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Write Now Summer 2010 • Produced by high school students enrolled in Newspaper2 training camp at Cal State Long Beach.

See page 3 www.newspaper2online.com

aspiring

Journalists

By Meghan Legg, Saadia Nur, Pritika Kumar

High school journalism students, designers, and advisers gathered at the newspapers2 workshop for a week of instruction on building and improving their high school newspapers. “The workshop is really inspiring. I already see changes we can make to our school paper,” Brennen Jacobsen teaches Samantha Thomas how to create audio Hye Sun Kim, Sunny Hills High slides. The workshop aims to improve journalistic techniques of student reporters across the state. School senior, said. This workshop, started eight where students focus on the layout ers wanted a place to be trained and years ago, offers a variety of classes such as Editors I, a beginners’ of the newspaper, and the Multime- bring their students,” Konnie Krisclass, and Editors II, a class for the dia class, which is geared toward lock, owner and co-director, said. Each class learns through lecmore experienced editors. Other putting newspapers online. “There was a need. Most advis- tures but also first-hand. classes offered are Media Design,

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All in the code By Jessica Kwok, Reetika Singh

Konnie Krislock

Discussing the rights and responsibilities of scholastic journalism, Konnie Krislock, co-director of Newspapers2, lectured high school students at CSULB on Aug. 11. Krislock aims to educate students about their rights when dealing with administration and censorship. “Without an accurate student voice, the administrators can do anything and get away with it,” Krislock said. “I want you [students] to be accurate, correct and consistent because you deserve the rights.”

Students such as Saddia Nur, sophomore at Sunny Hills High School, were enlightened by Krislock’s speech as they learned about rights they did not know that they had. “It’s good to know I have rights to produce what I want in the pages and be backed by [California] Ed. Code 48907, [which allows students in California public high schools to have the right to exercise the freedom of speech],” Nur said. As a part of a journalism code to follow, students cannot print obscenity in their newspapers because it is not good human behavior and not professional journalism behavior, Krislock says.

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FEATURE Circuit Breaking Blogger Shares Insight Tony Pierce introduces students to the everchanging blogosphere. By Alana Victor, Leanna Bishop, and Nancy Herrera

Shocking the students of newspapers2 with his high voltage personality, L.A. Times blogger, Tony Pierce shed a new light on the ‘blogosphere.’ Although he admitted “most blog writers are losers in pajamas sitting in their basements,” he wanted to spread the word that there are still “some really good blogs” out there. Pierce explained the road leading to his job while telling the students how important it is for them to start their own blogs as a way to develop their own journalistic careers. Blogging can be about anything or used to spread any message. Pierce explained that this begins by simply sitting down to a computer and writing. Practicing writing everyday stimulates a part of the brain and gets the mind moving. However, he has developed this passion into a career, starting his

Leanna Bishop/ Write Now

Pierce shows his electric side by posing by a fuse box. first blog with the simple words “just saw ‘Rush Hour 2’ don’t rush out to see it” and progressing by creating a fictional blog to impress girls. He now works as a blog editor for the L.A. Times where he is constantly working to boost the status of the world of blogging and its credibility.

During the presentation, Pierce encouraged the students to do things that would put them out of their comfort zone. Doing this would make them uncomfortable or nervous and this, as Pierce would say, “gets you ready for game time.” Even in the world of blogging journalistic integrity should remain; this includes owning up to mistakes. “If you treat things seriously and own up to it when you’re wrong, people will come back to you and come when it matters,” Pierce said. When it comes to news, people would rather have a source, such as the LA Times, that admits their mistakes and shows honesty and reliability in their product, according to Pierce. While writing for the L.A. Times blog, Pierce has broken the stereotypical blogging stream by incorporating his personal touch to connect with his audience. Pierce is an writer who is inventing the ‘blogospher’ in the hopes of influencing the next generation of journalists, writers, bloggers, and editors to join him the future.

newspapers2 attendees 2010 Students: Jennifer Horowitz Kimberly Aragon Meghan Legg Mia Agraviador Pritika Kumar Griselda Acosta Priscilla Peralta Christina Ko Brittnay Murray Karley Kemble Jessica Goston Eric Orr Daniel Becker Joshua Min Sally Hwang

