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AMANDA LEVESQUE DESIGN PORTFOLIO

User Research

Visual Communication Design Strategy

Design Development Prototyping

Implementation

Experience design

Publication design

Architectural design

CONTACT

alevesq@umich.edu (508) 633-0006 550 W 54th St, Apt 730 New York, NY 10019


HELLO! I’m Amanda Levesque, an architectural designer and visual communicator. I hold a Bachelor’s of Science in Art and Design from MIT and, just recently, a Master’s of Architecture from the University of Michigan. As an architect, I’ve been trained as a visual storyteller and multi-scalar thinker who can juggle the big picture and the small details simultaneously. I love to stretch these skills beyond the world of architecture and into a diverse range of other disciplines as well, including branding, graphic design, and publication design. The multidisciplinary depth and breadth of Pentagram’s body of work has certainly been a formative influence on my own design ambitions, and I’m excited to learn more about the junior level architectural design position currently available at your firm. I understand this will involve collaboration with exhibition curators and graphic designers, and I assure you that my versatile range of design skills uniquely positions me to handle this task with aplomb and enthusiasm.

CONTACT alevesq@umich.edu (508) 633-0006 550 W 54th St, Apt 730 New York, NY 10019

Specifically, I’ve coordinated two exhibitions of student work at MIT, including the design of display stands, signage, and accompanying publications. Additionally, I just recently served as the managing editor of Dimensions, University of Michigan’s annual journal of architecture. I coordinated a team of six student editors, and because of the small staff size, I contributed to every stage of production including content curation, art direction, graphic design, copywriting, and production specifications. I’ve included Dimensions among the four projects featured in the following pages, as well a variety of design work at a more architectural scale. Thank you for your consideration, and please feel free to contact me for more information or materials.


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04 /

Neuro Drinks How can a new brand turn heads in the ultimate saturated market—performance water?

24 /

Dimensions, Vol. 26 After 25 years of publication, how can a journal reimagine its identity and voice?

32 /

The Farmstead How can an architecture proposal help jumpstart a self-sustaining agricultural economy in Hawaii?

42 /

Thesis: Pop Up Architecture How might a storybook be a used as a vehicle for communicating design intent?

Selected work 2009 - 2013

62 /

Resume


NEURO DRINKS How can a new brand turn heads in the ultimate saturated market—performance water? Brand Strategy Product Design Prototyping Environments

This 2012 Options Studio with Professor Teman Evans at the University of Michigan explored the relationship between architecture, branding, and product design. Each student was given a struggling new brand, and I received Neuro, a line of low-calorie performance waters with few discernible differences from its well-established and less expensive competitors (think Vitamin Water). I was asked to develop a strategy to relaunch it, then design a new identity, packaging, and retail environment which exemplified that strategy.

Beginning with an industry audit, I devised a strategy that centered on a customizable, mix-andmatch system which turned the seven different varieties of Neuro into an infinite combination of flavors and functions, incentivizing the consumer to buy and try them all. It straddles the white space between “off the shelf” bottled drinks and “use as you like” flavoring syrups like Mio, housing 5 servings of concentrate in the cap with a single serving of lightly carbonated base cocktail below. This customizability empowers the consumer to be their own mixologist and permeates throughout the brand, from its marketing to its environments.

$$$$$

$$$$$

POWERADE

GATORADE

0.02/oz

0.03/oz

$$$$$

PELLEGRINO 0.09/oz

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AMANDA LEVESQUE


CONVENIENCE

EFFICIENCY

$$$$$ NEURO

0.16/oz

$$$$$ PERRIER

0.07/oz

$$$$$

$$$$$

SOBE LIFEWATER

$$$$$ PROPEL

0.06/oz

$$$$$

AQUAFINA 0.03/oz

VITAMIN WATER 0.06/oz

0.04/oz

M. ARCH OPTIONS STUDIO

BRAND STRATEGY // ENVIRONMENTS DESIGN

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TARGET MARKET

VISION AND MISSION status [SYMBOL] “top shelf” brand personalized blends expensive, luxurious

status [UPDATE] This brand brief succinctly diagrams the fundamental precepts of the Neuro brand. It drove every design decision as the project moved forward.

outgoing, young professionals who want a go-to drink to keep up with their busy lifestyle. they may identify as stylish, successful, social, active, and tech-savy.

mode of self-expression changes throughout the day part of your lifestyle

YOUR STATUS:

KEY COMPETITORS

STAK

enhanced water

for athletes

for health enthusiasts

for the average joe

known for tried-and-tested, scientifically proven performance benefits with generations of experience and endorsements

heavily associated with health and nutrition thanks to an emphasis on the active vitamins and minerals in each flavor

convenient for the office or on-the-go energy as part of a workday routine

VALUE PROPOSITION

The custom drink stron safe enough

Neuro can t significant highly pote barely pote vitamin wa

KEY PRODUCT

redesig

mix-and-match system keeps consumer drinking Neuro all day long Neuro

AMANDA LEVESQUE

Neuro

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Neuro

Neuro

Flavors and functions mix and match, allowing consumers to create personal blends in infinite combinations. Heading to the gym? Mix SPORT’s electrolites with SONIC’s energy to power through your workout. Bad day? Mix BLISS and PASSION to zen out.


ATTRIBUTES current instant fix for your mood or needs a system that keeps up with you over the course of the day

TRIM curbs hunger

SPORT rejuvenates

SONIC energizes

PASSION excites

SLEEP calms

cool cocktail culture, mixology keeps you at your best, gives you an advantage mode of self-expression

custom “there’s a neuro for you”

KEHOLDERS

d

BLISS uplifts

<<<

COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE

energy drinks

mer looking for functional ng enough to work, but also h to use frequently.

take advantage of the white space between ent energy drinks and ent nutraceuticals like ater.

jelly belly recipe philosophy

concentrate

+

housed in the cap

ANY bottle

=

with a screw cap

the ultimate

custom drink

gned bottle with 5 servings of concentrate housed in the cap

N

N

N

N

N

N

Neuro

Neuro

Neuro

COMPETITORS BECOME BRAND VEHICLES

M. ARCH OPTIONS STUDIO

BRAND STRATEGY // ENVIRONMENTS DESIGN

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FORMAL STUDIES FOR BOTTLE DESIGN

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AMANDA LEVESQUE


M. ARCH OPTIONS STUDIO

BRAND STRATEGY // ENVIRONMENTS DESIGN

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COLOR REBOOT AND LABEL DESIGN BEFORE PASSION

BOOST

BLISS

STRENGTH

PASSION

BOOST

BLISS

STRENGTH

stimulation desire energy

alertness energy

communication optimism happiness

growth renewal health

0 100 100 0

0 60 90 0

5 0 100 0

50 0 100 0

AFTER

Variation across labels transform Neuroâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s limited shelf space with a billboard-like, eye catching effect.

