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ISSUE NO. 13

edition TasteA


Melia by Bode Living is a n e x c lu sive f o u r

Wi t h i n a s h o r t s t ro l l o f De n m a n Pro s p e ct

b edroom on ly dev e lo p me nt, lo c a te d in a

i s t h e Na t i o n a l A r b o re t u m a n d St ro m l o

prime, elev ated positio n in the sta te o f

Fo re s t Pa r k – w i t h o n e o f Ca n b e r r a’ s

t he art s uburb of De nma n Pro sp e c t.

b i gge s t

Ins pired

m o u n t a i n b i ki n g, t r a i l r u n n i n g, h i ki n g a n d

by

a

co nte mp o ra r y

ba la nc e

o f In dus trial an d S c a ndina via n de sig n, Melia’s

res idenc e s

inc lu de

sporting

venues

ideal

fo r

cro s s co u n t r y r u n n i n g.

four

g en erou s ly s ized be dro o ms, f u ll siz e d

If y o u m a ke y o u r h o m e a t Me l i a , n o t

b ath room with s e p a ra te ba th, e nsu ite ,

only will you have your own stunning

powder room, walk in p a ntr y a nd a two -

re s i d e n ce s , b u t a l s o a cce s s t o a ce n t r a l

car garage with in te rna l a c c e ss.

gre e n s p a ce e x cl u s i v e l y fo r re s i d e n t s t o e n j o y a t t h e i r l e i s u re . No m a t t e r i f y o u

Melia s its in on e of De nma n Pro sp e c t’ s

a re a t h o m e o r v e n t u r i n g o u t t o e x p l o re ,

premiere locations, with u no bstru c te d

t h o s e l u ck y e n o u gh t o ca l l Me l i a h o m e

views overlookin g the Mo lo ng lo Rive r

w i l l b e p ro v i d e d w i t h a l l t h e y co u l d w a n t

Corridor an d with imme dia te a c c e ss to

a n d m o re .

t he s h oppin g an d c a f é p re c inc t, stu nning Hilltop Park an d nu me ro u s re c re a tio n areas with in th is a ma z ing ne w su bu rb. You will be s u rro u nde d by na tu re a nd w ith in walkin g dis ta nc e to the vibra nt Den man Village s ho p s, c a f é’ s, Me dic a l Cen tre an d oth er a me nitie s. De nma n Pros pect its elf is c o nve nie ntly lo c a te d t o Can berra’s Cit y Ce ntre , Be lc o nne n an d Woden – area s whic h no t o nly o f f e r

Register your interest today! melia@bodeliving.com.au

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b ut als o s ome of Ca nbe rra’ s be st sc ho o ls.

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ISSUE

NO.

13

ts n e t n o CA EVERY I S S U E

02 04 06

Editor's Letter Contributors HC Online

E N T E R TA I N M E N T

10 12 12

Movie Morsels Books Podcasts - Food For Thought

CITY

08 15 36 104 126

Save The Date The Winter Hot List Takeaway Tradition The Taste Of Memory The Spirit of Canberra

PEOPLE

22

Sarah Wilson's Changing Appetite For Life

60 111

Above And Beyond

LIFE

A Matter of Taste

47

Taking The Cake

FOOD

53 67

Beside The Seaside The Bucket List

STYLE

29 78 93

The Local Table Sand & Salt Tasteful On The Eye

T R AV E L

135

Snowbound

ACTIVE

18

––

What's Your Fitness Flavour?


HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

Fringe Benefits Brasserie on Marcus Clarke Street (now home to Courgette). Back then it was one of the few ‘fancy’ dining options in a city still finding its culinary identity, and an endless source of fascination to me.

E D I TO R ' S LETTER

When I first moved to Canberra in 1991 as an 18-year-old university student, I was already enamoured with all things food. Unfortunately, my budget ran more to the Belconnen Mall food court than fine dining. Nevertheless, whenever I would catch the 333 bus into the city, my eye would be drawn to

Fast forward to 1997, and Mary Brander’s Capital Taste: The A–Z of Good Food in and Around Canberra—touted as “the first ever culinary guide to the Canberra region—featured just four Braddon eateries. In 2018, we’re talking around 10 times that figure—there’s no question we are in the middle of a dining boom. These days, I’ve eaten at more swanky restaurants than you can poke a baguette at, but my interest has deviated slightly. I’m more intrigued by the enduring

operations that continue to thrive despite Canberra’s obsession with the new and shiny. That’s just one of the stories we share in this edition—but there’s much more to ‘taste’ than just what we put in our mouths. We’ll meet the woman responsible for changing Australia’s opinion on sugar, discover four people whose careers depend on their taste, dig into the snow country, and so much more. Turn the page and take a bite.

Amanda Whitley Magazine Editor-in-chief HerCanberra Founder + Director

TEAM HC

Emma Macdonald Associate Editor

Katie Radojkovic Graphic Designer

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Belinda Neame Production Manager

Ashleigh Went ACTIVE Editor

Beatrice Smith Online Editor

Laura Peppas Senior Journalist and Communications Manager


HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

Magazine contributors

WORDS Emma Macdonald Molly McLaughlin Belinda Neame Laura Peppas Tania Ward Ashleigh Went Amanda Whitley Rebecca Worth GRAPHIC DESIGN

SARAH WRIGHT

ANNIE BROWN

Sarah Wright is a hair and makeup artist who has worked with the best in the beauty industry, developing skills and achieving qualifications in hairdressing, makeup, brow styling, skin science and photography. Sarah’s newest and most exciting venture is Canberra’s first blow-dry bar 'Saloon' on Lonsdale Street in Braddon.

Annie Brown is a communications specialist, freelance fashion and personal stylist, and owner of online lingerie boutique www.misswinks.com. In between searching for the perfect piece of lingerie, Annie loves nothing more than travelling, finding new places to brunch and trawling for vintage gems.

Katie Radojkovic PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT Belinda Neame PHOTOGR APHY Tim Bean Lauren Campbell HAIR Sarah Wright, Saloon MAKEUP Sarah Wright, Saloon STYLING

TIM BEAN

L AUREN CAMPBELL

A firefighter by day (and night), Tim also loves being behind the lens to capture all things food, people and places. You can often find Tim drinking coffee at his local or capturing a time lapse on Anzac Parade!

Lauren Campbell is a Canberrabased wedding, portrait and fashion photographer, approaching all three with unflappable flair. She loves nature, animals, filter coffee and skiing. In the winter months, Lauren spends as much time as she can in the Snowy Mountains to combine as many of her loves as she can!

Annie Brown Belinda Neame MODEL Alexandra Rubio, HAUS Models PRINTING CanPrint Communications PROOFREADING Dr Pam Faulks AE Clarity Proofreading & Editing

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HC ONLINE Visit hercanberra.com.au for your daily dose of all things Canberra.

@cuppalinicakes

@two.brown.bears

@lauren.lately

@ambraah_smiles

@katie2600

@leerachel

@toallmyfriends_bar

@zoesbutton_hq

@you.me.and.the.sea_

#HERCANBERRA FOR THE CHANCE TO SEE YOUR IMAGES IN PRINT

C onnect @HERCANBERRA #HERCANBERRA

PAGE 6

–– STYLE FOOD & DRINK CITY BUSINESS EVENTS AND MORE ––


HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

SAVE the DATE J U N E

THE TRUFFLE FESTIVAL – CANBERRA REGION 1 JUNE – 31 AUGUST Various locations across Canberra trufflefestival.com.au

CANBERRA KIDS MARKET 16 JUNE Exhibition Park In Canberra canberramarkets.net.au

A POOCH AFFAIR 16 JUNE Exhibition Park In Canberra apoochaffair.com.au

THE FORAGE 30 JUNE Little National Carpark theforage.com.au

J U L Y

CREATIVE FIBRE 8 JULY Old Bus Depot Markets obdm.com.au

MISTER MAKER 10 JULY Canberra Theatre Centre canberratheatrecentre.com.au

MAMAMIA OUT LOUD 27 JULY Canberra Theatre Centre canberratheatrecentre.com.au

HANDMADE MARKET 28–29 JULY Exhibition Park In Canberra handmadecanberra.com.au

more events at

HERCANBERR A .COM. AU/EVENT S

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A U G U S T

GAMMA.CON 4–5 AUGUST Exhibition Park In Canberra gammacon.org.au

CANBERRA WRITERS FESTIVAL 24–26 AUGUST Various venues across Canberra canberrawritersfestival.com.au

AMERICAN MASTERS 1940-1980 24 AUGUST – 11 NOVEMBER National Gallery of Australia nga.gov.au

SYDNEY DANCE COMPANY’S ‘AB [INTRA]’ 30 AUGUST – 1 SEPTEMBER Canberra Theatre Centre sydneydancecompany.com


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FILM

Movie Morsels W O R D S

M O L LY M C L AU G H L I N

Whether it’s reality TV or critically-acclaimed films, today’s society has a fascination with watching food on screen. From love stories to ethical dilemmas, tales of friendship to family histories, these movies dish up so much more than what’s on the plate.

THE HUNDRED-FOOT

JULIE AND JULIA (2009)

JOURNEY (2014)

Two restaurants, two delicious cuisines, one tenacious Indian family and one regal Helen Mirren combine to create a touching story that proves exquisite food can overcome any barrier. After the Kadam family arrives in a tiny French village following the destruction of their beloved restaurant in Mumbai, the resulting fusion of Indian and French cooking and cultures will change their lives forever.

In 2002, blogger Julie Powell set herself an ambitious challenge: to recreate all 524 recipes in Julia Child's iconic cookbook Mastering the Art of French Cooking in 365 days. This is an intriguing story in itself, but Julie and Julia also deftly weaves Child’s life through the film, resulting in the perfect mix of two true stories and two strong, smart, funny women.

JIRO DREAMS OF SUSHI (2011)

Jiro Ono is an 85-year-old sushi master and owner of Sukiyabashi Jiro, a tiny restaurant located in a Tokyo subway station. But this is not just any sushi—Jiro has three Michelin stars and only serves a unique tasting menu of roughly 20 pieces that costs a minimum of 30,000 Japanese yen ($363 AUD). Jiro Dreams of Sushi is a documentary that will completely transport you into its subject’s world, and leave you wanting even more.

PAGE 10

RATATOUILLE (2007) OKJA (2017)

Set in the near future, Okja confronts the reality of our food choices. Created to be the ideal food source, the film’s title character is a huge, pig-like animal created by a multinational corporation to satisfy the planet’s ever-increasing demand for meat. But Okja is also a pet and friend to the young girl who raised it. Thought-provoking and challenging, Okja will make you think twice about what you put on your plate.

Remy (a rat) and Linguini (a garbage boy) make an inspired but unlikely culinary combination in this Pixar classic. Remy dreams of becoming a chef while Linguini fails in the kitchen, but together they must maintain the illusion that Linguini can create dishes to impress France’s top restaurant critic. Can they do it? Of course. But their journey is a hilarious and heart-warming story even for those viewers over the age of 12 who can predict a fairytale ending.


HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

Cooking

Fiction

HOME MADE: WINTER

CHOCOLAT

Yvette van Boven

Books REBECCA WORTH, PAPERCHAIN BOOKSTORE

All titles available for purchase instore, paperchainbookstore.com.au

The perfect book to stir the senses—a collection of delightful dishes that are sure to help you hygge your winter blues away. Dutch writer and chef Yvette van Boven shares her home recipes— from a humble toastie to homebrewed apple cider. My personal favourite? A simple homemade pizza base topped with fig, mozzarella and prosciutto. These cosy recipes contrast with moody scenes of a European winter, complete with frozen lakes, bare branches, charming old buildings and people wrapped up in scarves. This sizeble book is filled to the brim with recipes that make it even more tempting to stay inside and get cooking. Having created several dishes from this collection, I can highly recommend the Poached Pear and Cardamom Cake—perfect with a cup of tea and good company.

FOOD FOR THOUGHT: PODCASTS FOR EVERY APPETITE BY ASHLEIGH WENT

It’s not often that we explore food purely through sound. Listening to someone speak about food adds a new depth of understanding to a topic that is an integral part of our lives. With a seemingly never-ending stream of content available, there’s something for every taste.

PAGE 12

Joanne Harris

A tale of seduction and the power of chocolate, this old favourite is easy to sink your teeth into. Set in rural France, the story follows wanderer Vianne Rocher as she arrives in a quiet and respectable village, bringing with her recipes for all types of chocolate. As she sets up shop she encounters the pious priest, whose warnings against selling the "sinfully luxurious sweets" at the beginning of Lent go unheeded. Instead she sets about creating exquisite chocolates that the citizens of the small town begin to consume in secret. As the townspeople continue to eat, the bourgeoning sexuality of the long-sleepy and religiously devout village erupts and changes the town forever. A sensual work of fiction, and perfect for a mini‑break.

BURNT TOAST Burnt Toast is the podcast of Food 52: a muchloved blog of home cooks and community for food lovers featuring recipes, cooking tips and profiles. Michael Harlan Turkell has taken the reins as host for season three of the podcast, but former host Kenzi Wilbur is utterly delightful—relatable and capable of extracting the most sparkling conversation with her guests. Episode 30: The Genius Recipes that Change the Way We Cook is a highlight, showcasing Kirsten Miglore’s popular column about gamechanging recipes from the Food52 community.


MAGA ZINE I S S U E NO.13

Interior Design

Gardening/Cooking

Fiction

STYLED

GROWN AND GATHERED

LOVESOME

Emily Henderson

Matt and Lentil

Sally Seltmann

Renowned stylist Emily Henderson brings her wisdom and experience together in a book to help the wayward designer find their feet. Styled begins with a nonjudgemental quiz designed to define your valued lifestyle aspects and an aesthetic that resonates accordingly. So begins the study of a variety of styles from Scandinavian to Modern Glam to Zen—Emily explores the benefits of each and gives helpful hints and tips for repurposing old belongings in a new light. Sprinkled in the margins of the images are notes on styling a space to reflect your values. At the heart of the book is Emily’s drive to ensure you take joy in creating the home that fits you and your taste. A wonderful book that will inspire you to dream up your own domestic paradise.

Grown and Gathered brings domestic traditions into modern lives with a practical guide to growing, cooking, and preserving all your own veggies. Living on a property in rural Victoria, Matt and Lentil grow, forage and hunt for their food and trade flowers and food for any goods they don’t have. For aspiring green thumbs and preserving enthusiasts this is living the dream. With the help of Grown and Gathered, this homebody has bottled a harvest of olives, made a few sourdough batches and is working towards pickling perfection. There is (almost) nothing better than the taste of homegrown food and now there are friends that can help you put it together.

Joni Johnson, a painter fresh out of art school, works at upmarket French restaurant Harland. Her life is filled with her restaurant family—people as strange and endearing as the eclectic décor—and her best friend Annabel, a singer-songwriter always falling in and out of love. Filled with sumptuous descriptions of French food, the novel centres around moments of intimacy over shared meals, coffees and late-night wine parties. Annabel’s arrival into this scene prompts chaos that threatens to upset Joni’s balanced life. Tensions rise when Annabel begins to overstay her welcome, interfering with the one guy who takes an interest in Joni. Meandering and intimate, this debut novel moves between Joni’s small studio flat and the restaurant—a small but charming world where characters slowly unfold.

SPILLED MILK

THE FOOD PROGRAMME

THE PASS

It’s “the show where we cook something delicious, eat it all, and you can’t have any”, hosted by writers and comedians Molly Wizenberg and Matthew AmsterBurton. If you like your podcasts with a side of humour, this is the show for you. The duo dive into linguistics, history, cooking methods, culture and science, all with an air of jocular charm. Episode 306: Tokyo is insightful and, of course, hilarious.

BBC Radio 4’s The Food Programme is multi-faceted, covering issues such as food history, trends, and biology. British food journalist Sheila Dillon shares hosting duties with producer Dan Saladino and investigates everything from the sugar tax to agriculture, the diets of athletes and food cultures. The Future of Bread is an especially interesting episode, featuring Modernist Bread author Nathan Myhrvold.

