Page 1

Volume 1, Issue 1

American Indian Alaskan Hawaiian Native Resource Center

April 2011

N ATIVE A MERICANS

Child Maltreatment Women in DV

2

Women who Abuse Men

2

Cycle of DV

3

Bridging the Gap

3

Couples taking on DV

3

Resources and Information on DV

4

American Indian Alaskan Hawaiian, Native Resource Center is a non-profit organization that provides and ensures wellness and stability of the individuals who are seeking assistance in the western culture. To service all ages who are of Native descent of Mecklenburg County and the State of North Carolina. To promote cultural awareness, educations, empowerment and to preserve the traditional values of the American Indians. 501 (c) 3 Staus

N ORTH C AROLINA

Domestic Violence and Abuse in the Home

INSIDE THIS ISSUE: 2

OF

It was about nine or ten one cold winter night when I heard the familiar sound of fighting. I knew that it was one of his drunken nights and he was at it again. While running to their bedroom as fast as I could, I also feared that he would really kill her this time. Although I was keenly aware of everything that was happening at that precise moment, I also felt like I was in a terrible nightmare from which I could not awaken. I remember seeing my brothers and sisters crying and screaming for him to stop. It was then that we all jumped on him, and only to be thrown to the side while his relentless beating of my mom continued. With a sudden blow from a wooden stool, my mom laid on the floor with no sign of life. After that horrendous night, we just knew that our mom would really leave him this time and never go back. Much to our disbelief and dread, she once again took him back. My mom fell for his

“THIS

Intmensorg.

old lie, “I promise it will be different this time baby.” This familiar form of sick manipulation was accompanied with the usual shower of gifts and toys that was the “icing on the cake” to buy our forgiveness. This viscous cycle lasted about another three years. It wasn’t until then that my mom escaped that prison that she

stayed in for her children. She had finally hit her bottom and decided to leave to save herself. It was at that moment that we were on the road to freedom. This was the beginning of the long process that allowed not only my mom, but for all of us to start healing. Due to the serious nature of this story, with respect, the victim asked to remain anonymous.

TIME ITS GOING TO BE DIFFERENT”

THE ABUSED

THE OTHER VICTIMS

“He said he was sorry and that he would never do it again.”

“Mom, you said you would never take him back.”

“He said he was going to get help.”

“Its not your fault mommy.”

“He promises to stop drinking and be a better husband”

“If you really loved us, you would stop hurting our mom.”

THE ABUSER

“Its your fault that I don't have a job.“

“If you would just stop nagging me then I would not have to hit you.”

“You know how I get when I’m drinking and I want to have sex. “


Page 2

Volume 1, Issue 1

C H I L D M A LT R E AT M E N T Across the Indian nation, Native American boys and girls are affected by the impact of domestic violence in the home. Due to the ongoing changes in America, Native Americans are moving to-

Preventchildabusetexas.org

Protect OUR Children

WOMEN “Dad has not beaten me up for two years!� Anonymous boy, (white Bison).

IN

DOMESTIC

Today, women continue to live the terrifying life of Domestic Violence. Why do women stay in such relationships? There are many reasons why women choose to stay with the batterer. According to most professionals who deal with Domestic Violence have determined that most victims stay because of learned helpless-

WOMEN

wards modern lifestyles. Today, most young Native American couples are becoming parents at a very young age. Due to the lack of resources, economic struggles and environment influences such as drugs and alcohol abuse, couples are not engaging in the proper education for parenting skills. For these reasons, Native American couples are apt to living a life style which usually leads to Domestic Violence. Violence against children continue to rise each and everyday. Signs of child mal treatment 1) a child may

Husband abuse is believe to be underreported forms of abuse by many researchers. Because of society, men may find it difficult and uncomfortable in reporting that they are being abused by their spouse. Men who are abused are more likely to leave the relationship because of their financial ability. Some men that were abused by their mother or other females as a child may also become a vic-

VIOLENCE

ness. Women loose their selfworth and are unable to reach out for help which may lead to severe depression. Abusers convince their spouse that they are no good. Women may hope that they can change their man. Women may also stay with their abuser for financial survival, especially if children are involved. Victims

WHO ABUSE

experience psychological maltreatment which places a child at high risk or unsafe and serious and unhealthy environment. Such as physical and bodily harm 2) sex abuse, including a child in sexual activities, 3) neglect, not providing a child with the basic necessities and coping skills, 4) verbal abuse, attacking a child and call him or her names, 5) emotional abuse, avoiding and neglecting a child, (Beneokraitis). As parents, join us in the fight against children of Domestic Violence. See page 3 of news letter for times, date and location for groups.

often feel that they deserve the abuse and by blaming themselves. Victims feel powerless and may fear for her and her children’s life if she tries to leave the batterer. And some women are not permitted to have contact with the outside world. In the end, the victim is still a prisoner in her own home.

MEN

tim of Domestic Violence as an adult. Men with Mental Health issues can easily fall into the category of women that are abused. Even though both men and women suffer damaging outcomes, it is the female that are most likely to become addicted to drugs and to encounter depression. Men still struggle to report abuse, however, with the help of others, they are reaching out.

Vocfm.co.za

My brother hurts too!


