in knitwear for some time and the facilities at the university are brilliant, and they are what pushed me to come to the course.

MY STATEMENT

Currently in my personal design work I seem to be looking at oversized garments, usually sweaters and men-style overcoats. I can easily see it as a knitwear prominent collection. I also want to work with the idea of traditional knitting styles, but really making something new with them. We’ve all come across the fair-isle sweaters that are still going strong this year. I want to take that and change the patterns almost, or make the colours more vibrant, but not acidy. My Grandma knits, my Mum knits and so do my sisters and myself (well, I can do scarves...but that’s about it so far). None of us have done anything exciting with it so far, and I know that being able to be part of the knitting group would allow me to get creative with what I have been surrounded by my whole life. I would love, love, love to be considered for the induction. The knitwear opportunities that this course offers was one of the biggest factors for me choosing this university. Knitwear is something that I love to be surrounded by and now I really want to be able to take my design vision to a new level that I have not yet been able to.

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Domestic machine Machine knitting isn’t the easiest of things in the world. We told from the very start that we would need patience. And I most certainly needed patience during the first workshop. I couldn’t knit a single row. I didn’t ask for help because I knew I needed to learn, and it wasn’t until I got home and looked on YouTube that I realised I had threaded the machine wrong. So, I went back a few days later and did it properly, and I actually got somewhere!

The pieces came undone multiple time, laddered, knotted up...but it was such a good feeling to actually make something with the machine. I will get better at it and learn new techniques, one step at a time.

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Dubied machine The next workshop was using the big, scary looking machines. Ones I have never encountered before this course. They have 2 beds on them and there are so many different techniques you can use on them. I was more intimated by this machine than the other one (if you saw it, you would understand) but it actually turned out to be so, so much easier to use. Well, it was for my group anyway. We managed to make 3 samples (one each) and we only made a mistake once. I am very proud of us. Go Team!

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I don’t think I will have anymore knit workshops as such, but I am now allowed to go into the knit room and use both the domestic machines and the dubied machines. There are folders and drawers of loads of techniques to learn on the machines and it is going to be my side project to get as many done as I can!

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FABRIC SOURCING

It is important to know the qualities of fabrics because different weights and fibre contents can sometimes restrict garment construction and also the end result. Because of this we were encouraged to select, or at least start to source fabrics we may use for this project as well as others. Because my colour palette is white and the fabric shop in the university only really sells white fabric I didn’t have to venture out too far. For future projects this will not necessarily be the case. I will eventually build up a fabric book.

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CUSTOMER PROFILE

To keep a design range looking as it should a designer should have a person in mind when they are designing - call it a muse or whatever. My customer has come from my white on white research I did a little while ago. A woman who likes to dress feminine, and has dignity with how she dresses. As for the rest of it I just had fun with it. I did my board pretty much as I went along but I think the whole idea works well and it is certainly someone who I would like to design for at this stage. It could all change in 3 months...

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I have compiled my favourite pieces of research together to create two design boards that work as one. It is important that I don’t get bogged down with too many images so it was

DESIGN BOARD

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important for me as an individual to work in this way.

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Over the course of a weekend we were asked to design at least 20 garments. This isn’t as big of a deal as it might sound because I like designing lots and given a target makes it easier.

DESIGNS

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Although to be honest I don’t know what they are expecting so I’m a bit nervous about designing....

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DESIGN FEEDBACK ROBIN KERR AND ELENOR WHITE

Well...that didn’t go so well! I think my worrying about what is expected hindered my designs quite a lot and it was something that was picked up on. I also didn’t push the ideas enough, and there are possible design constraints. I totally agree with what was said though - I did spent too much time trying to make everything look “right” and neat instead of really getting into it. Thank god they liked my rough designs though! I feel at my best when I’m designing quickly so I’m pleased that they don’t disapprove of me working like that, so that’s how I will continue. They agreed to let me work on big sleeves using a knitting technique that reminds me of shells, but they want me to go big! We shall see how this pans out.... I managed to develop a design a bit further in the lesson, and also find out constraints with knitting it. I will develop this on more in the next few days so I can crack on with my pattern.

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NEW DESIGN IDEAS

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After a few days to clear my head I started working on my new design ideas. I’ll be honest and say they only took me about a hour or so to do the whole lot, but they are the best so far!


I will be developing a few on even further to create a line up,and I think my final design idea will come from that task. Feeling positive now.

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DESIGN PROBLEM SOLVING

I like to figure out what I’m doing before I do it, especially if it is something technical. I have never made my own sleeves before. Skirts yes, PLENTY of skirts, but never sleeves. There isn’t much more to say about this as I hope my excellent and technically drawn to scale diagrams will show you what I’m thinking.

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ALISON WELSH RESEARCH AND DEVEOPMENT OF DESIGN IDEAS

How to use a sketchbook to develop ideas through research

Ideas – It can take time for ideas to come Where do they come from? Your imagination – Push it! Use moments. Discussion – Collect ideas. Build on them. Through primary research – You can draw anywhere, any time. Museums. Reading – Read the right literature. Understand business. Shops. Books. Exhibitions.