Host Magdalena Roze quizzes food insiders on their businesses, cooking and life, then sits down with them for a meal at one of their favourite restaurants. The Pass gives a unique insight into Australia’s best dining experiences from those inside the industry— whether you’ve been to James Viles’ Bowral fine-diner Biota or not, you’ll appreciate his discussion around locally foraged and sustainable food. PAGE 13


Just minutes from the Parliamentary triangle, acclaimed galleries and the CBD, Pialligo Estate is nestled in a private and peaceful setting, one of Canberra’s first working farm properties. Our food is grown onsite or sourced from only the finest producers in the region and our multi award-winning Smokehouse products are incorporated to ensure an authentic Australian dining experience like no other.

+61 2 6247 6060

Come and visit us this season for a memorable foodie experience, try our hearty Sunday Roast, or indulge in a luxurious High Tea afternoon.

thepialligoestate.com.au


MAGA ZINE I S S U E NO.13

Winter THE

HOT LIST

W O R D S

B E AT R I C E S M I T H

The hottest things to do during Canberra's cooler months.

PAGE 15


HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

Drink MOLLY

When Molly, grand dame of the Canberra bar scene, closed her Hobart Place doors late last year, we had a sneaking suspicion she might make a fabulous re‑entrance some day. Those hopes have now been realised with the reveal of Molly’s new digs on Northbourne Avenue. Finally, our favourite gal has space to branch out, with a stage allowing for live jazz performances,

Eat

Molly | 35°16'44.5"S 149°07'42.0"E shhh@molly.net.au

TACO TACO

Situated in über cool No Name Lane in City West, Taco Taco will be all about flexible food—whether that’s eat in, eat at the bar, or grab it and go. With Mexican cantina vibes and a menu offering brunch, lunch and dinner plus cocktails and beers, this is sure to be one of winter’s hottest new spots.

Taco Taco | No Name Lane, Alinga Street, City West instagram.com/tacotacocbr

See PICASSO, THE VOLLARD SUITE

Regarded as “one of the greatest print suites, and perhaps the most enigmatic and famous of the twentieth century” Picasso’s Vollard Suite is coming to the National Gallery of Australia from June to September. Comprising of exactly 100 prints, this is one not to miss for lovers of Picasso’s unique and thought‑provoking style.

The Vollard Suite | 9 June – 24 September The National Gallery of Australia

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MAGA ZINE I S S U E NO.13

Road trip BRAIDWOOD

If you fancy a cool weather road trip, we recommend you head east, to Braidwood. The perfect destination for winter (as well as a beloved halfway pit stop between here and the coast) Braidwood offers a plethora of foodie experiences, from the chic Paydirt Eatery to a hearty breakfast in front of the fireplace at the Albion Hotel, complete with Lonsdale Street Roasters Coffee. Now you can also add authentic Italian fare to that list with the opening of Casanova’s. Serving up treats like housemade sourdough and pizza baked in a wood fired oven, Casanova’s is the perfect excuse for a destination lunch.

Casanova’s | 68–70 Wallace Street, Braidwood | Open for breakfast and lunch Monday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday facebook.com/pg/casanovas.braidwood

Don Fuchs; Destination NSW

"Expect warming drinks and delicious hot food."

Groove THE WINTER FORAGE

A must-do for all Canberra foodies, The Forage is a seasonal event that brings together the best of local street food for an afternoon-long party in Barton. Tailored around the season, at the Winter Forage you can expect warming drinks and delicious hot food as well as live music, giant games, entertainment and more.

Saturday 30 June 2–7 pm Little National Hotel, 21 National Circuit, Barton theforage.com.au

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HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

WHAT'S YOUR

FITNESS FLAVOUR A W O R D S

ASHLEIGH WENT

Brunch is, and will always be, one of the food highlights of our week–and few things complement this not-quite-breakfast, not‑quite-lunch option more than a weekend workout. What could be better than sweating it and then refuelling with a delicious leisurely feast (mimosa optional)? Follow our quiz to find your ideal workout and local brunch pick.

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MAGA ZINE I S S U E NO.13

WHAT ARE YOU FEELING? SWEET

SAVOURY

HEALTHY OR INDULGENT?

VEGETARIAN OR CARNIVORE?

MY BODY'S A TEMPLE

I'M TREATING MYSELF

CLEAN & GREEN

GIVE ME THE PROTEIN

IN THE MOOD TO CUSTOMISE OR KEEP IT SIMPLE?

FEELING ADVENTUROUS OR CRAVING THE FAMILIAR?

WHAT'S YOUR FAVOURITE FLAVOUR PROFILE?

HOW MUCH TIME DO YOU HAVE ON YOUR HANDS?

JUST GIVE ME OPTIONS

JUST GIVE ME THE FOOD

MAPLE & CLOVE'S PORRIDGE + F45

THE GOODS WHOLEFOODS’ BUILD YOUR OWN BOWL + WEIGHT LIFTING

CREATIVE

CLASSIC

DOUBLE SHOT'S STRAWBERRIES & CREAM HOTCAKES + PILATES

SPACE KITCHEN'S UNICORN WAFFLE + POWERLIFTING

SIMPLE

EXOTIC

LOCAL PRESS CAFÉ'S SAVOURY PANCAKE + YOGA

CHATTERBOX'S SMASHED AVOCADO + SPIN

LONG & LEISURELY

ON THE GO

HIGHROAD'S SALMON + BRAZILIAN JIU JITSU

TEDDY PICKER’S BREKKY ROLL + RUNNING

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HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

THE GOODS WHOLEFOODS’ BUILD YOUR OWN BOWL + WEIGHT LIFTING You like to match your food to your mood, and The Goods’ selection allows you to do just that. Choose from chia pudding, bircher muesli, housemade granola, yoghurt, stewed fruits, nut butters and more to suit your vibe. Weight training allows you the same freedom—choose a program that lets you mix it up with different exercises and variations, and get lifting.

MAPLE & CLOVE'S PORRIDGE + F45

–––

Decisions can be overwhelming—you’d rather choose an option that you know you’re going to enjoy every time. With warming cinnamon and nutmeg, maple syrup, banana, berries and seeds, Maple Porridge gives maximum satisfaction with minimal decision fatigue. Pair it with F45—with a team of effervescently energetic instructors and predetermined workouts, you’re always guaranteed a quality sweat session.

No Name Lane, 40 Marcus Clarke St, Canberra City

7 Burbury Close, Barton

itsthegoods.com.au

mapleandclove.com.au

SPACE KITCHEN'S UNICORN WAFFLE + POWERLIFTING

–––

DOUBLE SHOT'S STRAWBERRIES & CREAM HOTCAKES + PILATES

When you brunch, you brunch hard. With its lavender custard, green tea and rainbow ice creams, and fairy floss, this spectacularly sweet dish is a sight to behold. Given that you don’t do things by halves (and let’s be honest, you’ve got a lot of sugar to burn off) why not give powerlifting a spin? It’s a challenging, addictive way to get fit and strong.

When it comes to brunch, you just can’t go wrong with pancakes. This rendition is classic at its core with vanilla and fresh strawberries, yet provides a modern twist with rose and macadamia notes. Far from a fad, Pilates has long been known for building lean muscle and a strong core. It’s the perfect foundation for your fitness.

–––

–––

12 Furzer St, Phillip

7 Deakin Court, Deakin

space-kitchen.com.au

doubleshotdeakin.com.au

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MAGA ZINE I S S U E NO.13

CHATTERBOX'S SMASHED AVOCADO + SPIN

LOCAL PRESS CAFÉ'S SAVOURY PANCAKE + YOGA

Smashed avo on toast—it’s basic, in the best kind of way. Chatterbox have upgraded the millennial favourite with fresh basil, Armenian feta and poached free-range eggs for a protein hit. Spin classes are renowned for burning serious calories and keeping you fit. Best of all, you can adapt it to your fitness level so it will always be a solid choice.

This Indian-influenced dish is healing, nourishing and downright delicious. The flavours are complex yet harmonious—a mixed vegetable pancake with chickpea and lentil spiced relish, served with a coconut and cashew chutney and a poached egg. The warming, spicy notes are totally vibing with your heart chakra. Do we need to say it? Yoga should be your workout de jour.

––– 40 Cameron Ave, Belconnen

–––

chatterbox-catering.com.au

35 Eastlake Parade, Kingston Foreshore localpresscafe.com.au

HIGHROAD'S SALMON + BRAZILIAN JIU JITSU

TEDDY PICKER'S BREKKY ROLL + RUNNING

You’re here for the tender salmon, but you also love the kick that comes courtesy of the jalapeños and wasabi. There’s a blend of flavours and cultures happening here that’s right up your alley. Meet your new favourite—Brazilian Jiu Jitsu. Prepare to be floored (literally) by this physicallychallenging, fun, combat sport.

This is the ultimate no-fuss, delicious brunch choice. It wins points not just for its punch of flavour, but its portability. A meal that can be eaten with just one hand and not a piece of cutlery in sight? Yes please. With its crumbed brisket, red-eye mayo, pickled jalapenos and fried egg, this roll is the perfect post-run refuel to keep you energised and on your toes.

––– Cnr Cape & Woolley St. Dickson

–––

highrd.com.au

53/65 Constitution Ave, Campbell teddypickers.com.au PAGE 21


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Photo Mirija Ivkovik

HERCANBERRA.COM.AU


MAGA ZINE I S S U E NO.13

SARAH WILSON’S CHANGING APPETITE

for life

W O R D S

EMMA MACDONALD

Raised on a semi-subsistence property in Wamboin, Sarah Wilson has risen to become one of the country’s most influential wellness gurus— her I Quit Sugar empire literally changing Australia’s taste for the sweet stuff. Now she is turning her focus from building an unconventional business to building an unconventional family.

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HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

SARAH WILSON is packing up the last vestiges of her I Quit Sugar (IQS) empire in Sydney’s Surry Hills. She’s mildly irritated as the sustainable wooden desks she had commissioned to fit the space were meant to be left for the new tenant taking over IQS headquarters. But he no longer wants them there and she is left wrapping up a multimillion-dollar business, helping her 20 staff find new employment opportunities, dismantling one of the most successful wellness movements of the last decade— and now in possession with a whole lot of excess timber she needs to sort out. She is also trying to orchestrate getting pregnant. But we’ll get to that in a minute. Sarah, one of the most headstrong and committed campaigners against waste and excess, needs to ensure the desks are rehomed—it’s another headache to add to her substantial list. Sarah’s Instagram account often carries her recycling, repurposing, and conscious consumption messages alongside the tag #giveashit. She really does. Which is why, ultimately, she’s chosen to walk away from IQS while it remained a thriving commercial venture.

When Sarah made the public announcement in February that she would close the business down rather than sell it, it created a media storm. Was she in financial strife, was she burnt out? Was sugar coming back on the menu? Nope. We can actually blame Harry, Sarah’s accountant of six years. “I started seeing Harry when I started earning money after having none for so long. He asked me what my goals were,” says Sarah. “I told him I didn’t do goals and I had no real plans for the business. And then I told him a good goal would be to retire in five years with a modest wage to live off until I am 94" (that’s 50 years away for the now 44 year-old). Sarah checked in with Harry last January. “He basically announced I’d hit my goal at four years and 11 months... I thought to myself, ‘OK cool, let’s sell the business then’.” It seems the antithesis of what every other entrepreneur is striving to achieve—which is to upscale their exposure and earnings with no clear sense of what, or when, is 'enough'. Although Sarah is no longer a fan of the word entrepreneur. She says it used to connote the idea of a ground breaker and now is shorthand for a money maker with no sense of real ingenuity.

In a fitting way, Sarah’s decision to end her business is as unconventional as her decision to start it. Which, in Sarah’s case, is generally the way of things. She grew up the eldest of six kids in a home built, in part, by her father using scrap materials, in the bush outside Canberra. There were not a lot of material trappings but there were a number of ducks and goats. Sarah was bright and soon found herself succeeding at Lyneham High’s LEAP program. She got into Law at the ANU and honed her advocacy skills and political interests as the Women’s Officer. And while it was not her natural headspace, Sarah’s symmetrical features, beaming smile and awkward tallness saw her seconded into modelling. She’d turn up at castings after school, having fitted in a mercy dash to the makeup counter at David Jones to swipe some tester mascara across her lashes. The irony that she would later become the editor of Cosmopolitan Magazine would not have been lost on those who watched her fumble from her skivvies and ill-fitting jeans into a colourcoordinated fashion shoot. But Sarah was destined for public life. In 2009 her face was beamed across the country as she was made the inaugural (and only) female host of the top-rating first season of MasterChef.

" T H E R E WA S R E A L LY NO BIG SE CR ET TO I T. QU I T T I NG SUGA R WA S BE N E F ICI A L BEC AUSE PEOPL E H A D TO GO OU T A N D L E A R N TO COOK F OR T H E M SE LV E S ."

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Photo Rob Palmer

MAGA ZINE I S S U E NO.13

Those who have read her topselling most recent book First We Make the Beast Beautiful, will know now that Sarah navigated her rising celebrity through crippling anxiety and bipolar episodes. Not to mention an impending hormonal backlash through Hashimoto’s disease. Her move to quitting sugar was the result of her finally giving in to self-preservation mode and leaving Sydney’s A-list to hole up in a disused army shack in Byron Bay, where she turned her focus inwards for a series of newspaper columns—the earnings from which covered the cost of her food and board and precious little else. One, published in January 2011, saw her experiment with quitting sugar. Sarah wrote how she liked how she felt. People wanted to know more and she felt compelled to extend the experiment. It was as simple as that. Of course there was a backlash—“I was accused of all sorts of things, radical things, cutting out an entire food group things,” she recalls of the time.

But these days any glance down the supermarket aisle sees the mass market declaring its products have reduced or no added sugar. Jamie Oliver is banging on about it, as is blokey author Peter FitzSimons. Most informed parents are a little more conscious of the sugar content in their kids’ lunchboxes. Tuckshops have taken the hint. And Sarah could not be happier. In fact, she feels almost guilty at the extent of the success of IQS. “There was really no big secret to it. Quitting sugar was beneficial because people had to go out and learn to cook for themselves, which led to them cutting out the processed food, chemicals and trans fats. “Plus all our menu plans included seven to nine serves of fruit and veg which exceeded Australian nutritional guidelines. Fundamentally, it just makes sense and is what our grandmothers were doing.” But Sarah was never in it for a quick buck. In fact, her greatest

business learning from the IQS experience was to “give first and the abundance will come”. In the digital space that means basically that she published free content for two years—often devoting 15 hours a day to it— earning not a cent, but building herself a loyal tribe of those interested in, or experimenting with, removing added sugar from their diet. She was among the first dominant bloggers to refuse display ads, capping her ad revenue at 10 per cent. “Then I made an investment—of $100—to learn how to write an e-book. I grew that, money started to come in, I bought the trademark, I hired staff, and I was as transparent as possible with my tribe about what I was doing and why. “My decision to close as opposed to selling continues that storyline—I am totally grateful to the five million people who supported my crazy idea, and selling it to someone who isn’t me is just not appropriate.”

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" I D O N ’ T D O R E G R E T S . I H AV E G O N E A N D WO R K E D HARD AND ACHIEVED ABUNDANCE. BUT DO I FEEL S A D N E S S A B O U T N O T H AV I N G A PA RT N E R O R A C H I L D? A B SOLU T E LY, TO M Y V E RY C OR E ."

Not that there weren’t offers. But when pressed on the sorts of negotiations that were attempted, Sarah can’t hide her contempt.

funds going to a philanthropic trust she has set up that will fund food waste and mental health charities she works with.

“It’s been instructive, not that I have been surprised at the base level of greed. These people talk to me as though I want money. They just can’t grasp that I don’t want it,” says Sarah.

Sarah now feels propelled in other directions—an upcoming book on sustainability has allowed her to quell her manic moods with long bursts of concentration and writing. But her personal journey is far more complex than her business one.

