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ISSUE 1

WINTER

WINTER PREVIEW 2016

MAGAZINE

HERCANBERRA.COM. AU

The dream issue We vow to guide + inspire you from this day forth


Your vision, Your event, Your way 18 Kallaroo Road, Pialligo (02) 6247 6060 sales@pialligo.estate

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–– STREET DREAMING PAGE 76

CITY 08 61 69

Save the Date Future Capital One Perfect Day

TRAVEL 41

Dream Destinations

CAREER 20

Dream Jobs

FOOD & DRINK 93

Food Fantasies

WELLNESS

contents

108

Dream a Little Dream

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EVERY ISSUE 02 Editor's Letter 04 Contributors 06 HC Online

LIFE 10 31 53

Entertainment The Great Australian Dream The Nightmare of Modern Addiction

STYLE 12 76

Beauty Icons 101 Street Dreaming

INTERIOR 101

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THE NIGHTMARE OF MODERN ADDICTION PAGE 53

Dream Homes

GREAT AUSTRALIAN DREAM PAGE 31 THE


HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

TEAM HC ––

Editor's le tte r BELINDA NEAME

Events Coordinator

“Throw your dreams into space like a kite, and you do not know what it will bring back, a new life, a new friend, a new love, a new country.” – Anaïs Nin We all dream. Of foreign places, of the future, of following our passions. Without dreams, what is there to drive us and lift us up? That’s what Issue 6 of Magazine is all about. From the reality of ‘dream jobs’ to fantasy food, exotic destinations to the future of Canberra; this edition explores the theme from many angles. But with the light, comes darkness, and we also delve into the reality of 21st century addiction.

LAURA PEPPAS

Senior Journalist

This edition also sees one of the team’s own dreams come to fruition, as we reveal ‘Unveiled’ — our soon-to-be-released online wedding publication. Housed in a new dedicated Weddings section on the HerCanberra website, Unveiled is unlike anything Canberra has seen before. Flip over Magazine to check out a special preview ahead of its September launch. We hope that this edition inspires you to try something new, to explore new territory, to dream your own little dream.

BEATRICE SMITH

Editorial Coordinator

Amanda Whitley Magazine Editor-in-chief HerCanberra Founder + Director

JAVIER STEEL

WE'D LOVE TO HEAR YOUR THOUGHTS Please drop us a line at hello@hercanberra.com.au with your feedback. @HERCANBERRA HERCANBERRA.COM.AU PAGE 2

Creative Director


HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

Contri bu tors

WRITERS Tiffany Bonasera Tess Godkin Roslyn Hull Molly McLaughlin Belinda Neame Laura Peppas Adelaide Rief Jade Sargent Beatrice Smith Stephanie Wang

LAUREN CAMPBELL

TESS GODKIN

Lauren Campbell is a nuclear medicine scientist and a wedding and portrait photographer. You couldn’t dream up two more polar opposite professions but somehow, she manages to combine the two with unflappable flair.

After throwing in her desk job as an urban designer, Tess Godkin decided that she wanted to be a photographer — she hasn’t looked back. Tess specialises in food and wedding & portrait photography and lives in Canberra with her husband Sean and puppy Coco.

Amanda Whitley

PHOTOGRAPHERS Lauren Campbell Tess Godkin Martin Ollman

HAIR STYLISTS Jess Baczynski Lexi Bannister Kathryn Ilijoski Peter Magro Lee Makin Julie Okely Jessica Skokleska

MAKEUP ARTISTS Browlab Liv English Lesley Johnston Katie Saariko

HAYLEY O'NEILL

MARTIN OLLMAN

Hayley O'Neill is a Sydney-based fashion stylist (but a Canberra girl at heart) who currently works as a fashion office coordinator for marie claire Australia. She has worked alongside the likes of Alex Perry, Samantha Harris and Margaret Zhang.

Martin left traditional photography 20 years ago, moving into the digital photography revolution. Projected across our monuments for Enlighten, on the pages of nearly every regular local publication and making waves across the country, Martin's impression of Canberra is helping to define it.

Jacqui Scott Vendulka Wichta

STYLISTS Bianca Armstrong Deejay Jukic Hayley O'Neill

ART DIRECTOR + GRAPHIC DESIGNER Javier Steel

PRINTER CanPrint Communications, with special thanks to Janelle Cousins

PAGE 4


CANPRINT COMMUNICATIONS JANELLE COUSINS 6295 4406 0408 203 260 jcousins@canprint.com.au www.canprint.com.au


HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

HC ONLINE Visit hercanberra.com.au for your daily dose of all things Canberra.

@meetgathercollect

@netherleigh

@ds_doubleshotdeakin

@littlenationalhotel

@burburyhotel

@landspeedclothing

@timbean_photography

@ugynot_

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#HERCANBERRA FOR THE CHANCE TO SEE YOUR IMAGES IN PRINT

Connect @HERCANBERRA #HERCANBERRA

PAGE 6

–– STYLE FOOD & DRINK CITY BUSINESS EVENTS AND MORE ––


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HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

AUGUST

FLORIADE NIGHTFEST 28 SEPTEMBER – 2 OCTOBER

GHOST STORIES 17 – 20 AUGUST Canberra Theatre Centre canberratheatrecentre.com.au

CANBERRA WRITERS FESTIVAL 26 – 28 AUGUST Various venues canberrawritersfestival.com.au

TASTES OF TWO REGIONS 28 AUGUST Pialligo Estate tastesoftworegions.com.au

SEPTEMBER 2016 CANBERRA TIMES FUN RUN 4 SEPTEMBER Old Parliament House canberratimesfunrun.com.au

HANDMADE MARKET 10 – 11 SEPTEMBER Exhibition Park handmadecanberra.com.au

FLORIADE 17 SEPTEMBER – 16 OCTOBER Commonwealth Park floriadeaustralia.com

PAGE 8

Commonwealth Park floriadeaustralia.com

SAVE THE DATE

FASHFEST 29 SEPTEMBER – 1 OCTOBER National Convention Centre fashfest.com.au

OCTOBER MURRUMBATEMAN MOVING FEAST 1 – 2 OCTOBER Various Locations makersofmurrumbateman.org.au

THE CANBERRA HIGHLAND GATHERING AND SCOTTISH FAIR 8 OCTOBER Kambah Oval canberragathering.com.au

OTHELLO 14 – 22 OCTOBER Canberra Theatre Centre canberratheatrecentre.com.au

MORE EVENTS AT HERCANBERRA.COM.AU/EVENTS


CHOICE NEVER TASTED SO GOOD Lathlain Street is Belconnen’s newest dining destination. Day or night, stylish or relaxed, a great mix of well known venues means that choice never tasted so good.


HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

ENTERTAINMENT Still, dreams can have a lighter side. The best example being The Wizard of Oz, which cleverly linked Dorothy’s real-world experiences to her magical ones in Oz.

C el lu loid Dre ams BY R O S LY N H U L L M O R E AT H E R C A N B E R R A .C O M . A U

Dreams are often used in films to signify a psychotic break with reality — the dream is the only way to cope. And these films can be very dark indeed.

Mulholland Drive, by David Lynch, is just as dark as you would expect, with Naomi Watts giving a vulnerability that makes the twist even worse.

DREAM READS

BY S T E P H A N I E WA N G W R I T E R A N D B O O KS E L L E R AT M U S E

All titles available for purchase instore, musecanberra.com.au

ALICE IN WONDERLAND

DREAMS FROM MY FATHER

THE SINGING BONES

Lewis Carroll

Barack Obama

Shaun Tan

Alice Liddell dozes by the river one golden afternoon and is roused by the strange sight of a bunny in a waistcoat, checking a pocket watch. Lewis Carroll’s perennial classic is perhaps the quintessential children’s book – full of dreamlike encounters and absurdities; beloved by young and old alike.

PAGE 10

The way Jim Carrey’s dreaming self fights back against the loss of memories – both hilarious and painful – made Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind a very rich film.

Before the presidency, before politics, Barack Obama was a young law student whose estranged father had just passed. Both a meditation on race and a deeply personal story about his quest to understand his origins, the book is an honest, heartfelt account about the homes we inherit, and the ones we find.

Originally conceived when Tan was asked to illustrate the German edition of Philip Pullman’s Grimm Tales, The Singing Bones features snippets of folk and fairy tales that have been illustrated, unusually, through sculpture. The medium transforms, under Tan’s deft hands, into something beautiful and otherworldly, stripping the tales – sometimes literally – to their bones.


MAGAZINE ISSUE NO.6

The richest dream life in any movie, for me, is that in Tarsem Singh’s The Fall. It is wonderful to watch and gorgeous to look at.

SLEEP TALKER

top pic k

SWEET DREAMS BY M O L LY M C L A U G H L I N

The best use of this device is Shutter Island, where Leonardo DiCaprio's dream break with reality is his way of coping with unimaginable pain and the denouement is heartbreaking.

Podcasts can take you into another world, created purely from sound. Some are perfect for fantasising about your future, while others are the stuff of nightmares. Whether you’re planning your dream career or trying to scare yourself so much you can’t sleep – there’s a podcast for that.

An independent podcast out of Melbourne that discusses sleep, dreams, nightmares, and what goes on in your head after dark. And that means anything could happen.

TED RADIO HOUR This one is selfexplanatory. Just as exciting as the regular TED Talks but each episode brings together a couple of talks on a theme and delves deeper into the big questions.

SOAPBOX Canberra’s very own Lee Constable and Sian Willoughby interview people about what gets them on their soapbox. The guests discuss how they have found innovative and intriguing ways to make their dreams a reality.

This same dark device is at the core of Life of Pi but somehow the story manages to take us in a positive direction, helping us understand why Pi did what he did, before we understand what.

ALICE ISN’T DEAD THE SANDMAN SERIES Neil Gaiman

This groundbreaking series – now nearing the end of its third decade of publication – seems to be everyone’s gateway drug into graphic novels. With good reason: its dark, sprawling mythos of dream gods and far-flung places is indescribably compelling. With each issue, Gaiman taps into an unspoken truth – that dreams are stories, and stories are essential.

ATLAS OF LOST CITIES Aude de Tocqueville There’s something haunting about cities – how they’re born, die, pass into legend or disappear entirely. This gorgeously illustrated book focuses on exactly that; cities that now exist only in collective memory or as empty husks. Full of odd facts, maps, and curiosities, this book will delight and inspire in equal measure.

A serial fiction podcast from the team behind Welcome To Nightvale, Alice Isn’t Dead quietly questions whether there is anything at all that the characters can trust and tells a story of conspiracy, illusion and friendship.

NOCTURNE Nocturne is all about the night-time. Described as ‘essay radio’, it brings together elements of documentary, interview and fiction to uncover the dark, often-overlooked aspects of life. PAGE 11


HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

BEAUTY ICONS 101

101

Be au ty ic ons PHOTOGRAPHED BY MARTIN OLLMAN WHO DOESN'T DREAM OF POSSESSING AUDREY HEPBURN'S DOE LASHES OR BROOKE S HI E LDS' BOLD BROWS AND B E ACH WAVES FROM HE R BLU E L AG O O N DAY S? W E A S K E D LO C A L H A I R A N D M A K E U P T E A M S TO C R E AT E THE I R FAVOU RITE I CONI C LOOKS – CHECK THE M OUT!

Modern A udre y H epbu rn MAKEUP BY JACQUI SCOT T HAIR BY PE TER MAGRO OF

PONY & PINS MODEL ALEXANDRA RUBIO

DOE EYES

TOP KNOT

In this case, the more lashes the better! After lining the eyes with black eyeliner, apply a set of full lashes and if that’s not full enough double it with another pair. When applying lashes remember never to wear the lashes without measuring them against your eye and cutting them to fit. Also never overdo the glue – you don’t want to glue your eyelids shut! Don’t forget to coat the lashes with lots of mascara to achieve a heavy-lashed look.

Begin by spraying your wet hair with a texture spray then blow dry your hair until completely dry.

PINK KISSES

Keep it neutral by applying a soft pink lip. Turn any lipstick into a longwearing version by applying translucent powder to it – put on your lipstick, then hold a tissue over your mouth and dust translucent powder over it with a brush. The powder will transfer onto the tissue, locking in your colour.

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Pull your hair into a loose ponytail on the top of your head and put a hair tie around it — you want it to look effortless and messy, so no need to use a comb or brush. Separate the hair in the pony into three different sections and tease each section individually. Separate your teased hair into two sections and wrap the hair in opposite directions, as you would when creating a topknot. Pin these sections in and leave the hair messy with some strands out – remember you want to look a little like a ballerina who’s rebelling. To complete the look, pull a few rogue pieces out around the face. This look is timeless and you can make it more formal by adding a tiara, veil or flower crown.


MAGAZINE ISSUE NO.6

CLASSIC AND TIMELESS BEAUTY

PAGE 13


HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

SULTRY SEDUCTRESS

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MAGAZINE ISSUE NO.6

Monic a Be ll u c c i M A K E U P BY K AT I E S A A R I K KO H A I R BY J U L I E O K E LY M O D E L TAYA H M OT T AT V I C TO R I A S M O D E L S

S TART F R ES H

Remove the oil from your face using a micellar water such as Sukin Micellar Cleansing Water. Prime your eyelids with your foundation of choice then dust translucent powder over the top — this will make blending your eye shadow easier.

Dust cheeks with translucent powder before contouring or applying blush to ensure it blends smoothly. FIRST BLUSH

Apply a soft orange blush first for a pop of warmth before using a more pinky tone over the top.

ALL ABOUT EYES

Apply a medium shimmery brown to the entire lid, stopping at the crease – the Harlotte Smokey Eye Palette in Shimmer is perfect. Apply the same shadow all the way under the eye, stopping about one centimetre from the centre. Soften and blend out the edges of the eyeshadow using a soft brush in a windscreen-wiper motion. Apply a darker metallic brown to the outer third of the eyelid and blend in a ‘C shape’ up into the crease. Apply a lighter shade in the centre of the lid and at the inner corner of your eye. To finish, line your top lash line with dark brown pencil and your inner rim with cream pencil to make your eyes pop. Curl your eyelashes, and apply mascara and false lashes. Brush your brows up and fill in any gaps, as necessary. PERFECT PORCELAIN

Apply your foundation, starting in the centre and blending out – try Harlotte Afterglow for a soft, dewy finish. Pinpoint and conceal any blemishes using a small brush and tap the concealer into your foundation with your fingertip.

NO POUT ABOUT IT

Use two shades of red lipstick – darker on the outside, brighter in the centre of the lip – to create the illusion of bigger lips. BILLOWING WAVES

Making sure your hair is fully dry and clean, lightly spray with a working styling spray such as Silky ZERO Cult Hair Spray. Using your medium rod (or tong), wind the hair around it to set a nice medium curl. The best way to curl the hair is by winding it toward the centre of the back the head. This will help make the curls more balanced on both sides. Continue curling in wide sections, moving up the head. Once completed, shake your hair softly and put in a very loose ponytail. Twist the ponytail and pin to the top of your head and let the curls fall around your face. Use bobby pins to secure ponytail and curls in place. Spray with a finishing spray such as Silky ZERO Cult Hair Spray and finish with a light spray of the Dilkara Essence of Australia Shine Spray for optimum shine results. 

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HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

Lana D e l R e y M A KE U P BY V E N D U L K A W I C H TA H A I R BY J E S S B AC Z Y N S K I M O D E L B R AU TO N H E AT H W I L L I A M S AT D E VO J K A M O D E L S

Y O U G L O W, G I R L !

SCULPT IT

Achieve luxurious skin by buffing in foundation with a brush or beauty blender and give yourself a healthy glow. We love the Hourglass Ambient Lighting Palette for a dewy finish.

Contour the underside of the cheekbone to strengthen your bone structure. Sweep a contouring bronzer from the hairline at the temple, through to under the cheekbone, then under the jawline. The more you blend, the more natural it will look.

A HINT OF SMOKE

For the eyes, use the Kat Von D shade and light palette colours Ludwin and Succubus. Apply them only in the crease with a soft blending brush, as the winged liner should be a focus. For a perfect jet black wing, apply Shu Umera gel liner using an angled brush. PLUMP IT UP

Nothing says ‘icon’ like a signature red lip. Apply it around the edges of your lips and be sure to emphasise your Cupid's bow to achieve a plumper look. Use Jeffree Star Redrum to ensure longevity throughout the wear.

N OT H I N G SAYS I C O N L I KE A S I G N AT U R E R E D L I P. A P P LY I T A R O U N D T H E E D G E S O F YO U R LIPS AND BE SURE TO EMPHASISE YOUR CUPID'S BOW TO ACHIEVE A PLUMPER LOOK.

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WAVING, NOT DROWNING

Retro waves are best achieved with a Cloud Nine Micro Wand. Start by prepping dry hair with a grapefruit-sized amount of medium hold mousse – we love the all-star combination of Kevin Murphy Anti Gravity with the L'Oreal Professional’s Volume Riche. Dry in with hair dryer. Starting at the nape, take your hot tong and curl the hair in the same direction, leaving a rectangular section for the fringe. Make sure you pin each section up to allow it to cool down. To get the wave at the front, just remember this simple rule: two forward, one back. Give everything a light spray and remove all the pins. Using a paddle brush, brush hair into place. Give your hair another light spray with L'Oreal Professional Crystal Gloss and you are good to go! Tuck behind your ear on the ‘smaller’ side for a more polished look.