Saadia Nur Jamie Hwang Claire Song Josephine Lien Brittany Tsou Robert Hwang Reetika Sighn Jessica Kwok Charlotte Anderson Elyse Werksman Sarkis Ekmekian Laney Paulson McKenna Bulkley Erika Alcala Karla Rodriguez Sonia Chou

Saba Tauqir Frankie Sakamoto Nancy Herrera Alana Victor Bianca Botello Leanna Bishop Brendan Jackson Madeline Perrault Quinn Western Noelle Lovgren Ritu Ghiya Hye Sun Kim Judy Jun Julia Win Celine Ison Rachel Greenberg

Maddy Perault Laz Villa Alyssa Alvarez Myia Dickens Jessica Chavez Nusheen Goshtashi Marc Eddy Jeff Mirosavich Kelli Kosaka GiYoung Choi Kelsey Chung Andrea Arrellano Jordan Batti Courtney Chatoian Joshua Rojas Saima Faheem

Saima Nur Eliot Park Esther Hwang Christina Gaines Samantha Thomas Brennan Jacobsen Laura Bauer Wesley Wu

Advisers: Karnsten Barnes John Rodiguez Adriana Chavira Jamie Whitmarsh Jeffrey Berry Jessica Young Gene Dean Pat Geil Donn Cottom Linda Davenport Lindsay Safe Rebecca Chai Matt Lipeles Antoinia Guzman Dot Cannon


Feature

By Priscilla Peralta

S

Magnifying Life

truggling with a magnifying glass to read a document, Diane Taylor, administrative support assistant for student life and development, battles with permanent eye problems. Born at Long Beach Memorial Hospital, Taylor and her twin sister Darlene’s already-troubled vision deteriorated when doctors missed a procedural step. “When you put a baby in a incubator you need to put patches on her eyes and with us, they did not and that caused our eye problems to go from bad to worse,” Taylor said. The girls’ parents did not realize how severe their

daughters’ conditions were until a teacher pointed it out to them. “My teacher told my parents something was wrong because we held the paper right in front of our eyes,” Taylor said. Seeking hope, Taylor tried Lasik Eye Surgery six years ago, but the procedure did not improve her vision. Her eye problems still make everyday things a challenge. “It’s difficult to read small print, and getting a driver’s license was a challenge,” Taylor said. Even though she has been challenged all her life,

“It’s a struggle but I have no complaints and am living life”

Taylor has learned to cope them and live a normal life. “It’s a struggle but I have no complaints and am living life,” Taylor said. Today, babies are double-checked to have

patches or goggles in incubators so they will not have to face the same situation that the Taylor twins faced.

From highschool to highchair The struggles and accomplishments that a local pregnant teenager faces By Kimberly Aragon, Jenn Horowitz, and Meghan Legg

Every 16-year-old wants a car for iheir birthday. Karla Morales got a baby. She had the perfect set up: good job, good grades and a devoted boyfriend. A brown-eyed, curly-haired daughter was not supposed to be part of the mix. Six months ago, Morales, and her boyfriend of three years, conceived baby Angie mid-way through their junior year at Reid High in Long Beach. “Some people said, ‘You should have waited,’” she said. “I certainly didn’t plan on getting knocked-up, but I’m not gonna complain. Angie is now part of my life, and I will work with what I’ve got.”

“I certainly didn’t plan on getting knockedup, but I’m not gonna’ complain.

Since the birth, Morales, who works as a server at Sbarro, has changed her schedule to work full time, in order to support Angie’s financial needs. “It’s really hard because of the money. I have to balance work, school and now baby,” she said. Although her parents are disappointed, they now support Morales, and her cur-

rent lifestyle. They even offer to babysit the baby when Morales is working. Morales hopes to graduate high school, and enroll in Cerritos Community College to become a cosmetologist. “I’ve always liked makeup and hair. I saw my mom deal with Mary Kay, and have been inspired ever since. And it certainly can’t hurt being beautiful!” she said. In the future, Morales looks forward to opening her own beauty shop. In the meantime, her first priority continues to be raising Angie. “It’s my life, and I feel as though I have succeeded with my current altercations” Morales said.