“Giving them my business would be like taking a child from me. My community owns it in any event, and they have always trusted me to do the right thing. It would be the ultimate disloyalty to hand over their email addresses to someone who has not earned their trust.” While her investment portfolio has been geared to provide her with an average wage to get by on, Sarah avoids the trappings of overt wealth in favour of a peripatetic lifestyle. She doesn’t own a car (she’s been a bike fanatic since childhood), and the concept of settling into a three-bedroom home would feel to her like a jail sentence. Ironically, a number of parties came forward in the wake of the business closure wanting to buy some of the assets, such as the technology platform she built, and the recipes she created. She put out an expression of interest proposition that committed to all

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Sarah has been trying for the past two years to have a child. For many years, she assumed she was infertile due to her Hashimoto’s. When she fell pregnant to her then partner in 2016, Sarah felt a surge of utter surprise—and contentment. She then suffered a miscarriage and the relationship broke down in its wake. At 44, Sarah is heartbreakingly candid about her desire to love. And to be loved. “I’ve grown up with lots of kids around, I am particularly protective, I enjoy children and the company of kids. I think I have a young spirit. “I don’t do regrets. I have gone and worked hard and achieved abundance. But do I feel sadness about not having a partner or a child? Absolutely, to my very core. And at this point a part of me feels completely undernourished.”

On the topic of men, Sarah philosophises: “I have an answer for most things but I don’t have an answer to why I am still single. I am optimistic and so open, but I’ve also been stood up three times in the last fortnight.” She did glean an insight when a past date admitted, “I always get a sense you’re on your way to somewhere important.” As a result, her last two pregnancies—also heartbreakingly unsuccessful—have been through overseas donor insemination. In keeping with her personal thoughts about 'allowing' things to come, not forcing them, Sarah won’t bring herself to undergo IVF. “I think I would feel vain if I forced the whole pregnancy thing. The urge to have a baby is absolutely real but I’ve watched lot of friends go through IVF, the costs, the needles, the heartbreak. I have a very happy Plan B, which is to foster a child. “If I can’t bring a baby into the world in a natural and flowing way then I want to share my life with one of the 40,000 kids who needs a family. That, to me, makes far more sense. And it is authentic to my sense of who I am and how I want to live.” ¡


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MAGA ZINE I S S U E NO.13

The

e l b a t local A

P H O T O G R A P H Y

S T Y L I N G

TIM BEAN

BELINDA NEAME

Elevate the simple act of laying the table with these handmade wares, crafted with love by local artisans.

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HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

4.

7.

5.

7.

3. 2. 6.

3. 6.

6. 1.

7.

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9.


MAGA ZINE I S S U E NO.13

1.

ANNA GIANAKIS

Double Walled Creamer (RRP $70 each) in Dark Brown/Grey. Available from

@annagianakis

2.

BEV HOGG

Ceramic Takeaway Cup Made Permanent (RRP $40 each) in Green and Grey.

6.

POLKA LUKA

Luna Salad Bowl (RRP $85) in Black Swirl. Sabi Bowl (RRP $30) in Black Swirl. Frida Small Plate (RRP $40) in Black Swirl. Salt & Relish Bowl Set (RRP $45) in Black Swirl. Resin Cheese Platter (RRP $59.50) in Black Swirl. Available from Bison

polkaluka.com.au

Available from

@bev_hogg

7.

BISON 3.

ALISON JACKSON

Butter Knives (RRP $135 each) in Stainless Steel. Big Spoons (RRP $165 each) in Stainless Steel.

ORI Oil Vinaigrette Set (RRP $65) in Truffle. ORI Cup and Saucer (RRP $49 per cup and saucer) in Truffle. Main plate (RRP $49) in Emerald. Available from

bisonhome.com

Available from

alisonjackson.com.au 8. 4.

GIRL NOMAD CERAMICS

Milkyway Medium Pourer (RRP $40) in Grey.

TA B L E BY C U R I O U S TA L E S

(RRP price on consignment). Available from

curioustales.com.au

Available from

girlnomadceramics.com 9.

5.

MADE BY MARCELLE

Round Concrete Pot (RRP $34) in Grey.

REMY’S BAKERY

Baugette (RRP $5 each). Available from 8 Townsville St, Fyshwick.

Available from

@madeby_marcelle

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HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

7.

1.

4.

3.

5.

1.

2.

2.

3.

1.

5. 3.

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MAGA ZINE I S S U E NO.13

4.

T W I G TO TA B L E

1.

BISON

Main Plate (RRP $49), Utensils Pot (RRP $87), ORI Creamer (RRP $25), ORI Teapot (RRP $149), all in Milk. LouLou Vase (RRP $39) in Clear. Available from

bisonhome.com

Simple Spoon (RRP $40) in Southern Myrtle. Set of Salad Servers (RRP $90) in Southern Myrtle. Slanted Cooking Spoon (RRP $45) in Southern Myrtle. Available from

twigtotable.com.au

5.

LUCY GEMMA DESIGN

2.

POLKA LUKA

Luna Medium Bowl (RRP $30) and Salt & Relish Bowl Set (RRP $45), both in White Swirl.

Ceramic Nesting Bowls (RRP large $48, medium $38) in Mottled White. Tea Light Holders (RRP $22 each) in Mottled White. Available from Bison

@mslucygemma

Available from

polkaluka.com.au

6.

TA B L E BY C U R I O U S TA L E S

(RRP - price on consignment). 3.

ALISON JACKSON

Little Spoons (RRP $98 for set of 2) in Stainless Steel. Paddle Spoons (RRP $1300 for set of 2) in Fine Silver. Paddle I + II ($1500 for set of 2) in Sterling Silver. Available from

alisonjackson.com.au

Available from

curioustales.com.au

7.

REMY’S BAKERY

Almond Crossaints (RRP $6.50 each). Available from 8 Townsville St, Fyshwick.

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HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

6.

5.

8.

3.

1. 2.

3.

7.

3.

8.

7.

5. 10.

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4.


MAGA ZINE I S S U E NO.13

1.

6.

BISON

ANNIE TREVILLIAN

Small Milk Bottle (RRP $31) in Stormcloud.

Shine Dome Tea Towel (RRP $40) in Linen & Black.

Available from

bisonhome.com

Available from

annietrevillian.com 2. 7.

ANNA GIANAKIS

Double Walled Espresso Cup with Copper Detail (RRP $60 each) in Dark Brown/Grey. Available from

@annagianakis

ALISON JACKSON

Paddle I + II (RRP $1500 for set of 2) in Sterling Silver. Butter Knives (RRP $135 each) in Stainless Steel. Available from

www.alisonjackson.com.au 3. 8.

GIRL NOMAD CERAMICS

Dawn Pourer (RRP $30) in Light Grey. Milky Way Tapered Cup (RRP $45) in Grey. Milky Way Cake Plate (RRP $35) in Grey. Milky Way Bowl (RRP $40) in Grey. Midnight Bowl (RRP $40) in Black. Milky Way Every Day Plate (RRP $45) in Grey.

LUCY GEMMA DESIGN

Small Ceramic Dish (RRP $14) in Speckled Sand. Planter (RRP $35) in Mottled White. Available from

@mslucygemma

Available from

girlnomadceramics.com 9.

TA B L E BY C U R I O U S TA L E S 4.

(RRP - price on consignment).

MADE BY MARCELLE

Available from

Round Concrete Pot (RRP $34) in Cookies&Cream.

curioustales.com.au

Available from

@madeby_marcelle

10.

REMY’S BAKERY

Sourdough Loaf (RRP $6.90 each). 5.

T W I G TO TA B L E

Coffee & Tea Scoop (RRP $40) in Australian Blackwood. Spreader Knife (RRP $22) Australian Blackwood. Tiny Scoop (RRP $22) in Australian Blackwood. Available from Bison

twigtotable.com.au

Available from 8 Townsville St, Fyshwick.

Big thanks To Thea and Pete Bollington for allowing us to use their shop space 'Meet Gather Collect' to shoot this feature.

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HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

TAKEAWAY tradition W O R D S

AMANDA WHITLEY

P H O T O G R A P H Y

TIM BEAN

Canberra’s food scene has exploded in recent years, and these days it’s as much about the fit-out as the food. But at the humble suburban takeaway, flavour is still king—and so is community.

GROWING UP, an after-school snack of potato scallops fresh from the deep fryer was my daily ritual. Crispy, salty, served up in a plain grease-stained paper bag, these golden morsels were the ultimate comfort food.

Formica the universal textures of the local milk bar. There were no designer touches, no carefully considered colour schemes, no Instagram account. The focus was on producing simple, flavourful food.

Burgers were big—laden with beetroot, bacon, egg, pineapple and more—and came with the compulsory splash of Rosella tomato sauce on a sesame seed bun.

Our tastes have become somewhat more sophisticated in recent years, but one thing has remained the same—our appetite for fare prepared with love.

Practicality was foremost, aesthetics an afterthought—stainless steel and

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We met the people behind three Canberra takeaways that show good food never goes out of style.


MAGA ZINE I S S U E NO.13

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HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

REGAL CHARCOAL CHICKEN A NGELO A ND M A RY GAL A NOPOULOS

Regal Charcoal Chicken’s barbequed birds are so mouth-watering that people have been known to travel from Canberra’s southside to Charnwood just to get their hands on them. In Galanopoulos family hands for more than 15 years, Regal Charcoal Chicken continues a family legacy of food that began in Angelo’s teenage years, working in the family takeaway business.

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MAGA ZINE I S S U E NO.13

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HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

THE IMPACT OF C A N B E R R A’ S F O O D B O O M

"Most people like to get their hands on a battered sav and handmade scallop."

“There is definitely a lot of competition in Canberra and many eateries, but I feel that each shop brings its own style and flare to the community. “Some people will love it while others won’t. The key is to love what you do and just produce the best you can for your customers.” THE ENDURING APPEAL OF T H E TA KE AWAY

“There aren’t many simple takeaways left. Most people like to get their hands on a battered sav and handmade scallop. This was the traditional style of food that a lot of us knew and loved.”

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THE BEST BITS

“The people we meet. The people we have created lifelong friendships with. Those who share a chat with us day in, day out and share many of life’s ups and downs. Those who support us and keep us in business. “We love preparing food. We take pride in providing the best we can. Although sometimes the day-to-day operation is stressful, our customers often put a smile on our face when they appreciate the food and service we give them. It’s hard work but we love it!”

Regal Charcoal Chicken, Charnwood Place, Charnwood.


MAGA ZINE I S S U E NO.13

LITTLE THEO’S A NTHON Y A ND AIMEE FERR ARO

In the 1980s, Theo’s at Kambah’s Carleton Street shops was the spot for a good old-fashioned burger and fully loaded pizza. In the days before smartphones, a video game machine kept customers busy while they awaited their spoils. Anthony and Aimee (a Kambah local) bought Theo’s in mid-2016, seeing an opportunity to bring back to life what was an iconic takeaway for the area. The result is a café melding old and new while serving up favourites.

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HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

IN DEMAND

“Definitely our handmade twicecooked potato scallops followed by our Whoa Mumma burger, crumbed fish and our 1979 pizza!”

"We love connecting with the community around us."

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THE HIPSTER FACTOR

“If anything, it has had a positive impact on us. People are a lot more discerning these days and they appreciate the effort we have gone to, from our fit-out and retaining the original 1970’s counter, to our cheeky menu names and that we make majority of our food in house.”

ALL ABOUT COMMUNITY

“It’s local owners, employing local people and feeding the locals! We love the people—interacting with so many different people on a daily basis is really rewarding and we love connecting with the community around us.”

Little Theo’s, 3 Carleton Street, Kambah.


MAGA ZINE I S S U E NO.13

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HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

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MAGA ZINE I S S U E NO.13

WATTLE SNACK BAR KEITH AND AMANDA LOWMAN

Tucked away in a quiet corner of Dundas Court in Phillip is an unassuming takeaway that does a roaring trade. Linger awhile at Wattle Snack Bar and you’ll see a passing parade of tradies, schoolkids, and officeworkers keen for the fast food fix. For Keith and Amanda, it’s about knowing what they do best rather than keeping up with the Joneses, and that’s making fresh food that their customers love.

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M A D E F RO M S C R ATC H

“We make our own potato scallops, battered savs, seafood sticks, hamburger patties—people come a long way for our chips and gravy too! “We introduced our own range of gourmet pies and have won many awards in Australia's best pie competitions—they’re usually sold out within a very short time of them coming out of the oven!” MORE THAN JUST FOOD

“Our food is actually a reflection of the person cooking or creating it; much like you get in a restaurant, it's just the type of food that differs. “The effort that goes into running and improving these small businesses is felt and tasted in the foods that are presented; and people can tell the difference.”

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SERVICE NEVER GOES OUT OF STYLE

“We all still like personal service; and we pride ourselves in greeting people by name and getting to know them, what they do, listening to what is going on in their lives. “That sense of community is still alive and well and it happens mostly in small businesses like ours.”

Wattle Snack Bar, 32 Dundas Court, Phillip. ¡

"Our food is actually a reflection of the person cooking or creating it."


MAGA ZINE I S S U E NO.13

TAKING the CAKE The changing face of kids’ parties W O R D S

L AUR A PEPPAS

Three-tier cakes, horses dressed as unicorns, flower walls—are kids’ parties becoming the new wedding?

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HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

WHEN LYDIA SIMS* turned up to her friend’s four-year-old daughter’s birthday party, she found herself walking around shocked. “There were waiters holding canapés, a petting zoo, floral displays, champagne fountains, a three-course seated meal, two jumping castles and three-tier cakes,” she says. “When they went home, every child received jewellery. The whole thing probably cost more than my wedding.” Twenty years ago, children’s parties used to be relatively simple—parents would call their local fast food store and book a table, perhaps grabbing a halfmelted ice-cream cake along the way or paper hats if they were feeling particularly festive. Now most children’s parties are akin to weddings: think threetier cakes, flower walls, heavily detailed decorations matching a specific theme, gift registries and live entertainment. There isn’t a fairy bread or ‘pin the tail on the donkey’ in sight.

Eden-Mae's 1st Birthday, Photography by Varga Murphy, Styling by Naomi of For The Dreamers Blog

for each child, floral bouquets, candles and pearls; while a recent pamper party included pedicures, champagne fountains (filled with juice) and a dessert buffet.

One quick look through social media group ‘Party Mums’—a forum for parents to post photos and share ideas for parties—shows the level of creativity and detail parents are going to when planning.

Some mothers in the group scramble for last-minute birthday ideas; others admit they started planning for their child’s first birthday as early as when their baby was still in the womb.

One poster had a ‘My Little Pony’ themed party complete with grazing platters, an appropriately themed dessert buffet and real life little ponies for children to ride.

And while the rise of Instagram and Pinterest are certainly responsible for the more lavish trends, there’s also the celebrity factor.

Another ‘high tea’ themed party included delicate china tea settings

When Beyoncé’s daughter Blue Ivy turned four, the budget was close

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to $270,000 for her fairy princess party, complete with extravagant floral arrangements, fairy chairs and hanging greenery. Closer to home, shoe designer Terry Biviano has made an artform out of her daughter Azura’s birthday parties—her most recent included life-sized unicorn statues, three dessert carts and a gigantic threetier unicorn cake with a gold spiral horn. And it’s not just birthdays that are getting a look-in: you can’t scroll for long on Instagram before finding a perfectly styled baby shower, gender reveal or christening celebration (there’s even been a few ‘first tooth’ parties, complete with tooth shaped cakes.)


MAGA ZINE I S S U E NO.13

"YOU CA N’T SCROLL FOR LONG ON INSTAGRAM BEFORE FIN DING A PER FECTLY STYLED BABY SHOWER, GENDER REVEAL OR CHRISTENING CEL EBR AT ION."

But while celebrities may have cash to splash, the average parent doesn’t have the same budget. Yet many are spending more than ever: about 26 per cent of parents told BabyCenter.com that they spent more than $500 for their little one’s first birthday, while Sydney event stylist Phillip Carr recently revealed his clients drop anywhere from $10,000 to $50,000 on their children’s events.

Someone who has seen her fair share of children’s parties is Madlin Sims, the owner of local business Capital Kids Parties, which provides entertainment and decorations for parties in Canberra and its surrounds. Madlin believes Instagram and Pinterest have had a “massive influence” on the way people are hosting children’s parties now. “Before that, people never really got into colour themes, creative games or these elaborate party gifts—they’d just get the standard lolly bags from the supermarket,” she says. “Now it’s all very detailed, parents are really getting into the whole thing: entertainment, dessert buffets, decorations, party favours and games.”