What size are you comfortable with? What is a sketchbook? Somewhere to sketch – How much drawing in your book/How much research. It is not a scrapbook! Draw as much as you can. Once you have collected some research start to design next to it. On same page, on top, around it so research and ideas are one.

Get ideas down on paper to clear your head – It helps to explain it to others.

Lots of space for your ideas.

How to develop an idea

No such thing as a wrong idea.

Go through the “messy” phase. Testing. Push every detail. Think in fabrics. Be free. Experimental. Try out ideas based on your research.

Use your sketchbook to contain:Design ideas. Research. Workings out. Testing. Thinking. Pushing your design ideas. Resolving problems. Planning. Use your research to inspire NEW design ideas!

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Use your research. Work out new ideas based on your research. Be selective. Use colour and form. Combine your research images with your design drawings.


Workings out Messy is good initially. Use colour, collage, paint, felt pens etc. Practise. Experiment. Use your research. Work out colours – Layering.

Plan ranges. Draw it carefully.

A sketchbook is essential for the development of your design ideas A good drawing leads to good design.

Testing Find a good pose to draw from. Find something similar to what you’re drawing. Begin to draw things threedimensionally. Be creative – folds draping. Drawing from people. Completely develop every ideas. Thinking Use books to inform and inspire. Draw from all angles. Pushing your ideas Think through ideas in detail. Measurements. Include photographs. Draw on top of your photographs. Take risks. Resolving problems Find more research to solve your problems. What will it measure? How will you cut it? Where will the fabric come from? SOLVE ALL PROBLEMS BEFORE PATTERN CUTTING Use sketchbook to solve problems. Planning Plan how you are going to cut the pattern. Plan how you are going to make it. Plan what it will look like. Plan a photographic session.

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GROUP TUTORIAL - LOUISE ADKINS THR EE

This is only my third tutorial as I missed the last one, but I already feel like I’ve gotten so much from them! Louise is an angel and everyone is the group are so helpful - without them I would be totally clueless. Anyway, the notes are on the next page. There isn’t much more to add onto that.

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FINISHED SHIRT

And guess who forgot to document this... As you can see this is a white shirt. Similar to the ones you can buy in shops, but with many more mistakes on it. I thought I did okay considering this wasn’t the easiest of garments. And the mistakes aren’t major. It doesn’t hang correctly and the top stitching is awful on the underside. But I made it, and I am very proud of myself. I now think that if I can make this, I can make my final piece.

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SLEEVES

So we’ve started toiling, and I thought it would make the most sense if I started figuring out the sleeves full scale. As I didn’t really know how big the sleeve would turn out from the pattern I made I decided to make the massive one as well as a sleeve at normal length. I think I prefer the larger one however I’m not sure if the direction I seem to be going into will look right with the sleeve. This is what I get for continually developing until possibly the end...

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Comparison between massive sleeve and normal sized sleeve.

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GROUP TUTORIAL - LOUISE ADKINS FOUR

Everyone in the group is more or less ready to design our line up, and I am defiantly ready to start! I have a few ideas of what I would out with the designs that I already have done and now is the time to put them together. And make them neat! So they actually look like clothes and not the scribbles I’ve been doing since I was 8!

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INITIAL DESIGN LINE UP

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OWT AND ZOE HITCHEN

In a few weeks we are going to be having a workshop for either a digital magazine or a fashion film, and then we will present our next project in this way. This lecture was an introduction of what is to be expected from each workshop and so it will help us make a decision. Going into the lecture I thought I would definitely want to do a film. Not sure why, but I was so sure. Coming out of the lecture I was leaning more towards the digital magazine. So never go with you first instinct. Unless you should. It’s all so confusing.

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OWT CREATIVE Started off as a side project, but now works in many disciplinaries but is most known for it’s “zines”. What will be done in the workshop is either an online magazine or a small website to showcase our work.

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ZOE HITCHEN Worked at SHOWStudio as first assistant to Nick Knight. Now works for herself and her debut film was for Charlie le Mindu’s colletion.

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DESIGN PROBLEMS

I have hit a bit of a snag in my design idea. Basically, I do not feel confident enough anymore to use knit in this project. It is a practice that I do literally need to practice before I will be able to use it. I will go to the knit room in my free time to build up my skills so that I may be able to use knit in the future. Now back to the thinking board...

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NEW FINAL DESIGN

So...the knitting didn’t work out, and so I feel like the sleeve are kind of pointless without the texture on them. I’ve looked back at my line up to choose another, and this one has my attention now. It is rather simple, but it has a pure essence to it that I think will ref lect well. As for the time left to make this I don’t think it will be a problem, and so I think this is the way forward.

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TOILE

As with everything I do, I need to start taking photos of the processes. Now because I don’t have those photos I can only show the final toile. I will learn one day.