FEATURE

FEATURE

Teacher’s aide shares her passion for science with elementary students. By: Josephine Lien, Daniel Becker, Claire Song

“Say ‘park’ backward!” “KRAP, KRAP, KRAP!” Kristine Atia overhears some amusing conversations while working at the young scientists’ camp this summer at California State University Long Beach. “The kids are really fun, I don’t know what they will say,” Atia said. “Everyday is different.” Atia teaches basic science to her group of fifth and sixth graders, trying to keep the subject exciting. “They’re putting on a mock trial dealing with the oil spill between the U.S. government and B.P. (British Petro-

leum),” Atia said. “They will each have their own lawyers and heads of both sides. “ Up until her second year of college, Atia was less than enthusiastic about science. However, it being a mandatory college course initiated an unexpected fascination. “It’s actually really fun once you get past the lectures and the notes,” Atia said. Having taught for three years and continues to during her Master’s Degree, it is safe to say that her initial hatred for science has disintegrated. “I think a lot of people are afraid of science,” Atia said. “But if you give it a chance, it’s not so scary.”

student spotlights By: Rachel Greenberg

While Newspapers2 students enjoy lunch, Saba Tauqir (12) is forgoing her midday meal while focusing on assigned tasks. Why? Because this Wednesday marked the beginning of Ramadan, in which Muslims fast to Saba Tauqir observe the traditions. “We fast so we can relate to people who don’t have enough food to survive,” Tauqir said. Though fasting during Ramadan is not obligatory until age 13, Tauqir began fasting at six, viewing it as a family activity. Despite her persistent hunger, Tauqir still takes advantage of her time at the workshop. “I’ve learned how to be more patient with others,” she said. “It was fun being with students from all over California and getting out of the bubble that is Irvine.”

Passion, persistence and patience. These are the magic words that lead to success, according to music junkie Jim Villanueva.

CODE

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“Why alienate the people that you [as students] are trying to write for? Why alienate them by using bad language?” Krislock said. “[Journalists] write at a higher level.” Another part of the code is that journalists cannot libel, or misrepresent damagingly, anyone without proof.

Although long-time reporter, Stefanie Frith, has never commited a crime, she has been to jail numerous times to report on life behind bars.

student spotlights By: Madeline Perrault

By: Mia Agraviador

When Jenn Horowitz, 14, started fencing, she had no idea she would become the naI started fencing because when tion’s best feI was 9, my brother Charlie’s famale fencer of vorite hobby became hitting me. the Y14 age diBeing able to wield a weapon vision. gave me strength and power.” “I started -Jenn Horowitz fencing because when I was 9, my brother‘s favorite hobby was hitting me, “ Jones said. “Wielding a weapon gave me strength.” This feeling drove Horowitz to pursue fencing. “I placed at my first tournament and continued to rack up trophies,” she said. Horowitz increased her practice to 24 hours a week, becoming national champion of her age group.

Mayfield Senior School junior, Alana Victor, traveled across the world changing lives last April. Victor and ten of her classmates visited the Sprouting Knowledge Orphanage (SKO) in Battambang, a province in Cambodia. There, the volunteers used their Alana Victor fundraising money toward buying cots, water purifiers, school uniforms, and meals for the 25 orphans. While they were there, Victor and her peers helped the children with their English. Victor, the creator of "Project Cambodia, advocates that spreading the word and building interest will make such a difference. "Any help is appreciated" says Victor. “Even being pen pals with the kids can be a huge help.”

By: Mia Agraviador

Staring out of the airplane window, Pritika Kumar was in a swirl of mixed emotions while landing at LAX. “I was sad, hapI was sad, happy, excited, depy, excited, pressed and tired all at the same depressed time” and tired -Prikita Kumar all at the s a m e time,” Kumar says. Kumar had become accustomed to migrating over the years. After her birth in Bangalore, she moved to both Kerala and Bombay, where she stayed for eight and seven years, respectively. “We moved because my dad got a job transfer here,” Kumar says. ”I was sad that I was leaving my friends, but also excited.”