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AMANDA LEVESQUE


TRIM

SPORT

SLEEP

SUPREME

TRIM

SPORT

SLEEP

SUPREME

sophistication calm confidence

refreshment intelligence reliability

peace relaxation stability

authority power mystery

60 0 30 0

80 35 0 0

90 70 40 30

0 0 0 100

M. ARCH OPTIONS STUDIO

BRAND STRATEGY // ENVIRONMENTS DESIGN

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PROTOTYPING

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AMANDA LEVESQUE


M. ARCH OPTIONS STUDIO

BRAND STRATEGY // ENVIRONMENTS DESIGN

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THE RELAUNCH CAMPAIGN // POP-UP GIVEAWAY

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AMANDA LEVESQUE


, meet

Neuro After completing the product design phase, the studio focused on a relaunch campaign—getting the product in the hands of the target market through a memorable giveaway experience and pop-up retail design. The only constraint was that the giveaway must take place on the streets of Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Neuro

neuro

Continuing to play on ideas of customization, mix-and-match, and adaptability, I designed a pop-up giveaway installation, placing hundreds of Neuro samples along American Apparel’s storefront. American Apparel was selected as a similar-minded brand to Neuro, centered on a bright, contemporary, mix-and-match system of basics that appeals to a very similar target market. Inspired by the window designs of fashion retailers, these reflective, eye-catching hangers prominently display the Neuro samples while generating visual interest for American Apparel. Made from PETG and attached with a simple suction cup, the hangers (affectionately called “barnacles”) are fabricated, installed, and removed inexpensively and easily.

M. ARCH OPTIONS STUDIO

BRAND STRATEGY // ENVIRONMENTS DESIGN

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YOU WILL NEED...

18

suction cups

PETG

mirror film

contact paper

string

tape measure

spray bottle

squeegee

PETG Mirror film Contact paper Suction cups Equipment

$22 $27 $12 $18 $9

TOTAL yields 50 modules

$88

AMANDA LEVESQUE

$2.00

PER MODULE


1. Crease the outer shell along score lines

2. Slot side tabs

3. Crease the inner shell

4. Slot side and bottom tabs; attach suction cup

5. Nest inner and outer shell

6. Slot final set of tabs

M. ARCH OPTIONS STUDIO

BRAND STRATEGY // ENVIRONMENTS DESIGN

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MODULAR HANGERS

4” 4 in small

5.55.5”in medium

7” 7 in large

AGGREGATION PATTERNS 90°

45°

90°

45°

These modular hangers house a sample size of Neuro in their centers. They are easily deployed on plate glass via a simple suction cup, and can transform any street front into an engaging and unusual product giveaway experience.

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AMANDA LEVESQUE


rican Apparel

Made in LA

122 in 122” 85 in 85” 99” in 12 12”in

M. ARCH OPTIONS STUDIO

BRAND STRATEGY // ENVIRONMENTS DESIGN

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AMANDA LEVESQUE


M. ARCH OPTIONS STUDIO

BRAND STRATEGY // ENVIRONMENTS DESIGN

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DIMENSIONS 26 After 25 years of publication, how can a journal reimagine its identity and voice? Art Direction Publication Design Content writing Copyediting

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For the 2013 academic year at the University of Michigan, I served as the managing editor of Dimensions—the school’s annual, student-produced journal of architecture. It contributes to critical discourse at the college by documenting the most compelling work produced by its students and faculty. After 25 issues, Volume 26 demanded a fresh take on the journal’s identity and voice to open a new era of its publication.

To do so, the editing team created a graphic language which would tie the book together, from its cover to its endmarks. Additionally, a pop of fluorescent pantone ink and a removable dust jacket poster made Volume 26 a landmark issue in the long and prestigious history of Dimensions . After soliciting work, selecting content, designing layouts, and some extensive editing, we ran 2,000 copies on an offset press. The journal was distributed at the 2013 graduation ceremony and will be used as promotional material for prospective students in future years.

AMANDA LEVESQUE with Anthony Pins, SJ Kwon, Eric Nelson, Yi Yuan, and John Hilmes


M.ARCH EXTRACURRICULAR

ART DIRECTION // PUBLICATION DESIGN

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IDENTITY AND COLLATERAL

MAST HEAD

LETTERFORM

PATTERNS AND FILLS

rrough: hink we are entering a new age for the “little n architecture?

mina: e differences, of course, between contemmagazines and the magazines of the 60s and r example, is a part of a new culture of theory It’s not a platform for long, scholarly articles footnotes. It’s something else. So in reaction we are seeing the emergence of a new kind azine. This always happens when a new meecting older forms of media, akin to how teleeen affected by the internet. The magazine pear, but it will radically change. D

POSTER // DUST JACKET

139

END SIGN

ecture as Narrative

you this kitchen. It is like those of our houses in dishwasher]. This is our newest model. This is in thousands of units for direct installations in a, we like to make life easier for women...

Interview

2 ompetition Winner

pitalistic attitude toward women does not occur

y, or the right to choose, is the most important e one decision made at the top by one governve many different manufacturers and many dif26 LEVESQUE with Anthony Pins, SJ Kwon, Eric Nelson, Yi Yuan, and John Hilmes ng machines so that theAMANDA housewife has a choice.