MAGAZINE ISSUE NO.6

OLD HOLLYWOOD GLAMOUR

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HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

BIG BROWS AND UNDONE BEACH WAVES

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MAGAZINE ISSUE NO.6

Brooke Shields circa ' t he Blue Lagoon'

M A KE U P BY T E L I S A P E I Z L E Y AT B R OW L A B H A I R BY L E XI B A N N I S T E R M O D E L S H A N N O N N U T T AT V I V I E N ' S M O D E L M A N AG E M E N T

IT’S AL L AB O U T THAT BAS E, ' B O U T THAT BAS E

Prepping your skin is one step you don’t want to skip this winter. A moisturiser onto clean skin followed by a primer depending on your skin type is non-negotiable — they’ll rescue your face from the ravages of the weather and give you longer wear. For a soft-focus glow and the perfect canvas, pair BECCA Backlight Filtering Primer all over the face with their Under Eye Brightening Corrector then follow with their latest flawless finish foundation, Aqua Luminous. All can be applied with a brush, fingers or a damp blending sponge. GET CHEEKY

Keep the glow going with a cream or liquid based blush for that fresh, dewy flush. We love BECCA Beach Tint cheek and lip stain in Guava. This gorgeous product guarantees smudge-proof wear, buildable pigment payoff and that fresh, soft-gloss finish. Follow by sweeping BECCA’s signature Shimmering Skin Perfector from the highest point of your cheekbone to the outer arch of your brow. This will give you subtle highlights, lift and radiance. BROWS ON FLEEK

When filling your brows always remember less is more – if you don’t require fill then don’t. Swap colour for gel and a soft, matte underbrow highlight to define your lines. We recommend starting with your favourite brow, tracing along your bottom line from the beginning to your arch then down through your tail in one continuous line (then follow and repeat on the second brow).

If that’s all you need then just brush through and voila! If you need more fill throughout the brow, softly enhance sparse areas then brush through with a brow brush or spooly to mimic natural hair growth. If you find that your lines are asymmetrical and messy after fill and brushing (because you were never great at colouring inside the lines), never fear! Simply take your matte highlight or concealer and an angled brush or cotton tip and clean up around your desired shape. TOU SLED WAVES

You’ll need Wella’s EIMI Sugar Lift Spray and Ocean Spritz Salt Spray, a blow dryer, a Cloud Nine Wand and Paddle Brush. To start, spray hair down with water and follow with generous amounts of Sugar Lift at the roots and Ocean Spritz on the mid-ends. To start, spray hair down with water and follow with generous amounts of Sugar Lift at the roots and Ocean Spritz on the mid-ends. Dry the hair, make sure it’s 100 per cent dry by rubbing the roots in circular motions and ends in a twisting motion. Lightly brush out ends, if knotted too much. Separate the hair into three equal horizontal and six vertical sections and wrap the hair around the wand starting at mid-lengths and leaving out ends. Hold your finger on the hair until it's too hot to keep there and let it drop. Let the hair cool for 10 minutes – if you can leave it longer (up to 30 minutes), it will add to longevity of the style. Use a paddle brush to lightly brush ends out until you’ve achieved a natural looking shape – it doesn’t need to be perfect! n PAGE 19


^


MAGAZINE ISSUE NO.6

Dre am j obs WRITTEN BY AMANDA WHITLE Y PHOTOGRAPHED BY MARTIN OLLMAN “ W H AT D O YO U WA N T TO B E W H E N YO U G R OW U P? ” W H E N W E ’ R E YO U N G , M A N Y O F U S FA N TA S I S E A B O U T BEING MUSICIANS OR MAKING MOVIES; AS WE GET O L D E R W E M AY D R E A M O F B E I N G PA I D TO R E V I E W F I N E F O O D, O R WO R K I N G I N M AG A Z I N E S . B U T W H AT ’ S T H E R E A L I T Y O F T H E S E ‘ D R E A M J O B S ’? W E F I N D O U T.

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" I WANT TO TELL STORIES THAT MEAN SOMETHING TO ME. "


MAGAZINE ISSUE NO.6

Georg ina Je nk ins SHE’S WORKED AS A WRITER/PRODUCER ON EVERYTHING FROM F A S H F E S T S H O R T F I L M S T O F O X T E L’ S S E C R E T C I T Y, B U T A S G E O R G I N A JENKINS RE VE ALS, IT’S NOT ALL CELEBRITIES AND RED CARPE TS.

WHEN DID YOU KNOW YOU WANTED TO BE A WRITER/PRODUCER? I knew I wanted to be a writer from quite a young age, but it wasn’t until I was a teenager that I became interested in drama and filmmaking … but acting wasn’t really for me. I wanted to be more in control, so I took on the role of stage manager in several school productions. Like all kids I loved the movies, and cult classics like Apocalypse Now, Whitnail and I and Bladerunner saw me totally blown away by this elevated art form called cinema.

WHAT WAS IT THAT DREW YOU TO THE PROFESSION? Film is such a compelling, immersive, versatile medium. As a storyteller, I’m totally intoxicated by the possibilities of its transcendental and transformational power. What I love about writing is that it’s about connecting with audiences through self-exploration. It’s about bringing an idea to life. Producing is about driving the project forward. What I love about producing is that you’re constantly in motion. I used to think I had to choose between the two, but in recent years, I’ve discovered it’s quite handy being both.

WHAT’S YOUR JOB REALLY LIKE? The realities of the job are that to make a living you’re not always working on your dream projects. I run a production house with my cinematographer husband where we do a lot of

corporate work … It’s rarely glamorous but it allows us to pay the mortgage, feed our kids and occasionally be able to work on our own selffunded short films and documentaries. I’m currently developing a low-budget feature and a TV series, but film is the most expensive art form ever devised and investors don’t take these risks lightly! It may take years of development before a project sees the light of day. So it’s a hard slog requiring a lot of persistence and determination.

BEST BITS? Stories are how we make sense of the world. I want to tell stories that mean something to me, and as a creator it’s important to bring that authenticity, but when a story resonates with audiences, that is what it’s all about. Another very rewarding thing is giving back to the industry and mentoring emerging filmmakers.

WORDS OF ADVICE? Get a degree – it’s a great foundation. But all the theory in the world cannot replace work experience. Making films with your mates is great. Make as many of them as you can. But you also need to align yourself with people more experienced than you. Get an internship. Get a mentor. Offer your services working on professional productions. Be prepared to do coffee and lunch runs – whatever it takes to prove you are in this business for the long-haul.

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HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

H ay le y O’N ei ll J U S T T H R E E Y E A R S AG O, H AY L E Y O ’N E I L L WAS A P U B L I C S E RVA N T W I T H A PAS S I O N F O R FAS H I O N . TO DAY S H E ’S WO R KI N G W I T H O N E O F AU S T R A L I A’S M O S T R E S P E C T E D M AG A Z I N E S, A S FA S H I O N O F F I C E C O O R D I N ATO R W I T H M A R I E C L A I R E AU S T R A L I A .

HOW DID YOU GET YOUR ‘DREAM JOB’? In 2013 I volunteered at the very first Fashfest, which reignited my love for fashion and I went on to study clothing production, after work hours, at the Canberra Institute of Technology. One night I had the idea to start a corporate fashion blog called The Work Diaries — I put the word out and got in touch with local creatives and started shooting editorials every weekend for the blog to create content. This became a digital portfolio and landed me a meeting with the management at Westfield Belconnen, who gave me an opportunity to grow as a stylist. After a year, I took the biggest risk of my life and quit my job in the public service to pursue a career as a stylist. I started driving to Sydney on a weekly basis to study at Fashion Business Institute and intern at marie claire Australia, whilst also working as fashion editor at HerCanberra and freelancing as a fashion assistant for Aileen Marr, a Sydney-based stylist. I spent the entire year studying, interning, working and driving back and forth weekly. I don’t quite know how I managed it all … but I desperately needed to make something of myself in this industry. I remember the day I got the phone call from Jana, fashion director at marie claire Australia, offering me the position. I knew I had finally proven myself and achieved what I had been hoping for.

WHAT ARE THE BEST BITS? Working with a team who are passionate and are experts in their field. Learning from them and seeing them work has been invaluable.

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People look at the magazine and think it’s beautiful but they’ll never see just how much work goes into it — there are roughly 30 people who work at the magazine and every single one from our editor Nicky Briger, to our art, subs and editorial teams have an influence on making each page as good as it can possibly be; it’s an incredible experience to be a part of that.

WHAT DOES A TYPICAL DAY ENTAIL? There is never a typical day in the marie claire office. Our fashion team has to create roughly 50 pages of content for each monthly issue. My job is to assist our stylists to do this. Days are spent in the office managing a team of interns, unpacking/packing garments, sourcing product credits, creating social media posts, and liaising with PR companies. Sometimes, my days are spent out and about finding the best garments/props for a story, or on set or on location assisting one of our stylists on a shoot.

WHAT ARE SOME OF THE CHALLENGES? Deciding what to wear to work each day to Australia’s leading fashion magazine! But seriously, working to deadlines each month requires work to be turned around quite quickly, and I always need to have a plan B in place to make sure everything is completed on time and of the highest quality. There are only so many hours in the day!


" PEOPLE LOOK AT THE MAGAZINE AND THINK IT’S BEAUTIFUL BUT THEY’LL NEVER SEE JUST HOW MUCH WORK GOES INTO IT. "


" I DON’T DISGUISE MYSELF WITH WIGS OR OVERSIZED SUNGLASSES "


MAGAZINE ISSUE NO.6

W endy Johnson N OTI C I N G A GAP I N TH E C IT YN E WS ’ CO NTE NT OVE R A D E C AD E AGO, W E N DY J O H N S O N S U G G E S T E D A W E E K LY F O O D C O L U M N . TO D AY S H E ’ S C A N B E R R A’ S LO N G E S T S E RV I N G R E S TAU R A N T R E V I E W E R .

HOW DID YOU GET YOUR ‘DREAM JOB’? I pitched the idea to CityNews about 12 years ago — Canberra’s dining scene wasn’t as delicious then, but it was tasty enough to justify a weekly story. The then-editor challenged me to dish up a smorgasbord of story ideas and kickstart the column. I have a master's degree in journalism and so took up the challenge. I’m still there having dined more than 650 times since my first review.

WHAT DOES A TYPICAL REVIEW ENTAIL?

I’m wary of expectations, which is why I rarely go to ‘openings’. Most restaurant owners who know me would never try to influence me anyway.

WHAT ARE SOME OF THE CHALLENGES AND WHAT ARE THE BEST BITS? Food overdose; having to put up with mediocre fare and service, while paying for the privilege; maintaining the courage to write negative feedback, especially when you know the owner, chef or staff; deciding if humour is appropriate, and fitting reviewing into my busy schedule.

First, selecting where to eat. This is a snap with Canberra’s burgeoning food and wine scene. The editor doesn’t tell me what to review. I choose, eat and file, trying to balance type of eatery, cuisine style, new versus old, and location.

The best part is being presented with art on a plate, experiencing inspiring chef creations and different cuisines; meeting passionate wait staff; and hearing that my suggestions have informed positive change.

Second, rocking up announced with friends. If booking is wise, a friend usually books or I use their name. I don’t disguise myself with wigs or oversized sunglasses.

HAS ANYONE TAKEN UMBRAGE WITH A REVIEW?

Third, eating once and then reviewing. I don’t have the time or stamina to dine out several times in the same place and average results out. Fourth, telling a well-rounded story. Dealing with a tight word limit is challenging when covering décor, ambience, service, food, wine, address and opening times.

WHAT ARE YOUR ‘RULES OF ENGAGEMENT’? I don’t approach restaurant owners, asking them to pay for my wine and food in exchange for a guaranteed glowing review. Writers who do this should declare they’ve been paid for their opinion.

I rarely deal with direct aggression but I’ve had a Twitter campaign against me, an owner call me at night yelling down the phone, another accusing me of trying to close a long-standing family business (they did close but certainly not because of my one review). I’ve probably been banned from some eateries but am not fussed. I rarely return to eat in a mediocre establishment anyway.

WHAT WOULD YOU SAY TO PEOPLE WHO DREAM OF EATING AND WRITING ABOUT IT FOR A LIVING? Have the courage to stir the pot when the pot needs stirring. Season your comments well. Never be vindictive. Be fair – if reviewing ‘cheap and cheerful’ don’t apply Michelin-star standards. Do your research. I remember a ‘reviewer’ complaining that the top of the crème brûlée was hard. Duh.

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HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

A mber Nic hols S H O OT I N G I N TO T H E N AT I O N A L S P OT L I G H T O N L A S T Y E A R ’ S S E A S O N O F T H E VO I C E AU S T R A L I A , A M B E R N I C H O L S R E V E A L S T H AT T H E REALITY OF ‘OVERNIGHT’ SUCCESS IS YEARS OF HARD WORK.

WHEN DID YOU KNOW YOU WANTED TO BE A MUSICIAN? It's something that's always been a part of me. I remember tinkering on a toy keyboard at a young age, playing back the melodies I heard on the radio and delighting in creating new ones. I can attach a song to every emotion I've ever felt, every big event in my life. When I feel happy I sing, when I feel sadness I sing, when I'm lost I sing. As cheesy as this sounds, I didn't choose music, it chose me.

HOW HARD IS IT TO MAKE A LIVING AS A PROFESSIONAL MUSICIAN? I get asked all the time why don't I do music full time and my answer is this: ‘Because I love it’. My heart is just not in gigging five days a week, late nights away from my family and supplementing my income by teaching. Slogging it out on the corporate scene playing somebody else’s song doesn't appeal to me. What does appeal to me is opportunities to share my songs and my soul and touch somebody with a message of hope, of comfort, or understanding.

I've had no sleep, to keep networking and to do crazy things like go on national TV and sing at 39 weeks pregnant.

WHAT ARE SOME OF THE CHALLENGES? The biggest challenge for me right now is balancing music and family. Some days it all seems too hard. Sound-checks with one baby strapped to you and your two-year-old heading at full speed to the nearest exit. Learning how to be creative when you're running on little sleep. Breastfeeding between sets. Not seeing your spouse out there in the crowd at an important show because he's at home holding down the fort. Those are the hard things.

AND BEST BITS? The absolute best part of being a musician is when a song that you have written resonates with a listener and hearing them share with you the impact that a song has had on their life. Nothing beats that.

ANY WORDS OF WISDOM? HAVE YOU EVER BEEN TEMPTED TO GIVE IT UP? I'm not sure I could ever give up music completely [but] I've been tempted many times to give up on the dream of becoming a recording artist. I'm certainly very aware that only a small percentage of musicians are afforded the opportunity to share their songs with the masses. But that's the dream. It's what drives me to drag a newborn across the country from one recording studio to the next, to keep writing when

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I would say there are no quick wins, or short cuts. Hard work and determination are the best chance you have and still there are no guarantees. It's as much about your talent as your network, so work on both. Build a team around you, who believe in you, and will help carry your vision. Be a decent human being! Be kind to your fans and be generous with your time because it's the consumer that ultimately decides your fate in this business. And above all, stay true to yourself and love what you do. n


" WHEN I FEEL HAPPY I SING, WHEN I FEEL SADNESS I SING, WHEN I'M LOST I SING. "


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MAGAZINE ISSUE NO.6

GREAT AUSTRALIAN DREAM WRIT TEN BY L AU R A PE PPAS PHOTOGRAPHED BY MARTIN OLLMAN THEY ARRIVED IN AUSTRALIA AS MIGRANTS, OVERCOMING F I N A N C I A L A N D L A N G UAG E BA R R I E R S TO P L AY T H E I R H A N D I N S H A P I N G C A N B E R R A I N TO W H AT I T I S TO DAY. M E E T T H R E E FA M I L I E S W H O ' V E M A D E T H E G R E AT AU S T R A L I A N D R E A M A R E A L I T Y.

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Ivan Domazet, captured at the Realm Precinct, Barton AMONG the bustle of corporates and Parliamentarians in Barton's busy Realm Precinct, sits a trim, softly spoken man in a pressed suit. He is the man who helped create the swanky restaurant where the pollies are nonchalantly sipping pinot noir, the hotel where business travellers are busily wheeling suitcases, the café where a group of young friends are gathered, nursing soy chai lattes. As the founder of one of the largest property and investment companies in Canberra, Doma Group, Ivan Domazet is behind some of the city's most successful and pivotal developments in areas including the Kingston Foreshore, and most significantly, the Parliamentary Triangle in Barton. But before all that, back when those sites were little more than dusty paddocks, Ivan set foot on Australian shores with just $20 in his pocket and the clothes he had on his back. Born in 1946, Ivan grew up in the Croatian village of Bijeli Vir, some 211 miles south-east of Zagreb, the country's capital city. It was post-World War II and times were uncertain; Germany was crushed and the map of Europe was being carved up by the United States and the Soviet Union. By the time Ivan hit his teens, prospects were bleak: he could choose to join the army, enduring tough conditions, or he could pave a new life for himself. Either way, the decision was an emotional one: he'd have to do it without family. With two friends, Ivan spent several days dodging armed Yugoslavian soldiers and hiking across the Slovenian Alps before arriving safely across the border where they were

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greeted by Austrian police. The boys were taken to a detention centre 20 kilometres outside of Vienna for questioning, before the process for asylum and resettlement began. At the time, the choice for resettlement was between Australia, Sweden and Canada. Australia was hailed as “the lucky country”; advertisements promising golden beaches ran before movies in theatres, enticing Europeans to pack up their lives and start a new one in the land of leaping kangaroos and koalas. “I can't remember exactly why I chose Australia now,” Ivan says. “I think at the time, it was because it was the furthest away I could go from Europe.” On 28 October 1964, at 18 years old, Ivan arrived in Australia, part of the surge of two million migrants who came to the country between 1945 and 1965. He spent four days in a migrant reception centre near Albury, before the most unlikely of circumstances landed him a job. “I was playing a game of soccer and back then, people used to come to the camp on weekends looking for players to recruit for their home teams,” Ivan says. “These guys saw me and asked if I would come with them to Canberra. I said ‘Sure – why not?’” On the drive to Canberra, Ivan mentioned the names of some people near his village in Croatia who had recently moved to Canberra. By chance, his driver knew them and Ivan was given board with his fellow Croatians on arrival.