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GROUP TUTORIAL - LOUISE ADKINS FIVE

My final tutorial for this project and it was a very quick one as Louise could see I was finishing my final piece at the time. The feedback was very encouraging and I don’t have much in the list of what I need to do, so I may even have some time to add in extras.

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FINAL LINE UP

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FINAL PIECE

I am quite happy with how the garment has turned out and I think it is because of the fabric I’ve used - the cotton is light enough to move f luidly but the gathered hem is heavy enough to keep the shape.

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FINAL GARMENTS FASHION FILM

It was decided that we would show off our final garments a little differently to previous years by having a fashion film made instead. I didn’t have much input into it because I wouldn’t have been much help. I couldn’t even make the shoot due to hospital appointments, but everyone did so well! The film was shown at The Vault in the Northern Quarter. It was a nice atmosphere and I think it was a massive sigh of relief from everyone!

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DIGITAL MAGAZINE WORKSHOP WITH JON HANNAN

I am into my magazines, and I do enjoy the odd digital one but I never thought I’d be able to make one. But I’ll tell you what, they are bloody easy to put together (hence this journal being made into one...) and they are very fun! I will not go into the technical stuff because I have forgotten how I do things on the program and I’m just able to do it out of habit now. We were given a list of designers to look at and I chose Holly Fulton because I really enjoy her designs and I thought I could create some nice pages with her work. I was very happy with how it turned out, and it is now online with everyone else’s (whose also look amazing!)

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FEEDBACK

So Generating Fashion is all done now so my feedback session is the last time I want to hear anything of it! But it turned out alright in the end. In our discussion Louise mentioned similar things that I have put in my self evaluation form, and she also made a good point and said I need to look at more contemporary designers. Which is true, I do get stuck in the past too often!

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Sarah Easom has worked on/with:-

SARAH EASOM

Fashion Fringe Roksanda Ilincic The Foundling Museum Julie Vaehoeven Jane Bourvis Freelance projects and future plans Teaches at the V&A and Central Saint Martins Themes in her work:Pure and Trashy Enginering Design Illusion with trims Identity – Didn’t want the same fabric as anyone else so she makes her own fabric Uses a lot of pattern pieces – 600 pattern pieces to create one dress Fabric manipulation to look like a print when it isn’t Vintage fabrics and unusual fabrics Not meant to be tasteful, but conservatory tasteful Ticking all the boxes (Wants to prove she can do anything in her collections) Uses outside people to make sure everything is done on time Collage Femininity encased – Nothing revealing, something fun – Not taking itself too seriously. Consideration of application Inspired by Warhol, Dali, Surrealism Always needs to be something different Wearble pieces,but it depends on the personality

Sarah Easom is one of our tutors on the fashion course aswell as doing numerous other things and during this lecture she has talked about her work.

Work with Julie Verhoeven – Assistant What you learn in fashion can be used in different disciplinary Need a taste level to select.

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SARAH’S MA SHOW

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FASHION FRINGE 2009

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ALEX RUSSELL DIGITAL PRINT Works on print, illustration and trend books, and has worked on set design. Has been interested in working digitally and his current work involves a lot of coding and using computer programs to create interesting and unique patterns. Went straight into an MA after her BA but he thinks he should have waited and got some experience first. Now teaches at MMU. Worked in Belgium for may years as a freelancer and then Premier Vision got interested. He was then on their books and managed to wok for Levi’s for 7 seasons as well as many other companies on all brand levels. Large companies usually have in house print designers but also buy in. Smaller companies usually buy in. Brands ether buy in finished designs for around £400, or commission deigns where the price can go higher than finished designs.

Tips

Have good digital skills Clients prefer Illustrator or vector files Put pattern on end use as it is better for the clients

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JASON HUGHES STYLING AND FASHION CONSULTANCY

jasonhughes.info julianwatsonagency.com

some sort of fantasy but it has to be grounded. Presenting the current trends but stll looking forward. Doesn’t like fussy. Things need to look expensive. The language of clothing is important. Clothes need to exist off the catwalk!

BA at LJM Fashion ad textiles. Mainly constructed textiles. However, he explored things outside of fashion. MA Fashion Women’s Wear at Central Saint Martins

The process for a styling job takes around 2 weeks:Discuss ideas Develop and research as individuals Bring ideas together Prepare individually Work in the team to decide on hair, make-up,model. Sometimes includes a casting director.

Assisted stylist Nancy Rohde for a year and then Edward Enninful at I.D magazine. It is difficult to become a stylist right after graduating. You need the contacts to get the models, clothes, make-up and hair to create a fashion story. Fashion is an enclosed industry. You need to network to get the contacts.

Everything is planned!

A stylist has a book which is a portfolio. This changes constantly as it represents the stylist. He is interested in pop music and youth culture. A fusion of music, culture and travel shows through into his work. No story comes from fashion. It normally starts with art, a building, a music video, an article in a magazine etc. He doesn’t like things to look like they are in the past as “it is suffocating”. He likes modernness. You have to create

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Clothes need to exist off the catwalk!

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Amber Jackson Journal Volume One