M.ARCH EXTRACURRICULAR

ART DIRECTION // PUBLICATION DESIGN

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LAYOUT STRUCTURE FOR TITLES Thesis:

As_Built Designers:

Advisors:

Justin Mast Andrew McCarthy Matt Nickel Kurt Schleicher Andrew Stern

Lauren Vasey Ning Wang Brenna Williams

With the ambition of reacquainting architec-

a result, the group adopted and practiced

ture’s thesis polemic with the act of making,

intelligent agility—to deftly problem-solve

As_Built sought to challenge a group of 13

under pressure. Through the course of the

thesis students to collectively develop a full-

project, a working dialogue emerged between

scale installation through a process of design

the unpredictable nuance of site, material

iteration and site negotiation. Building on

properties, design agenda, and resultants.

the University of Michigan’s fabrication

The thesis group learned to recognize and

lab resources, this project translates design

exploit the potential accidents and mishaps

from digital space to material tectonics, then

that were created by complex constraints

takes it a step further by siting the work in

which included: practical considerations,

an existing building—in this case, a vacated

client desires, construction sequence,

auto body shop in Detroit’s North Corktown

structural capacity, material economy,

neighborhood.

budget concerns, bureaucracy, component

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Anand Amin Andrew Aulerich Lauren Bebry Ashley Goe Tarlton Long

Thesis

Maciej Kaczynski Catie Newell

built intervention enforced an active discus-

Acknowledging and embracing that there are

sion on the role of installation work within

aspects of architecture that cannot be fully

the context of architecture and community

expressed, explored, or known when left on

development. Furthermore, beyond the built

paper, the thesis seminar embraced hands-on

output, the theoretical underpinnings sought

making as well as the iterative prototyping

to empower students to embrace creative

necessary to expose and actively utilize such

and alternative modes of making.

Kaczynski | Newell

transportation, and on-site adjustments. The

Actualizing and Intelligent Agility

physical occupation. Through actualiza-

Working Teams and Teamwork

tion—to make actual, or real—the project

To launch the project, the students were pro-

was often met with unforeseen consequences

vided a client, site, contractor, and a modest

that needed to be addressed quickly, on-

budget. Aware that their design would be

the-spot, and/or through improvisation. As

tested in-field, the students eagerly met the

As_Built

effects, atmosphere, material behavior, and

As-Built Installation Site A former automobile body shop at the intersection of 14th Street and Perry Street in Detroit

FOR IMAGES Historical Images of Industrial Cities in America The project recuperates the tradition of the architectural ‘capriccio’ as a means to emphasize the history of labor movements in North America and to make legible the physical semblance of these movements in cities including Sudbury, Chicago, Pittsburgh, and Detroit. (Images courtesy of the Albert Kahn Collection of the Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan)

questions, the book and attendant exhibi-

and created the footprint of the Sudbury

tion Stainlessness advance a tendentious

Basin astrobleme. To understand the

history of architecture, extraction, and

Anthropocene, we must first begin to grasp

cultural memory as they persist in Sudbury,

the force of the human. We must begin to

Chicago, Pittsburgh and Detroit.

think the magnitude of human impact and the oblique but undeniable consequences

In the book, I first develop a tendentious

for our biological species-being as it mani-

history of the Sudbury Basin, where the

fests a geological reformation; in order to

world’s most strategic nickel deposit is

do so, several problematic assumptions

mined along the irruptive rim of a massive

must be laid to rest.

for the production stainless steel. Through

First, despite the frequent knowledge

a reading of the denuded landscape of

claims of architects regarding reasonability

the Basin and its toxicosis, as well as the

or rationality, the overall activity of the

surface level dispersion of steel that it

human species is entirely acephalic; that is,

permits by way of mineralization processes

the aggregate impact of human actions on

149

astrobleme to be converted into an additive

American Hole Wizard An industrial drill press worker on the assembly line

in Chicago, Pittsburgh, and Detroit, we enlabor unrest, and aesthetic meditation (in the sense Georges Bataille, following Nietzsche, gives to the term). As we become entangled in these questions, we can begin

Fellowships

counter questions of cosmic contingency,

to reconsider the legacy of labor in the anthropocene and its modulation of our most pernicious cultural value—stainlessness—by reading both the remainders and erasures of refinement. In order to do so, the book suggests that we first locate the site of our inquiry within the broader logic of modern industrial activity. The pseudonymously named force most commonly known as Homo sapiens is expanding its territory of influence, or—perhaps more correctly—that force is beginning to recognize its reflection within the expanded field of its operations. No longer confined to the organic register of biology—although by no means freed from it as a limit condition—humans are a geologic force with an impact comparable to that that struck the earth nearly two billion years ago during the Paleoproterozoic era

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AMANDA LEVESQUE with Anthony Pins, SJ Kwon, Eric Nelson, Yi Yuan, and John Hilmes

Turpin

caused by the bolide (i.e. a fireball-asteroid)


FOR TEXT, Style A

JH: How do you select the territories that you work on in the projects? What sort of process gets you into these places? LS: It usually starts with a very broad hunch, if I were to be totally honest. Often, there’s an element of accident followed by rigorous research at different resolutions, and we pick up productive leads along the way. Slowly, places like the American Southwest, and particularly the Salton, emerge as a condenser and a litmus test of so many issues related to water infrastructure—and all happening essentially in our backyard, yet rarely rendered obvious in the design disciplines. Similarly, for Next North, we began very broadly and then would happen upon interesting intersections. And we find, for example, that the caribou are diminishing in a certain region, and

LS: That’s an interesting question. I want to say idealism. I think the profession is a hugely powerful one, and I remain hopeful that if we are better, smarter, and more nimble advocates for the range of things that we can do, that will only help the profession and perhaps help reclaim our role in shaping the immediate and larger contexts in which we operate. I think there were a range of people, particularly in grad school, that raised questions of this sort. I took one studio in particular that interrogated what the limit of architecture is. The question resonated with me at the time and long after, though maybe without my full awareness. The premise of the studio was the condition of disaster. The studio sought to ask, “What is the least architecture can do before the project becomes purely technical or engineered?” This may seem odd, given the very large scale of Lateral’s projects, but I think we’re very much interested in what is the least you can do. That’s what we try to accomplish, while maintaining a certain instrumentality from a social, cultural, and aesthetic perspective. D

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LS: I know, I know. Americans always laugh at this, but they literally use the term “Southerner” up there. That dynamic is very interesting. I know people that have been in the North for ten years, and they’re still referred to as a Southerner because it’s as much a cultural distinction as a geographic distinction. We know that one can never understand someone’s culture fully, and there’s a fairly large gap between growing up in a city like Toronto and trying to envision everything from social dynamics to cultural dynamics and so forth from a Northerner’s perspective. Projects like the Arctic Food Network very much engage questions of culture by recognizing that food harvesting, food sharing, etcetera, is central to the Inuit way of life because that’s their means of survival. So we have to deal with these issues in a very conscious way within our work. It’s like any thesis, really. You’re trying to invent the project, which means figuring out where architecture has a role and where it doesn’t.