FEATURE

FEATURE

Teacher’s aide shares her passion for science with elementary students. By: Josephine Lien, Daniel Becker, Claire Song

“Say ‘park’ backward!” “KRAP, KRAP, KRAP!” Kristine Atia overhears some amusing conversations while working at the young scientists’ camp this summer at California State University Long Beach. “The kids are really fun, I don’t know what they will say,” Atia said. “Everyday is different.” Atia teaches basic science to her group of fifth and sixth graders, trying to keep the subject exciting. “They’re putting on a mock trial dealing with the oil spill between the U.S. government and B.P. (British Petro-

leum),” Atia said. “They will each have their own lawyers and heads of both sides. “ Up until her second year of college, Atia was less than enthusiastic about science. However, it being a mandatory college course initiated an unexpected fascination. “It’s actually really fun once you get past the lectures and the notes,” Atia said. Having taught for three years and continues to during her Master’s Degree, it is safe to say that her initial hatred for science has disintegrated. “I think a lot of people are afraid of science,” Atia said. “But if you give it a chance, it’s not so scary.”

student spotlights By: Rachel Greenberg

While Newspapers2 students enjoy lunch, Saba Tauqir (12) is forgoing her midday meal while focusing on assigned tasks. Why? Because this Wednesday marked the beginning of Ramadan, in which Muslims fast to Saba Tauqir observe the traditions. “We fast so we can relate to people who don’t have enough food to survive,” Tauqir said. Though fasting during Ramadan is not obligatory until age 13, Tauqir began fasting at six, viewing it as a family activity. Despite her persistent hunger, Tauqir still takes advantage of her time at the workshop. “I’ve learned how to be more patient with others,” she said. “It was fun being with students from all over California and getting out of the bubble that is Irvine.”

Passion, persistence and patience. These are the magic words that lead to success, according to music junkie Jim Villanueva.

CODE

Jump from Page 1

“Why alienate the people that you [as students] are trying to write for? Why alienate them by using bad language?” Krislock said. “[Journalists] write at a higher level.” Another part of the code is that journalists cannot libel, or misrepresent damagingly, anyone without proof.

Although long-time reporter, Stefanie Frith, has never commited a crime, she has been to jail numerous times to report on life behind bars.

student spotlights By: Madeline Perrault

By: Mia Agraviador

When Jenn Horowitz, 14, started fencing, she had no idea she would become the naI started fencing because when tion’s best feI was 9, my brother Charlie’s famale fencer of vorite hobby became hitting me. the Y14 age diBeing able to wield a weapon vision. gave me strength and power.” “I started -Jenn Horowitz fencing because when I was 9, my brother‘s favorite hobby was hitting me, “ Jones said. “Wielding a weapon gave me strength.” This feeling drove Horowitz to pursue fencing. “I placed at my first tournament and continued to rack up trophies,” she said. Horowitz increased her practice to 24 hours a week, becoming national champion of her age group.

Mayfield Senior School junior, Alana Victor, traveled across the world changing lives last April. Victor and ten of her classmates visited the Sprouting Knowledge Orphanage (SKO) in Battambang, a province in Cambodia. There, the volunteers used their Alana Victor fundraising money toward buying cots, water purifiers, school uniforms, and meals for the 25 orphans. While they were there, Victor and her peers helped the children with their English. Victor, the creator of "Project Cambodia, advocates that spreading the word and building interest will make such a difference. "Any help is appreciated" says Victor. “Even being pen pals with the kids can be a huge help.”

By: Mia Agraviador

Staring out of the airplane window, Pritika Kumar was in a swirl of mixed emotions while landing at LAX. “I was sad, hapI was sad, happy, excited, depy, excited, pressed and tired all at the same depressed time” and tired -Prikita Kumar all at the s a m e time,” Kumar says. Kumar had become accustomed to migrating over the years. After her birth in Bangalore, she moved to both Kerala and Bombay, where she stayed for eight and seven years, respectively. “We moved because my dad got a job transfer here,” Kumar says. ”I was sad that I was leaving my friends, but also excited.”


feature

Student protection program After being quiet for several years, charter schools are finally speaking out.