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MAGAZINE ISSUE NO.6

“The Croatian community was very supportive – back in those days. There was probably only about five to six hundred Croatians living in Canberra but it was tight-knit,” Ivan says. “It was easier to meet people, easier to find job, easier to find everything.” With his skills Ivan soon found work as a glazier, but the language barrier proved too difficult. “I would be working and the others would start laughing, and I didn't know if they were laughing at me or not,” he says. “I felt very uncomfortable.” Through his soccer connections, Ivan met a group of fellow Croatians who were painters, before venturing out on his own, painting houses through word-of-mouth. He eventually landed a job subcontracting for what was the biggest construction company in Canberra at the time. “Back then there was too much land and not enough people,” he says. “And the government was handing out loans for $7K. So I bought a block of land for $150 and spent every evening and weekend building our first home.” After building his three-bedroom, single garage home, Ivan and a friend went halves in a block of land, built another home, and sold it for a profit. One development quickly turned to two and three, and eventually Ivan was making enough to quit his job as a painter and set his sights on the property business full time, marking the berth of his career as one of Canberra's most influential developers. The kid from Croatia had made it.

" IT WAS EASIER TO MEET PEOPLE, EASIER TO FIND JOB, EASIER TO FIND EVERYTHING. "

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HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

Tim Efkarpidis, captured at the NewActon Precinct –––

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MAGAZINE ISSUE NO.6

IN an office overlooking the impressive Nishi building in NewActon, Tim Efkarpidis is reflecting on his first time on Australian shores. Whip-smart with a slick sense of humour, Tim admits he's not one to talk himself up, ploughing through any successes with humility. But Tim, born in the city of Katerini, near historic Thessaloniki in Greece, has played a hand in creating Canberra's most innovative precinct. Since it was built from the derelict Acton hotel site over 10 years ago, NewActon has given Canberra boasting rights across the country: a thriving, unique cultural hub with quirky cafés, funky bars, arts events and a tight-knit community feel. Most days you'll see tourists gazing up in awe at the exquisite sculptures or snapping photos on their iPhones of the intriguing design of the precinct's signature hotel, Hotel Hotel. Countless television shows have requested to film in the area, drawn to backdrops such as that wooden staircase in the foyer of the Nishi building, already one of Canberra's most recognisable landmarks. The award-winning precinct is by far the family’s proudest achievement to date, and although he helped develop it, Tim says it has exceeded all his expectations. “I'm very proud of it as a family and as a team of dedicated people in our company,” Tim says. “I think personally it turned out better than expected. I don't think it ever finishes though; there are always things you can add to it and improve it. I think the main thing was we didn't listen to the negativity – there are always a few people who do not

understand what you're trying to do. There's always going to be three or four people who try and fight it.” Like Ivan, Tim didn't speak much English when he arrived in Australia to meet with his brother, Tom, in August 1963. But both managed, working at cafés, restaurants and hotels to make ends meet. He copped his fair share of racism at the time, but took it with a grain of salt.

" I THINK THE MAIN THING WAS WE DIDN'T LISTEN TO THE NEGATIVITY – THERE ARE ALWAYS A FEW PEOPLE WHO DO NOT UNDERSTAND WHAT YOU'RE TRYING TO DO "

“You might get told go back to your own country, but you just ignore it,” he says. “It happens in every country – my parents dealt with racism in Greece because they were from Russia, so it is everywhere. “Sometimes you'd feel alienated and upset, but you had to accept it and move on. It was what it was. If you don't care, at the end of the day, it goes away. Once you think like that, then it doesn't matter.” With his brother Tom, Tim ventured into the supermarket industry as active members of the ShopRite and The Warehouse Group. At the time, the independents captured in excess of 45 per cent of the ACT's supermarket trade. Before selling to Woolworths in 1996, the brothers created their own group, including Supabarn and Cannon’s Quality Fresh. “After that, we decided it was time to try something new,” Tim says. With his sons Johnathan and Nectar, Tim helped to launch property development and creative production business Molonglo Group, beginning work on the NewActon precinct at the end of 2006.

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Johnathan Efkarpidis, captured at the NewActon Precinct –––

The family is extremely proud of its heritage; in fact, the “community feel” of the precinct was designed to emulate certain Greek communities, where students, art lovers, business travellers and locals alike can mingle. “That was one of the most difficult parts of the development,” says Johnathan. “Coming from a Greek heritage, I knew I could go out by myself because you knew you'd meet other people, and they were your instant friends. You feel connected.” I ask Tim why he thinks so many European migrants have overcome vast barriers – language, money, isolation – to work their way to the top.

" GROWING UP, I HAD AN APPRECIATION FOR WHAT DAD DID AND HE ALWAYS WAS A SOURCE OF MOTIVATION FOR NECTAR AND I. "

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Johnathan, who is a director of the group and established Hotel Hotel with Nectar, says he originally had aspirations to work in foreign affairs but eventually fell into the business after becoming immersed in it. “Growing up, I had an appreciation for what Dad did and he always was a source of motivation for Nectar and I,” he says. “There are many advantages working with your family – the main one is you can trust them and that they're going to do the right thing. Even when you are arguing, you know you both want the same thing, it's just I want to go left, and they want to go right – but we still want to reach the same destination.”

“You soon learn that you're by yourself – with no family, no friends – so you have to work your butt off because nobody else will do it for you,” he says. “If you don't do it, you might as well go back. You have no choice.” It defines the drive behind successful first generation migrants: many tell stories about sacrificing time with their families to work 15–hour days, seven days a week, just to make sure their children can have the opportunities they didn't. The value of his father's work ethic was never lost on Johnathan, as he tells: “When we were growing up, Dad always said ‘I don't care if you're going to be a garbage collector, just as long as you're the best f*king garbage collector there is’.”


THOUGH the late Giovanni Balzanelli also established a career in property, he ended up turning his attention to something a little meatier: the butchery industry, to be precise. Today, Four Bee Meats Balzanelli Smallgoods is an award-winning business that produces meat for delis across Canberra and interstate, priding itself on meats locally handmade the traditional way. Giovanni's son, Marco, took over the business when he passed away in 2002 and when you walk into the Queanbeyan store, Giovanni is everywhere – from the black and white family photos on the walls to the photograph of his family home in the Italian village of Canicossa, printed on all the packaging. “It's really important to us to keep that connection,” says Marco. “To me, it means everything to continue along the lines of what my father started. I think what people really relate with, is the traditional aspect of our business." Giovanni and his wife Carla arrived in Australia from Italy in 1960, at 29 years old. “They were actually going to try and go to Argentina at the time, but they weren't taking any more migrants, so the only place they could go was Australia,” Marco says.

“There were other Italian people working there as well who realised my father's potential and helped him with getting a job on the Scrivener Dam when it commenced,” Marco says. “With a French company called CITRA, Dad ran his own job on the dam. Once the job was finished, they sent him and Mum to Queensland to work on another dam. They were there for two years. After the job, Mum and Dad both knew that Canberra was the place for both of them to raise their family so they came back here with my brother Andrew in tow.”

When he arrived, Giovanni knew about 150 words of English, the result of self-taught lessons on the long ship ride on the way over.

In the early 1970s, Giovanni began building units and houses, before investing money into a farm at Goulburn in 1979. Here, he started a piggery, selling meats to local shops, before eventually moving to Queanbeyan where the family have been ever since.

With no family in Australia, the couple was taken to a migrant centre near Albury before receiving sponsorship to come to Canberra, where Giovanni worked as a labourer at Parks and Gardens.

“We started out with a small butcher's shop on Monaro Road in Queanbeyan, we were there for about five to six years, then we purchased a place in Fyshwick, a small factory,” says Marco.

“They had no idea where Australia was. But they jumped on a ship, and they started their life here.”

Sandra, Marco and Dolores Balzanelli captured infront of their store in Queanbeyan –––

" TO ME, IT MEANS EVERYTHING TO CONTINUE ALONG THE LINES OF WHAT MY FATHER STARTED. "

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HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

Marco Balzanelli in his store in Queanbeyan –––

Marco recalls when Giovanni retired from the business at 65, he still found it hard to “completely let go.”

“We've been manufacturing in Fyshwick for all those years.” Marco has fond memories of accompanying his father to the farm or butcher's shop as a child.

WHEN it's the business you built from the ground up, it's a difficult task to take a back seat and relax.

“I remember the smell of the meat, and we'd make our dinners using it – Mum was the best cook, she'd cook anything,” he says.

Though Ivan Domazet says he's “semiretired” these days, he enjoys coming into the Doma Group office in the Realm Precinct at lunchtimes to watch it thrive.

“Meat in the Italian way of cooking cuisine is very up there – the beautiful salamis, the slow-cooked meat. Mum would never cook a pasta sauce in less than four hours.”

Working with son Jure, who Ivan describes as the “front man” of the business now, the father and son's relationship has only strengthened over the years.

Keen to help his father out, Marco joined the business when he was 16, taking a butchery apprenticeship.

“We've never had a fight in the entire time we've been working together,” he says.

The business has since expanded interstate, and has about 14 employees including Marco's daughter Sandra, who runs the marketing side of the business, and wife Dolores who works in the Fyshwick office.

“Maybe it's because we’re both strong,” he offers, with a chuckle.

“There is so much hard work involved in this business,” Marco says. “I'm very proud at the progress we've made, the quality of the products and the family we've grown. It was hard, because we had a dream of manufacturing a product, and it wasn't easy but we were surprised at the outcome, because we did establish ourselves pretty quickly in the market with our product and know-how.” PAGE 38

“Dad had retired but he'd always be poking his head in – it was good though, I would enjoy making him a cup of coffee and talking to him about what we were doing,” Marco says.

“I never listened to anyone – lawyers, accountants – I only did what I wanted to. I've always been someone who looks forward. I think that's why I've been successful in what I've done.” Similarly, Tim Efkarpidis says the word “retire” doesn't exist in his vocabulary. Each day he rises early and dons a suit, heading into the office with a smile. “I don't know the meaning of the word retire,” he says. “I don't want to die, I want to live.” n


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MAGAZINE ISSUE NO.6

DISCOVER SINGAPORE × AND × WELLINGTON

I T ’ S H A P P E N I N G ! I N S E P T E M B E R, I N T E R N AT I O N A L F L I G H T S TO S I N G A P O R E AND NEW ZEALAND WILL COMMENCE FROM CANBERRA, WITH SINGAPORE A I R L I N E S R U N N I N G F O U R F L I G H T S P E R W E E K TO E AC H C I T Y.

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A× CANBERRA GIRL'S GUIDE ×

WRITER SELINA GREENVILLE

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MAGAZINE ISSUE NO.6

NAME D ON BBC ’S HOT TEST CITIES AND ROUGH GU IDE ’S TOP 10 CITIES FOR 2015, WE LLINGTON H A S B E E N L A B E L L E D T H E ‘ C O O L E S T L I T T L E C A P I TA L I N T H E W O R L D ’ BY LO N E LY P L A N E T A N D A ‘ LOCAVORE ’S DRE AM ’ BY VOG U E . S E T ON THE E DG E OF A STU NNI NG HARBOU R AND S U RROU NDE D BY ROLLING HILLS, IT’S A CIT Y WAITING TO BE EXPLORED.

Stay SOFITEL WELLINGTON

11 Bolton Street 6011 Wellington New Zealand sofitel.com

MUSEUM ART HOTEL

90 Cable Street Wellington 6011 New Zealand museumhotel.co.nz

INTERCONTINENTAL WELLINGTON

2 Grey Street Wellington 6011 New Zealand intercontinental.com/wellington

New Zealand’s newest luxury hotel, Sofitel Wellington, has just opened its doors in the city, bringing French hospitality and elegance to the country’s capital. Sofitel Wellington is the latest five-star, internationally branded hotel to open in the city in over 10 years. Sofitel Wellington has been designed to artfully blend the brand’s French origins and elegance with local culture to create exceptional experiences. Set to become the capital’s must-stay destination for business and leisure, guests can enjoy beautifully-appointed rooms and suites in vintage gold and bronze tones with indulgent rain showers, complimentary wifi internet for multiple devices, Smart TVs with Bluetooth, a SOFIT gymnasium and state-of-the-art technology across three meeting and event venues.

Museum Art Hotel is a 165-room boutique hotel located in the centre of Wellington city opposite Wellington’s beautiful harbour and New Zealand’s national museum, Te Papa. The spacious lobby features opulent décor, walls adorned with original New Zealand art and a bar/café in which to relax. Voted amongst the Top 10 Hotels for art collections in the world by Yahoo!7 Travel, Museum Art Hotel shares a vast, varied and vivacious art collection with its visitors. The hotel is currently undergoing some change, and will soon be known as QT Museum Wellington Hotel. QT Museum Wellington will be the first property outside of QT's Australian origins. With six boutique properties across Australia, Wellington will follow suit and be led by design, quirk and innovation, capturing the heart of Wellington's creative culture. New Zealand’s most admired art hotel will remain a luxurious experience with an extensive contemporary art collection.

Conveniently located adjacent to the iconic harbour waterfront. Shops, museums, galleries, the café culture, and the city's vibrant nightlife are all within walking distance. Recently named New Zealand's leading hotel suite and best conference hotel, the InterContinental offers 232 superbly appointed guest rooms. Head concierge, Jason Eade, was named joint Australasia’s Top Concierge in the International Hotel Management Awards and is on-hand to make your experience at the hotel seamless. Adding to the experience, InterContinental Wellington's most recent addition to its team includes a luxurious 2015 Bentley Flying Spur car, to be used for guest transfers and touring.

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HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

Play WELLINGTON CITY MARKETS

Various locations throughout the city

Wellington's markets are filled with colour, vitality, local and international flavours. Soak up the aromas of roasted coffee, fresh vegetables and sizzling spices. Browse handmade craft from cheesemakers, jewellery designers, chocolatiers and dressmakers.

wellingtonnz.com

THEATRE AND GALLERIES

Various locations throughout the city tourismwellington.com.au/ explore/arts-culture

MUSEUM OF NEW ZEALAND TE PAPA TONGAREWA

55 Cable St Wellington 6011 New Zealand tepapa.govt.nz

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From classic theatres to boutique venues, art lovers can take their pick from exciting performances and nightly shows. Enjoy live performance at its best at Circa Theatre and Bats, while the Opera House, Michael Fowler Centre and St James Theatre are larger venues that house the Royal New Zealand Ballet, opera, music, and more. Celebrated as New Zealand’s arts and cultural capital, Wellington’s love for creativity is evident throughout the city. From great galleries to specialist studios, there's something to suit every artist and admirer. We recommend checking out the City Gallery Wellington and Peter McLeavey to get you started. Public sculpture is also a key thread in the cultural capital’s fabric, with dozens of public artworks to be discovered in the city’s gardens, parks and streets.

Visit Te Papa and experience New Zealand in one building at this bold and innovative museum. Te Papa is New Zealand's national museum, where you can explore the great stories of this fascinating land and the people who live there. Recently named in Lonely Planet’s Top 50 Places on the Planet, the past, present and future are exhibited here in provocative, challenging and entertaining ways. Be sure to pop in to the Te Papa Store for high-quality souvenirs, books, clothing, jewellery, and treasures.


ZEST

zestfoodtours.co.nz

THE WORLD OF WEARABLEART™ AWARDS SHOW

TSB Bank Arena Queens Wharf Wellington worldofwearableart.com/ticket

Discover Wellington's vibrant food scene with Zest Food Tours. Experienced guides will introduce you personally to their favourite Wellington gourmet food stores, coffee roasters, cafés and restaurants, as well as some of the artisans behind these culinary experiences. Perfect for people with an appetite for culinary adventure and discovering new places through food and wine.

From boutiques featuring local and international designers, to quirky gift stores, Wellington is a treasure trove of beautiful things. Best of all, the easily walkable city makes a day’s shopping nice and simple. Browse through top New Zealand designers including Karen Walker, twenty-seven names, Kate Sylvester and Trelise Cooper. For classic tailoring you can’t go past Cuba Street vintage stores Ziggurat and Hunters & Collectors. Or for quirky gifts and wares get lost browsing the shelves of Iko Iko, Tea Pea and Vessel. Luxury international brands have made the newly opened David Jones their home in the city. The first to be opened outside of Australia, this store will be stocking the finest brands across fashion, beauty and home.

Eat and drink S A I D TO H AV E M O R E B A R S, R E S TAU R A N T S, R OA S T E R I E S, B R E W E R I E S A N D C A F É S P E R C A P I TA T H A N N E W Y O R K C I T Y, W E L L I N G T O N I S O N E O F T H E WO R L D ’ S G R E AT F O O D C I T I E S . H E R E A R E S O M E O F T H E M U S T-V I S I T S :

RESTAURANTS

Whitebait G04/1 Clyde Quay Wharf, Te Aro Wellington 6001 New Zealand

The elegant and refined restaurant, Whitebait, has a seafood-focused menu which is also translated into Maori as a way to pay homage to the regional kai moana (seafood) used. Other local touches include stone aggregate floor from Wellington’s Red Rocks and oversized paua shell-shaped light fittings.

white-bait.nz

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HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

HANNAH'S LANEWAY

6G/14 Hannah Factory Laneway, Te Aro Wellington 6011 New Zealand wellingtonnz.com/discover/ things-to-do/eat-and-drink

It’s official — foodie heaven exists. Right in the heart of Wellington city, this tucked away laneway is home to a trail of delectable flavour-filled factories. Here, you can sample artisan chocolate, bread, peanut butter, soda and locally-roasted coffee. After you’ve stocked up, you can then relax over a craft beer and pizza at the super colourful Golding’s Free Dive. Find out more about what is quite possibly the world's tastiest laneway.