D26: As a final note this afternoon, are there any particularly formative experiences you had as a student that shape the work you are doing today?

Interview

D26: It’s funny that someone from Toronto is considered a southerner of Canada.

it corresponds to a area where many research stations are based. So we begin to wonder how these seemingly unrelated stakeholders and effects might be leveraged against each other and how architecture might become the mediator in that process.

Talk-Show on Clip, Stamp, Fold A Conversation between Beatriz Colomina and John McMorrough

John McMorrough: As we are here to discuss the exhibition Clip, Stamp, Fold, here in the Liberty Annex gallery, literally amidst the exhibition, I was hoping that as a starting point to this conversation you could generally describe the subject of the show—the “little magazines” of architecture. Beatriz Colomina: Before we begin, let me just thank you very much for inviting me to come here and for bringing the exhibition to this fantastic place. I’m really happy that it came here to Michigan. The exhibition has been touring for six years since it opened at The Storefront for Art and Architecture in New York in 2006, and it continues to tour. It’s like the Energizer Bunny—we cannot stop it! As it moves from country to country, the exhibition incorporates new

ideas, new research, and new magazines. In that sense, it is an interactive archive. For example, it was most extraordinary for me to bring the exhibition back home to Barcelona. I thought I knew everything about magazines from Barcelona, yet we found little magazines that even the very protagonists have forgotten. The thing about little magazines is that, by definition, they proliferate and disappear. Sometimes, the creators of these magazines forget what they did.

Colomina

LS: Much to my mother’s horror, Mason and I both have sabbaticals coming up, and we’ve been talking about going up there for a period of time. We’ve traveled there several times now, but to fly in for a week is very different than living there, particularly in the context of the North. There’s a whole set of complex cultural challenges in terms of being a Southerner projecting onto the North, and I think it would be hugely helpful for us, both to build knowledge and to build trust, to spend a significant amount of time there. We keep joking that we’ll open an outpost of Lateral in Iqaluit, but we haven’t figured out the logistics of that yet!

John McMorrough: In the staging of the exhibition was there any opportunity for the creators of the magazines to remember their efforts—that is, were any of the original players part of the exhibition effort, or did they at least come to the gallery to see the show?

But I think when you start telling people on Facebook to show up on this street corner at 9:00 PM… what I was

I was so into architecture, living and breathing it, totally geeking out on it. It was a little bit scary to me that I could find another lover and so quickly forget the last one. Dimensions 26: Was it easy to give up that mantle of “architect”? Evan Roth: Yes and it actually was almost scary to me because I was so into architecture, living and breathing it, totally geeking out on it. It was a little bit scary to me that I could find another lover and so quickly forget the last one because it’s not really part of my nature to be that way. It’s not that I don’t think about architecture or that I’m no longer inspired by it. But it’s just a little bit scary that you can be so far into something that you think is all consuming and then you take a little bit of a right turn. All that faded really quickly for me. I don’t look at architecture the same way I used to. Maybe in another five or ten years from now, I’ll be the same way with code. Maybe I’ll just be so bored of it, I’ll be making rap albums or something. Dimensions 26: Do you have an MC name? Evan Roth: No comment, no comment! There may be several, none of which I’d be happy to have written down. Dimensions 26: So, the projects and installations we saw this weekend at D-lectricity drew some people into parts of the city they don’t normally visit. What do you consider the limitations of those sort of interventions, and are they a sustainable practice for rejuvenating parts of the city?

M.ARCH EXTRACURRICULAR

interested in doesn’t work that way. And especially as a lot of projection mapping pieces are getting really popular and people are expecting these light shows—and I don’t make light shows. I don’t do it very well. It’s not what I set out to do with a lot of pieces of the Graffiti Analysis. The first one I was doing as a projection piece is boring as hell. If you’re going to show up at a street corner at 9:00 PM and expect to be entertained for an hour, you’re going to be really disappointed. If you’re just walking through Brooklyn and you happen to see this piece, you’ll remember that night. At least for the next week or so. And so I think the downfall of some of these festivals is that I think people are experiencing a subpar version of a certain kind of projection work. It’s not as if all public space projection pieces are aiming to be that though. I think D-lectricity was focused in a smart way. Working with them was actually cool for me too because everybody else really wants Laser Tag and a lot of the more interactive, really punchy, entertaining pieces that I’ve done in the past. When I explained this to them, even though the audience would have loved it, they were cool and willing to work with me to do a piece that I think fit that venue better. But it’s a tough sell. Part of what I do now is when I get an invitation from festivals, I try to explain to them some of these things and tell them that if we just went and did it renegade style it would be awesome. But if we just sit there and do it, all night long, it’s just gonna turn into kids drawing penises on the wall. No one’s gonna be happy and it was cool for them to hear that and they let me do a piece that I know is less interactive. I know it’s less of a crowd pleaser, but I think they got a better piece out of it.

Dimensions 26: That leads me to my next question. Your installation for D-lectricity was the digital projection counting down until the catalogue of J-Dilla’s work is public domain. Can you speak a bit on intellectual property and if there are any instances in which open source solutions can be harmful? Evan Roth: Hmm. I’m sure the answer to that is yes. The open source community is going through a big debate internally with the Makerbot. I don’t know if you’ve been following that, but there’s a really interesting conversation going on surrounding just that. What happens when you’re developing something with that community that then all of a sudden gets locked down? I think part of the answer to that question will be whatever happens with Makerbot. There are some people that are of the opinion that the community supporting that open source hardware movement was the reason that they were selling units. So it’s a big gamble for them to turn their backs on that community of developers. But they did it. I think that their answer to that question would be yes. It can be harmful. I think the reason they made the decision is that they started to see competitive models being released to the market based on their research. Which is really not “they” as an individual company, but “they” as this community that was competing with those models financially and that had all this backing. It’s one of these hard questions to answer though because you never know the answer until you go all the way through it. It’s still a very new phenomenon, especially for companies that are making money. The open hardware movement is relatively young. I think for artists such as myself, I deal with it to some degree too in the sense that I give away everything digitally that I possibly can. Mostly because I can. I wouldn’t feel comfortable living in a world if that wasn’t the case. I feel digital content is like water flowing down a mountain, You can put a dam up if you want, but the water definitely wants to go downhill. But I make a living with the art—I try to pay rent through art and it’s an old institution that doesn’t know what to do with open source either. The arts reward the opposite of openness. The arts reward limited editions, unique editions. It rewards very specific things that are devalued when they are shared and so it’s a hard question to answer ‘cause I’m sure I’ve lost financially on a lot of things by opening them up. Laser Tag is a big example of that. If I was just trying to make money, I could have made a lot more money by doing different things with Laser Tag, by making it proprietary and using it with advertising. But at the same time, I wouldn’t have been able to work with the people I was working with, both in the graffiti and hacker communities. And so for me, it’s just a decision of determining which one’s more valuable.