T

hrity-three years ago, the state of California passed Ed. Code 48907, allowing high school students to exercise their First Amendment rights including freedom of speech and press. At the time, the law was created specifically for public high schools. However, it is time that the law makers realize that it does not matter whether the school is charter or public. It is still a violation of the First Amendment and student rights to censor a student publication. Student expression takes many forms, but too many school journalism programs are under the watchful eye of “Big Brother”-influenced administrations. Student publication is meant to be an open forum that expresses the voice of the student body. In a school that is run by adults, it is one of the few ways writers can keep readers informed as well as promote change. Currently, Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger has a bill on his desk that firmly establishes the inclusion of charter schools in 48907. It is important that this law passes so that charter schools can receive equal protection as to that of public schools (REP). If this bill is rejected, limitations and policies may hinder students’ ability to properly inform the peers

MAN ON THE STREET Mia Agraviador Capistrano Valley

“I think it’s creepy if you don’t know them. But, if it’s just through mutual friends, it’s okay.”

with integrity and honesty. Along with private funding, charter schools are partially funded by the government. Because they are supported by the government, they should fall under the exact state laws as those of public schools. Yes, it is understandable for charter administrators to be cautious of what is published because of certain risks in publication. However, rebellion is not the intent of any publication. This is larger than just putting offensive words in print, be it symbolic armbands, anti-war protests or any other form of expression. As young adults, students have a responsibility to contribute to their society. They must be able to publish what they want and when they want to, without the limitations of unknowledgeable and misinformed administrators. It is understood that administration needs to be aware of what is printed; however, they have no right to change the context of a student publication. Students must stand up for their rights. Administration needs to understand that student publications are vital. When they realize how much better students write without fear of backlash, they will do a better job of making fellow students more aware and understanding of the school. Thus, instead of acting as a barrier, the school administration will be able to use its authority to protect and support student rights and eventually move forward.

How do you feel about Facebook stalking?

Wesley Wu Walnut HS

“I don’t do it, and I think it’s weird, but Facebook basically allows everyone to stalk with its free access.”

Meghan Legg

Capistrano Valley

“I’m definitely guilty of it. There are extreme cases that aren’t good, but moderate stalking is fine.”


Opinion

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Breaking the Marriage Barrier

Thinking that the battle was lost, the ban on same sex marriage was finally overturned By Judy Jun

I

n schools, students are taught the evils of discrimination. We’ve all learned the negative impacts from history classes and the playground. With society growing more open about race, religion and beliefs, it was surprising to see Proposition 8, banning gay marriage, pass. It was even more disappointing that it took about two years to overturn by a federal judge who deemed it unconstitutional. Criticism against lesbians and

gays is encouraging the her own personidea that being different in al beliefs, but any way is wrong by any it doesn’t mean means. Everyone has the that those beright to marry—they are liefs should be forced ensured equal treatment upon others because under the law. they don’t agree with Yet, we see picket signthe opposing side. It wielding men on the is growing difficult to corner of every street see how we are living fighting against gay in the “land of the Illustrated by Sonia Chou rights. Their reasoning free” when there is supported by nothing are still those who but religious and moral do not receive equal objections. Everyone has his or treatment.

Ground Zero: A City’s Call for Change

Years after 9/11, New Yorkers debate putting a mosque next to Ground Zero By Saba Tauqir