So are parties becoming less about the kids, and more about parents fulfilling a creative outlet? “Oh for sure,” says Madlin. “When you’re a parent, everything you do is about your kids. And I think parents feel guilty when they take time out for themselves or have a hobby, so planning a party for their kid is kind of the best of both worlds, it’s for the child but it’s sort of also for the adult.” Madlin says one of her more extravagant requests was a 'Mad Hatter’ themed children’s birthday party, with a high tea at Hyatt Hotel Canberra. “The mum hired a Mad Hatter, Alice in Wonderland and a White Rabbit entertainer. For the party, they had to act out scenes from the book. It was over the top but very cool. “Our customers vary, however— some are single mums who love having parties for their kids but try not to go overboard in spending, then we have other customers who say ‘I don’t care how much it costs, this is what I want.'” She adds that one of her most popular requests at the moment is for unicorn parties—“and everyone’s still asking for Elsa [from Frozen] or Spiderman at their parties.” Madlin agrees there is more pressure on mums and dads now than ever before to keep up with the changing trends. “I think that’s in part because of social media, everyone’s looking at people’s lives so easily now, you can see what others are doing and you feel like you should be doing it too,” she says.

Frankie's 1st Birthday, Photography by Ruby + Ted, Styling by Willow + Bear

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"WE’VE SEEN IT ALL; FROM HORSES DRESSED AS UNICORNS TO E X T R AVAG A N T F LOW E R WA L L S SMOTHERED IN THOUSANDS OF ROSES."

“We’ve also seen dessert trends come and go,” she says.

Colourful Summer Pool Party, Photography by Hails and Shine, Styling by We Love Sundays + Lark Store

“I think that goes for not just parties but all aspects of parenting— you feel guilty about things you shouldn’t feel guilty about. There can be an element of competition with these parties when they are posted on social media, but I think it’s subconscious—not because we want to be better than that person, more that we would like that for our child too. “It can be really hard when kids go to a fairly extravagant party and don’t know why their parents can’t afford to have petting zoos and ponies too, because the younger kids don’t yet have a grasp that some people just have more money than others. But I think if you can educate kids early on about that concept, then they can have an understanding.” PAGE 50

One publication providing daily party inspiration is Hooray, a locally produced website and magazine that vows to “celebrate the art of entertaining.” Editor Emily Coates says she has seen everything from large-scale balloon installations to extravagant flower walls at children’s parties. “We’ve seen it all; from horses dressed as unicorns to extravagant flower walls smothered in thousands of roses… some parties spare no expense,” she says. As for trends, they “change like the wind”, but at the moment, unicorns, glamping sleepovers, mermaids, boho and woodlands themed parties are very much ‘in’, according to Emily.

“Lately, we’ve been seeing a lot of grazing tables, doughnut walls, naked and semi-naked cakes, smash cakes and drip cakes. “Also, number cakes from the 1990s are on their way back—but not the classic sponge cake you’ll remember. The new number cake is ornately decorated with puffs of cream, fresh fruit and florals. “Anecdotally, parents are spending more time, money and energy on kids’ parties than they were 10 years ago.” Mother of two Louise Pye, of Fadden, says she usually spends three to four months planning for parties for her boys Henry, 1, and James, 4. This includes sourcing decorations, ordering cakes or cupcakes and sending out invitations to fit the theme. Some of her party themes have included Winnie the Pooh, Woodland creatures and Peter Rabbit.


MAGA ZINE I S S U E NO.13

Mia Grace's 2nd Birthday, Photography by Steph Brown, Styling by Sarah of She is Sarah-Jane Blog

WHAT'S TRENDING AT K IDS PA RTIES

TOP THEMES

The key to avoiding party-planning stress, according to Emily, is to “just go with the flow and enjoy it.” “For our Winnie the Pooh celebration our decorations included a beehive smash cake, cupcakes with edible bees, a tree with hanging beehive cookies,” Louise says. “For the Woodland party, our cake was a tree stump with a 3D bear on the top, and we had cupcakes with edible toadstools. The kids— and adults—loved it.” Louise says she always sets a budget of about $300–400 and usually sticks to it. “I think everyone wants a party that is Instagram-worthy these days,” she says. “Gone are the days of dragging mattresses into the lounge room for a girls sleepover. Now every child gets an individual tepee with fairy lights and matching PJ sets. If you love party planning like I do, this is great, but if you don't you may feel pressured to match what other parents are doing— which can be exhausting and financially straining.”

“It doesn’t have to be huge and expensive. It doesn’t have to be a Pinterest-perfect DIY affair. After all, the kids aren’t going to care whether you DIY’d the décor,” she says. “My advice is to think about what the mini partygoers will find fun and centre the occasion around that. Clear a play space and plan age-appropriate activities to keep the kids entertained—a colouring in table, some fun dancing music and a floor scattered in balloons will do the trick.” Madlin agrees that going back to basics and remembering who the day is for, is the best approach. “While it is nice that these parties can create great memories, at the end of the day I don’t think parents should put themselves into financial hardship trying to outdo one another or because of the pressure—they should remember that they are the centre of their child’s universe and that’s what matters.”

Unicorns Mermaids Jungle/Woodlands

ENTERTAI N M ENT

Petting zoos Glamping Pamper parties

CAKE TRENDS

Number shaped-cakes with macarons and fresh florals Unicorn cakes Colourful drip cakes

D ECO R ATI O N S

Flower walls Doughnut walls Balloon garlands

*name has been changed

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MAGA ZINE I S S U E NO.13

Beside the Seaside A

W O R D S

BELINDA NEAME

P H O T O G R A P H Y

TIM BEAN

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MAGA ZINE I S S U E NO.13

Baked soft white cheese A INGREDIENTS

250g good quality soft white cheese Honeycomb Seasonal fruits that work with soft white cheese (pears, figs) Sliced bread Walnuts

METHOD

Preheat your oven to 180 degrees and place the cheese (we used Brie) in a small cast iron pot. Place the cheese in the oven with the lid on and bake for 10–15 minutes. The baking time will depend on how soft and gooey you want your cheese. Remove from the oven and place half of the honeycomb on top of the cheese. You can find honeycomb at any good deli or speciality supermarket. Arrange the fruits, bread, walnuts and remaining honeycomb on a piece of wood, or large wooden board, and start scooping away!

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HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

tti marinara SpagheA INGREDIENTS

METHOD

2 tablespoons olive oil

In a large saucepan, heat olive oil over medium heat. Add the onion and cook until softened (about 3–4 minutes). Add the garlic and wine, and simmer for 2 minutes. Add in the crushed tomatoes and paste and simmer for 15–20 minutes until slightly thickened. Stir occasionally to make sure nothing is sticking. Season with salt and pepper.

1 onion, finely chopped 3 garlic cloves, crushed 1 cup dry white wine 2 x 400 grams cans crushed tomatoes Salt and pepper, to season 500 grams good quality spaghetti 500 grams good-quality marinara mix (or seafood of choice) 300 grams black mussels, debearded 3 tablespoons tomato paste 2 tablespoons flat-leaf parsley

Meanwhile, cook the pasta in boiling, salted water until al dente. Drain and toss in a little olive oil. Add marinara mix (or seafood of choice) and mussels to the tomato sauce and stir through thoroughly. Cover with lid and cook for 3–4 minutes over medium heat, discarding any mussels that do not open. To serve, toss the sauce through the pasta and serve topped with parsley.

Recipe adapted from taste.com.au PAGE 56


MAGA ZINE I S S U E NO.13

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A INGREDIENTS

METHOD

2 large Granny Smith apples, peeled and finely chopped

Preheat your oven to 180 degrees. Grease a 19cm square cake pan and line the base with baking paper.

1 cup dates, chopped and pitted 1 teaspoon bicarbonate of soda 1 cup boiling water 125 grams unsalted butter at room temperature 1 cup caster sugar 1 teaspoon of good quality vanilla extract 1 egg 1 ½ cups plain flour 1/3 cup walnuts, chopped

In a bowl, combine the apples, dates, soda and boiling water. Stir and cover and allow to stand until warm. In the meantime, beat the butter, sugar and extract until light and fluffy. Add the egg and beat until well combined. Stir in the sifted flour alternately with the apple mixture and mix until well combined. Stir through the walnuts. Transfer the mixture to the prepared pan and even out. Bake for 50 minutes and then spread with the topping. Bake for a further 30 minutes or until the topping is golden brown. Cool the cake in the tin.

TOPPING

60 grams unsalted butter ½ cup milk 2/3 cup shredded coconut ½ cup brown sugar

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TOPPING

Combine the butter, milk, sugar and coconut in a small saucepan. Stir over low heat until the butter is melted and the sugar is dissolved.

Recipe adapted from the Australian Women’s Weekly ¡


MAGA ZINE I S S U E NO.13

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ABOVE BEYOND and

W O R D S

BEATRICE SMITH

Canberra women aren’t just changing our city. They’re changing our world. We meet two Canberra women with a taste for something outside the confines of a nine-to-five workplace, and driven to make a difference.

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MAGA ZINE I S S U E NO.13

EVENT ORGANISER TURNED REFUGEE CAMP LOGISTICIAN

Anna Haskovec has crammed a lot into 27 years. From rural roots at her parents’ property in Murrumbateman, she’s voyaged on a Sea Shepherd expedition, been a producer’s assistant at the Sydney Opera House, a logistician at a Ugandan refugee camp and is currently transporting tuberculosis treatment via raft to remote communities in Papua New Guinea (PNG). As you might expect, her journey to these varied career points was not a straight one but it is one built around a desire to help. For Anna, it all started when she took a job repairing Sea Shepherd vessels in Port Melbourne.

“I joined because I wanted to be a part of protecting ocean wildlife,” she explains via email from where she’s currently based in PNG. “The Antarctic waters are a total wild west, there is no law enforcement or fisheries patrols protecting the sanctuaries or endangered species. Antarctica and its sea life deserve protection from us. “I went on to sail with them and spent three months out at sea. Sailing the Ross Sea was incredible, the seascape was amazing—the depth and complexity of icebergs is honestly unreal, like incredible floating kingdoms made out of 100 shades of blue.”

Back on dry land once more, Anna worked in events management at the Sydney Opera House and for Melbourne’s Federation Square (as well as a stint in Nepal, where she got stuck during the 2015 earthquake). While Anna enjoyed the roles, the refugee crisis in the Mediterranean was reaching epic proportions, so she reached out to German organisation Jugend Rettet. “Jugend Rettet [is] a German group committed to the fact that everyone at sea deserves rescue,” she explains. “This really resonated with me. As a seafarer you have an obligation to assist vessels in need. You don’t get to ask for their citizenship status before you drag them on-board.” So Anna booked a one-way ticket, spending the next few months at the forefront of the search and rescue operation in international waters. PAGE 61


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“It was pretty scary to be honest... because I knew that were we were headed we were really the end of the line. We operated the SAR search and rescue zone off the coast of Libya on the lookout for people in distress.” Even though Anna had been through Sea Shepherd’s rigorous training when it came to safety at sea, the stories of the people they helped have stayed with her. “The people that we were dealing with have been looking for safety for often years,” she says. “They have been escaping wars, crossing deserts being used as slaves in Tripoli and have nothing, not a single possession. “The one thing I noticed that a lot of them carried were small

PAGE 62

bits of paper—letters from loved ones, scraps of paper with phone numbers on them. Small enough to be hidden and personal enough to not be of worth to anyone else and not stolen.

With all this behind her, it’s unsurprising that Anna chose to apply for a role with the international aid organisation Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors Without Borders (MSF).

“The last rescue that we did I remember one women in particular. I found some new clothes for her from our donations and she took them, gladly discarding her old clothes—literally the last things she owned in the world.

“It happened pretty organically for me,” she says. “My mum has been a donor for years so I had always known about MSF and it just seemed like they were doing the kind of work I wanted to do.

“During this process we didn’t make eye contact or speak at all. But by the end she looked at me and she gave me a small nod. This was, to be honest, the best feeling I’ve ever had in the world. In hindsight she was probably in shock but this little flicker of her really meant a lot to me.”

“I really loved their integrity and independence and their ability to respond in emergencies—MSF can deploy a group of people and an inflatable hospital in just a matter of weeks to people in need. I just thought that was incredible and I wanted to be a part of it.”


MAGA ZINE I S S U E NO.13

"THER E’S L ITTL E TH AT SEPA R ATES US A S H U M A NS, E XCEP T LUCK."

Anna jokes that her experience in event management “parallels pretty nicely with working in a refugee camp... I mean [whether] you are a citizen or not, everyone needs toilets, water, good signage and a clear exit route!”.

of the refugee community’s needs. My favourite part of the hospital was always the maternity ward; whenever I would drop in to check on the building or the biomedical equipment I would get to see some very happy new families.”

unsure of what the future will hold. For the moment, she’s currently helping MSF tackle the issue of PNG’s “massive” tuberculosis problem, helping the organisation deliver treatment to remote, low density areas.

So she applied for the role of Logistician and she soon found herself in Uganda, working in the Bidi Bidi Refugee Camp, which she explains was a camp for South Sudanese refugees “fleeing violence in their home regions”.

Having just become an aunt for the first time, Anna believes that there’s little that separates us as humans, except luck.

As for those whose lifestyle prevents them from, say, jumping on a rescue ship in the Mediterranean, Anna says there’s a lot we can do close to home.

“We built a functioning maternity unit, inpatient ward, nutritional feeding center and outpatient department out of timber, plastic sheeting and a whole lot of determination,” she says. “Of course, even these mammoth efforts only respond to a small part

“We all just want to live happily with our families and have enough money to eat food and drink clean water,” she says. “But we’re luckier then some, which is one of the reasons I wanted to work in contexts like these.” As you might realise by now, Anna says that she always knew a “9–5” wasn’t the life for her, but is

“In Australia and in Canberra, a lot of us have the opportunity to make a difference,” she says. “Whether that’s donating to an organisation you feel passionate about or spending your time with them. You’re totally capable of making a difference in someone’s life, just choose to do it yourself.” PAGE 63


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Chloe Breakwell GLOBE TROT TING VE TERINARIAN A N D W I L D L I F E C O N S E R VAT I O N I S T

As children, many of us would have dreamed of being a carer for exotic animals, travelling the world to explore some of our rarest fauna. But one woman who held on to these dreams and then made them a reality is Chloe Breakwell. After completing her schooling in Canberra, Chloe studied Veterinary Science at the University of Melbourne before taking off across the world. But it all started with a humble house cat. PAGE 64

“As the story commonly goes for people within my profession, I have wanted to be a vet for as long as I remember,” says Chloe. “Funnily enough, initially I think it was my cat Pep who motivated me. Being an only child who moved around a lot, I never felt lonely with him.” Chloe explains that Pep’s role in her family showed her the extraordinary bond between animals and humans. At age 12, Chloe moved with her family to Lord Howe Island, a tiny but diverse ecosystem in the Pacific, which is where her passion for the exotic began. “I fell in love with the beauty of our natural environment, and the magnificent creatures within it. I think it was from here that I started to look at the bigger picture and my role within it, and I begun to be driven by a desire to 'do my part' in the world.”


MAGA ZINE I S S U E NO.13

As soon as Chloe finished her veterinary studies, she set about this with gusto, working towards what she describes as her overall goal—working in the field of species conservation and environmental health. Chloe says that, with this in mind, it’s no surprise that she ended up in Africa, learning to work with some of the rarest and most dangerous animals in the world. "SPECIES ARE BEING DRIVEN TO EXTINCTION AT THE H A N DS OF P OACH E R SA"

“Africa is a continent that is so diverse and unlike anywhere else on this planet,” she says. “Amongst such beauty of the plains, jungles, savannas, mountains, beaches and wildlife you have the horror of poverty, desperation and conflict. “Species are being driven to extinction at the hands of poachers in a situation that has seen rhino horn become the most valuable commodity on the face of the earth.” As a result of this, Chloe describes Africa as a hotbed of conservation innovation, with people from all around the world coming together in an attempt to halt the depressing statistics of extinction and poaching that plague the continent. For her, it was the perfect place to learn unique skills for handling these animals, such as darting animals with sedatives from a helicopter and translocating elephants and giraffes. “A memorable experience would have to be the time I was chased by an angry rhino. She had recently been woken from an anaesthetic in the field, and she had wandered back off into the bush.