Dimensions 26: So when you’re working on a new project, is there a moment in the process where you pause and reflect on the potential application of that work towards spectacles of gentrification, or how it could get co-opted by an advertising company? Is there a moment where you ask yourself if you release this into the wild or not?

ART DIRECTION // PUBLICATION DESIGN

Evan Roth: I don’t go through that as much anymore. But when I first started working on Graffiti Research Lab with James Powderly, we went through this together, and there were “Oh Shit!” moments left and right. It was because part of our mission statement was that we were trying to make tools that were leveling the playing field between the visual culture of advertising and the visual culture of city inhabitants. The first project was immediately used in MTV campaigns, Coke campaigns, everywhere. And then there was that whole debacle that happened in Boston. Do you remember the Aqua Teen Hunger Force movie? There was a whole shit storm where they took Throwies and turned it into a marketing campaign for this pretty crappy movie, but everybody in Boston thought they were bombs and the whole city shut down and the FBI was calling us. It was a really crazy story, but it was at a time when that viral phenomenon was new to me. Making this work I thought had a political message through the way we were releasing it and then seeing it being co-opted was really a hard pill to swallow. It hurt the first time. It hurt the second time. It hurt the third time and then slowly—the reason it doesn’t bother me quite as much anymore is that I’ve become more comfortable with the fact that when these pieces get coopted, especially by the advertising industry, they lose so much of the punch because it’s their second time around. We’ve already released something that they’re usually just copying. There’s not a lot of innovation happening. The second thing is that, whether as artists or ordinary people, people who make things because they want to make them with no ulterior motives—that honesty plays really well on the internet. I think most people online have developed really honed radars for finding honest content because they’re saturated with so much bullshit, especially growing up through TV culture. It’s that you’re taught to sit through all these advertisements and this consumer message. Now we have trained ourselves to notice those Reese’s Pieces as product placement. I get that now. You’ve tricked us once, but it’s not gonna happen anymore. So I think the reason I don’t worry about it quite as much anymore is because I see it failing when they rip off these pieces. I see it reflected in the view counts. From when we released Laser Tag, there are now videos on Youtube with several millions or at least a couple million, if not one anyway. You see the corporate rip-offs getting two or three hundred, and I think that’s happening because nobody wants to sit down and seek out content that’s selling them stuff or lying to them. You don’t want to watch bullshit in your free time. Even though Lucky Strike Cigarettes did a Laser Tag campaign in Vienna—which was a horrible, horrible mistreatment of a technology that had a political slant towards activism and against advertising—I see it failing for them in so many cases that it’s easier to sleep at night. Dimensions 26: That reminds me of the Laser Tag projection on the Verizon Building in Lower Manhattan with “NSA” inscribed in green. What are some potential institutions, technologies or practices you would to see other young designers take on today?

Interview

Evan Roth: I think the limitations of those kinds of festivals are that for a certain public space work, setting it up on a pedestal removes a lot of potential power and influence. A lot of the Graffiti Research Lab work I don’t do any more, especially at festivals. It’s the same as street art. If you just come across a graffiti piece or a piece of street art that is really good, it can have this effect because it’s reaching you in a moment where you’re not expecting to have a creative experience. And when I started doing projections, that’s how it all was. I was just going out in New York, borrowing equipment from the university and renting cars, driving around, and doing it. And it was really powerful to people because they weren’t going out to a festival. They were just trying to get to the bar and they came across this thing and that’s a really cool moment to hit people with a political message or interactive street piece or whatever it is.

Roth

it was the first time visual programming had a really friendly interface. So there were a lot of people doing Flash experimentation, which was really inspiring. I was coming home and doing that in my off hours, and then it started to creep into all the architecture proposals—especially when my boss realized that I knew how to do it. He was like, “Oh man! We can pitch this to clients and get interactive installations.” And that was pretty early in that scene. People were doing way more advanced stuff than I was doing, but it was still really new, especially to clients and outsiders. We had some big clients like the California Academy of Science. I was finding ways to sneak in the stuff I was staying up late to do into the work, and then at some point, the realization came that I should be doing that. It wasn’t that I didn’t like the architecture, but I’d fallen in love with this other thing that was different. They’re connected for sure, but it was—it is—a different scene. And that was the decision to go to Parsons. It wasn’t a decision to go to Parsons as much as a decision to get an MFA to focus on code and art, basically.

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FOR TEXT, Style B

Evan Roth: The kinds of things technologies I’m interested in are typically ones that have an empowering aspect to them, and are typically ones that are easy to reproduce—

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FINAL PUBLICATION

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AMANDA LEVESQUE with Anthony Pins, SJ Kwon, Eric Nelson, Yi Yuan, and John Hilmes


M.ARCH EXTRACURRICULAR

ART DIRECTION // PUBLICATION DESIGN

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THE FARMSTEAD

In 2009, a Hawaiian nonprofit organization called The Kohala Center reached out to MIT community for ideas which could steer Hawaii away from a turbulent tourism economy and back to its How can an architecture proposal roots in local, cooperative farming. Professor Jan Wampler and a selection of six architecture students, including myself, explored help a grassroots organization this multi-faceted issue from a design perspective. Over the course jump start a self-sustaining of the semester, we workshopped a housing proposal focused on a agricultural economy in Hawaii? modernized, cost-effective farmstead that could catalyze economic self-sufficiency and environmental responsibility in one integrated design solution. Our primary goal to make a career in organic farming more Material Innovation accessible meant keeping construction and operation costs low, mitigating a Architectural Design new farmer’s start-up debt. Prototyping

Implementation

The final design included many money-saving features—modular bays that expand the house as the owner’s resources and family grows, strategic siting for natural ventilation to keep cooling and maintenance costs low, and a clustered development that maximizes the area of the surrounding farmland. Most importantly, we used the abundant supply of local bamboo as our primary material, both for structure and enclosure. Not only did this dramatically cut the cost of raw materials by eliminating the need to ship dimensional lumber across an ocean, but it potentially created a lucrative new market processing an invasive bamboo species into a viable construction material.