COFFEE CAPITAL

coffeesupreme.com/locations/ new-zealand/wellington/ customs milkcrate.co.nz facebook.com/lamasonbrew-bar

WINE AND VINE

wellingtonnz.com/discover/ things-to-do/sights-activities

FESTIVAL CITY

wellingtonnz.com/discover/ things-to-do/events

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With well over a dozen roasteries in Wellington, you'll often catch the warm aroma of roasting coffee on the wind. It also means you're drinking the freshest, liveliest coffee around. Each roastery has a distinct approach to the craft, and tours are enlightening as well as refreshing. You’ll want to check out Customs Brew Bar for Supreme Coffee, Milk Crate for Peoples Coffee and Lamason for espresso and siphon brewed coffee.

Wellington is fortunate enough to be tucked between two of the country’s best wine regions. As well as enjoying the wine lists in the city, take a quick trip to either the Wairarapa or Marlborough regions to sample from the source at some of the award-winning wineries. Stay in boutique accommodation and cycle the vines for a relaxing weekend or day trip close to the capital.

Time your trip with one of the Wellington region’s excellent food and wine festivals. Held over the last two weeks in August every year, Visa Wellington On a Plate! is the ultimate food festival with over 100 events, dedicated menus and the highly anticipated Burger Wellington. Let Visa WOAP! surprise you with a feast of foodie fun for the whole family. Taste the unexpected, challenge your palate, open your mind — or just have fun! — with 127 Festival Events. Gelato making, beer brewing, all-you-can-eat, truffle feasts, street eats and breakneck feeds to name a few.


MAGAZINE ISSUE NO.6

WRITTEN BY BARB FISHER

A× CANBERRA GIRL'S GUIDE ×

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HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

B A L M Y T R O P I C A L W E AT H E R, C A P T I VAT I N G A R C H I T E C T U R E , A S H O P P I N G PA R A D I S E A N D C U L I N A RY EXPERIENCES TO PLE ASE THE MOST DEMANDING GOURMAND — SINGAPORE HAS IT ALL. GE T OFF THE W E L L- B E AT E N TO U R I S T T R AC KS A N D I M M E R S E YO U R S E L F I N I T S C O LO U R F U L C U LT U R E .

Stay SOFITEL SO

35 Robinson Road Singapore 068876 sofitel.com

THE NEW MAJESTIC HOTEL

31-37 Bukit Pasoh Road Singapore 089845

There are so many wonderful places to stay in Singapore, from all the big chains to the littlest of boutique hotels. There’s the famous Raffles Hotel, (original home of the Singapore Sling), if you want to relive the colonial past, or there’s the vibrant W Hotel on Sentosa Island, ideal for heading to Universal Studios and the Aquarium with the kids. However, for something a little different than the usual suspects, here are a few others to consider. If you’re after a spot of luxury during your stay in Singapore, you can’t go past the Sofitel So. Located in an iconic heritage building on Robinson Road, this is a fairly recent arrival on the Singapore scene. It has stunning rooms and a gold-tiled swimming pool, along with many other ultra-chic elements by fashion designer Karl Lagerfeld. I think I want to move in permanently.

If you’re after something a little more out-there, The New Majestic Hotel is the answer. Set amongst the bustling bars, cafés and restaurants of Chinatown, this hotel is housed in a traditional conservation shop-house, with rooms designed by local artists and designers. Not one for the faint-hearted.

newmajestichotel.com

NAUMI HOTEL

41 Seah Street Singapore 188396 naumihotel.com

THE SCARLET HOTEL

33 Erskine Road Singapore 069333 thescarlethotels.com/singapore

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After the obligatory city-view-infinity-pool shot, but don’t want to shell out for Marina Bay Sands? The Naumi Hotel is a much better (and much cooler) option, in my opinion. This gorgeous boutique hotel is situated just near the iconic Raffles Hotel, and if you fall in love with anything in your room or the rest of the hotel, most of it is available to purchase or send back home as a gift. How cool is that?

This is Singapore’s original boutique hotel. The Scarlet Hotel is nestled amongst the vibrant Club Street community of restaurants, wine bars, antique shops and galleries, this original 1924 Art Deco building has been beautifully restored and is adjacent to a row of gorgeous shop houses from the late 1800s. Club Street closes off to traffic after 7pm and has a fun, vibrant atmosphere with the patrons of all the bars and restaurants spilling out onto the street, perfect in the tropical Singapore climate.


THE PARKROYAL ON PICKERING

3 Upper Pickering Street Singapore 058289 parkroyalhotels.com

A five-minute walk from both the Central Business District and the famous riverside area of Clarke Quay is the super groovy-looking Parkroyal On Pickering. My daughter calls this the "cardboard hotel", as parts of the façade looks like the internal layers of a cardboard box. Can’t you see yourself sipping a Singapore Sling in one of those birdcages by the pool?

Play RIVER CRUISE

rivercruise.com.sg

GARDENS BY THE BAY

18 Marina Gardens Dr Singapore 018953 gardensbythebay.com.sg

UNIVERSAL STUDIOS SINGAPORE

8 Sentosa Gateway Singapore 098269 rwsentosa.com

There’s so much to explore in Singapore. Wander the neighbourhoods or see it from the water. Jump aboard the Singapore River Cruise for a scenic ride down the river. It’s a great way to get your bearings amongst all the hottest riverside spots like Clarke Quay, Boat Quay, Esplanade, and Robinson Quay.

Just across from Marina Bay Sands is Gardens By The Bay. The Flower Dome is the world’s largest glass greenhouse and the Cloud House has it’s own mini mountain shrouded in mist. At night, the Super Trees are spectacularly lit up, and you can walk across the Skyway to dine at the very top of the tallest tree (Indochine), with gorgeous food and views all the way back across the Singapore skyline. There are some great restaurants within the complex (check out Pollen), and make sure to bring the kids’ swimmers as there is a free water park to help cool down after a few hours exploring in the Singapore heat.

If you have kids, no trip to Singapore is complete without a trip to Universal Studios. It’s less crowded than many other theme parks around the world, and yes, it’s a little bit dated in terms of the themes for some of it’s attractions and rides, but it’s still a fun day out for the whole family. I recommend forking out for the Express Pass if you can manage it, as it will take you right to the front of the queue every time.

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SENTOSA ISLAND

Tanjong Beach Club tanjongbeachclub.com Coastes coastes.com

Now the beaches in Singapore aren’t much to write home about, but while you’re over at Sentosa Island visiting Universal Studios (or any other of the zillion attractions), it would be rude not to stop off at the Tanjong Beach Club or Coastes for a refreshing beverage, wouldn’t it?

LITTLE INDIA

Mustafa Centre 145 Syed Alwi Road Singapore 207704 mustafa.com.sg

SHOPPES AT MARINA BAY SANDS

Shoppes at Marina Bay Sands 10 Bayfront Ave Singapore 018956 marinabaysands.com

HAJI LANE

Haji Lane Singapore 189244

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You actually do feel like you’ve stepped across to India when you take in the sights and sounds of Little India in Singapore. It’s an assault on the senses, usually full of thronging crowds and a buzzy atmosphere. Explore temples, enjoy the clamour of the famous Tekka wet market, and get lost in the mazelike Mustafa Centre, open 24 hours a day.

Singapore is a shopper’s paradise … you could very easily spend days wandering the interconnected mega-malls of Orchard Road without emerging from their air conditioned comfort. But there are also some more quirky and interesting places to spend your dosh. If designer labels are your thing, you’ve come to the right place. There are more Gucci, Prada and Chanel shopfronts in Singapore than you can poke a stick at. If you really want to get your label on, you can’t go past the Shoppes at Marina Bay Sands, where every fashion house you can think of is contained under one giant (super air conditioned) roof. It’s also where world-famous chefs like Tetsuya, Gordon Ramsay and Wolfgang Puck set up shop.

If you want a little more bang for your buck, head to the quirky Haji Lane in Kampong Glam where small, independent boutiques are the order of the day. Head out in the early evening, do a spot of shopping and watch the bars and cafés come alive at night.


Food and drink OF COURSE, MORE THAN ANY THING ELSE, SINGAPORE IS FAMOUS FOR IT’S CUISINE; THERE’S E V E RY T H I N G F R O M H I G H - E N D M I C H E L I N - S TA R R E S TAU R A N T S TO H AW K E R S ’ C E N T R E S A N D E V E RY T H I N G I N B E T W E E N . A N N S I A N G A N D C LU B S T R E E T G E T A LOT O F ( W E L L- D E S E R V E D) R A P S, B U T T H E R E A R E A F E W OT H E R A R E A S WO R T H YO U R AT T E N T I O N . D O N ’ T B E A S K I N G F O R SINGAPORE NOODLES, THOUGH … THERE’S NO SUCH THING!

DUXTON HILL

Lucha Loco 15 Duxton Hill 089598 luchaloco.com

Duxton Hill is minutes from the CBD and packed with cafés, bars and shops. Stroll around and admire the traditional shophouse architecture and try and choose from all the delicious options at your fingertips. One of my faves is Lucha Loco – a fantastic Mexican taqueria and garden bar. The cocktails go down too well on a balmy evening and their Mexican street-style grilled corn rubbed with mayo, chili, and cotija cheese is out of this world!

STREET FOOD

Lau Pa Sat 18 Raffles Quay Singapore 048582

To get a feel for the real Singapore, you need to go to a hawkers' centre, which is basically a group of street food vendors – but all operating under very strict guidelines regarding food safety. The most famous centre is Lau Pa Sat, which has recently undergone extensive renovations.

laupasat.biz

TIONG BAHRU

19 Yong Siak Street Singapore 168650 odpsingapore.com

Tiong Bahru is one of the oldest housing estates in Singapore, and is full of gorgeous three-storey Art Deco buildings. It houses many cool little shops, cafés and restaurants and is one of my favourite areas in Singapore. I love to just wander the streets and take in the old-school atmosphere. There’s also a great wet market and hawkers' centre right in the middle of it all. Check out Tiong Bahru Bakery, Plain Vanilla, Open Door Policy (my personal favourite), PS Café Petit and 40 Hands. Afterwards, wander the boutiques: Strangelets, Books Actually, Maissone, and Nana & Bird are all delightful. n

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MAGAZINE ISSUE NO.6

W R I T T E N BY B E AT R I C E S M I T H P H OTO G R A P H E D BY M A R T I N O L L M A N

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HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

TYPICALLY addiction is the stuff of the socially marginalised – the black sheep, the plot twist in a TV show, the downfall of a wayward teen who redeems themselves in the end. This is not 21st century addiction. Addiction exists in a grey area where society at large assumes that whatever the problem, there must be an obvious treatment. Cause and effect. Good and evil. An option to be saved, to give up a wicked vice – a ‘yes’ or a ‘no’ answer. But the role of addiction and the actor that plays it are shifting quickly in our modern age, with technology addictions becoming more insidious and less treatable via the 12-step programs of the 20th century. Our views of addiction, however, haven’t shifted – they’re archetypal, still revolving around notions like “just say no”. But it’s not always that simple, as founder of Canberra-based pasta business Dish It Up, Sue Kemenes, testifies. “I grew up in 1960s Melbourne. It was pretty tough going then,” she says. “I left home when I was 14 because my mum was an alcoholic and Dad abused me physically.” Sue moved in with a friend and her family, started working in a “dinky little store” on Chapel Street and spent her 15th birthday drinking in a pub. One night, her friend’s older brother and his friends sexually assaulted Sue, the repercussions of which she believes set her on a destructive course, with effects that echoed through the next three decades of her life. At 17, she became pregnant with her first daughter and went on to have another three children with her former partner. “I drank heavily and smoked cigarettes and of course we smoked pot, cause that [was] the thing to do then,” recalls Sue. “Nothing unusual, just part of the lifestyle. The self destruction was always there. I lived a very hard lifestyle.”

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In her late twenties, Sue and her partner separated. “We had three kids and 10 years under our belt and [his leaving] knocked the wind right out of my sails,” Sue says of the separation. “That’s when I fell into heavy drugs.” “I was drinking, doing pot and speed every day, still with the three kids, still kept a clean house. It was pretty insane now that I think about it.” Like many before her, Sue had a moment of clarity when she realised she couldn’t keep her life on the same trajectory. “I just realised that it was really dangerous,” she recalls. “I was sleeping three hours a week, down to 50 kilos in weight; it was really bad and I knew it. I had friends who were over in Perth so I said, ‘I’m going over there to dry out’.” “Three days on the train [to WA] was the last partying I ever did. I got to Perth, pulled up to my friend’s house and I couldn’t believe it. I went there to dry out and get away from all the speed and the house they were living next to had a 10-foot cyclone fence around it and caravans out the front with air conditioning going 24/7 – it was a jolly speed kitchen!” Despite living next door to her vice, Sue used her iron willpower to “stay well away” and within a few months she had quit speed completely. “I just went cold turkey. I don’t know how many days I was [drying out] for, because it was just so horrible, but I was over there for two months. I came back to Melbourne, picked the kids back up from their father’s and got back into life.” Sue’s story doesn’t end there. She later met her current husband and gave up smoking, cannabis and excessive drinking.


MAGAZINE ISSUE NO.6

“ I W A S D R I N K I N G , D O I N G P O T A N D S P E E D E V E R Y D A Y, S T I L L W I T H T H E T H R E E K I D S , S T I L L KE P T A C L E AN H O U S E . I T WAS P R E T T Y I N SAN E N OW T HAT I T H I N K AB O U T I T.”

“He took me along to a little independent Baptist Church and that was what changed my life. I’ve been clean and sober now for 23 years. I don’t have any cravings, I don’t need to go to the meetings, I no longer have to go to church ... I’m free.” When I ask Sue what sort of treatment programs she looked into at the time, she laughs. “I didn’t go then because that’s not how I roll, honey,” she explains. “I’m very independent. I’ve always been strong – and stubborn is in there too.” Sue’s tale of addiction follows a narrative that society believes is a one-size-fits-all for addiction. Making the conscious choice to ‘quit drugs’ cold turkey

seems like a sensible and noble decision - the ‘best way to do it’. But if quitting through pure willpower and determination isn’t an option, where does that leave you? Modern addictions are more insidious than a dealer on a street corner, and there are more voices than just angels and demons on the shoulders of society. Social media can be used to name and shame, illicit substances can be bought online, the legalisation of drugs throws a spanner into the works of moral arguments and technology can be the cause of the addiction itself. So what does a 21st century view of addiction look like?

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KATE Seselja is an elegant woman, polished and softly spoken. She takes her time with her words, speaking slowly and deliberately and making each of her sentences count. She’s not the woman you would expect to find pregnant and crying behind a poker machine at midnight, but that was where she was four years ago. “As an 18-year-old, I sat down in front of a pokie machine,” says Kate. “I thought it was just harmless fun. That was the messaging I was getting – they’re just for entertainment.” In 1997, Kate started playing the pokies with her then boyfriend so they could spend time together, but quickly began visiting by herself. “I had no concept of how addictive they were,” says Kate. “Within a couple of months I was putting my whole pay [into the machine] on the day I received it.” In the scheme of addiction, poker machines are a relatively new phenomenon. Being addicted to the feeling a substance creates inside your body or the taste of alcohol are universally accepted addictions – we crave a physically positive feeling, a high or a trip. So how does hitting a plastic button become an addiction?

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“Poker machines cultivate addiction by teaching the brain to associate the sounds and flashing lights that are displayed when a punter “wins” with pleasure,” writes Charles Livingstone, senior lecturer at the School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine at Monash University.* “And since the pattern of wins, or rewards, is random, the 'reinforcement' of the link between the stimuli and pleasure is much stronger than if it could be predicted.” Livingstone says that the neural pathways created by the pokie’s combination of wins, lights and music leads to signs of addiction similar to that of cocaine use. “The sounds the machines made were in my dreams,” says Kate. “I thought about them when I wasn’t there. There were no [support] groups, there was no knowledge of how the machines are designed to interact with your brain that way.” To the layperson, however, a poker machine is usually found annoying, further alienating the experience of being addicted to playing them. Why would someone want to be around such annoying jingles all day and night?


MAGAZINE ISSUE NO.6

“ W I T H I N A C O U P L E O F M O N T H S I WAS P U T T I N G M Y W H O L E PAY [ I N TO T H E M AC H I N E] O N T H E DAY I R EC E I V E D I T.”

“I quickly knew I was out of control,” says Kate. “But in the same sense, if I had a win I would think; I’m in control, I’m good at this, I can do this.”

“I thought, ‘Wow, there really is no help ... the only outcome I can expect is to not wear shoes. Can I ever trust myself with myself?’”

Kate’s addiction was “interrupted” when she met her husband at age 19, and she assumed that her gambling past was behind her. Within four years, they had a young child, were running their own small business, and living with her husband’s parents while building their own home.

Kate then turned to a counselling service. The counsellor singled out her husband as the main stressor in her life, encouraging her to distance herself from her marriage, despite her husband’s unwavering support.

Kate knows now that stress was her main trigger for gambling, but at that stage no dots had been connected as to why she had become addicted. Her husband still didn’t know about her past and the cause hadn’t been addressed in any meaningful way. “One day, I was out trying to source some tiles for our bathroom,” recalls Kate. “We had money in the bank for the build and I thought, ‘Remember that time you put $100 into the machine and came away with $1000?’” “I recognised that the environment I was living in was super stressful but I didn’t put two and two together to work out that my old [gambling] triggers were being activated.” Within a month, Kate burnt through the $20,000 they had saved for the build of their house and had no choice but to disclose her addiction to her husband. “I didn’t [recognise] his depression and him not being able to deal with any more stress,” says Kate. “His reaction was, 'Are we together? Yes? Then don’t worry about the money.' Kate’s first attempt at reaching out after disclosing to her husband was to a telephone helpline at 3am. The operator kindly instructed her the solution was to “not wear shoes” as she would be refused entry to gambling establishments. Kate relays this experience to me with a long pause at the end and a sad look in her eyes. She says this is when she first felt complete and utter hopelessness.