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"The team and I were walking back to the trucks with our equipment and I was talking with a good friend of mine when we heard hooves and grunting behind us...before I knew it everyone was either up a tree or behind one, and my friend with whom I was talking had taken off at a speed Usain Bolt would be jealous of. “As I'm not much of a runner nor an agile tree climber, the rhino was quickly gaining ground on me when out of nowhere I remembered an obscure piece of advice I’d once received—‘if a rhino is ever chasing you, take a 90 degree turn either left or right as they are fast but no good at turning’. Very helpful and couldn’t have come at a more perfect time—I quickly managed to get out of her way!” From that adrenaline-inducing experience to learning to translocate a fully grown male

PAGE 66

"IF A RHINO IS EVER CHASING YOU, TAKE A 90 DEGREE TURN EITHER LEFT OR RIGHT"

giraffe (you sit on its neck, apparently), it’s no surprise that Chloe has some great stories from over the years, though they’re not all necessarily hair-raising. “A sea lion I once worked with in a zoo became famous after chewing the lock off his enclosure one night so he could have a swim around in the big pool,” she laughs. “He didn't stop there, though, he methodically went around to all

the other cages and removed all the locks from them so that all the sea lions were free to have a bit of a party until the keepers found them the next morning!” While Chloe’s recent travels have included visiting the Charles Darwin research facility in the Galapagos Islands, where she saw giant albatross and met some of the oldest tortoises in the world, she’s currently doing “nothing vet-related” in Germany, where she’s living for the next few months in preparation for her wedding there in July. What she is doing is learning German, which she says is “MUCH harder than vet school!” As for her next adventure? You’ll just have to wait and see. You can follow Chloe and her travels on her Instagram at @jungle_doctor. ¡


MAGA ZINE I S S U E NO.13

The

BUCKET LIST W O R D S

AMANDA WHITLEY

100 Canberra food experiences you must have before you die.

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4.

7.

Sexy squid from Griffith Vietnamese— 'sexy' fried squid laced with fiery chilli.

Enigma chocolates— local chocolately goodness, crafted with care.

6B Barker Street, Griffith.

enigmafinechocolates.com.au

38 Mort Street, Braddon. bakedonmort.com.au

18 Barker Street, Griffith. aubergine.com.au

16 Iluka Street, Narrabundah.

8.

Baked On Mort’s apple rose tarts.

A stalwart on an always evolving menu: Aubergine’s brown butter ice cream, almond praline and frozen lemon verbena milk.

XO’s Asian bolognese—everything you love about the Italian version with an Asian twist.

xo-restaurant.com.au

1.

2.

10 .

5. Hungry Brown Cows—handmade, soft fudgy brownie sandwiches filled with a variety of different flavours.

Some may swear by eightysix’s caramel popcorn sundae, but for us it’s the banoffee pie all the way. A salty biscuity base, rich dulce de leche, fresh banana, whipped cream and pretzels combine for a flavour explosion.

Corner of Eloura and Lonsdale Streets, Braddon. eightysix.com.au

Find them at markets around Canberra.

11 . A Pâtissez freakshake— the milkshake on steroids that made headlines around the world.

21 Bougainville Street, Griffith. patissez.com.au

3. A Turkish kebab roll from Yarralumla Turkish Halal Pide House— fresh, generous and absolutely delicious.

45 Novar Street, Yarralumla. turkishhalalpidehouse.com.au

6.

12 .

Pho Phu Quoc's pho. Order the traditional rare beef noodle soup and slurp your way through a giant bowl of fresh flavours with just the right amount of bite.

Laksa at Dickson Asian Noodle House.

Sammy’s Kitchen Penang-style char kway teow—king prawns, Chinese sausages, bean sprouts, chives and chilli.

5 Badham Street, Dickson.

29 Woolley Street, Dickson.

9 Bunda Street, Canberra City.

9.

sammyskitchen.com.au

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MAGA ZINE I S S U E NO.13

19 . 16 . Jasper & Myrtle chocolates—exotic flavours made right here in Canberra.

13 .

Various retailers and markets.

Chanchito, Mr. Papa’s Peruvian pork belly sandwich. Slow-cooked and juicy pork belly, golden-fried sweet potato, Creole salsa and homemade chillies, all served in ‘Pan Frances’ Peruvian-inspired bread made by local bakers.

jasperandmyrtle.com.au

Krofne—Croatian yeastraised donuts, amazingly light and fluffy and filled with jam or Nutella.

Find them at markets around Canberra.

bluginger.com.au

23.

Pulp Kitchen's lemon tart.

pulp-kitchen.com.au

ANU Pop-Up, University Avenue, Acton.

20. Grease Monkey’s Dirty Bird—an upmarket version of the Colonel’s, it’s finger lickin’ good.

mrpapa.com.au

Blu Ginger’s Jahingiri lamb, tender meat simmered in coconut milk, fresh and ground masala and finished in rich gravy of brown onion and fresh spinach.

5 Genge Street, Canberra.

17 . 1 Wakefield Gardens, Ainslie.

22.

Italian and Son's tiramisu.

7 Lonsdale Street, Braddon. italianandsons.com.au

19 Lonsdale Street, Braddon. greasys.com.au

14 . Lolo and Lola’s Merienda Cena– Filipino afternoon tea.

3 Watson Place, Watson. loloandlola.com.au

15 . Truffle brunch/lunch at The Truffle Farm.

23 Mount Majura Road, Majura. thetrufflefarm.com.au

18 . Goodberry’s gives you the best of the frozen yogurt and sundae worlds, with their American frozen custard. We love the vanilla with Good Time biscuits and Flake.

20 Gartside Street, Erindale and 4/25 Lathlain Street, Belconnen. goodberrys.com.au

21. CBD Dumpling House’s fried prawn and pumpkin dumplings.

Canberra Centre, 148 Bunda Street, Canberra. Photo VisitCanberra

Photo VisitCanberra

24. Sweet Bones' Bacon Cheeze burger. OK, so it's not really bacon, and it's not really cheese. But it is really delicious. This vegan meal tastes so good you'll forget all about the meat.

18 Lonsdale Street, Braddon. sweetbonescompany.com

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27. Agostinis’ Frico— paper-thin layers of Montasio and potato, oven roasted to form a heavenly, crunchy, chewy pancake.

69 Canberra Avenue, Griffith. agostinis.com.au

25.

Photo VisitCanberra

30. Bollywood Masala's Bollywood Dahl. 'Heaven in a bucket'–a rich bean and lentil mix swimming in a deliciously rich and mildly spicy sauce with butter and cream.

46 Giles Street, Kingston.

Remy's Fougasse.

8 Townsville Crescent, Fyshwick.

33. Natural Nine’s mantou— a fluffy steamed bun filled with either bang bang chicken, kung pao pork or sensational salmon.

Casino Canberra, 21 Binara Street, Canberra. natural9.com.au

bollywoodmasala.com.au

remysbakery.com.au

28.

26. Little Theo’s Papa McCheesy burger with two beef patties, sliced Monterey Jack and Egmont cheddar, dill pickles, caramelised onion, tomato sauce and American mustard, with a side of housemade potato scallops.

3 Carleton Street, Kambah.

Ottoman's salmon dolmades. Generous chunks of succulent salmon are wrapped with their companion ingredients in vine leaves before hitting the deep‑fryer.

9 Broughton Street, Barton.

31. Mee's sushi. There’s a reason why people queue every day for their lunchtime fix.

45-55 West Row, Canberra and 4/1 Flinders Way, Griffith.

Photo VisitCanberra

Deconstructed G&T at Tipsy Bull. Some may roll their eyes at the hipster presentation but there’s no denying the taste.

2/5 Lonsdale Street, Braddon.

ottomancuisine.com.au

tipsybull.com.au

29. Barrio's cheese toasties. Who knew something simple could taste so good?

59/30 Lonsdale Street, Braddon. barriocollective.com

32. Akiba's pork belly bun, char sui, asian slaw. Crispy and creamy inside a soft pillowy bun.

40 Bunda Street, Canberra. akiba.com.au

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MAGA ZINE I S S U E NO.13

37. Bruno’s Truffels. Exquisite handmade freshcream, butter-based, soft‑centred truffels in more than 25 flavours.

2/106 Mawson Place, Mawson. brunostruffels.com.au

35. Silo Bakery’s baguette— lauded as the best in Australia, there’s a reason why people line up for it every morning.

36 Giles Street, Kingston. silobakery.com.au

Photo VisitCanberra

38.

Monster Kitchen and Bar’s pulled lamb shoulder—fall-apart tender and topped with pistachio, yoghurt, vine leaf, pomegranate and brik.

25 Edinburgh Avenue, Canberra. monsterkitchen.com.au

Frugii Dessert Laboratory may be known for ice-cream maker John Marshall’s wacky flavours, but his handmade dark chocolate ice cream is an undeniable classic that’s always on the menu.

28/30 Lonsdale Street, Braddon.

Canberra Glassworks, 11 Wentworth Avenue, Kingston, ANU Pop-Up, University Avenue, Kingston and Capital Brewing Co, Building 3/1 Dairy Road, Fyshwick.

42. Chairman & Yip’s roast duck and mushroom pancakes with a sweet and salty hoisin dressing have been a cult favourite for decades and are still every bit as popular today.

Brodburger’s flamegrilled burger, the Broddeluxe, may well be Canberra’s most popular burger, with its two half-pound beef patties, eggs, crispy bacon, homemade aioli, your choice of cheese and more!

also at

36.

39.

1 Burbury Close, Barton. chairmangroup.com.au

40. Kokomo's key lime pie.

1 Genge Street, Canberra. kokomos.com.au

brodburger.com.au

41. Pialligo Estate bacon— Australia’s best. Smoky and flavoursome, it’s a cut above.

18 Kallaroo Road, Pialligo. thepialligoestate.com.au

43. Arguably the best cheese selection in Canberra, the humble Ainslie IGA has an entire wall devoted to 150 varieties.

9/11 Edgar Street Ainslie.

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44. Teddy Picker’s Brekky Roll–crumbed brisket, red-eye mayo, pickled jalapeños, shallots and a fried egg with a yummy hash brown on the side.

53/65 Constitution Avenue, Campbell.

Photo VisitCanberra

47.

An educational cupping session at The Cupping Room. A unique and intimate coffee experience.

The Scholar’s scallop and chive dumplings.

23 Woolley Street, Dickson.

1/1–13 University Avenue, Canberra.

scholarrestaurant.com

50.

teddypickers.com.au

Morks’ soft shell crab roti, yellow curry, house pickles.

45.

18/19 Eastlake Parade, Kingston.

OTIS’ pepper steak. A French classic taken to modern heights.

52.

morks.com.au

29 Jardine Street, Kingston. thisisotis.com.au

thecuppingroom.com.au

53. ONA Manuka’s jalapeño, emmental and potato fritters, poached eggs, corn, snow pea tendrils, coriander aioli, lime.

Palmerston Lane, Griffith.

48.

onacoffee.com.au

Bar Rochford’s beef tartare, apple, squid ink crisp.

65 London Circuit, Canberra.

54.

barrochford.com

46. Vincent’s Peking duck: coriander, orange, chilli and cashew. Succulent pieces of duck are sandwiched between layers of crispy wontons, with a surprising addition of tart raspberries cutting perfectly through the rich flavours.

Corner of Macquarie Street & Broughton Street, Barton vincentrestaurant.com.au PAGE 72

49. RAKU’s toasted sesame ice cream with caramelised almonds, sticky miso caramel and matcha wafer.

Canberra Centre, 148 Bunda Street, Canberra. rakudining.com.au

Rama’s goat curry.

51. Trecento Margherita pizza—san marzano tomato, parmesan, fior di latte and basil pizza. You can’t beat the classics.

Manuka Terrace, Flinders Way, Griffith. trecento.com.au

Pearce Shopping Centre, Corner Macfarlane and Hodgson Crescent, Pearce. ramas.com.au Photo VisitCanberra


MAGA ZINE I S S U E NO.13

55. Any one of Bentspoke Brewing Co’s awardwinning craft beers.

59.

65.

Sfoglia’s Sfogliatella— traditional pastries handmade with love.

Space Kitchen’s Space Benedict pulled-pork croquette with poached eggs, beetroot hollandaise, pork-crackling brioche crumble and pea purée.

1/53–57 Woolley Street, Dickson. sfoglia.com.au

48/38 Mort Street, Braddon.

High Tea at Hyatt Canberra. A sweet tooth’s paradise.

bentspokebrewing.com.au

Breizh Café’s sugar and lemon crêpe.

15 Edgar Street, Ainslie. breizhcafecreperie.com

58. The Flute Bakery’s Jaffa Dome—dark chocolate and orange mousse, blood orange jelly, flourless orange cake, hazelnut and almond feuilletine.

space-kitchen.com.au

hyatt.com

Secret Garden’s eggplant burger—good enough to tempt the most devoted carnivore.

57.

12 Furzer Street, Phillip.

120 Commonwealth Avenue, Canberra.

56.

Manuka Village, 18-26 Furneaux Street, Griffith.

62.

63. 60. Joe’s Bar’s Cin Cin— Cinzano Bianco, mint, cucumber, ginger ale—and some moreish housemade popcorn with flavours that change with the seasons.

A Double Shot buildyour-own salad.

18 Duff Place, Deakin. doubleshotdeakin.com.au

61. Spence Family Bakery’s lamingtons.

12/10-12 Glassey Place, Spence.

The Duxton’s Breakfast of Champions cocktail— rum, maple syrup, cold press coffee and chocolate bitters. Who says it’s too early?

8 Macpherson Street, O’Connor.

69 Canberra Avenue, Griffith. joesateast.com

66.

theduxton.com.au Photo VisitCanberra

64. One of Stand By Me’s many amazing variations on French toast.

7/9 Lyons Place, Lyons.

67. Roast pork roll from Spit Shack.

14 Lonsdale Street, Braddon; 22A Beltana Road, Pialligo; 150–180 Soward Way, Greenway. spitshack.com.au

8 Barrier Street, Fyshwick. theflutebakery.com.au PAGE 73


HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

70.

77.

Kingsley’s chips. As awesome as the ads claim.

Locations across Canberra. kingsleyschicken.com

68. Molto Italian’s Spaghetti Cacio e Pepe, mixed and served straight from a massive wheel of cheese!

43 Eastlake Parade, Kingston Foreshore. moltoitalian.com

71. Reef & Beef from Charcoal Restaurant. An oldie but a goodie.

61 London Circuit, Canberra. charcoalrestaurant.com.au

74. The Mandalay Bus’ fried wings—crispy, no-frills deliciousness with a side of nostalgia.

Haig Park Carpark, Lonsdale Street, Braddon.

Toasted’s S’more Than a Feelin. Nutella, grilled marshmallows and biscuit crumble—on toast, of course!

22 Lonsdale Street, Braddon. wearetoasted.com.au

78. Au Lac’s Eight Treasure.

75.

4/35-39 Woolley Street, Dickson. aulac-restaurant.com.au

Butter chicken fries from Tikka Take. It shouldn’t work, but it does.

Photo VisitCanberra

72.

6/21 Genge Street, Canberra.

Malaysian Chapter’s Nasi Lemak with rendang.

tikkatake.com.au

Some Café’s chocolate and beetroot cake. Worth the road trip.

8 Weedon Close, Belconnen.

5/7 Murray Street, Collector.

malaysianchapter.com.au

somecafe.com.au

69. Wild Duck’s pork belly in lotus leaf: slow-cooked pork belly with three kinds of soy sauce, rock sugar and mixed spices, wrapped in lotus leaves with sticky rice.

77-78/71 Giles Street, Kingston. wild-duck.com.au

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73. Muse’s three hour free-flow sparkling wine brunch.

East Hotel, 69 Canberra Avenue, Kingston. musecanberra.com.au

79.

76. Le Bon Melange’s cinnamon rolls.

Corner Gungahlin Place and Bruning Street, Gungahlin. lebonmelange.com.au


MAGA ZINE I S S U E NO.13

82.

87.

Doughnut Department Buttermilk old-fashioned ring with white chocolate and freeze-dried raspberries.

Portia’s Place's King Island fillet steak with black pepper sauce in claypot.

2 Alinga Street, Canberra.

11 Kennedy Street, Kingston.

thedoughnutdept.com

80.

85. Ricardo’s breakfast waffle—blueberry waffle, fresh strawberries, freezedried raspberries, red apple gel, passionfruit curd and maple syrup ice cream.

Robyn Rowe Chocolates—the best chocolates this side of Belgium.