FOREST

SITE SECTION 32

RETAINING WALL

0

32

GARDEN

FARMHOUSE

160 ft

AMANDA LEVESQUE with Yuliya Bentcheva, Ryan Doone, Theo Issaias, Fred Kim, and Jay Tapia

ENTRY ROAD


Russia

YVR SEA China

Japan

PEK

OAK

PUS

LAX

SHA HKG TPE

HNL

90% of Hawaii’s food items are imported from the mainland.

35% of a Hawaiian grocery bill

SIN

goes to cover shipping costs alone.

Indonesia

Australia

ENTRY ROAD

GARDEN

B.SAD WORKSHOP

FARMHOUSE

SERVICE ROAD

BAMBOO WINDBREAK

MATERIAL INNOVATION // ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

FARMING PLOT

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SITE PLAN

PLOT 1 6.25 ACRES

PLOT 2 6.5 ACRES

PLOT 3 6.5 ACRES

PLOT 10 8.0 ACRES

N

0

34

100

500 ft

AMANDA LEVESQUE with Yuliya Bentcheva, Ryan Doone, Theo Issaias, Fred Kim, and Jay Tapia


PLOT 4 6.25 ACRES

PLOT 5 6.25 ACRES

SHARED STORAGE

PLOT 6 6.25 ACRES

PLOT 7 6.5 ACRES

PLOT 9 6.25 ACRES

B.SAD WORKSHOP

PLOT 8 6.25 ACRES

MATERIAL INNOVATION // ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

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THE FARMHOUSE

Each of the ten farmhouses uses a modular system of bays to create a flexible living space. The starter house comes with just the basicsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a kitchen, a bathroom, and a fully-screened open plan. Bamboo partitions are added to privatize space over time as needed, for example as a bedroom or as storage space. Over 80% of the final design is constructed with bamboo. Additional materials include steel bolt joinery, concrete footings, a PVC-coated fabric for roofing and upcycled shipping pallets for flooring.

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AMANDA LEVESQUE with Yuliya Bentcheva, Ryan Doone, Theo Issaias, Fred Kim, and Jay Tapia


0

B.SAD WORKSHOP

MATERIAL INNOVATION // ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

2

4

6

12 ft

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THE MODEL HOME KIT

When we traveled to Hawaii to present the design, we wanted to encourage open and honest feedback with the North Kohala community. To quickly communicate the flexible, customizable options we built into the farmhouse design, we created two model home kits for the town hall style meeting. Attendees were encouraged to use the models like they would a play

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house, mixing and matching the 70 pieces to design their ideal home, from front porches to fireplaces to furniture. These kits were very well received and stimulated a critical, earnest conversation at the meeting. Residents were most notably enthusiastic about the use of their â&#x20AC;&#x153;backyard bambooâ&#x20AC;? as a potential building material.

AMANDA LEVESQUE with Yuliya Bentcheva, Ryan Doone, Theo Issaias, Fred Kim, and Jay Tapia


1. Position the entry porch, considering your favorite view or time of day.

2. Partition up to three rooms with bamboo dividers according to your needs.

3. If you choose to fully enclose these rooms, add a staircase to access this loft space.

4. Select furniture for the loft, or simply use it as a storage area.

5. Raise the roof.

6. Keep playing and experimenting to design your ideal home.

B.SAD WORKSHOP

MATERIAL INNOVATION // ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

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PROOF OF CONCEPT // THE BUILD OUT

1. Frame out the primary structural members.

2. Install the floor joists.

6. Hoist the first bamboo wall panel and secure it to the columns with a series of J-hooks.

7. Continue securing the three remaining wall panels.

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AMANDA LEVESQUE with Yuliya Bentcheva, Ryan Doone, Theo Issaias, Fred Kim, and Jay Tapia

3. Raise the roof tr connections w

8. Install plumbi


russes and join the with steel bolts.

4. Pipe the hollows of the bamboo columns with concrete to secure the joinery.

5. Strip 3 shipping pallets to make entry stairs and floor surfacing.

ing and fixtures.

9. Drape the fabric over the roof frame.

10. Grommet and secure the fabric to complete.

Since bamboo was not considered a legal building material under Hawaiian code at the time of this proposal, we initiated a legal process alongside several community leaders to make bamboo construction possible. This involved building a full scale mock up on the site

B.SAD WORKSHOP

over an 8-day period to demonstrate our construction techniques. This small shelter served as the proof of concept, and it will stay on site as a shower house once the farming cooperative is up and running. Fundraising for the projectâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s construction is ongoing.

MATERIAL INNOVATION // ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

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POP-UP ARCHITECTURE

Great architects must be great storytellers. Long before any architectural proposal can be realized, it must captivate an audience as a set of drawings which, together, promise an experience. As a discipline fundamentally tied to means of representation—physical, digital, or otherwise—architecture and its practitioners must constantly find new ways to visually communicate ideas.

How might a storybook be reimagined as a vehicle for communicating design intention to a general audience? Storytelling Publication Design Architectural Design

Inspired by recent architectural hacks of unconventional mediums like the guide book and the atlas, from Atelier Bow-Wow’s Made in Tokyo to Reiser and Umemoto’s Atlas of Novel Techtonics, this M.Arch thesis reimagines the storybook as a vehicle for architecture’s cultural dissemination. As a well-loved and easily accessible narrative format, the storybook bridges the gap between the fiction of the page and reality of the built environment and, accordingly, between the designers and users of architecture.