“That counsellor had [recently] been through divorce ... I almost got counselled out of my marriage,” says Kate. “I was with her and thinking, ‘Yes, he’s contributing to my stress, this is all his fault'.” Over a 12-year period, Kate estimates she put between $500,000 and $750,000 through poker machines. Her biggest win in one ‘press’ was $10,000. “The 20th of January 2012, I sat crying behind a pokie machine,” says Kate. “The thought of going home again and disappointing my family once more was too great. I didn’t want to keep existing is all I was going to do was relapse.” Without an awareness of her addiction as being legitimately treatable, and in the absence of specialised gambling counselling, Kate found herself trapped. “I was the point of total hopelessness. The only reason I’m sitting here right now is because I was pregnant, and I couldn’t figure out how to kill myself and not hurt the baby.” Four years on, Kate has founded The Hope Project, a not-for-profit which helps those struggling with issues like addiction find the hope in their situation – something that Kate felt she couldn’t do without the right support. “If we reconnect people and restore them back to society, we create hope, and kindness follows.” While support systems failed to keep up with the technology to which Kate was addicted, in the near future, radical changes to the health system may alter the way we view the most common trope of addict – the drug user.

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HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

“ADDICTION has a lot of baggage attached to it, as a word.” Chris Gough is the manager of the Canberra Alliance for Harm Minimisation and Advocacy (CAHMA), and his perspective on addiction, or "dependence", as he prefers, is a challenge to the way society marginalises addicts ("dependants"). “From my point of view, the word addiction has a connotation that you have lost control in some way,” explains Chris. “If I said that I was addicted to heroin then that conjures up images of a person controlled by that drug and who will do anything to fulfil the need to have that drug because they have no control over themselves.” Chris’ perspective is unique because he has a 360-degree view of pharmacological dependence. “My personal experience is someone who, in my late teens, used a lot of cannabis and came into contact with heroin. I smoked heroin for a while and became dependent on [it]. I started injecting heroin,” explains Chris. Now Chris advocates against the stigma and discrimination of drug users at CAHMA, which also serves as a point of reference for organisations like ACT Health in creating more effective health policy. Chris’ personal drug use didn’t stop him from graduating with a Bachelor of Entomology (Honours) in Developmental Parasitology from the University of Queensland. In fact, he believes it had little impact on his life until his tolerance to opiates grew to a point-of-financial impossibility. “My use became problematic in that I couldn’t support the cost of my use,” explains Chris.

As Sue attests, going cold turkey on hard drugs is “just horrible” and pharmacotherapy programs provide an alternative in the form of oral ‘doses’ of synthetic opiates like methadone to help dependants remove drug use from their life. But there are serious limitations placed on those on programs. Participants must take ‘doses’ in front of a pharmacist and their ‘take away’ allowance – the number of doses they’re allowed to take in private per week – are strictly capped, meaning that participants capacity to travel, even intestate, is extremely limited. According to Chris, pharmacotherapy programs exist in a legal and social grey area. If you’re on a methadone program you’re not ‘using’ drugs, however, your body is technically dependent on opiates. Even if a person’s participation is the result of a conscious decision to kick a drug dependency, the stigma that surrounds drug use bleeds into the perception of pharmacotherapy participants. Chris says he knows of people that had been bullied at work because they had been ‘outed’ as being on a methadone program. But this stigma may be challenged sooner than society can adjust its expectations, with unprecedented developments in drug use research. On 17 June 2016, the Royal Society for Public Health (RSPH) and the Faculty of Public Health, two of the UK's peak health bodies, released the report Taking a New Line on Drugs. In a groundbreaking and deeply controversial move, they announced that “Internationally, increasing numbers of countries, alongside the World Health Organisation, are recognising the failures of prohibition-centric drugs policies.”***

Due to the human body’s capacity for increasing its tolerance for opiates, Chris explains that heroin addiction escalates no matter the frequency or quality of the product. Chris says that someone with a low tolerance to opiates who is heroin dependent will spend anywhere from $50-100 per day, while “the sky's the limit” for dependants with higher tolerances, and it will always go up.

The report called for the decriminalisation of all drugs, deeming the war on drugs “a failure” and drug use a health problem, not a criminal one.

While Chris hasn’t been dependent on heroin for years, he’s currently on a pharmacotherapy methadone program, a concept that challenges the black and white notion of addiction even in its most basic form – it allows someone to stay dependent for as long as they feel is necessary.

“In the long term, you essentially destroy all of the stigma and discrimination associated with [drugs] and you allow people to access health services if they have problematic use.”

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Chris couldn’t agree more. “The gains that I see for decriminalisation that it takes drug use out of the criminal world and you could regulate and tax [all drugs],” explains Chris.


“ I F I SAI D T H AT I WAS A D D I C T E D TO H E RO I N T H E N T HAT C O N J U R E S U P I M AG E S O F A P E R S O N C O N T RO L L E D BY T HAT D R U G AN D WHO WILL DO ANYTHING TO FULFIL THE N E E D TO HAVE T HAT D R U G B EC AU S E T H E Y H AV E N O C O N T R O L OV E R T H E M S E LV E S .”

“It’s never been seen that by decriminalising or legalising a drug there’s an increase of a drug’s use, which is the main problem people see with it, like, ‘if we legalise heroin everybody will want to do it!’ That simply hasn’t been the case. In places like Portugal who have tried this, there’s good evidence to show the contrary.” Chris is correct. Portugal decriminalised all drug use in 2001 – as of 2015, there were three drug overdose deaths for every million citizens in Portugal**. To give some perspective, the EU average is 17.3 per million and 44.6 per million in the UK. “My argument would be that my heroin dependency would never have been problematic if, instead of having to pay $300-500 per gram of it, I could get a script and go to a pharmacy and for $6.10 and get a [dose] of diacetylmorphine [the chemical term for heroin].”

DISCRIMINATION and stigma cloak addiction to the point where Kate once told her husband, “If anyone finds out about [my addiction], I will kill myself.” “The scariest moment of my life was putting myself out there publicly and being honest about my past – I was so afraid of how people would judge me,” she says. Chris agrees. He says that when people see someone they perceive to be hard on their luck, sleeping rough or dangerous looking, they immediately assume that drugs are involved. “What they don’t understand is that while they’re looking at this person, 10 other drug users have walked past them wearing suits”. This is what modern addiction looks like. n *

Bright Lights, Big Losses: How poker machines create addicts and rob them blind, Charles Livingstone, published 20 October 2015, Read it here: theconversation.com/brightlights-big-losses-how-poker-machines-create-addicts-and-robthem-blind-49143

** Taking a New Line on Drugs, Royal Society of Public Health, released 17 June, 2016, Read at: www.rsph.org.uk *** Portugal Decriminalised Drugs 14 years ago and now hardly anyone dies from overdosing, Chris Ingraham, published 7 June, 2015. Read it here: www.independent.co.uk/news/ world/europe/portugal-decriminalised-drugs-14-years-agoand-now-hardly-anyone-dies-from-overdosing-10301780. html PAGE 59


Future Capital

–– TAKING CUES FROM CANBERRA’S PAST IS HELPING TO DEFINE NEW ASPIRATIONS FOR OUR CITY –– WRIT TEN BY TIFFANY BONASERA H O W D O E S C A N B E R R A , A P L A N N E D P O L I T I C A L C I T Y, S H A K E O F F I T S R E P U TAT I O N A S A S O U L L E S S P U B L I C S E RV I C E TOW N TO B E C O M E A H OT B E D O F I N N OVAT I O N, C R E AT I V I T Y A N D E N T R E P R E N E U R S H I P? BY P L AY I N G TO I T S S T R E N GT H S — BRILLIANT MINDS, BIG IDEAS AND BOLD AMBITION.

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HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

WITH our population set to hit 400,000 by the end of 2016, our little bush capital is it at the crossroads. What kind of Canberra do we want it to be in the future? Six notable Canberrans share their vision for our city. They all agree pretty cool things are already emerging in our national capital, which we can all feel proud about, and there’s plenty more to come.

THE BIG PICTURE

As our city has grown, it has benefited from becoming more diverse and interesting. However, ACT Chief Minister, Andrew Barr, acknowledges change is confronting for many people. “The pace of that change can impact on how people to respond to it,” he explains. “The biggest challenge in my job is about one-third of residents want it to change faster, about one-third are pretty comfortable with the general direction, and about one-third have concerns.” For Mr Barr, his vision for Canberra involves getting the balance right. That means drawing on our values, heritage and identity to implement positive changes as the city rallies to elevate its status to become the world’s most liveable, inclusive and competitive cities. Mr Barr is confident we are on the right track. Canberra will soon be connected by international flights and the planned light rail project has the

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potential to transform the city. But there’s a sticking point. For the city to be a global talent magnet, revitalisation has to be a priority. “What Canberra needs is to be a little less homogenised, to have different areas that have their own distinct character, and make that a virtue – the concept of 100 little villages,” he says. In Mr Barr’s view, the Braddon, NewActon and Realm precincts are good examples of higher density, urban renewal projects. They reflect the new culture of people choosing to live here – less conservative, prepared to push boundaries, and happy to leave the car at home.

SMART PEOPLE WITH BIG IDEAS = I N N OVAT I O N

Our city’s value proposition is its intellect, according to Sarah Pearson, CEO and Founder, CBR Innovation Network (CBRIN). It is thanks to the high concentration of world-class education and research institutions. The fact these organisations are collaborating is what’s driving innovation. “You won’t see that happening anywhere else in Australia,” she says. “We are not trying recreate a Silicon Valley, we’re drawing on the concept to create a connected ecosystem where we’ve got new businesses being born and growing to be successful international businesses.”


The CBRIN, which supports and promotes innovation across the public and private sectors, has a clear vision – for Canberra to be recognised globally as a clever, connected and creative city. According to Sarah, entrepreneurs are sitting up and taking notice of our connected ecosystem. “What entrepreneurs are telling us is that while there is lots more activity in the bigger cities, it’s all disconnected and they don’t know where to go,” she says. “The reason entrepreneurs will come to Canberra is because there is support for them.” For Sarah, who believes we will see “many, many startups coming out of Canberra” in the future, the dream is for large internationals to base research and development hubs in our city, and for the public service to be more commercially-focused. “The most phenomenal thing is the community has really jumped on board. If people aren’t buying into it, you can’t achieve anything. But people are really buying into it,” she says. “We’re already being seen as a hotbed for innovation and entrepreneurship, which is amazing.” While innovation is permeating in many places it hasn’t been seen before in our city, Sarah notes housing affordability, transport and lifestyle will influence decision making, too. “Entrepreneurs like to walk places, they want entertainment and creativity,” she says. “We’ve got experienced entrepreneurs here in Canberra, but we’re going to need more.”

THE IMPACT OF DIRECT I N T E R N AT I O N A L F L I G H T S

“Airports say a lot about a place because they are both a city’s business card and its handshake: they tell us what a community yearns to be as well as what it really is.” The quote, by renowned travel author, Pico Iyer, has guided the transformation of the Canberra Airport precinct. According to Stephen Byron, Managing Director, Canberra Airport Group, the new terminal is one of the key markers that gives us confidence and makes us proud of our city – from a place to live, to have friends and to have tourists visit. “It is a sophisticated terminal that says we’re a sophisticated city, ready for international flights,” he explains. “It says we are contemporary, we are forward looking and we do believe in design, aesthetics, and also function.” Preferring to focus on concrete actions than aspirations, Stephen is optimistic about the future of Canberra. He describes the knock-on effect of direct international flights between Canberra, Singapore and Wellington as a “significant upwards jolt” for our city. “We will have more people in our hotels, more people in our restaurants, more people visiting our tourist attractions, which leads to more creative investment in bars, in restaurants, in lifestyle,” he says. “It [direct flights] will really justify the investment small business people have made over the last five to ten years.” PAGE 63


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Direct international flights will also open up freight opportunities for Canberra and surrounding regions, which will attract new businesses and industries. “You only need a couple of things to get Canberra front and centre and change the radar a little bit,” Stephen says. “We will become a more cosmopolitan and lively city. Being able to travel to Asia more easily means Canberra will be an outward-looking society with a world view.” “I think we’re on the cusp of being a city of which the country can be proud. Anyone who knows Canberra, knows we have gone well and truly beyond that.”

LIGHT RAIL – ARE WE THERE YET?

The Capital Metro – the planned light rail in Canberra – will change our city’s future. Saori Peguicha, Project Manager, Pacific Partnerships (part of the consortium which will deliver stage one) encourages Canberrans to be open to change. “Canberra has lots to offer in terms of lifestyle, great food, and beautiful places,” she says. “This project is the first stage in delivering a truly integrated transport system, which will provide more options in how Canberrans move around, enriching lifestyles and enhancing growth.” Major construction on the tram line from Gungahlin to the city centre is due to begin in October this year, covering 12 kilometres and 11 stops. As the system grows, all Canberrans will benefit from a better public transport network. “Light rail will bring local employment and a new industry in light rail operations, maintenance and hospitality for the next 20 years,” Saori explains. This will drive growth, and growth will generate vibrancy, diversity of employment and long-term sustainability – just like it has in other cities around the world.

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THE FUTURE OF OUR CITY PRECINCT

Historically heckled for its lack of oomph, Canberra’s city centre – comprising the city village of Braddon in the north to the Lake Burley Griffin Parklands in the south, and stretching from the CIT to the ANU is being reinvigorated. Higher density living, our thriving food and café culture, and calendar of city-based events and cultural activities, has infused life into our city centre and surrounding inner suburbs. For Jane Easthope, CEO, In the City Canberra, we all have a part to play in changing outside perceptions. “My dream is for us all to have a paradigm shift and consider ourselves in the business of tourism,” she says. “The business of attracting, accommodating and entertaining our guests so that they will return – and perhaps stay and invest.” In the City Canberra, a not-for-profit organisation, advocates for improvements in the city centre, specifically across cleaning, safety and beautification. It is important to Jane that we have a city for the next generation with a discernible identity. “I would like us to known as the kindest little capital as well as the coolest little capital,” she says. “And we have people wanting to escape the older cities in preference for our city that has a remarkable quality of life – a blend of the natural and built environments.” According to Jane, we must “fix the broken bits first” – slow down the urban sprawl and the sell-off of finite government-owned land. Then, there’s the fast train and our city’s gateway. “What I’d love to see achieved is Northbourne Avenue as a showcase to the arrival to our national capital and to the metropolitan heart of Canberra sprinkled with award-winning architecture with something for everyone – day and night,” she says.


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YO U N G AN D N OT- S O - RES TLES S

Young people couldn’t leave Canberra fast enough – once upon a time. Traditionally a city with a transient population, families now have roots here. It means there’s a pulling power to stay that hasn’t been there before, according to James Deamer, Community Manager, Entry29. But what James thinks is so motivating for young people – the future of our city – is the accessibility of technology and how it can be applied to solve problems, because problems create opportunity. He sees it happening every day at Entry29, a community of entrepreneurs. “Most of the startups in Canberra either come through our co-working space or are part of the Canberra startup community,” he says. “What is happening is we are being forced to change and think differently because of environmental constraints.”

“ I T H I N K W H AT’S I M P O RTA N T F O R H I G H LEVEL DEC I S ION-MAKERS I S TO HAVE AN E D U C A T E D S T A N D P O I N T, A N D S A Y, ‘ W E ’ R E G O I N G T O D O T H I S ’, ”

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An entrepreneur himself, with an interest in technology and health, James believes Canberra is a great place to be a young person. Canberra is such a unique city, you have access to world-class universities and research institutions, great employment and career opportunities, events and attractions but it is still small enough to be a connected global village. While he is more-or-less happy with the direction our city is heading, he does feel high-level decisionmakers sometimes miss what is actually happening. As someone who has grown up in Canberra and chooses to stay, James believes the city’s progression is reliant on being brave. “I think what’s important for high-level decisionmakers is to have an educated standpoint, and say, ‘We’re going to do this’,” he says. “Progression is stifled because a decision can’t be made.” “Canberra has been pretty good at making decisions and just going for it – whether it’s good or bad. Really, the future of our city is exactly what we want to make it.” n


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MAGAZINE ISSUE NO.6

SHOP TIL YOU DROP CREATIVE CYCLE AND

FORAGER'S FANTASY

One

perfect day

W H AT ’ S YO U R I D E A O F T H E P E R F E C T DAY ? E XP LO R I N G A R T G A L L E R I E S? DAY S F I L L E D W I T H G R E AT FOOD AND WINE? SHOPPING 'TIL YOU DROP? PERFECTION IS IN THE E YE OF THE BEHOLDER, SO W E ’ V E A S K E D T H R E E C A N B E R R A N S TO S H A R E T H E I R U LT I M AT E 24 H O U R S I N C A N B E R R A .

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SHOP 'TIL YOU DROP WRITER JADE SARGENT C R E ATO R O F C A N B E R R A FA S H I O N L A B E L , S OVATA

Canberra is brimming with independent fashion and design stores, but sometimes you need to know where to look. We start our stylish exploration in Belconnen. An unlikely place to find cool or unique stores? You might be surprised at what you’ll find.

9 AM F U E L U P

Two Before Ten 68 Bandjalong Crescent, Aranda twobeforeten.com.au 1 0 AM S T A R T Y O U R COLLECTION

Meet Gather Collect 68 Bandjalong Crescent, Aranda meetgathercollect.com.au 1 0 : 4 5 AM A T R I P D O W N MEMORY LANE

Down Memory Lane 34 Geelong Street, Fyshwick downmemorylane.net.au 1 1 : 3 0 AM S E C O N D CHANCE SHOPPING

Salvos Op Shop 15 Mildura Street Fyshwick my.salvos.org.au PAGE 70

Start with a coffee and a yummy flavoursome breakfast at Two Before Ten in Aranda — I recommend the Bubble and Squeak — delicious! This moody café roasts its own coffee beans on site in The Roastery, which makes for a wonderful aroma.