N a t iv e A m er i c a n s o f N or t h C a r o l i n a

THE CYCLE VIOLENCE Battered Women Syndrome: is a woman who has experienced many years of physical abuse and who feels incapable of leaving. Cycle Theory of batteredwomen syndrome defense, (Walker, 1976). Phase One– The Tension building Phase. “Minor” battering incidents occur and conflict builds. Scenario: In the beginning, family walks on egg shells.

OF

Page 3

DOMESTIC

Scenario 2: The batterer begins to abuse the family member physically. Phase Three– Calm. Sometimes called the honeymoon phase.” As the batterer often promises never to be abuse again. Women often convince themselves that he will really change. This period gradually fades and the cycle begins again. Scenario 3: Buying gifts and promises to ever hurt spouse again. Women tell themselves, “This time It’s going to be different”

Phase Two– The Acute Battering incident. “An explosive beating or otherwise abusive incident.

Blog.fpst.org

Native American Cycle of Violence Picture above symbolizes the vicious cycle caused by Domestic Violence among Native Americans.

(Beneokraitis).

BRIDGING What can health professionals do to help the indigenous population overcome the obstacles of Domestic Violence while keeping the Native American traditional values a priority. As one of my hero’s stated, “through education and collaboration, professionals can bridge the gap between the treatment agency and tribal

THE

GAP

Cultures by encouraging the involvement of the family elders, traditional elders, and the traditional medicine people in the design and delivery of services for the Native clients, (Don Coyhis, White Bison). Equally important, it is suggested that the medicine people should be open to educate the western in tradi-

COUPLES TAKING

ON

tional healing in order to help the Native American culture in the urban areas of the community. Looking for a new way of healing or educating your loved ones by utilizing traditional healing. See schedule below for more information or call Doni at 704-555-1234

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

7890 West Hope St. Charlotte, NC 28207 Domestic Violence Group for Children (Little Warriors) When: Monday and Wednesday Time: 4pm to 6pm American Indian Sisters Domestic Violence Group When: Monday and Wednesday Time: 4pm to 6pm

By DJART

Let Families Get Hope Today

Domestic Violence Group for Men When: Tuesday and Thursday Time: 6pm to 8pm Couples Group When: Saturday Time: 11:00 am– 1pm Bridging the Gap DV Group When: Every other Saturday Time: 1:30-2:30pm (open)

“I’m Sorry sweetie, I will never hit you again...How about we take a vacation, just the both of us?”


American Indian Alaskan Hawaiian Native Resource

AIAH Goals is to:

To represent Native peoples in Mecklenburg County, NC.

PO Box 790763 Charlotte NC 28206-0763 Phone: 704-712-3913

Execute and preserve traditional values by promoting cultural awareness in community.

Manage treatment and service in the community.

Flshepard@yahoo.com Sheresebrooks@yahoo.com Jeffsteeledean@yahoo.com

Be an advocate and support for client rights.

Establish and maintain healthy relationships and supports within families and their community.

Clients to be knowledgeable/competent within their individual and Native rights.

• •

Continuation of cultural identity

Email:

Nonprofit Organization 501 (c) 3 Status

To provide a foundation of resources and programs within Mecklenburg County and the State of North Carolina. Services Provided:

How you can get involved:

Case Management

Promote AIAH Native Resource Center, Inc

Job training/readiness

Building networks

Educational advancement

Provide and link to resources

Substance Abuse treatment referrals

Legal consultation

Counseling

Participation in the Advisory

Economic Independence

Committee

W H A T C A N W E D O T O P R E S E R V E F A M I L Y VA L U E S AND TRADTIONS WITHOUT DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AND ABUSE IN THE HOME. Native American Tribes and Organizations:

Resources: Mecklenburg County: Domestic Violence Misdemeanor Unit (704)3364126 Domestic Violence Healthcare Project (704)-4463999 HERO program for children (704)336-3210 Magistrate’s OfficeProtection Orders, etc. (704)336-4728 NOVA Services for Batters (704) 336-4344 Police Domestic Violence Unit (704)336-2311 Programa Confianza (Spanish Speaking) (704)432-6970 Shelter for Battered Women (704)332-2513 Women’s Commission (704) 3363210 Mcleod Addictive Disease Center (704)332-9001 Mecklenburg County Mental Health (704) 336-6404

Squisdo

The Art of Healing CRISIS HOTLINES: (704)332-2513 Mecklenburg County Mobile Crisis 704-566-3410 National Domestic Abuse Helpline for men and women 1-888-743-5754

Metrolina Native American Assoc., 704-4589209; Mr. Jesse. Chair Coharie Tribe 910-5646909 Eastern Band of Cherokee 828-497-2771 Guilford Native American Association 336-2738686 Haliwa Saponi Indian Tribe 252-586-4017 Lumbee Tribe of North Carolia 910-521-7861 Meherrin Indian Tribe 252398-3321 Occaneechi Band of Saponi Nation 919-304-3727 Sappony 434-585-3352 Triangle Native American Society 919-733-7107 Waccamaw Siouan Tribe

AIAH Newsletter, Vol. 1, Issue 1  

American Indian, Alaskan & Hawaiian Resource Center newsletter. Covers domestic violence issues.

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you