Scene 1, Arrival Particularly, a pop-up book has the potential to blend two-dimensional and three-dimensional space while harnessing the most compelling storytelling elements shared by architecture and fiction alike—setting, style, and sequence. Through the development of five pop-up scenes, this thesis takes readers on a journey through the Amazon rainforest, revealing in each vignette the design details of a proposed biomedical research station. For centuries, the Amazon’s lush rainforest has frustrated scientific voyages into its depths, from historical quests in search of El Dorado to more contemporary research expeditions for elusive cancer cures. The storied past of this fantastical landscape pairs with architecture’s capacity to frame, distance, heighten, and reveal its context. By reimagining an abandoned lake in the heart of Brazil’s rainforest in the form of a storybook, this thesis projects new architectural possibilities in the Amazon. Part fact and part fiction, the design proposal for a research station facilitates increased scientific understanding of the rainforest while the book format contributes new stories and myths to the Amazon’s cultural legacy. Ultimately, this experiment in architectural representation suggests that the mode in which architects draw can provide an experience on its own terms rather than serving merely as a means to an end, a precursor to a built artifact. The following pages contain excerpts of this book.

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AMANDA LEVESQUE


Scene 2

Scene 1

SITE MAP 0 ft M. ARCH THESIS

60

PUBLICATION DESIGN // ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

120

180

240

300 43


A prologue is a common literary tool for opening a story. Full of rich background details, it provides context for the main plot and often forshadows the ensuing conflict. To quickly convey the depth and breadth of research that informed my thesis, I developed a prologue timeline as a precursor to the design proposal. In it, I selected three key moments in the Amazon’s history which illustrate the profound link between storytelling in the region and its resulting physical occupation. The earliest moment dates back to the sixteenth century, when rumors of El Dorado first appeared in Spain,

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Francisco de Orellana reaches the Amazon’s Atlantic coast 1542

Hunger and disease force most of Pizarro’s men back to Quito 1541

Gonzalo Pizarro takes 300 soldieers to find El Dorado 1540

El Dorado begins appearing on Spanish maps 1535

A shipwrecked explorer is rescued by the Chief of El Dorado 1531

PROLOGUE // TIMELINE

perpetuated by a young conquistador shipwrecked on the Amazon who claimed to have been rescued by a goldclad chieftain of the same name. Within four years, the approximate location of his shipwreck began appearing on maps of the territory. While El Dorado eventually proved to be a piece of fiction, the Spanish spent years searching for the city, navigating the entirety of the Amazon watershed, from the Andes to the Atlantic. This pursuit quite literally put the Amazon on the map, facilitating its settlement by Western regimes for centuries to come. Clearly, the story of El Dorado had a deeply impactful physical presence on the territory it described.

AMANDA LEVESQUE


By 1930, stories of the Amazon’s “new gold” attracted Henry Ford to Manaus, where he founded the city’s first rubber

M. ARCH THESIS

Henry Wickham smuggles rubber seeds to Malaysia 1925

Madeira Railroad built to transport rubber to Atlantic ports 1917

Rubber boom begins in Manaus 1896

Rubber stabilized for industrial use 1879

The second key moment in the timeline depicts a rapidly urbanizing Amazon in 1896, when rubber was first discovered deep in Brazil’s rainforests. Its extraction was a lucrative business based in a remote Portuguese-controlled city called Manaus, surrounded only by hundreds of miles of rainforest. So many industrialists were drawn to the city for this purpose that its opulence and amenities rivaled many contemporary European cities, including electric street lights and an opera house paved in rubber.

plantation to streamline and optimize latex extraction. However, despite the best efforts of Ford’s engineers, the ecology of the Amazon proved too complex to be replicated or mechanized. Planting thirty-fold more saplings per acre than found in the wild made Fordlandia a hotbed for the rubber tree’s natural predators. Before this mistake could be rectified, Malaysian rubber hit the global market—a biopirate named Henry Wickham smuggled seeds out of the Amazon—derailing Ford’s entire investment. Fordlandia and the opera house, both abandoned, fell into ruin. Rubber’s boom and bust became a cautionary tale, which brought the extraction economy in Manaus to a halt.

PUBLICATION DESIGN // ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

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A diseased crop and labor disputes force fordlandia to close 1945

Henry Ford founds Fordlandia to monopolize the rubber industry 1930

Henry Wickham smuggles rubber seeds to Malaysia 1925

The third and final moment of this timeline brings us to near-present day. Within the last thirty years, pharmaceutical giants such as Merck and Pfizer have instituted biomedical research programs throughout the world’s remaining rainforests with directives focused on cancer, AIDS, and other diseases with similarly elusive cures. Similar to prospectors of the gold rush, bioprospectors of the “gene rush” search the interior of the Amazon in a proprietary race to discover and extract commercially valuable species. This explosive interest in biologically-sourced pharmaceuticals coincides with Eli Lilly’s manufacture of vincristine, a chemotherapy drug which dramatically

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increased lymphoma survival rates from 20% to 80% success. In 1957, its active ingredient was extracted from a rare periwinkle flower native to the rainforest, a species long rumored to have healing properties according to local folklore. The unprecedented effectiveness of the drug spurred such urgent demand that the species became extinct soon after its discovery. Following periwinkle’s disappearance from the wild and numerous failed attempts to synthetically reproduce it in the lab, Eli Lilly began purchasing the flower from local producers for $1.3 million per kilogram, ranking vincristine among the most expensive substances in the world at the time. Today, Eli Lilly manages massive periwinkle plantations in Texas to maintain its supply chain the drug.

AMANDA LEVESQUE


M. ARCH THESIS

Oncovin approved for clinical use 1963

Supply transfered to greenhouses in Texas 1960

Periwinkle goes extinct in the wild 1959

Extraction process patented 1958

Periwinkle is discovered as a leukemia therapy 1957

Eli Lilly begins conducting research on local medicinal plants 1950

Both success stories like vincristine and industrial failures such as Fordlandia accentuate how little empirical knowledge has been gleaned from the Amazon to date. In fact, the vast majority of the its biotic material has yet to be described by science, though the 1% of species that have been thoroughly researched yield 25% of pharmaceuticals used in modern medicine. Rather, resource extraction in the region is largely fueled by stories, comprised of centuries-old ethnobotanical tradition as well as the rumor mill of contemporary industry. This book is the next chapter in that story, and it picks up where Eli Lilly left off. Knowing full well how a single fiction can impact the development of an entire region, it proposes a series of bioprospecting research stations on Lake Balbina,

a naturalized dam reservoir originally built to bring power to Manaus’ rubber industry. The existence of this site, an artifact of Manaus’ boom and bust, is already implicated as a part of the Amazon’s history with extraction. By locating renewed action here, the design anticipates the impact of extraction and reimagines a new ending, told through the point of view of the same protagonist—the field scientist.