This beautiful little store boasts wonderful natural light and is full of handcrafted furniture, homewares, jewellery, accessories, art and more. Everything at Meet Gather Collect is unique, colourful and tactile — the few times I have visited this store I have walked around smiling, touching and repeating the words 'how cool is this!?'.

At the end of an unassuming street in Fyshwick is a little alley which leads to a trip Down Memory Lane. A store full of vintage wares … furniture, books, homewares, jewellery, fashion, accessories — and the items I get most excited about — vintage hats. I could spend hours wandering around this wonderful store.

Pull in for a quick look around the absolutely massive Salvos Op Shop in Fyshwick. I often frequent op shops looking for vintage hats, gloves and accessories, and this store more often than not, has some real treasures. Op shopping is also a great way to help the environment by rescuing some pre-loved clothes, whilst saving some cash and helping out a good cause at the same time.


MAGAZINE ISSUE NO.6

1 2 : 3 0 PM S P E E D U P

Landspeed 30 Garema Place, Canberra City thingswelost.com.au

1 PM G O U N D E R G R O U N D

Greed Shed Café and Green Shed Underground 140-180 Garema Place, Canberra City thegreenshed.net.au

2 PM A R E A L TREASURE TROVE

Trove Shop 13, Level 1, Garema Centre, Canberra City trovecanberra.com.au

3 PM S K I P O N I N T O O R I

itrip iskip Shop 63/30 Lonsdale Street, Braddon itripiskip.com

3 : 1 5 PM P R E T T Y H A N D S O M E …

Handsomepretty Shop 64/30 Lonsdale Street, Braddon handsomepretty.com.au

3 : 3 0 PM G E T YOURSELF TOGETHER

Assemblage Project Shop 66/30 Lonsdale Street, Braddon assemblageproject.com 4 PM T A I L O R M A D E

Timber and Tailor Shop 67/30 Lonsdale Street, Braddon timberandtailor.com 5 PM L A S T S T O P !

The Elk & Pea 21 Lonsdale Street, Braddon elkandpea.com.au

I sometimes find Landspeed a little intimidating because I’m not a muso, but the call of fashion overpowers this feeling. Start at the front if you’re into music, or head straight to the back to get your fashion fix from their fabulous mix of vintage and new clothing and accessories. Be sure to check out their house label, Things We Lost.

In the city the Green Shed has a two shopfronts: green shed café, and around the corner, a larger store called green shed underground. Grab a quick bite to eat from the Green Shed Café and then take your time exploring. The café is filled with vintage furniture, homewares and a small selection of fashion and accessories — I particularly love the vintage sewing patterns and material. The underground store is filled with lots of clothing and accessories.

This little store is only new to the city and is truly wonderful, although I might be a little biased as they stock Sovata! A collective of local artists and designers, this shop has something for everyone: fashion, a wide range of jewellery, millinery, homewares, kid's clothing, artworks, and more. A store that smells absolutely divine, is great for gifts, and is unique as you will be served by one of the designers stocked within the store.

The sculptural Ori building is a veritable treasure trove of stylish finds. Start your exploration in itrip iskip — a store filled with natural light and a cool and trendy charm about it. Discover great pieces that will keep you on-trend from local, national and international brands. I especially love the shoes and accessories they stock, and always find myself saying 'like' a lot in this store.

The best way to describe Handsomepretty is colour, colour, and more colour. This beautiful and truly visually inspiring store is so much fun to walk through. You'll find gifts, quirky homewares, vibrant art, clothing, furniture, and so much more. One of my favourite stores to wander through and discover cool stuff from all over the world.

Stocked in this industrial styled store you can find a great selection of inspiring local fashion designers and a wonderful range of jewellery and shoes. If you appreciate fashion which focuses on design, quality and sustainability, then Assemblage Project is the store for you. If you’re lucky enough, you might see garments being created in store.

This store is light and bright with a Scandi feel. Full of cool homewares, beautiful furniture, jewellery — and my favourite pieces in store — the stunning resin art. Timber and Tailor is beautifully curated and a real pleasure to wander in.

The Elk & Pea is a South American-inspired restaurant that is effortlessly stylish: mismatched artworks on the walls and the roof, elk and peacock figurines, a ‘birdcage’ and so much more. I love the enchiladas and am always visually entertained by the decor whilst eating truly tasty food. PAGE 71


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CREATIVE CYCLE WRITER ADELAIDE RIEF CO - MANAG I N G PRO D U C E R YO U AR E H E R E, C AN B E R R A’S FE STIVAL O F E M E R G I N G A N D E XP E R I M E N TA L A R T S A N D C R E AT I V E P R O D U C E R AT A I N S L I E + GORMAN ARTS CENTRE

One of my favourite things about Canberra’s creative scene is the mix of independent artists making incredible things happen behind the scenes and large–scale institutions charged with presenting our nation’s history. Here’s my guide to the hidden gems and the stand outs.

1 0 AM S T A R T P E D D L I N ’

Sly Fox On the cycle path between Macarthur Avenue and David Street in Turner Facebook @SlyFoxCoffee 1 0 : 1 5 AM C O N T E M P O R A R Y CRUCIBLE

ANU Art School Gallery 105 Childers Street, Acton soa.anu.edu.au/school-of-art-gallery 1 1 AM P A S T , P R E S E N T AND FUTURE

National Museum of Australia Lawson Crescent, Acton Peninsula nma.gov.au 1 2 : 3 0 PM A T A S T Y H O L E IN THE WALL

Barrio Collective Coffee 59/30 Lonsdale Street, Braddon barriocollective.com

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What better way to explore than carbon neutral? On your bike! Ride down the O’Connor/Turner bike path, and because you’ll definitely need it by then, grab a coffee–to–go at pop up coffee cart, Sly Fox.

Cruise onwards down the path, dodge the cockatoos having their morning tea and head to the ANU Art School Gallery. Here, you can see the finest of Canberra’s contemporary arts on display with a series of regularly changing exhibitions from graduates and postgraduate students.

Cycle down to the National Museum of Australia to check out the incredible collections and soak up some inspiration for your next creative project. No mouldy old exhibits here, the museum is bright and full of interactive exhibits. Be sure to check out the Australian Institute of Anatomy collection, featuring an array of preserved animals that are sure to inspire mild horror and a little bit of curiosity.

By this stage you’ll be needing some lunch. Skip on over to the cosy little nook that is Barrio Collective Coffee on Lonsdale Street in Braddon for lunch. They do completely delicious light meals and some pretty interesting coffees (and a very. very good cup of tea for those, like me, who find the search for one an eternal struggle!)


MAGAZINE ISSUE NO.6

2 PM: I N D I E A R T S F E V E R

Lowbrow Gallery and Bar Level 2, 181 City Walk, Civic sanchosdirtylaundry.com Impact Comics 16 Garema Place, Civic impactcomics.com.au 3 PM C L O S E T O H O M E

Canberra Museum and Gallery 176 London Circuit, Canberra cmag.com.au 4 PM T U N E I N

2XX 98.3FM 2xxfm.org.au/content/localnlive 4 : 3 0 PM T R E K

Mt Ainslie Mount Ainslie Drive, Ainslie visitcanberra.com.au

Cruise into the CBD and head over to the Low Brow Gallery and Bar, independent street art gallery/shop/bar managed by Sancho Murphy, one of Canberra’s new breed of creative entrepreneurs. Then stroll through Garema Place, checking in at indie comics den, Impact Comics – my picks are Saga by Brian K Vaughan/Fiona Staples (USA) and Blue by Aussie comic artist Pat Grant.

You’ll be close by so make a quick pit stop at the Canberra Museum and Gallery. They host some pretty special exhibitions and there’s some hilarious and poignant Canberra–related ephemera in the permanent collection.

Turn your dial (or smart phone) to 2XX 98.3FM, Canberra’s own community radio. From 4pm-6pm catch Local N Live, playing the best music by local musicians, punctuated by some rolling and hilarious interviews.

Take a hike up Mt Ainslie (while listing to 2XXFM!) and take in one of those glorious Canberra sunsets from the top. And marvel at the intricate plans that Marion Mahony Griffin drew for the original competition to design Canberra. Imagine our city if her and Walter’s visions had been realised?

6 : 3 0 PM I B E T Y O U ’ R E HUNGRY AGAIN!?

Močan and Green Grout 1/19 Marcus Clarke St, NewActon mocanandgreengrout.com Nishi Gallery 17 Kendall Lane, NewActon newacton.com.au 8 PM S T I L L N O T E N O U G H ?

The Street Theatre 15 Childers St, City West thestreet.org.au 9 PM T H E F I N A L C U R T A I N

Phoenix Pub. 23 East Row, Civic lovethephoenix.com

Grab dinner in NewActon at Močan and Green Grout (the fab people behind Goodspeed Bicycle Company), the ethical, seasonal and local café that’s both a delicious place for dinner and an art and design experience in itself with gorgeous wood panelling and an open kitchen. While you’re there, pop into Nishi Gallery, a stunning space with high ceilings and raw industrial finishes, showing the works of local artists.

See a show at The Street Theatre – an amazing selection of music, dance, theatre from local, interstate and international artists. A great place to tap into the beating heart of Canberra’s contemporary performance scene.

Post-show, head to the Phoenix Pub, the home of Canberra’s live music scene. Grab a beer and a bench for that late night deep discussion about art and life you’ll need after such a jam–packed day!

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FORAGER’S FANTASY WRITER BELINDA NEAME C R E ATO R O F C A N B E R R A S T R E E T F O O D E V E N T, T H E F O R A G E

The beauty of The Forage is we get to know and experience Canberra’s food scene on many different levels. From street food to fine dining, our food scene is pretty amazing. It’s been quite a task trying to pack things into 24 hours so if that idea scares you, why not change it up and do it over two days instead!

7 . 3 0 AM R I S E A N D S H I N E !

Capital Regional Farmers Market Every Saturday 7:30am to 11:30am at Exhibition Park in Canberra, Flemington Road, Mitchell capitalregionfarmersmarket.com.au

GO SOMEWHERE 9.30 DIFFERENT AM

Some Café 5/7 Murray Street, Collector Facebook @somecafécollector

1 1 . 3 0 AM M O R E WINE, PLEASE!

Mount Majura Vineyard 88 Lime Kiln Road, Majura mountmajura.com.au

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Capital Regional Farmers Market is the essential start to a Saturday. Make Bombolini’s custard and jam–filled artisan doughnuts your first stop because these babies sell out quickly (doughnuts are the best breakfast food and every mouthful is delicious!). Move on to more sensible morning fare at The Muesli Bar — handcrafted 'build it yourself' muesli and porridge where you choose what goes in it. Stock up for the week at Dish It Up, where you’ll find award-winning fresh gourmet pasta: handmade gnocchi, cannelloni, ravioli, lasagne, sauces, and more! We also hit up The Brathaus for our German sausage supplies — you can get a sausage on a crusty bun with a choice of sauerkraut, cheese, German mustard and tomato sauce while you’re there or grab some packs to take home

Take a short 30-minute drive from Canberra to one of our favourite ‘destinations’ — Some Café at Collector. This beautiful 1820s building has a rich history and housed a blacksmith, a butcher, a general store and other ventures over the years. It recently got a new lease on life when it was transformed into an unassuming and homely café that serves up a simple but flavour-packed menu made from local and seasonal produce. Even the eggs are from the chooks that roam freely out the back! After a bite to eat, pop into Collector Wines, also in the homestead, for a tasting or perhaps a bottle or two to take home.

On your way back into town for lunch; detour off the Federal Highway and pop through Mount Majura Vineyard for some tastings. A small vineyard and winery on the eastern slopes of Mount Majura, it’s a unique site producing single-vineyard wines of real character. The only trouble you will have is deciding on red or white!


MAGAZINE ISSUE NO.6

"YOU DON'T NEED A SILVER FORK TO EAT GOOD FOOD" PAUL PRUDHOMME

1 2 . 3 0 PM Q U A L I T Y K I T C H E N  T I M E

The Kitchen Shop 1, 2 Iluka Street, Narrabundah canberradinnerrush.com.au

2 . 3 0 PM N O B O N E S ABOUT IT

Sweet Bones Shop 8, 18 Lonsdale Street, Braddon sweetbonescompany.com

4 . 3 0 PM G O W H E R E EVERYBODY KNOWS YOUR NAME

54 Benjamin 54 Benjamin Way, Belconnen 54benjamin.com.au

6 . 3 0 PM A L L B A R O N E

Bar Rochford First floor, 65 London Circuit (Melbourne Building) Canberra City barrochford.com

8 . 3 0 PM T I M E F O R O N E  M O R E

The One Westside Acton Park 3 Barrine Drive, Canberra westsideactonpark.com.au

Head across town to Narrabundah for lunch at The Kitchen — it’s a tiny space but there’s an amazing array of delicious home-style food to choose from: delicious heat–at–home meals (think Beef and Ricotta Meatballs with Napoli or Baked Chicken with Cannellini, Roast Tomato and Lemon); seasonal salads; or coffee and cake (old-fashioned honey jumbles are a favourite!). The shelves are lined with housemade condiments and crackers, local cheeses, pâtés and terrines that change with the season. It’s the perfect place to put together a weekend picnic basket or gift.

Make your way to Braddon to indulge in some chai-infused tea and a cupcake at Sweet Bones — an organic vegan café that is passionate about wholefoods. Their menu is extensive and they serve up breakfast and lunch, but the real stars of the show are their baked goods: cupcakes, brownies, cake pops and cookies. The café has a rustic, rock’n’roll feel and a friendly, local vibe. It’s a great spot to sit and watch Braddon’s colourful parade pass by.

Pre-dinner drinks are always a great way to start a night out. 54 Benjamin have a motto ‘the place where people know your name’ and that’s what’s so cool about this place. It’s a small bar in Belconnen that you’ll want to make your local — start with one of their carefully crafted cocktails and if you’re feeling peckish before you move onto dinner, you can always order one of their jaffles to keep you going.

You might recognise the team behind Bar Rochford from our Lemonade stand at The Forage — they’ve gone from selling cups of Grandma’s lemonade to a sophisticated but relaxed wine and cocktail bar hidden away in the iconic Melbourne Building. Their philosophy is all about fine food, exciting wine producers and good jams and the menu is made up of seasonally-focused shared plate options. You must try their hand-cut chips — they are the real deal! Grab a booth by the fire and enjoy the chilled out vibe.

It's nearly home time but what would be a food trail without stopping somewhere for dessert? The One at Westside Acton Park is our favourite ‘street food’ style dessert place. Think deconstructed black forest cake or citrus vanilla cheesecake with all the creaminess, sweetness and trimmings that come with a decadent dessert. Prepared and served in takeaway boxes, you can either sit and end your day there or take them away and finish off your indulgent day at home with a cup of tea. n

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HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

WITH IZZI, TAYLOR + MALISSA FROM

PROJECT BEATS STUDIO

street dreaming LAUREN CAMPBELL HAYLEY O'NEILL + DEEJAY JUKIC PHOTOGRAPHER

STYLISTS

C R EATIVE D I R EC TO R

tt FAS H I O N ' S N EW AT TIT U D E G AT H E R YO U R G I R L S Q U A D A N D H I T T H E STREETS IN GRUNGE-CHIC STYLE

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JAVIER STEEL


Abby wears top, $309, by Cue at Westfield Woden; pants, $30, by Valley Girl at Westfield Belconnen; nose ring, by Colette at Colette Hayman at Westfield Belconnen; bracelet, by Redpath’s.


HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

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MAGAZINE ISSUE NO.6

From left: Malissa wears top, $60, jacket, $130, and choker (worn throughout), all by Bardot at Westfield Belconnen; skirt, $20, by Valley Girl at Westfield Belconnen; shoes, by TUK at Redpath’s. Abby wears top, $219, and pants, $339, both by Cue at Westfield Woden; coat, $200, by Corr Blimey at CARDIF Collective; pocket chain, by Redpath's; shoes, by TUK at Redpath's. Isabelle wears dress, $100, and beanie, both by Bardot at Westfield Belconnen; bracelet, by Redpath’s; shoes, by TUK at Redpath’s. Rebecca wears dress, $229, by Cue at Westfield Woden; top, $16, by Ally at Westfield Belconnen; bracelet, by Redpath's; belt, by Bardot at Westfield Belconnen; shoes, by TUK at Redpath's. Taylor wears top, $55, by Forever New at Westfield Belconnen; jacket, $130, by All About Eve at Parliament at Westfield Belconnen; shoes, by TUK at Redpath's. Sinead wears top, $25, by Valley Girl at Westfield Belconnen; skirt, $36, by Ally at Westfield Belconnen; backpack, by Cue at Westfield Woden; ring set, by Colette by Colette Hayman at Westfield Belconnen; shoes, by TUK at Red Path. PAGE 79


HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

Malissa wears dress $90, and top (worn underneath), $50, both by Bardot at Westfield Belconnen. Taylor wears top, $100, by Corr Blimey at CARDIF Collective; singlet, $40, by Bardot at Westfield Belconnen; jacket, $110, by Forever New at Westfield Belconnen; beanie, by Ally at Westfield Belconnen. Isabelle wears top, $149, by MAAK; jacket, $250, by Corr Blimey at CARDIF Collective; skirt $70, by Bardot at Westfield Belconnen. Opposite: Malissa wears dress, $220, by Veronika Maine at Westfield Woden; top $20, by Ally at Westfield Belconnen.