Normally, building a religious center in a metropolitan city would never be of international impor-tance. So, building an Islamic community center in a questionable neighborhood would, of course, garner so much attention as to anger even the genius of Sarah Palin. That seems absolutely normal, right? Wrong. Plans to build Park51 passed Tuesday, with the New York Landmarks Preservation Committee greenlighting the project. Located two blocks from Ground Zero, the building is obviously under fire from politicians to families of 9/11 victims. Adding even

more fuel to this argument, Eid al-Fitr, the day of celebration after Ramadan, the month-long fasting period for Muslims, lies just days before the anniversary of the Twin Towers incident. However, as the ninth anniversary of the World Trade Centers attacks nears, this just might be what America needs to begin to heal the wounds from that day. Freedom of religion is one of the founding principles of America,whichbegsthequestion: if this were any other religious worship center—say a syna-

gogue or a Buddhist temple— being built on private property, would it still be an issue? Of course not. Furthermore, the center is open to people of all religions, and though it will have a mosque, it is meant to sooth American and Islamic relations. One notable goal listed on the

Park51 website is “promoting tolerance, dialogue and compassion for all.” That is what this center should be judged by, not by the events that occurred a few blocks away by a few militants who supposedly represented an entire religion. It is Ramadan now—a month of peace and fasting. So, let there be peace. And until there is a legitimate argument against Park51 that cannot be debunked by the First Amendment, let it be.

Drawn by Sonia Chou


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NEWS

Deep inside the Daily 49er By Samantha Thomas Contributing Editor

Students from the newspapers2 program at CSULB took a step into the Daily 49er newspaper room. The students stood in the back of the room and watched the editor-inchief lead a planning meeting for their first issue of the school year. “Our staff works hard to produce the Daily 49er,” adviser Barbara Kingsley said. “I think our staff is great. We don’t just base our journalists by seniority completely, we also base it on who is a stronger writer and who has experience and talent.” Every day, the staff gets together and discusses its progress and new stories that need to get added. When a story gets added some sort of action has to be taken. “It was really interesting to talk with the editors and see how they put

Noelle Lovgren & Sarkis Ekmekian

The Daily 49er summer issue is the student paper at Cal State University, Long Beach. their paper together,” Rachel Greenberg said. Students were lectured on how sometimes things go smoothly with the paper and sometimes they don’t. There may be minor problems like mistakes and grammatical errors in someone’s article, or there could be a more serious situation like someone

A new media age dawns By Josh Min, Jamie Hwang, Sally Hwang

An expert in mass media emphasized the ever-changing aspect of news to high school reporters at a journalism workshop on Wednesday. “In today’s age of technology, you always question ‘How do you know it’s true?’,” journalism professor Jennifer Fleming said. Asking students to define news, the professor challenged the Editors I class, held at California State University Long Beach, as part of newspapers2. She explained that television and the Internet have made printed news “obsolete” because they are more

easily accessible. “(The Internet) makes us more open and the world much smaller,” Editors I student Pritika Kumar said, acknowledging it as a major news source. “Newspapers will not be as prevalent as they once were,” Fleming said. She noted successful news networks on television take sides on political issues and “maintain credibility” based on brand building. “Cable news tends to depend on opinion and ideology—these appear to be the keys to growth,” Fleming said. She concluded the seminar with a discussion on how modern consumers access news.

missing their deadline. “When someone usually misses their deadline, we usually don’t give them a hard time if they let us know ahead of time,” Kingsley said. “However, if they miss it and don’t tell us, then it becomes a problem. We usually pull their story.” When it’s crunch time, things in the 49er newspaper room get hectic. There’s no more silence and concentration, there’s more arguing about where a story should go and how long it should be. “Once the newspaper is published everyone begins to relax and not stress so much,” Kingsley said. The visiting students not only got to speak with the staff off the Daily 49er, but also took away something from the experience. “I saw how hard they worked on it and it really inspired me to just work harder on my own paper,” Judy Jun said.

JournalistS Jump from page 1

This “learning by doing” method is also used in the production of the workshop newspaper, created by the students working together and using their new knowledge. “Students have to write, edit and design the newspaper. This presents lots of opportunities for them to meet and interview other people in the field,” co-director Jolene Combs said. Like the rest of the students, Christina Ko, a Northwood High School sophomore, joined the workshop to boost her writing skills. “I hope to prepare myself well enough for my school. The Editors I class has been helpful because the teachers effectively tell you how to write concisely like a journalist,” Ko said.

WRITE NOW  

Publication produced by Newspapers2 high school students at journalism camp at CSULB in summer 2010