PUBLICATION DESIGN // ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

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REGIONAL MAP

Bayer

Annatto Point

Point of interest

Archeological remains discovered here reveal centuries-old ethnobotanical traditions, 1921.

Genzyme

South Bank

Merck

CAPE MERCK Point of interest

Endemic fish species C. macropromum evolves to feed on Amazon tree fruit found here, a contemporary adaptation to rising water levels, 2011.

Lake Balbina Active dock

Emergent forest

Abandoned dock

Middle aged forest

Overlook Point of interest Settlement Road 0

2

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4

6

8

10 mi

AMANDA LEVESQUE

Old growth forest Logging forest Amazon River


North Bank Point of interest

Dr. J.G. Armstrong nearly cures leukemia with the discovery of vinctistine, derived here from C. roseus periwinkle, 1958.

Periwinkle Point

Site location

LILY BAY

DUPONT BAY

Hopkins

Novartis

Oxford

MacArthur Point

Nobel Point

Columbia

AMGEN ISLANDS

Amgen

Gates Crick Watson

PFIZER BAY Pfizer

Golden Hill Pizarro’s Peak

BALBINA FALLS

Long Wharf

Pascal’s Peak

Balbina Airport

M. ARCH THESIS

PUBLICATION DESIGN // ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

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DESIGN SEQUENCE

Sampling

Extraction

+

=

Resampling

Synthesis

Pre-clinical t affinity potency toxicity

Clinical tria dosing bioactivity

Scene 2, The Extraction Fields 50

AMANDA LEVESQUE


trials

Manufacture FDA approval

als

M. ARCH THESIS

Consumption

PUBLICATION DESIGN // ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

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Birds

Reptiles Nematodes atmosphere

Arthropods

CO2

H2O NH3

NO3

Bacteria

soil

Organic matter

Scene 3, Mature Forest Habitat 52

AMANDA LEVESQUE

Fungi


Mammals

M. ARCH THESIS

PUBLICATION DESIGN // ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

53


Scene 4, The Laboratory 54

AMANDA LEVESQUE


M. ARCH THESIS

PUBLICATION DESIGN // ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

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CONSTRUCTION DETAILS

56

AMANDA LEVESQUE


M. ARCH THESIS

PUBLICATION DESIGN // ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

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58

AMANDA LEVESQUE


M. ARCH THESIS

PUBLICATION DESIGN // ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

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AMANDA LEVESQUE


M. ARCH THESIS

PUBLICATION DESIGN // ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

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University of Michigan EDUCATION EDUCATION 2011-2013 Master of Architecture University Michigan Ann Arbor, MI GPA: of 3.8/4.0 Master of Architecture with Distinction, 2013 Honors: Ann Arbor, MI Taubman College Merit Scholarship Student Show Exhibitor, 2012 Massachusetts Institute of2013 Technology Student Show Exhibitor, Bachelor of Science in Art and Design, 2010 Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge, MA 2006-2010 Bachelor of Science in Art and Design Ecole Des Beaux-Arts AmĂŠricain Cambridge, MA GPA: 4.9/5.0 Fellowship in Architecture, 2010 Honors: Fontainebleau, FR Emerson Prize for Excellence in Architecture Phi Beta Kappa Inductee Student ShowEXPERIENCE Exhibitor, 2009 PROFESSIONAL

EcoleInnovation Des Beaux-Arts AmĂŠricaine Continuum Environments Contractor, Summer 2012 Summer 2010 First Prize Fellowship in Architecture Newton, Fontainebleau, FR MA Tony Tappe Merit Scholarship Developed an interactive retail environment for a large corporate client. Delivered all architectural drawings Continuum for schematic Innovation, design phase. Contractor EXPERIENCE May-June, 2012 Worked collaboratively with the Environments EHDD Group to develop an interactive retail Newton, MA Architecture environment for a large corporate client. Extern, March 2012 Responsible for producing architectural San Francisco, CA drawings during design development. Assisted project managers with various construction administration tasks for the Exploratorium, EHDD Architecture, Extern including RFI responses and client presentations. March, 2012 Assisted project managers with various San Francisco, CA construction administration tasks for the Jan Wampler Architects Exploratorium, including RFI responses, site documentation, and meetings with the client. Intern, 2010-2011 Cambridge, MA

Jan Wampler Architects, Intern

Engaged in schematic design and design development Engaged in schematic andin design phases for a large-scale cultural design institution China. 2010-2011 phases fordigital a large-scale cultural Responsible for physical models, drawings, and Jamaica Plain, MA development institution China. Responsible for physical preparation of clientinpresentations. models, digital drawings, and preparation of client presentations.

Howeler + Yoon

HowelerSummer + Yoon,2009 Intern Design researcher, Boston, MA June-August 2009 Researched and prototyped a line of Prototyped a line of microturbines for an environmenfor an environmentally Boston, MA microturbines tally responsive installation, Windscreen. responsive installation, Windscreen. Utile Design, Extern

Utile Design

Primary model builder for design JanuaryExtern, 2009 January 2009 development of the Harbor Islands Pavillion. Boston, MA Boston, MA Primary model builder for design development of the Harbor Islands Pavilion.

AMANDA LEVESQUE DESIGNSKILLS SKILLS DESIGN User User research research Visual Visual communication communication Design Design strategy strategy Design Design development development Mock Mock ups ups and and prototypes prototypes Installations Installations Brand design Graphic design Experience Experience design design Architectural design Publication design Architectural design

TECHNICAL SKILLS 3D TECHNICAL SKILLS

Rhinoceros AutoCAD 3D Revit Rhinoceros SketchUp AutoCAD SketchUp 2D Revit (working knowledge) Photoshop Illustrator 2D InDesign Photoshop Final Cut Pro Illustrator ArcGIS InDesign Office Dreamweaver (working knowledge) Excel Final Cut Pro ArcGIS Fabrication Excel Lasercutting Powerpoint 3D printing ZUND knife cutting Fabrication Wood shop proficiency Lasercutting 3D printing ZUND knife cutting Woodshop profficiency

CONTACT alevesq@umich.edu (508) 633-0006 CONTACT 71 Windsor Drive alevesq@umich.edu Tewksbury, MA 01876 (508) 633-0006 550 W 54th St, Apt 730 New York, NY 10019

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THANK YOU.


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