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MAGAZINE ISSUE NO.6

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MAGAZINE ISSUE NO.6

Isabelle wears overalls, $80, by Forever New at Westfield Belconnen; top, $26, and beanie, both by Ally at Westfield Belconnen; bracelet, by Redpath’s. Opposite: Rebecca wears top, $200, by Veronika Maine at Westfield Woden; skirt, $140, by Cue at Westfield Woden; shoes, by TUK at Red Path. Sinead wears tunic top, $190, by Veronika Manie at Westfield Woden; pants, $189, by Oxford at Westfield Belconnen; bracelet, by Redpath’s; ear cuff, by Colette by Colette Hayman at Westfield Belconnen. Malissa wears dress, $220, by Veronika Maine at Westfield Woden; top, $20, by Ally at Westfield Belconnen; shoes, by TUK at Redpath's.

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From left: Rebecca wears top, $169, by Cue at Westfield Woden; skirt $40, by Ally at Westfield Belconnen; bracelet, by Redpath's. Abby wears dress, $150, and coat, $200, both by Corr Blimey at Cardif Collective. Sinead wears dress, $279, by Veronika Maine at Westfield Woden; knit (worn underneath), $50, by Forecast at Westfield Belconnen; jacket, $259, by Cue at Westfield Woden; beanie, by Bardot at Westfield Belconnen.


HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

Sinead wears dress, POA, by MAAK; shoes, by Dr Martens at Redpath's.

PAGE 86


From left: Taylor wears overalls, $70, by Forever New at Westfield Belconnen; knit (worn underneath), $50, by Forcast at Westfield Belconnen; shirt (worn around waist) $50, by All About Eve at Parliament at Westfield Belconnen; beanie, by Bardot at Westfield Belconnen; shoes, by TUK at Redpath's. Abby wears top, $309, by Cue at Westfield Woden; pants, $30, by Valley Girl at Westfield Belconnen; nose ring, by Colette at Colette Hayman at Westfield Belconnen; bracelet, by Redpath’s; shoes, by TUK at Redpath’s. Isabelle wears overalls, $80, by Forever New at Westfield Belconnen; top, $26, and beanie, both by Ally at Westfield Belconnen; bracelet, by Redpath’s; shoes, by TUK at Redpath's.


Taylor wears overalls, $70, by Forever New; knit (worn underneath), $50, by Forcast; shirt (worn around waist) $50, by All About Eve at Parliament; beanie, by Bardot. All products available at Westfield Belconnen.


Cervical cancer is one of the few cancers that can be prevented through regular screening. A Pap test every two years is currently the best way to protect against cervical cancer. If you’re aged between 20 and 69 and have ever been sexually active, you need regular cervical screening — even if you have received the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine.

Call your health practitioner to book your cervical screening (Pap) test today or, for more information on cervical screening, call 13 15 56.

A program of

www.act.gov.au/cervicalscreening


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CHECK OUT THE VIDEO AT HERCANBERRA.COM.AU/MAGAZINE

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CO N C EP T † C R EATIVE D I R EC TO R JAVI E R ST E E L PHOTOGRAPHER L AUREN CAMPBELL ASSISTED BY DAN SMEE V I D E O M A R T I N O L L M A N AT C O O R D I N AT E

MUSIC KIRKLANDD RIGHT HERE

F I R S T S T Y L I S T H AY L E Y O' N E I L L

S EC O N D S T Y L I S T D E E JAY J U KI C

(PROD BY CAM BLUFF)

AS S I S TANT S T Y L I S T S B I AN C A AR M ST RO N G † L AU R A P E P PAS † AMAN DA WH I T L E Y H A I R L E X I B A N N I S T E R † K AT H R Y N I L I J O S K I AS S I S TANT HAI R L E E MAKI N † J E S S I C A S KO KL E S K A M O D E L S A B B Y M A S T E R S † R E B E C C A C O U R T N E Y AT DE VOJKA MODELS … SINE AD CARPENTER

MAKEUP JACQUI SCOT T † LESLE Y JOHNSTON AS S I S TANT M AKEU P L I V E N G L I S H DANCERS ISABELLE SNOWBALL † MALISSA HUYNH † TAY LO R - J A N E M A N A LO AT P R O J E C T B E AT S

COVER DRESS MADE BY LOCAL L ABEL MA AK - 80 HOURS OF WORK AND OVER 10 0 0 BE ADS SINE AD'S BROWS WERE LIGHTENED BY BROWL AB S P E C I A L T H A N KS B R OW L A B . W E S T F I E L D B E LC O N N E N A N D WO D E N . M A A K C LOT H I N G . R E D PAT H ' S . C A R D I F   C O L L E C T I V E . T I N A N I KO LOV S K I AT D E VO J K A M O D E L S . C A N B E R R A T H E AT R E C E N T R E F O R   S E T U P LO C AT I O N A N D B E L I N DA N E A M E F O R O R G A N I S I N G C AT E R I N G

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LE BON MELANGE RICARDO’S + SPACE KITCHEN AND

LA SABLE PÂTISSERIE

Food fantasies

WRITERS BELINDA NEAME AND AMANDA WHITLEY PHOTOGRAPHER TESS GODKIN E VER SINCE ADRIANO ZUMBO BURST INTO THE MASTERCHEF KITCHEN IN 20 09 WITH HIS TOWERING CROQUEMBOUCHE, GOBSMACKING V8 CAKE AND RAINBOW OF MACARONS, W E ’ V E B E E N C A P T I VAT E D BY I M P O S S I B LY C O M P L E X D E S S E R T C R E AT I O N S . B U T F O R S O M E , T H E O B S E S S I O N S TA R T E D LO N G B E F O R E I T B E C A M E FA S H I O N A B L E . W E M E E T T H R E E C A N B E R R A N S W H O A R E L I V I N G T H E I R F O O D FA N TA S I E S .

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N ATA L I E VA N D E N B O S C H

Le Bon Me lang e PAGE 94


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NATALIE Vanden Bosch’s childhood love of cooking has endured throughout her life. After finishing high school in 1987, she wasted no time following her dream. “I started my apprenticeship [the following Tuesday] at Quigley’s, a fine dining restaurant owned by Terry Fiddler in Launceston. Terry has a profound understanding of his trade and was a terrific inspiration, mentor and boss,” she explains. Moving to Canberra after two years, Natalie continued her apprenticeship at the newly opened PARKROYAL, and under the guidance of a hard and disciplined French-Austrian chef, learnt many new skills. “I was given the opportunity to work in the pastry section for nine months and this is where my love of pâtisserie started,” she says. It was to be a short-lived affair. When her time in pastry kitchen came to an end, she moved into commercial cookery; and at a time when pastry departments were closing down, she embraced the security of this role. But Natalie’s ‘sweet dreams’ never left her. In 2013, nearly 25 years after she first stepped into the pastry kitchen, she completed her pâtisserie certificate. She now spends hours gaining inspiration from "food porn" on Instagram and is in complete awe of the work of French pâtissier, chef Johan Martin.

“I daydream up most of my products. Sometimes I have a plan and I just let the product develop as I go. I record the details of my ideas so I can refer to them later on. The shower is always a good place for creative thinking!” laughs Natalie. “I am obsessed with what I am doing. I go to sleep thinking about what I’ll be making in the morning,” she says. “My biggest dream now is opening a French patisserie and café called Le Bon Melange. I want to create an eclectic place where people can get lost in a moment, transporting them to what I imagine to be a little piece of Europe.” Cabinets of beautiful pastries, petit gâteau and entremets, pies and fresh filled baguettes are planned for this Gungahlin slice of Paris, as well as crusty fresh French bread. “I have had plenty of time to come to the decision to follow my dream. I am not getting any younger and I definitely feel that it is now or never.”

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RICK DE MARCO

R ic ardo’s and Ki tchen S pac e

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CANBERRA’S answer to Zumbo, Ricardo (Rick) De Marco, can’t remember not being surrounded by food. “My parents owned a supermarket. I was always there and knew nothing other than working seven days a week. I especially loved the confectionery aisle!” he says. Opening his first eatery, the eponymous Ricardo’s Café in Jamison, at just 19, Rick is now known just as much for his business nous as for his spectacular sweet creations. He credits his parents for much of his success. “I’m amazed when I think about my parent’s achievements during those early years. Dad had no background in business, but learnt as he went. He was a great resource when I ventured into business.”

Peeking inside Rick’s tempting cabinet of fantastical creations, it’s staggering to learn he has no formal pastry training. There are Big Boy Ferrero Rochers – double nutella mousse rolled in hazelnuts dipped in chocolate sprayed in gold, resembling miniature gold-sprayed moonrocks; quivering Peanut Butter Domes – peanut butter mousse coated in caramel on a raspberry curd chocolate tart; and Milo like you’ve never seen it before – Milo mousse, salted caramel centre and an Oreo biscuit base. The only limit is Rick’s imagination. ”I'm always trying to improve the products and dreaming up the next big thing. Sketching an idea on paper and then creating it with your own hands, is pretty rewarding.”

These childhood memories have played a big role in influencing his dessert creations at Ricardo’s Café in Jamison and now Space Kitchen in Woden. “A lot of the desserts have been created from memories and flavours. I love colour, shapes and textures,“ says Rick. Case in point, their new dessert, ‘The Mushroom’. “It has been inspired from my childhood of playing Super Mario Brothers but the flavours are from adulthood, combining rhubarb and vanilla with a type of Ferrero Rocher texture inside.”

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BEN TURNER

La S able Pâ ti sse ri e

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AWARD-WINNING baker, Ben Turner’s passion for pastry and desserts began 10 years ago when he was working as an apprentice in a small pâtisserie in Bowral in the Southern Highlands. “As an apprentice, I was able to watch some of the best pastry chefs in the world compete. I watched as these amazing chefs created masterpieces from just chocolate and sugar. It was at this point that [I knew] this is what I wanted to do.” says Ben. It’s a skill Ben says has always come naturally to him, something that’s evident in his stunning artisanal products. “I love being creative, experimenting with different flavours and using lots of colour. I draw most of my inspiration from food, especially fruit.

“Chocolate decorations are by far my favourite decoration to use. I was lucky enough to be able to work with Paul, who is one of the best chocolatiers in the world.

“I am constantly thinking about new cake flavours and I always strive to create something that no one has tasted before.”

“I draw inspiration from the different shapes around me and mould the chocolate into those shapes,” he explains.

Ben loves being able to experiment with different styles of cake designs, but has a weakness for chocolate, and has learnt from some of the best in the business. Travelling to Melbourne in 2014 to attend Savour Chocolate & Pâtisserie School, Ben was taught by two of his biggest influences, awardwinning chefs Kristen Tibballs and Paul Kennedy.

Last year, Ben’s dream of opening his own patisserie came true, with Mitchell’s La Sable becoming a firm favourite among Canberra’s dessert and pastry aficionados. “To be able to do what I love every day is a blessing.” n

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Your dream home Be inspired by our favourite collections and find exceptional value on furniture, kitchenware, home accessories and more. Canberra Outlet Centre Corner of Newcastle Street & Canberra Avenue, Fyshwick ph: 6280 9803


MAGAZINE ISSUE NO.6

Dre am H ome s WRITTEN BY BELINDA NE AME + AMANDA WHITLE Y PHOTOGRAPHED BY MARTIN OLLMAN THE TERM ‘DREAM HOME’ CONJURES IMAGES OF AN OPULENT MANSION, G R A N D S TA I R S A N D C O U N T L E S S R O O M S . B U T J U S T A S S T Y L E I S I N D I V I D UA L , SO TOO I S E ACH PE RSON ’S CONCE PT OF TH E PE RFEC T LIVI NG S PACE .

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An

Eclectic Escape

TA K I N G I N S P I R AT I O N FROM TR AVE LS AND A R T, J O U R N A L I S T E M M A MACDONALD’S AINSLIE HOME IS ECLECTIC, COLLECTED AND BOLD — A SANCTUARY FOR HER B U S Y FA M I LY.

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Having inherited her mother’s eye for unique pieces, Emma believes that the key to creating a memorable home is surrounding herself with things she loves, rather than seeking to recreate a look that is trending. Art looms large throughout the home, the diverse collection spanning Indigenous canvasses, vintage rock posters and a favourite bright yellow Vichy poster. The latter is an advertising poster, featuring artwork by Rene Gruau, which graced the sides of Parisian buses in the early 1970s. Only a handful of originals remain and after

years of keeping watch, Emma’s husband, Paul Chamberlin, finally tracked one down in Paris. The galley kitchen is the heart of the home and it’s here where Emma spends a lot of her time with her children, connecting across the kitchen bench while she prepares meals. Life is hectic during the week, so Emma likes to guard her family time quite zealously on weekends by setting the formal dining table for family dinner complete with music, candles and three-course meals. Home is definitely where Emma’s heart is.


MAGAZINE ISSUE NO.6

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Natural Habitat '

A

AFTER GROWING UP IN A HOME FULL OF D O L L H O U S E S, M I N I AT U R E S AND TINY THINGS, SHOP G I R L , F L O W E R G I R L’ S KERIST KLEKNER’S CHARMING HOME I N WAT S O N I S Q U I T E THE OPPOSITE.

Kerist has a natural, simplistic and timeless approach when it comes to creating the spaces within her home. Keeping possessions to a minimum and investing in quality items, she has used natural materials such as wood, ceramic, cloth and neutral colours to create unity. The study is an inspiring room for Kerist and her husband, Tom. It's packed to the ceiling with books and DVDs and it’s a place where they daydream about travel. The couple designed the kitchen space together, as Tom does most of

the cooking. Loads of bench space, storage and both timber and stone have been used to give it a masculine edge with warmth. Meaningful pieces also play a big part in Kerist’s home. The living room is saturated in natural light and is warmed by a beautiful fireplace. It is a true sitting room with cherished couches inherited from grandparents who had them made in the 50s when they came to Australia. Adorned with loads of linen cushions and places to rest weary feet, it’s a favourite room to do quiet things like knitting, reading or simply daydreaming.

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A

Modernist Space

GROWING UP IN AN AUSTRALIAN EMBASSY CO M P O U N D I N BAN G KO K, INTERIOR DESIGNER VANES SA HAWES ’ FI RST CHILDHOOD HOME WAS A FAR CRY FROM THE TYPICAL AUSSIE RED BRICK BUILDING WITH G R AS SY BAC K YA R D.

Rather, four 60s-style houses designed for the tropics were positioned around a large communal garden where families would come and go, living rooms opening onto garden spaces and fostering an outdoor lifestyle.

With this home, less is more, giving carefully selected pieces a chance to shine. Vanessa singles out the Jardan ‘Archie’ chairs; relaxed and inviting, the texture of the soaped American oak timber gives plenty of character.

Years later, the flow between interior and exterior — and the impact it had on the people who lived in this space — influences Vanessa’s approach to her design projects with Paul Tilse Architects & Interiors, founded by her partner, Paul. It’s certainly evident in this light-filled and warm Yarralumla home.

Often, people are drawn towards one aesthetic — minimalist or opulent, cosy or cool. But Vanessa sees beauty in a variety of styles. Her dream? To live in Paris and renovate an apartment in St Germaine, combining modern elements with beautiful original features: parquet floors, high ceilings and tall windows.

Restraint and simplicity has created a classic, minimalist and tactile finish in the Modernist home with Scandinavian-style interiors. Vanessa loves sitting at the kitchen island bench looking out at the Japanese red maple in the internal courtyard, a clever way of bringing the outside in.

The common factor between her design dreams and Yarralumla reality? A focus on style that reflects lifestyle and embraces the character of a space. n

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Dream little dream a

W R I T T E N BY M O L LY M C L A U G H L I N W H E T H E R W E R E M E M B E R T H E M O R N OT, E V E R Y N I G H T W H I L E W E A R E A S L E E P O U R B R A I N S A R E F I L L E D W I T H D R E A M S . I T I S E S T I M AT E D T H AT M O R E T H A N T WO H O U R S O F E AC H N I G H T ' S S L E E P A R E S P E N T D R E A M I N G . P E O P L E H AV E B E E N FA S C I N AT E D BY D R E A M S F O R C E N T U R I E S, A N D W H I L E S C I E N C E H A S A L LOW E D U S TO B E T T E R U N D E R S TA N D H OW W E D R E A M , T H E M E A N I N G A N D P U R P O S E O F D R E A M S R E M A I N S A M Y S T E RY.

Sigmund Freud called dreams “the royal road… to the unconscious” and believed every dream was based on wish fulfilment. Another theory is that dreams are simply random impulses created by our brains while we are asleep. Dream dictionaries that interpret the fixed meanings of dreams are common, but Dorothea Wojnar, a Canberra-based psychotherapist, believes dreams are much more complex. Dorothea is currently training as a Jungian analyst with the C. G. Jung Institute of the Australian and New Zealand Society of Jungian Analysts. Through the Canberra Jung Society, she facilitates dream groups where members can share and interpret their dreams. Dorothea has been interested in dreams and what they can tell us for many years.

“The dream is often not very intelligible,” she says, “because dreams are communicated mostly in images that are symbolic. I’m reluctant to say X means Y, because it’s more complicated than that.” Dreaming generally occurs during the REM (rapid eye movement) phase of our sleep cycle. It is still not known exactly why our eyes move during deep sleep, but it is believed that it could relate to the visual images of our dreams because REM is associated with brain wave spikes in the regions of the brain involved with vision as well as elsewhere in the cerebral cortex. Getting a good night’s sleep is an important part of our health and very vivid dreams can sometimes be disruptive.

“The Jungian approach is basically that the dream is one person’s way of interpreting whatever is going on in their life and it is unique to that person,” Dorothea explains. “You can’t say what any specific symbol means without context of the individual.”

“Sometimes when people have been under a period of great stress they tend to remember their dreams more and that can help them in some way,” says Dorothea. “People often find that once they start paying attention to their dreams, disruptions like sleep talking and waking up from the dreams become less as well.”

Even if, like most people, your dreams seem nonsensical or disconnected, Dorothea believes there is usually something deeper that is being communicated. She believes that our unconscious brains present images that then can be linked to other aspects of our lives.