1153 Nanima Road, Murrumbateman.

Jamison Plaza, 1/1 Bowman Street, Macquarie.

robynrowechocolates.com.au

88. Tudo’s pork chop with crabmeat pate and broken rice.

2/7 Sargood Street, O’Connor.

ricardoscafe.com

83.

89.

Winifred’s Place Eggs Benny ravioli.

Buvette’s Sunday brunch with bottomless mimosas.

Fyshwick Fresh Food Markets, 12 Dalby Street, Fyshwick.

18 National Circuit, Barton. buvette.com.au

winifredsplace.com.au Photo VisitCanberra

81. Bombolini—sweet little Italian balls of joy stuffed with delectable fillings.

Kynefin, 2–4 Victoria Street, Hall. kynefin.com

84. Fyshwick Market Crust Bakery’s curried chickpea pie.

Fyshwick Fresh Food Markets, 12 Dalby Street, Fyshwick.

86. Penny University’s matcha green tea crepes.

15 Kennedy Street, Kingston. pennyuniversitycafe.com

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90. Abell’s Kopi Tiam’s Bali chicken in tamarind and coconut cream with aubergine and green beans.

7 Furneaux Street, Manuka. abellskopitiam.com.au

93. Les Bistronomes’ beef Wellington, mushroom duxelle, foie gras— black Angus beef fillet wrapped in crêpes and puff pastry.

Corner of Mort and Elouera Streets, Braddon. lesbistronomes.net

91.

96. Conservatory Restaurant’s Son-inlaw eggs–crispy deepfried poached eggs with caramel chilli, coriander and shallots.

Village Centre, National Arboretum, Forest Drive, Weston Creek. gingercatering.com.au

Lilotang’s grilled cauliflower walnut, anchovy garlic dressing—a side that deserves main billing.

99. 94.

Lazy Su’s Wagyu cheesesteak springroll.

Parmigiana – Wood Baked Eggplant, Smoked Ricotta and Pesto Genoese from Mezzalira.

lazy-su.com.au

55 London Circuit, Canberra. mezzalira.com.au

1/9 Lonsdale Street, Braddon.

97. Catch’s potato scallops.

92. Lanterne Rooms’ mud crab ‘Kam Heung style’.

Shop 3, Blamey Place Campbell. chairmangroup.com.au

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Dream Cuisine’s macarons and heavenly pastries made from scratch with cultured butter.

dreamcuisine.net.au

Burbury Hotel, 1 Burbury Close, Barton. llilotang.com.au

98.

95. A Supabowl Puffle.

40 Marcus Clarke Street, Canberra City. supabowl.com.au

Corner Lonsdale and Eloura Streets, Braddon. catchfishandchips.com.au

100. Ritual’s Rolo cookies— chocolate chip cookies with a Rolo in the middle for an oozy caramel surprise!

21 National Circuit, Barton ritualbarton.com


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D I R E C T I O N

P H O T O G R A P H Y

S T Y L I N G

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AMANDA WHITLEY

LAUREN CAMPBELL A NNIE BROWN


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At left: Shona Joy Aimee Mini ($295) from David Jones, Canberra Centre. At right: Aje Faux Fur Jacket ($595) from David Jones, Canberra Centre. Briefs ($19.95) from H&M, Canberra Centre.

Previous page: Aje Leather miniskirt ($390), Aje Sweatshirt ($195) and Camilla and Marc Coat ($999), all from David Jones, Canberra Centre. Gumboots ($289) from Sissa Sorella in Deakin.

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At left: Shona Joy Aimee Mini ($295) from David Jones, Canberra Centre. At right: Aje Wrap skirt ($279) and Evolve top ($129) by EDITION. Available from Assemblage Project in Braddon. Knit Scarf ($69) from Sissa Sorella in Deakin.

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Aje Faux Fur Jacket ($595) from David Jones, Canberra Centre. Briefs ($19.95) from H&M, Canberra Centre.

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and Viktoria & Woods Culottes ($290) from David Jones, Canberra Centre. Gold Boots ($259) from Sissa Sorella in Deakin.

At left: Wrap skirt ($279) and Evolve top ($129) by EDITION. Available from Assemblage Project in Braddon. Knit Scarf ($69) from Sissa Sorella in Deakin. At right: Jac + Jack Resistance Sweater ($310)

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and Sabatini Knit Dress ($499) both from David Jones Canberra Centre. Knit Scarf ($69) and Grey Boots ($249), both from Sissa Sorella in Deakin.

At left: Knit Top ($65) from Designer Op Shop and Polka Skirt ($69.95) from I Trip I Skip, both in Braddon. Gold Boots ($259) from Sissa Sorella in Deakin. Milana Knit Beanie ($39.95) from David Jones, Canberra Centre. At right: The Fifth Label Lantern Coat ($149)

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Bethhiendscenes

C

PHOTOGRAPHY LAUREN CAMPBELL CONCEPT AMANDA WHITLEY C O O R D I N AT I O N B E L I N DA N E A M E + B E AT R I C E S M I T H ST YLING ANNIE BROWN, MISS WINKS M A K E U P + H A I R S A R A H W R I G H T, S A L O O N M O D E L S A L E X A N D R A R U B I O, H AU S M O D E L S L O C AT I O N C U T TAG E E B E AC H, N S W SPECIAL THANKS ALISON AND BRUCE FOR ALLOWING OUR T E A M TO S TAY I N T H E I R B E A U T I F U L C OA S T H O U S E AT B A R R AG G A B AY.

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MAGA ZINE I S S U E NO.13

TASTEFUL on the eye

W O R D S

EMMA MACDONALD

P H O T O G R A P H Y

TIM BEAN

They say you eat with your eyes. So, it follows that after you see what is on your plate, restaurant dĂŠcor plays an integral part in setting the scene for a memorable meal. We take a look inside five local eateries that are as delightful on the eye as they are the palate.

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HIGHROAD WHERE

1 Woolley St, Dickson DESIGNED BY

Studio Foolscap, Melbourne. Completed 2017.

S P EC I A L F E AT U R E S

Highroad pays homage to Canberra, the home of the original ONA coffee empire of which it is the latest incarnation. This airy and light-filled space contains several clever references to Canberra’s meticulous design, notably that the curved booths reflect topographical lines on a map—part of Walter Burley Griffin’s original territory blueprints. In fact, map motifs abound, as does a seamless mix of refined and raw materials that represent the man-made and natural character of the bush capital. The imposing wooden bar is made from pine and the sides have been sand-blasted for a smooth and textured effect. The other bar is concrete, cast with a wood grain effect. The colour palette is as muted as the bush. LOOKS AND FEELS LIKE

Being under clear skies in the Brindabellas.

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S P EC I A L F E AT U R E S

MONSTER’S SALON WHERE

Ovolo Nishi, NewActon DESIGNED BY

The Molonglo Group in close collaboration with Don Cameron, Ken Neale and Craig Tan Architects, Melbourne. Completed 2014.

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The floor of the Salon is a monumental polished shattered terrazzo with hidalgoite green oxide seams. An original and unused early 1950s floral-pattern Axminister broadloom carpet remade as a rug provides a setting for a collection of armchairs designed by Viennese furniture maker Paul Ernst Kafka who immigrated to Australia in 1939. The rest of the seating is an assembly of Australian vintage boomerang lounges that sit alongside wireframe chairs and original decorative painted-metal screens. At the heart of the space is an in-the-round fireplace providing back-warming views across Lake Burley Griffin to Parliament House and the surrounding mountains. LOOKS AND FEELS LIKE

Being back in the suburban family room of an Australian immigrant family circa 1940.


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VINCENT, BARTON WHERE

48 Macquarie St, Barton DESIGNED BY

Head chef Ute Pikler and her business partner Ollie Ryrie. Completed 2016.

S P EC I A L F E AT U R E S

Vincent turns the concept of conventional restaurant design on its head. A small space is painted charcoal with a long snaking table facing all diners inwards to a bustling staff and bar. Vincent invites diners to be participants in the nightly theatre of service. They provide an audience to the inner dance of waiters and sommeliers and, if that doesn’t catch their attention, there is large framed window straight into the kitchen to spy on the kitchen wizardry. LOOKS AND FEELS LIKE

Being in a dimly lit, cosy kitchen while playing foodword Scrabble.

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PUBLIC WHERE

1-33 Flinders Way, Griffith DESIGNED BY

Andrew Parr of SJB Architects, Australia. Completed 2012.

S P EC I A L F E AT U R E S

Using the base of Manuka’s heritage-listed main corner shopfront off Franklin Street and Flinders Way, Public brings a New York–style public bar and bistro to a busy corner. Stripping back decades of fit-outs (it was once a kitchenware shop) the elegant 1920s bones of the space are revealed through exposed timber trusses and raw painted brickwork. Carefully selected contemporary fixtures, tiles and furniture highlight the industrial feel, while the traditional layout evokes the notion of a past era. LOOKS AND FEELS LIKE

A boisterous public bar in Brooklyn before the Great Depression hit. PAGE 100


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BAR ROCHFORD WHERE

65 London Circuit, Canberra City DESIGNED BY

Owner Nick Smith. Completed 2016.

S P EC I A L F E AT U R E S

Nick Smith is a born-and-bred Canberran who’s spent years travelling in Europe and living in Melbourne and has combined all three influences on this very personal space. Upstairs in the historic and aptly named Melbourne Building, the cracked and chipped paint, exposed brickwork and muted concrete floor set off the focal point of the bar—a massive black steelframed and arched art deco window. Spotted gum tables and bar bring a homely feel to the industrial space. Distinctly Canberra references—from the large framed photo of the building’s architect John Sulman, to an archived original photo of a diver back-flipping into the Civic Pool—are juxtaposed with musical themes. These include a huge photo of Grace Jones and rows upon rows of Nick’s personal record collection, which are played from a turntable at the bar. LOOKS AND FEELS LIKE

Hanging out in Nick’s living room—but with better windows. ¡

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THE TASTE of memory W O R D S

EMMA MACDONALD

CAPHS STANDS PROUD, if a little tired, on Franklin Street in Manuka. It is, after all, Canberra’s oldest continuously operating eatery.

under the high and ornate ceilings, proudly watching his two sons learning how to operate the business. His eldest, Theodore, is part of a new generation of born-andbred Canberrans with an entrepreneurial bent and a hankering to be part of what is now a nationally lauded restaurant renaissance. Theo is planning a big make-over for the venerable old café —with Manuka on the cusp of some large, new developments. He wants to make it great again.

Constructed in 1926 by the Notaras family, it was opened as the Liberty Café. By virtue of the fact nothing else had been built in the fledgling national capital, it was the place for socialising for those who had been unceremoniously uprooted from Sydney and Melbourne and dumped in what was little more than a sheep paddock with great expectations. It survived the swinging sixties and seventies as Mogambo’s—a romantic night-out destination for baby boomers and a constant influx of newcomers bolstering Canberra’s public service ranks. In 1973, after various changes in ownership, John Stefano and Partners named the restaurant Caphs, representing the initials of each of the business partner’s first names; Chris, Anthony, Philip, Helen and Steve. In 1990 it reverted to Notaras family ownership and is now run by Manuel (Manny) Notaras. Still serving the honest Greek Australian fare of its past, Manny sits in a front table of Caphs PAGE 104

In many ways Caphs symbolises Canberra’s restaurant history. Born of necessity, buoyed by bureaucracy and now being made-over to compete with a new generation of hip and happening eateries. It’s a saturated marketplace as Canberra has historically boasted more places to eat out per head of population than any other Australian city.

Caphs opening in 1983 and formerly known as Mogambo.

"I N M A N Y WAYS CAPHS SYMBOLISES C A N BE R R A’ S RESTAUR ANT H I ST ORY."

Of course, Manuka is no longer the hotspot it was up until the 1990s— when La Grange pulled a steady stream of revellers from across the city until the early hours, and the Ottoman had queues lining up around the corner.


Those crowds are now filling the Kingston Foreshore, NewActon or Braddon. Or even Barton, which is where the Ottoman moved to in 2000, and now home to a thriving new restaurant precinct of its own. TWENTY-SIX YEARS ON and Ottoman still stands out on Canberra’s culinary landscape. The brainchild of Istanbul native Serif Kaya and his wife Gulbahar, it is a 260-seat fine diner that has notched up more local, national and international recognition than perhaps any other establishment. Serif took a chance on a one-way ticket to Australia in 1980 when he was just 18, and by a quirk of fate he landed in Canberra when he was offered a 'free bus tour' by his ESL school in Sydney. It was more of a political hijacking when he found himself and the

NAA: A1200, L59410

MAGA ZINE I S S U E NO.13

other students deposited outside Old Parliament House for an education rally. Not feeling overly rebellious, Serif instead wandered the peaceful, leafy streets—falling immediately in love—and formulated a plan to relocate his home and studies to the capital. Not long after, his studies were abandoned for Serif’s 'calling'. “My mum was a good cook, it always felt natural for me to be in the kitchen. It is what I love.” He hatched a plan with a fellow Turk—his future mother-in-law to be exact—to start up a small Turkish eatery, Alanya, in Manuka’s Style Arcade. Even in the eighties Canberra was a multicultural city and when people visited, they took to Serif’s zucchini puffs and sardines with gusto. “I always tried to cook simple and honest food. My zucchini puffs, they are still some of my biggest sellers.” When he and Gulbahar first opened Ottoman in 1992 in

Manuka (upstairs off Franklin Street), such was Serif’s acclaim that it was not unusual to see prime ministers deposited at the door, MPs of all political persuasions tucking into platters of mezze, and a hopeful queue outside. Despite the naysayers, Serif moved to Barton to massively expand the operation. It was a little away from the action, yet Ottoman still attracts the big functions, loyal crowds, chef hats, and is considered a special place for a meal. Serif puts his longevity and success down to Canberra having an international community, a discerning palate and disposable incomes to dine out on. Plus, he and Gulbahar have put in the relentless hours to keep their business a success. “People assume it is a glamorous job. But five per cent of it is glamorous, the rest is hard work.” Serif also pays tribute to the politicians who have patronised Ottoman over the years. “I’ve always stayed neutral and welcomed everyone,” he answers with diplomacy. PAGE 105


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SIMILARLY, INVETERATE LONG-LUNCHER, political commentator and former editor of The Canberra Times, Jack Waterford, can’t imagine how Canberra’s restaurant scene would ever have flourished were it not for the patronage of generations of politicians, journalists and lobbyists. While he laments that these days journalists are too busy catering to a 24-hour news cycle to take contacts to lunch, his own career was forged by a ready exchange of information between him and hungry public servants, served over a sizzling plate of garlic prawns and a bottle or three of wine. “In many ways Santa Lucia (established in 1975 in Kingston and operating as Salotto Bar and Kitchen today) became my de facto office. In a town such as Canberra, information is a vital currency.”

NAA: A6135, K18/9/81/12A6135

Over the years he would frequent the prominent restaurants of the day—Peaches in Campbell, Alberts in Lyneham, Nobbs in Manuka, and Noah’s, Seasons, The Bacchus Tavern and The Charcoal (still going strong) in the city. “Of course, it all came to a crushing halt in 1986 with the introduction of the Fringe Benefits Tax,” says Jack, of the sudden end to restaurant largesse that was done on expense accounts. By the 1990s, the industry had to work through leaner times, and out of that, a more competitive generation of restaurateurs was born.

Photo VisitCanberra

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CHRIS HANSEN was doing an Arts Degree at the Australian National University when he took up some

part-time shifts at the university fine-diner, Vivaldi. His boss was David Wood, who would go on to establish Atlantic, a mould-breaking Manuka restaurant which, alongside Juniperberry, Mezzalira, Fringe Benefits and The Lobby, would gather positive reviews from national publications. It was around this time the rest of the country started to take note of what was popping up around the nation’s capital. But the destination Chris would devote eight years to—rolling what he estimates to be 10,000 duck pancakes—was a restaurant that really lifted the bar high for Canberra: Chairman and Yip on Bunda Street. Working alongside Josiah Li, Chris and the team would


MAGA ZINE I S S U E NO.13

"THE GREAT THING ABOUT CANBERRA IS THAT ITS YOUNG PEOPLE ARE GLOBAL A N D W EL L CON N ECTED."

cater to the city’s business elite. Not to mention Kim Beazley, the Labor Leader who would turn up faithfully on a Sunday night at the start of every parliamentary sitting week. Chris, who now runs his own hospitality recruitment firm servicing the likes of Pialligo Estate and the Canberra Rex, says Canberra is benefitting from a new generation of self-starters who are well travelled and obsessed with food. “The great thing about Canberra is that its young people are global and well connected. They have been to the hottest new places in Tokyo and New York and they bring their creative energies back here because there is an industry to sustain them.”

and former Ottoman manager, Paul Downie, has notched up a stellar career working for Heston Blumenthal in London and managing the number-oneranked restaurant in the world, Eleven Madison Park in New York.

“I think there will continue to be a focus on the provenance of food and sourcing quality and sustainable product—certainly I see that is where Pialligo Estate is focused.” BAR AND RESTAURANT OWNER Frank Condi agrees that Canberra no longer needs to exploit its public sector and political clientele, because it is increasingly a hub for gastronomy by virtue of its geographical location. “I think we have all underestimated Canberra’s unique position where we are surrounded by productive country, by farms, by wineries and within a short distance to the sea.”

Photo VisitCanberra

NAA: A1500, K22262

Luckily for those of us who stay, the scene has continued to evolve. Chris cites Pulp Kitchen, Vincent, Lazy Su and XO as among his current favourites, believing the future focus will narrow even further to fresh, clean food.

There are also some who have taken a little bit of Canberra to the rest of the world, with Chris noting his old Chairman supervisor PAGE 107


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"WHILE IT’S EASY TO GET EVERYONE’S ATTENTION WHEN YOU OPEN SOM ET H I NG N EW, SU RV I V I NG F I V E OR 10 YEA RS IN THIS CITY IS A REAL ACH I EV E M E N T."

is no good and if the place doesn’t feel relaxed and hospitable then people aren’t going to want to be there no matter what the food is like.” Having devoted his energies since the age of 17 to hospitality, Frank can vouch that not everyone gets this basic right.

“Part of the reason we are riding this wave now is because of our access to this produce.” Condi also cites the city’s booming coffee culture—and coterie of craft roasters—as part of our appeal. He singles out World Barista Champion and ONA founder Sasa Sestic for “making a huge contribution to our city—the guy is a genius.” Frank, who cut his hospitality teeth helping run the Private Bin nightclub and connected eatery

PAGE 108

Waffles, has helped create some of the city’s most popular bars and restaurants, including Public, Shorty’s and Mr Wolf. He’s also behind Edgar’s Inn and Mama Dough in Ainslie.

“If we talk about a booming restaurant scene in Canberra then we also need to acknowledge that it is still a hard industry to survive in. Yes, we have a lot of new places opening up every week, but there are just as many that close down very quietly.

He says the challenge is not so much attracting business in this age of eating out most nights, or ordering Uber Eats—instead, Frank thinks it comes down to the oldfashioned basics.

“It’s a bit of a revolving door and while it’s easy to get everyone’s attention when you open something new, surviving five or 10 years in this city is a real achievement.”

“I’ve always believed in welcoming people. I think if service

Who knows what the future will bring? ¡


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MAGA ZINE I S S U E NO.13

matter of taste W O R D S

L AUR A PEPPAS

P H O T O G R A P H Y

TIM BEAN

What if your career depended entirely on your taste? Whether it’s their tastebuds or taste in fashion, Laura Peppas uncovers four Canberrans with jobs that revolve around their palates‌

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GAIL fashion LUBBOCKbuyer IN A WORLD WHERE FASHION is fickle, it takes a keen eye to navigate the fads from the long-lasting trends. Enter owner of Manuka boutique Escala Shoes, Gail Lubbock. Gail’s meticulous eye for detail and “insatiable curiosity” has led her to become one of Canberra’s best-known style experts. Since taking over the boutique in 1998, Gail has sourced shoes and accessories from some of the most indemand designers in Europe, including Aquatalia, Antonio Barbato and Thierry Rabotin; with some labels sold exclusively through the store. She now travels to Milan every six months for about a week, scouring shoe fairs and trade shows for beautiful, well-designed shoes, boots and accessories to stock.

Interestingly, Gail began her career as a nurse, but says she always had a love for fashion. Even as a child, in her home town of Orange, she would often sneak into her mother’s or aunt’s wardrobe to “clomp around in their shoes.” “My mother was always dressed beautifully, she had a lovely eye for colour so I grew up with all that,” she says. “I still remember twelve and six pence bought me my first shoes—a pair of Moxoms—from the local store in Orange.” After moving to Canberra in 1978, Gail decided to give up nursing due to a back injury. She started to work in retail, where, at the time, the buying process was largely dictated by men.

“I always go and expect something fabulous, and every time, without fail, I find it," Gail says.

“It worked well for a long time, but as they were mainly men who were responsible for buying, I was always curious and wondered if there was something there that they don’t see,” Gail says.

“So every six months, designers are having to recreate, reinvent and reconsider, and they always step up to the plate. It’s my job to find something I know our customers will love, but also that is of very high quality and wearable.”

“A woman’s eye is always different to a man’s eye; they have a different vision. A lot of theirs is concerned with the economics of the whole thing, whereas I’m more concerned about the aesthetics.”

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After taking over Escala, Gail gradually built up the business, taking her first buying trip to Europe in 2005. She's returned every six months since. Her favourite season to visit is winter: “I just love it—the boots, the leathers, the textures, the fabrics.”

“It’s a fascinating industry, and it’s always changing so you do have to keep up to date. And the more you know about your industry, the more interesting it becomes.”

When she's not in Europe, Gail spends time in-store or researching new trends; a task that wasn't easy before the online world erupted.

As trends are ever-evolving, Gail says she’s now noticing a global casualisation in the fashion industry.

“Back then I’d have to just subscribe to magazines to learn about the industry, along with new designers and a whole raft of information,” she says.

“Flats are very in right now, and the more practical, blocky heel is much more prominent than it was a few years ago,” she says.

“Now it’s much easier, I keep up with the various websites and keep a fine eye on fashion. I’m an insatiably curious person as well, I love to find out what people are doing, what they’re wearing, and maybe finding new shoe designers.

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“Casualisation often means that it’s comfortable and it’s adapting to fit with a lot of things. This autumn/ winter season I’ve also noticed a lot more colour, plenty of pinks and deep reds—I love that.” While travelling Gail will often visit the factories that make the products she sources, allowing her

to see the intricacies that go into making each piece. “Visiting factories is wonderful and gives you such an insight into the process,” she says. “I’ll go into the leather rooms and just love seeing the different things they do with them; the colours, the embellishments, the textures, and watching the intricacy of a woman on a sewing machine doing different embroidery. You get to understand why they are so expensive, due to the hand component. “It’s also certainly lovely being able to recognise the people making the pieces, knowing they’ll go to a good home with our customers here in Canberra and say ‘thank you very much, we’re really enjoying what you do back on the other side of the earth’.”


MAGA ZINE I S S U E NO.13

MARTIN art ANDgallery SUSIE directors BEAVER IN AN INDUSTRY that is largely subjective, Martin believes art is all about making a connection.

Martin and Susie Beaver’s job to have their finger on the pulse of the art world.

"Some clients will look at one piece of art and feel nothing, and then they’ll have a real connection with another," he says.

“The worst thing in the world you can do as an artist is to be static, and I do believe that’s true for Susie and I too,” says Martin.

"Kids are actually fantastic with art—they take away something from it that you’d never thought of before, because they’re not inhibited about what they see."

Yet he is also adamant there's a fine line between evolving and becoming a slave to trends: "You don’t want to become a faddist—that's something we try and steer clear of."

As directors of Deakin art gallery, Beaver Galleries, it’s a vital part of

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and their work is developing. We encourage them and enjoy watching them change and develop, they grow with the gallery. “It's taking artists to art fairs, pushing them to institutional collections—there's a whole lot of things that go into representing artists because you're trying to move their career."

Since taking over the gallery in 1992, the husband and wife duo have showed work from hundreds of artists hailing from all around the country, in a variety of mediums including paintings, prints and drawings, sculpture, glass, ceramics and jewellery, and stage about 20 shows a year. Beaver Galleries was originally established in 1975 by Martin's parents, Ron and Betty Beaver, in the back of a suburban house in the inner south, moving to custom-built premises in Deakin 10 years later. It is now one of the oldest, and largest, commercial art galleries in Australia. Finding new artists while maintaining relationships with existing artists is an integral part of the job for Martin and Susie, who met at a pub in London. “It’s more than just hanging a painting on a wall—you really build a relationship with each artist,” Martin says. "You might find somebody whose work you like, but you’ve also got to like the person and their attitude

to the work. Then it becomes a partnership between the artist and the gallery, so a big part of our job is building relationships too. And then hopefully you’re bringing the clients along with you too, changing their tastes and expectations." He recalls one artist who he tracked down after seeing her paintings in an artist-run space in Hobart, eventually finding her working in a pub in Salamanca. "All that I knew was that she worked in a pub in that area so I worked my way through them all until I found her, and we’ve been showing her since," Martin says. "The interesting thing about galleries is you’re always treading a fine line between consistency and change. New artists are always emerging and creating new things. “What I think a lot of people don’t know about commercial galleries is that you tend to work with a stable of artists, a regular group so you’re not just hanging work, you’re actually representing the artist because they’re changing,

When I ask if selling a piece is a bit like giving away one of his children, Martin instead describes the experience as very satisfying. "It’s always nice to see one of our pieces go to a good home, because that person has made their own connection with it," he says. Martin and Susie now split their time between running the gallery and travelling interstate to art fairs and shows. It's very much a labour of love, with the pair running the business full-time, employing two staff, and investing large amounts of money into the business—implementing state-ofthe-art lighting, for example—to keep it running. "The reality is that you’re always thinking ahead in this job," he says. "We’re a funny community in the art gallery world, we’re always busy doing things and we don’t get to talk to each other as much as we would like. But it is important to see what others are doing and this helps when you get the chance to sit back and really appreciate what you've done."

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CATRIONA foodJACKSON critic CATRIONA JACKSON is the first to admit she’s probably not how most people would expect a food critic to look. “Particularly when I first started reviewing restaurants, everyone would expect a man—and someone who was perhaps a little overweight,” she laughs. It works in her favour: reviewing food is one of the few positions where anonymity is key, as every intention is to have the same kind of experience as the person at the next table. “My view of a restaurant reviewer is that you are there to represent the normal person, and it’s an awful lot easier to represent the normal person if you are treated normally,” Catriona says. “So I try really hard to make sure people don’t know. It's also better for the staff in a way; you'd have a lot of nervous people." With so many restaurants popping up left right and centre in Canberra, Catriona has a lot on her plate—literally.

During her career, Catriona worked as regional editor for The Sydney Morning Herald Good Food Guide and contributed to cultural magazines such as Vogue Entertaining and Travel, Eureka Street and Overland; her tastebuds often taking her around the country and beyond. She is now currently reviewing a restaurant every three weeks for The Canberra Times, outside of her busy day job as chief executive at Universities Australia. But while her skillset is diverse, it’s not hard to sense the deep passion Catriona has for food when we chat. She says she’s always taken food extremely seriously, even if others didn’t. “My first job was working for the student newspaper, where I decided to put one of my food reviews on the front page, much to my colleagues’ displeasure,” she says. “That was 30 years ago, when food television was an oddity, and you could name on one hand any celebrity chefs.”

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Times have certainly changed; now food is practically considered an art form, with celebrity chef upon celebrity chef spruiking their latest restaurant venture. With that comes the good and the bad, says Catriona. “The celebrity chef thing has become a massive phenomenon, but sometimes it stops becoming about the food and becomes more about ferocious competition,” she says. “But then you have people like Jamie Oliver, Nigella Lawson or, someone who I always admired, Julia Child— people who are just really passionate about food and the role it plays in life.” Looking back at her restaurant ventures, she’s noticed big changes in the way people eat—predominantly, that the restaurant experience has become more relaxed. “Going to a restaurant used to be a much more formal exercise, with white tablecloths and very formal service," she says. "We’ve really loosened up about eating, and I think that's a good thing." She adds that Canberra is lucky in that it hasn't been subjected to any "pretentiousness" that often comes with popular restaurants in bigger cities. So what comes first when reviewing a restaurant—the atmosphere, service or food? “Atmosphere is incredibly important in a restaurant, but quality is more important," Catriona says. "If the food is spectacular and I feel unwelcome, it’s not going to be a pleasant experience.

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"Food is a pretty intangible thing, it’s hard to describe what really makes somewhere a fabulous place to be in."


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"A really exciting restaurant, as far as I’m concerned, is where you can just tell they’re always thinking about food, they’re evolving, they’re looking for new ideas, you go in and there’s something that just makes you go ‘wow.’ “And it’s not necessarily at just the high-end restaurants—sometimes that’s going somewhere fabulously cheap. Or sometimes they aren’t changing, but they’re just continuously making what they make really well, and having serious pride in what they do.” When I ask if she has any local favourites of her own, Catriona, an inner-north resident, says she is spoilt for choice.

“It really depends; Italian and Sons in Braddon is where I choose to go with my husband for a lovely indulgent evening,” she says. “If it’s a weeknight or a casual thing, I really enjoy things that are offbeat but still interesting and individual. So we will often find ourselves trotting down to the Polish Club, because they’re a set of really terrific, young and vibrant cooks making interesting, diverse meals for next to nothing. “Or we’ll pop down to Braddon to find out what’s new that day. If the kids want a treat we’ll go to Frugii, for the best ice cream—in my opinion—outside of Italy." Of course, one of the more uncomfortable parts of Catriona’s job is giving criticism where it is needed, which is not always met with open arms. “Very occasionally in Canberra, you get chefs or restaurant owners who are very unhappy with what you’ve written, so it is incredibly important that you take giving restaurant criticism very seriously, because you’re giving criticism that may affect their business," Catriona says. "For this reason you've got to be absolutely scrupulous that you get every detail right, and that you check and double check yourself. “Food is a pretty intangible thing, it’s hard to describe what really makes somewhere a fabulous place to be in. But the people who run the restaurant are a fundamental part of that. If they care about the restaurant, love being there, and they’re welcoming people, it’s very difficult not to feel special, like you’re part of something.”

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FREDERIQUE RAIMBAUD sommelier THE PROCESS OF WINE TASTING, according to sommelier Frederique Raimbaud, is akin to a blind date. “First you look and really study them, and if you like what you see you’ll get a little closer and inhale the scent, and the taste structure of sour, bitter or sweet—then you make your decision,” she laughs. As Pialligo Estate’s head sommelier Frederique often tastes up to 10 wines from all around the world in a day; so it's fair to say she knows a good drop. Originally hailing from Lyon in France—long considered the gastronomic capital of the world—Frederique already had a relatively strong introduction to fine food and wine; but she says it was her parents who passed on their love of 'du vin'. “The French have a different approach to wine compared to Australians; they are a bit more slow when it comes to drinking, they’ll nurse a drink for hours and they’ll drink more during the day before a meal—it's a complete experience," she says.

"My parents were wine lovers, so I was very much familiar with wine from the start. I then travelled around Europe a lot so I learned a lot more about different types of wines, and gained much more of an interest." Yet it wasn't until she studied a course in hospitality at the Hospitality school Bonneveine in Marseille, that Frederique got serious. After a "spur of the moment" decision to move to Australia, Frederique spent the next 18 years making a name for herself as a sommelier in some of the country’s top restaurants, including Sydney’s three-hatted restaurant Quay and Tasmania's Josef Chromy, described by food critics as one of the country's best outposts. Shortly after joining Pialligo Estate, she helped them to take out the much-coveted gong for the ACT’s best wine list from Gourmet Traveller Wine. “I think sommeliers have really become a necessity in restaurant culture," Frederique says.

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The process of wine tasting is always the same, starting with a visual inspection of the wine under neutral lighting. “A lot of clues about a wine are buried in its appearance," she says. "I’m always on the lookout for good colour, opacity and viscosity (wine legs).” Then comes smell: where Frederique will detect the primary, secondary and tertiary aromas: while the 'taste' step is generally an analysis of texture and the 'length' of the wine, though Frederique doesn't actually swallow the wine. "I'll swirl the wine, then I always spit," says Frederique. "The taste of wine is also timebased, there is a beginning, middle (mid-palate) and end (finish)."