According to Dorothea, dreams can be broadly classified into normal dreams, nightmares or night terrors and each can be interpreted in different ways. Night terrors require particular psychological attention because they often represent an underlying trauma.

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WHAT’S IN A DREAM? F LY I N G

Flying can symbolise feeling happy or satisfied with something in life.

“In night terrors, you’re stuck in a repetitive memory and the dream is using a symbolic way of trying to process it,” she says. “Working with a night terror is almost like working with a post-traumatic stress event. A nightmare can be a bit more open and still has terrifying images, but isn’t so repetitive.” For those that struggle to remember their dreams, Dorothea suggests the tried and true technique of keeping a notepad or recording device next to your bed as the first step. Some common dreams like falling or being naked in a public place have wellknown associations (it is believed that falling relates to a concern about a major life problem and nudity indicates anxiety), but these could be reinterpreted with respect to an individual’s personality and history. “When you wake up and you know you’ve had a dream, you can be sure you’ll remember it, but as soon as you get up a lot of people forget it,” she says. “Once you start remembering the dream, you can then analyse the associations and try to see what makes sense. It might take months but eventually you can get some meaning from that.” Dorothea is aware that some people dismiss the meaning of dreams, but for others it can be a fascinating insight into our minds. It is unlikely that we will ever be able to scientifically prove the purpose of dreams, but psychology can offer some theories to those that are interested. “I’ve never had a shortage of people wanting to come to dream groups,” Dorothea says. “Mostly people come to me because they’re curious and they’re looking for a sense of direction, and you might just find something you didn’t know about yourself. Talking about dreams also creates an openness and connection with others that is really important.” n

FALLING

Falling can symbolise a fear of letting go or losing control.

A BABY

A baby can symbolise vulnerability, or the need for a fresh start.

A PUPPY

A puppy can symbolise emerging skills that require more training to develop further.

EXAMS

Exams can symbolise selfevaluation, that a personality trait or aspect of life is under inspection.

MISSING A FLIGHT

Missing a form of transportation can symbolise a struggle to make a decision and worry about missed opportunities.

PAGE 109


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Unveiling unique Canberra weddings

Flip Magazine over to check out your exclusive Unveiled preview. Full edition available online, September 2016 at hercanberra.com.au/unveiled

CO N N E C T A N D K EEP U P -TO - D AT E #unveiledcanberra

@unveiledcanberra


20

16

WINTER PREVIEW 2016

ISSUE 1

WINTER

MAGAZINE

HERCANBERRA.COM. AU

The dream issue We vow to guide + inspire you from this day forth


Unveiled Winter Preview 2016 Full edition available online, September 2016

01

Editor’s Note

02

Ideas & Inspo

04

Four brilliant bouquets

06

Real weddings

12

Bridal beauty

16

Fashion: Lost Love


Editor's Note CO N T R I B U TO R S Amanda Whitley – HerCanberra Founder Belinda Neame – Events Coordinator Laura Peppas – Editor Beatrice Smith – Online Editorial Coordinator Javier Steel – Creative Director Published by HerCanberra Printed by CanPrint Communications

You may have noticed that Canberra has really come into its own in the wedding game, with a growing pool of local bridal designers, makeup and hair artists, stylists, florists and venue options outside the box. However, we found there was a lack of wedding publications that really reflected that: you’d either have to flip through the dated annual publication that includes the same old vendors or settle for interstate options, which doesn’t really fit the growing trend of local brides and grooms craving celebrations that reflect their individuality. So we decided to create a magazine that showcased our city’s talented and growing pool of bridal vendors and creatives, in the most beautiful and unique way. At its heart, Unveiled will be a one stop shop for every local bride or groom - featuring stunning photo shoots, real-life weddings and practical articles and directories dedicated to planning the perfect wedding or celebration in Canberra and beyond.

In each issue, you’ll find unique and inspiring venues, gowns, photographers, music, makeup, jewellery, hair and styling, right down to the stationery, cake and florals. The first issue will be launched online in September, part of a new dedicated Weddings section on the HerCanberra website (hercanberra.com.au/ unveiled), but for now, we couldn’t resist giving you a sneaky peek of what you can expect, with a selection of articles and stunning photo shoots that will be appearing in the Magazine. We can’t wait to show you what else is in store – until then, we hope you enjoy the preview!

Laura xo P.s You can also check us out on our Facebook, Instagram and Pinterest pages (@unveiledcanberra).

I S S U E 1 PA G E 1

Ah, weddings. They have the ability to make even the hardest of hearts melt just a little.


Ideas & Inspo

UNVEILED WINTER 2016

GUARANTEED FLOOR FILLERS

01

Let’s Dance David Bowie

11

Uptown Funk Mark Ronson

02

Feel the love Rudimental

12

Brown Eyed Girl Van Morrison

03

Sexyback Justin Timberlake

13

Wake me up Avicii ft Aloe Blacc

04

Need you tonight INXS

14

Bills LunchMoney Lewis

05

1999 Prince

15

Paper Planes M.I.A

06

I want you back Jackson 5

16

Jessie's Girl Rick Springfield

07

This is how we do it Montell Jordan

17

Jump around House of Pain

08

Push it Salt and Pepa

18

I Love it Icona Pop

09

Hey Ya! Outkast

19

Mr Brightside The Killers

10

I Gotta Feeling Black Eyed Peas

20

Get Lucky Daft Punk ft. Pharrell Williams

TIPS It’s all in the lighting: Take note of how light it is in the room once it’s time to dance – if it’s too bright, chances are it could make your guests a little shy about shaking it on the dancefloor. Make sure you ask the venue to dim the lights from the first dance onwards to avoid any awkwardness! If you’re completely in doubt, leave it to your guests: Leave a section on your RSVP invite or wedding website that invites guests to choose a song that would have them up and dancing on the floor!

Consider timing and your audience: While you may want to break out to the latest club banger first thing, chances are your Aunt Gladys won’t. Weddings require a very different formula than what you’d usually choose to listen to in your living room! If you’re not going pro, try an App: Apps such as WeddingDJ are handy for a smooth-running playlist if you’re not hiring a DJ or band.


MUST-FOLLOW CANBERRA WEDDING STYLISTS

F LO R EN T I N E E V EN T S

@wrenandrabbit

@florentineevents

Specialising in wedding planning, styling and design, this local business’ Instagram is filled with quirky, colourful and unique ideas, perfect for a rustic wedding with a touch of whimsy.

Headed by local Anna Karagiannidis, Florentine Events is a relative newcomer to the wedding scene but is already turning heads. With luxe, modern styling and intricate detailing, their Instagram is a must-follow.

SHOWPONY

LG W D ES I G N

@showponyevents

@LGWdesign

Showpony has established itself as an 'allrounder' in Canberra’s wedding industry, styling corporate events, weddings, formals and everything in-between. The business’ Instagram shows off their creativity to a tee, making even the most average room shine.

Romantic and dreamy, this bespoke florist, styling and events management business opts for natural elements, bringing the outside in with deep colours and greenery. The focus? Texture, style and modern appeal.

I S S U E 1 PA G E 3

W R EN A N D R A B B I T


Four Brilliant Bouquets

01

ROM ANTIC

U N S T R U C T U R ED V I N TAG E Laurel and Lace

UNVEILED WINTER 2016

By Peony N' Pearl

02

Fionna: "I used roses, succulent, cymbidium orchids, protea, seaholly and blushing bride for this bouquet. I love it because it reminds me of spring, and with all the cherry blossoms it’s a bit more of a fresh colour and look. The tulips are very typical of spring. A beautiful outdoor wedding would be great for this particular bouquet, such as a garden wedding or a lawn wedding. The roses are an antique colour, so it’s a beautiful mix of greens, blushing pinks and creams."

Lauren: "I used roses mixed with charcoal coloured kale, native banksia and lots of foliage to give this bouquet height. This bouquet would be perfect for a vintage wedding, for a bride who wants to stand out. When I’m working with weddings, most brides give me a colour palette and shape, and leave the rest up to me. My style is relaxed, unstructured bouquets with lots of height and natural elements. This bouquet could work with either a formal or more relaxed wedding."

Prices for bridal bouquets start from $160

Prices for bridal bouquets start from $170


03

D R A M AT I C Moxom & Whitney

04

TRADITIONAL Arum Floral Design

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Lou: "We used cymbidium orchids, black Colombian roses, peach David Austin Roses, various greenery and a whole lotta love for this bouquet. This bouquet would work for a bride who loves some contrast and movement and wants something created just for her. We are seeing a swing towards brides wanting pops of colour, different textures and more of a foraged look."

Djiwo: "Fresh flowers always lure and captivate they are essential to complement your special day and provide a touch of elegance and sophistication. For this delicate bouquet, I used white Phalaenopsis orchids, white proud roses, super green roses and baby's breath flowers with Australian wild berries. This gorgeous bouquet would really suit a winter wedding, especially with the baby's breath flowers."

Price: As every bouquet is bespoke, prices vary.

Prices for bridal bouquets start from $160


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Masa and Michael a minimalist vegan wedding W E D D I N G D AT E 12 March 2016 CERE MO NY AN D RECEPTI O N VEN U E The Crisp Galleries, Hume Hwy, Bowning NSW

Canberra couple Masa and Michael’s beautiful minimalist wedding proves you don’t have to blow the budget to host a spectacular occasion. Here, the lovely bride takes us through the big day.


On the wedding day, I got ready at a B&B that we had booked out for the whole weekend for my family so we had the whole place to ourselves, while Michael got ready at our place in Crace. We chose not to have a bridal party.

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I found my Rachel Gilbert dress at David Jones Bridal and fell in love with it as soon as I put it on. I didn't think much of it when it was on the rack, especially because it had sequins and I didn't envision myself in a sequined dress (I had a romantic, French lace dress with a low back in mind.) However, once I put this dress on, I knew it was the one. It fitted me like a glove and as it was only a month to the wedding, I bought it straight off the rack! I loved the detail of lace and the sleeves were a lovely touch. Apparently it was also the last of that particular dress left in Australia!


The look we were going for at the reception was to bring nature indoors and to have some beautiful handmade details around. My dad made the wooden stands that we put everyone’s names in. We were lucky enough to borrow all plates, cutlery and wine glasses from a friend that bought everything for her wedding a couple of years prior because she found it more cost effective that way. The napkins I bought but pretty much everything else was borrowed; the only thing we had to hire was the chairs. We had two tables altogether, and Michael and I just sat amongst our families.


My sister, who is an amazing cook, offered to tackle the enormous task of catering for the wedding and delivered beyond anyone’s expectations. We wanted to have a buffet so people could pick and choose what they wanted to eat. We’re both big eaters and don’t like it when we don’t get enough food and feel hungry 30 minutes later. The drinks were organic, vegan wines and champagne and we also had organic beer and organic iced teas that everyone loved!

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Being a minimalist wedding, there were a lot of things that we saved money on because we were privileged enough to have many talented people around us or we just didn’t see the need to spend money on it. For example for the hair and make up, my friends did it, while the flowers for the tables were arranged by us. We didn’t have a DJ, live music or cars, and a friend did our videography as a wedding gift. s

THE LITTLE DETAILS

P H OTO G R A P H E R Lauren Campbell Photography V I D E O G R A P H E R A friend as a wedding gift D R ES S Rachel Gilbert G RO OM AN D G RO OM SM EN’S SU ITS Jacket was from Politix, pants groom already owned H A I R Done by a friend

M A K E U P Done by a friend

F LO W E R S Lady Larissa

S TAT I O N E R Y DIY

C A K E Sweet Bones Bakery and Rainbow Nourishments F I R S T D A N C E S O N G At last - Etta James


Ultra Mod Bridal Beauty

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M A K E U P BY Vendulka Wichta H A I R BY Jess Baczynski M O D E L Samantha Farrow at Devojka Models

BE AUT Y

Glowing Skin. This look is for the ultra-chic bride, one who is up to date with current trends and wants to be bold and fashionable, but soft and timeless all at once. It's a modern take on the classic nude eye that brides opt for, creating a 'halo' effect with darker colours surrounding a pop of shimmer on the lid. Although this look is modern, it isn't too harsh which allows wedding photos to stand the test of time.

HAIR

Effortless Bun. The mixture of soft textures and the right level of messiness is a take on a classic look. Fresh flowers are a modern alternative to traditional head pieces and veils. To achieve Sam's look, prep dry hair

with Kevin Murphy Anti.Gravity and blow dry in. Using the GHD Creative Curl Wand, set the hair on a diagonal to create a soft finish. Through the top section, use the wand to direct all the curl backwards to help create height. Spray lightly with Eleven Australia's Give Me Hold Flexible — it will allow you to still brush and play. Use your fingers to ‘brush’ the curl out to create a soft wave, then twist and pin either section of hair next to the ear low on the back of the head. Twist the remaining hair into itself and pin to chosen side. Incorporate top section. I recommend using a little texture powder or dry shampoo to give some texture and height to the hair. Finish off with a stronger hold hairspray such as the L'Oreal Professional Air Fix and place flowers where desired. Flowers: Moxom & Whitney s


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Gothic Romance M A K E U P BY Telisa Peizley at Browlab H A I R BY Lexi Bannister M O D E L Katherine Wu at Haus Models

Bold Brows. Statement brows have become commonplace on the catwalk and we are loving the strong, straight lines and lifted tails. This trend can be translated by dropping your natural arch and softly lifting the tips of your tails to achieve a straighter brow that will ultimately lift your facial features. A quality brow fill product or regrowing your natural brows can assist in a softer facial landscape. Going Goth. Make a statement and add a little drama to your day with some seriously lush lips. Deep-coloured lips will add life to your face, intensifying the colour of your eyes and defining your lip line. Quick tips for some love struck lips include exfoliating, moisturising and lining before applying lipstick. These will not only guarantee a smoother application but also longer wear. Our current faves are Jeffree Star, Model Rock and Bite Beauty!

#doyouevenlift. Choose your statement features and keep the rest simple — we went bold with the brows and lips and left the eyes muted but still wide awake with a pair of fluffy falsies. Not all faux lashes have to be OTT — we love using them to define the eyes. If the idea of applying lashes makes you cringe then a lash lift is a great alternative that will give you that wide awake, doe-eyed flutter without the fuss.

HAIR

Blushing pink hair for the bride? Why not! To create this look, I braided the hair and pulled it out to give it texture. I then brushed the hair back into a low ponytail, spraying with hairspray to set it. This hair colour is fresh with a touch of edge - perfect for the bride who wants to stand out on her big day.

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BE AUT Y


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lost love P H OTO G R A P H E R Lori Cicchini S T Y L I S T Hayley O'Neill C R E AT I V E D I R E C TO R Javier Steel

Opposite: Dress, $990, by Alex Perry at Frockaholics; headpiece, by Millela Couture.


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Gown, POA, by L’Wren Collection at Annabel’s Bridal Studio headpiece, by Millela Couture; veil, by Three Sunbeams.


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Ariella gown, $3,800, by Chachino; diamond ring, by Diamond Boutique. Opposite: Gisele gown, $7500, by Chachino; veil, by Three Sunbeams; diamond ring, by Diamond Boutique; jewellery, available at Devine Goddess.


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Dress, $990, by Alex Perry at Frockaholics; veil, by Three Sunbeams; cross and jewellery, all available at Devine Goddess.


Black crow gown, $2,900, by Chachino; veil and headpiece, by Three Sunbeams; diamond ring, by Diamond Boutique; jewellery, available at Devine Goddess.

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Gown, POA, by L’Wren Collection at Annabel’s Bridal Studio; veil, by Three Sunbeams; diamond ring, by Diamond Boutique; jewellery, available at Devine Goddess.


MADE WITH LOVE.

moxom+whitney S H O P 55, 28 -3 0 L O N S D A L E S T B R A D D O N MOXOMWHITNEY

/ 047 7 888 805

MOXOMANDWHITNEY

M O X O M A N D W H I T N E Y.C O M . A U

COME TO US FOR YOUR WEDDING R E C E P T I O N F L O W E R S & I N S TA L L AT I O N S FLORAL & GREENERY ARBOURS & CHANDELIERS


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THE TEAM

P H OTO G R A P H E R Lori Cicchini S T Y L I S T Hayley O'Neill CO N C E P T + C R E AT I V E D I R E C T I O N Javier Steel CO O R D I N AT I O N Laura Peppas M O D E L Ariel Ayers at Devojka Models H A I R Lexi Bannister M A K E U P Jacqui Scott B R O W S Browlab A S S I S TA N T S Shay Flanigan, Mon Juric, Kerry Brewer and Caleb Williams LO C AT I O N St John the Baptist Church, Reid S P E C I A L T H A N K S Tina Nikolovski at Devojka Models. Reverend Paul Black at St John the Baptist Church. Browlab. Chachino. Annabel’s Bridal Studio. Millela Couture. Three Sunbeams. Diamond Boutique. Devine Goddess.


BY HOTEL R E ALM & BUR BURY HOTEL

The Realm Precinct is the perfect location for an unforgettably intimate and romantic wedding day. Located within Canberra’s beautifully planned and superbly maintained Parliamentary zone, the Precinct has everything from award-winning venues and 5-Star accommodation to Chef Hatted restaurants, a hair salon, day spa and health club. Hotel Realm has been awarded the Best Meetings and Event Venue in Australia by the Australian Hotels Association for 2012, 2013 and 2014, and was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2015.

HOTEL REALM 18 NATIONAL CIRCUIT BARTON ACT 2600 W W W.HOTELRE ALM.COM. AU

MA X GUESTS UP TO 450 02 6163 1800 BSM@DOMAHOTELS.COM. AU

BURBURY HOTEL 1 BURBURY CLOSE BARTON ACT 2600 W W W.BURBURYHOTEL.COM. AU


Your vision, Your event, Your way 18 Kallaroo Road, Pialligo (02) 6247 6060 sales@pialligo.estate

pialligoestate.com.au


HerCanberra Magazine: The Dream Issue