"People are much more interested in them when visiting a restaurant, and learning more about the wine itself." Interest has peaked so much, in fact, that Frederique is now teaching level 1 and level 2 Award in Wines and Spirits courses at Pialligo Estate on a regular basis. "A lot of people in Canberra have interest in the wine industry and improving their wine education," says Frederique. "The course has a very eclectic crowd—there are people from all kinds of backgrounds such as firefighters, army recruits and mums and dads.

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“As part of the course we test wine from all of Europe, as it's an internationally recognised exam. We'll also do a wine dinner every month with a local winemaker, called Meet the Maker. It's a great way to recognise Canberra's winemakers, and chat about what they do." Frederique says a typical day at Pialligo Estate will usually begin with wine tastings, while her palate is fresh. “After breakfast and lunch, or even coffee, your palate will change, so I tend to do my tastings before anything else," she says.

She has a limit, though. "I'll usually test a maximum of 10 wines a day— it's a bit like perfume, after that your senses stop working as well." When she's not tasting, Frederique is busily researching new or interesting wines or buying matching wines for upcoming weddings and the restaurant. Her personal favourites? “I love Italian wine, definitely, and a good French champagne,” she says. “Pinot noir or chardonnay are my favourites. Canberrans are also making some great quality wines too so we are very lucky here. You’ll always find a French wine on the menu at Pialligo though; it’s part of me so I can’t change that.” ¡


AUSTRALIAN GIRLS CHOIR

AUSTRALIAN SCHOOL OF PERFORMING AUSTRALIAN SCHOOL OF PERFORMING ARTS

ARTS


HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

f o t i r i p s The Canberra a

W O R D S

EMMA MACDONALD + AMANDA WHITLEY P H O T O G R A P H Y

TIM BEAN

In sheds across the Canberra region, a quiet revolution is underway as makers from diverse backgrounds turn to alcohol. Distilling, that is.

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processes from the medical world could be used to improve the traditional spirit production processes, this idea that there is more than tradition. “When I returned to Canberra I started talking about these ideas with some of my friends, people with backgrounds in food and business, and next thing I knew we founded a distillery.”

TALKING TO THE FOUNDERS of four of Canberra’s leading distilleries, there’s a common thread—a passing interest in spirits has been transformed into all-consuming passion. Tony Angstmann, co-founder of Underground Spirits, is an obstetrician, robotic surgeon and IVF specialist, who was also in the Australian defence forces and occasionally lectures in medicine at the Australian National University (ANU). So why on earth did he start a distillery? “The inspiration came to me after a trip to Scotland in the summer of 2016. As I toured the distilleries there, it...occurred to me that it would be fun to see if some

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Tim Reardon’s story isn’t dissimilar. Growing up in the same region where his ancestors received their 'ticket of leave' in Collector in the 1820s, the Canberra Distillery Founder studied Economics at the ANU to postgraduate level and has worked as an economist/lobbyist ever since. It’s hardly surprising he sought respite in an unrelated pursuit. “About 10 years ago, I fell into distilling as a form of occupational therapy. It became a quiet place to tinker and make things rather than the more destructive and less tangible world of lobbying. “In 2015 I had some time on my hands, after the carbon price was repealed, and I started the process of becoming a licensed distiller. It wasn’t that I had a plan to start a distillery. It was simply because as I kept distilling, problems kept presenting themselves, and as I resolved those problems I got closer to having a distillery.”


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"I grossly underestimated how many people would come to support us."

CEO and Head Distiller of Baldwin Distilling Co, Anthony Baldwin, had a slightly more selfish motivation. “My inspiration was a mixture of a love of Bourbon and the fact that what is commercially available here in Australia, imported from the US, is not the same as what the American public is drinking .” Plus, he had watched a US show called “Moonshiners” and thought he’d have a crack at creating his own product. Brad Spalding’s journey to distilling success began in the Austrian village of Kössen in the Kitzbühel region, where the winters are simply too cold for traditional wine production. His wife Monika’s family has a long history distilling schnapps—that quintessential tipple from the Alpine region of Europe. Paired with Brad’s passion for ski sports and instructing, it was the perfect background from which to create world-class spirits in the Snowy Mountains. “While living in Austria, I had a rare opportunity to study traditional European schnapps production methods, immersing myself in the business, spending much of my time studying the art of fruit fermentation and distillation.

“In 2004, we opened the doors to the Wildbrumby Distillery, and with exclusive access to home-grown organic fruit and botanicals, we began creating a wide of range of schnapps—and later gin and vodka.” WHAT FOLLOWED for all four businesses, was a journey of discovery. With no well-worn path to follow, there was a lot of trial and error, and creative solutions. “There was this really fun fusion of local produce, real ingredients, and new, nerdy processes born from this background of traditional distilling,” says Tony.

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“I had mates who are farmers dropping off produce, friends who were economists and teachers popping in as my tasting brains trust. I was running out of meetings with plumbers as someone’s labour kicked off with gusto. “But we were way off on scale. I grossly underestimated how many people would come to support us. Everything we made just flew off the shelves. This fun craft project—that was such a joy to me, something I reveled in doing for doing’s sake—needed to become a proper business. “As we grew, we were so lucky to have a network of family and friends with amazing talent, who were keen to be part of this new endeavour. It just clicked, the hard work, the late nights distilling, bottling, the first truckload shipped overseas. All these little things coming together organically.”

For Anthony, the biggest hurdle was the lack of power in the Mitchell industrial zone. “Basically, we never checked when signing the lease that the warehouses we are in had not much more than a residential home in available power. “We had to run on generators for over a year, which nearly killed us while trying to find a solution that didn’t cost the earth. Luckily our electricians came up with a clever way of utilising both units’ power for our large equipment.” Australian tastebuds proved a challenge for Brad. “Schnapps has historically been a strong alcoholic beverage (alcohol by volume at 40 per cent) consumed in the cold, alpine regions of European. While it is familiar to many snow sports enthusiasts, early product testing revealed that traditional schnapps did not have mass appeal.

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The good news is bourbon sales in Australia exceed all other spirit sales and we drink more bourbon per capita here than in the US.” BUT INTERNATIONAL COMPETITION isn’t the only barrier to success for our craft distillers. According to Tony, there’s an urgent need to address the crippling effect of a taxation system that is biased against distilleries and favours wineries and breweries. “Around $24 from every bottle goes in duty, whereas in other countries this is vastly different. In the USA this duty is 49 cents a bottle. “I think Australian distillers, in the best tradition of our Tasmanian whisky trailblazers, could be leading the world in this sector over the next 20 years." First, he says, we need to even the playing field. From there, the future goes beyond the bottle. “After an intense period of product development came the creation of a delicious new genre of fruit liqueur schnapps in a lower alcohol range (18 per cent).” Baldwin also faced an uphill battle to gain a foothold in the market. “Being the first in Australia to focus on American-style whiskey (bourbon), we are up against the big American brands that hold the monopoly when it comes to spirit sales in Australia.

“Craft distilling can be much more than just selling spirits. It is about a place, people and communities. “There are huge flow-on effects for tourism, leisure and hospitality. People want to be connected to their food and drink and its story. If this industry is nurtured, if we address the tax issue and can build the systems to train distillers in proper processes, we will see more distilleries emerge and there will be more jobs and opportunity.” Tim agrees. Still crafting from his garage, he has hopes of someday creating a space where locals and tourists can learn the art, science and experience of distilling. But for him, success does not involve taking over the world; rather, it’s about the way he feels about the distillery. “That means being a part of something in Canberra. I love going to markets and hanging out with market people. I love talking to customers and sharing the things I made. I love hearing back about events. I love being able to donate product to worthy causes. I love making new products. Seeing the look on people’s faces when a memory is sparked and they are taken to another time and place.” ¡

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Snowbcound W O R D S

TA N I A WA R D

The road from Canberra to Thredbo is much-traversed in the colder months, packed with keen skiiers and families seeking a winter wonderland. But, as we discovered, you don’t need to set foot on the slopes to enjoy the riches of the road to the snow.

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Eat From food trucks to hearty country fare and boutique spirits, the snow country doesn’t disappoint when it comes to winter comfort food.

l

SLOW BEANS AND BONES

Keep an eye out for Slow Beans and Bones (formerly the Ingelara Farm Truck)—it was a very popular addition on the ‘road to the snow’ last winter. The menu isn’t extensive but it is all farm-fresh, and the pulled pork rolls, pumpkin pie and wood-fired bread sure are tasty. It's usually open from Thursday to Sunday.

23 Monaro Highway, Bredbo. facebook.com/slowbeansandbones

"The snow country doesn’t disappoint when it comes to winter comfort food."

KETTLE AND SEED

For lunch, try Kettle and Seed. With coffee roasted on the premises and delicious treats plus daily sandwiches, Kettle and Seed brings a touch of city sophistication to Cooma. Bags of coffee beans are also available so you can get your fix wherever your road trip takes you.

47 Vale Street, Cooma. snowymountainscoffee.com.au THE LOTT

Another great option is The Lott, a cosy lunch spot with an open fire in winter. A regular in the Good Food Guide, The Lott is located within a 100-year-old wool store and focuses on regional produce. The menu changes seasonally and they’ve now introduced takeaway options for lunch on the run.

177-179 Sharp Stret, Cooma. lott.net.au

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"Expect everything from food trucks to hearty country fare and boutique spirits."

RED THREAD

Red Thread opened in Cooma last summer and this little dessert bar is proving to be a hit with lime cheesecake, chocolate tarts and a daily selection of sweet treats.

100 Sharp Street, Cooma. facebook.com/redthreaddessertbar WHISK AND COCOA

Berridale’s Whisk and Cocoa has made a splash since opening in 2017, with perfect ONA coffee and a selection of homemade baking that makes choosing near impossible. There are delicious breakfast and lunch options and rumour has it they’ll do the occasional dinner too.

2/70 Jindabyne Rd, Berridale. whiskandcocoa.com.au TA KE P OT LU C K

The Take Potluck custom silver van serves daily lunch and dinner specials that are homemade, fresh and delicious. Chef and artist Sandy creates whatever he feels like on the day so it really is pot luck! Keep an eye out for Sandy’s art class dinners where you can eat and paint.

Outside 'Sacred Ride', 6 Thredbo Terrace, Jindabyne. takepotluck.com.au

WILDBRUMBY

You can’t go past a visit to wildbrumby schnapps and gin distillery for a true mountain experience. It comes complete with a European‑inspired menu and schnapps tasting, and an infectious atmosphere.

Alpine Way & Wollondibby Rd, Crackenback. wildbrumby.com CRACKENBACK FARM

Crackenback Farm is a hidden gem and local favourite with delicious cuisine created by chef Jodie Evans. Enjoy an afternoon of fine wine and food as you soak up winter in the mountains.

M E R R I T S M O U N TA I N HOUSE

Located at 1660 metres, at the bottom of the Cruiser Chair, Merrits Mountain House is the ideal stop for skiers and riders on-the-go. Merrits is always a favourite, with hearty lunch options cooked in the big pan, fresh juices kept cool in the snow, and warm pastries. The bar is busy serving schnapps, European beers and hot chocolates all day, every day.

Thredbo Village. merritts.com.au

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Play Whether you’re seeking retail therapy or your zen, the road to the snow has you covered.

a

THE CHRISTMAS BARN

BIRDSNEST

JINDABYNE’S YOGA SHAL A

The Christmas Barn is like a magical, mystical Christmas journey with a huge store packed to the brim with beautiful Christmas trees and decorations. Childhood dreams are made here! Open June to December—it’s never too early to celebrate!

If you’re in the mood for some retail therapy, take a wander around the flagship store of online fashion giant, Birdsnest, for beautiful clothes, a unique shopping experience, and the opportunity to stock up on some winter necessities.

Whether you’re looking for an escape from work stress or need a stretch after hitting the slopes, Jindabyne’s Yoga Shala is a picturesque spot for yoga and everyone is welcome at classes that will revive the body and mind.

23 Monaro Highway, Bredbo bredbochristmasbarn.com.au

232 Sharp Street, Cooma. birdsnest.com.au

12 Thredbo Terrace, Jindabyne. jindabyneyoga.com.au F U N AT T H E S N OW

Keep an eye on thredbo.com.au for events throughout your stay, including the Flare Run and fireworks, a Thredbo tradition that happens on Thursday nights (for kids) and Saturday nights (all ages). Keen for some celebrity ski tips? Winter Olympic gold medal winner Torah Bright will be in the village again this winter hosting her mini shred events.

thredbo.com.au/events

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Ski The Snowy Mountains’ four winter resorts offer something for everyone. Perisher is the largest resort, Thredbo has the longest run, Charlotte Pass is only accessed by oversnow transport and Selwyn Snowfields is a fun family resort.

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CHARLOT TE PASS

Charlotte Pass is Australia’s only completely snowbound snow resort. With the village sitting at 1765 metres, it offers an intimate experience that is accessed exclusively via over-snow transport. As Australia’s highest resort, Charlotte Pass receives some of the most consistent snowfalls delivering the best quality natural snow. Whether you’re a beginner testing out your snow legs on Easy Starter, an intermediate carving up Kosi Coaster, an experienced skier looking for adventure on Sidewinder or a hard-core rider after an adrenalin rush at Guthrie’s Chutes, you’ll find something to suit here. Keep an eye out for the great packages including all meal, lift ticket and oversnow transport to the village.

charlottepass.com.au S E LW YN S N OWF I E L D S

"The Snowy Mountains’ four winter resorts offer something for everyone."

Widely known as the learn-to-ski resort with the motto ‘Friendly Family Fun’, Selwyn Snowfields— more commonly known as Mt Selwyn—is perfect for first-timers by providing progressive terrain, working your way across the mountain from beginner slopes to intermediate and advanced trails.

selwynsnow.com.au THREDBO VILLAGE

Thredbo has 480 hectares of snow riding whether you are a skier, boarder, sightseer or snowman builder.

For beginners, there’s the gentle slope of Friday Flat, intermediates can step it up a gear at the Cruiser intermediate area, while confident skiers can have a crack at some of the most advanced terrain in the country. To hone your skills, the Thredbo Snow Sports School offers group and private lessons for all ages and ability levels.

thredbo.com.au PERISHER

Perisher boasts an incredible 47 lifts accessing an immense 1245 hectares of varied snow-covered terrain, suitable for all ages and abilities. With four distinct resort areas—Perisher Valley, Guthega, Smiggin Holes and Blue Cow— sitting above the recognised snow-line, Perisher is renowned for its snow reliability and consistency, providing a true on-snow experience. Its world class Snowsports School offers skiing and snowboarding tuition for first‑timers right up to experts, across a variety of different programs designed to suit individual needs and ages.

perisher.com.au

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Stay Take your pick from familyfriendly resorts brimming with activities to Pinterestperfect hideaways for two.

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LAKE CRACKENBACK RESORT AND SPA

Surrounded by mountains, Lake Crackenback Resort and Spa is a five-minute walk from the Bullocks Flat ski area and 17 kilometres from Thredbo’s ski resort. Warmly decorated, the apartments (one, two or three bedrooms), feature wooden furnishings, TVs and wi-fi, as well as fireplaces, kitchens and mountain-view balconies. There's a bright waterside bar/ restaurant, plus a relaxed cafe with a kids' menu. Onsite activities include archery, trampolining and water sports, as well as hiking, biking and tennis. There's also a spa, a 9-hole golf course, a gym and an indoor pool. Ski and bike rentals are available.

1650 Alpine Way, Crackenback. lakecrackenback.com.au

THE SCHOOL HOUSE

Known far and wide for her exceptional work running Thredbo restaurants over the years, Sonja Schatzle has created this new venue for events and workshops. The School House is part of her little precinct in the valley and works in with the incredible mountain retreats, The Post Office and Pender’s Bar, that Sonja created from derelict ruins.

1056 Alpine Way, Crackenback. penderlea.com.au SKI IN SKI OUT

Ski In Ski Out is the place to stay. These luxury apartments are right on the Crackenback Ridge and the snow is literally on your doorstep. These quality apartments are spacious, well fitted out and the basement spa is a treat after a hard day on the slopes. ¡

skiinskiout.com.au

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HerCanberra Magazine Issue 13: Taste  
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