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STUDENT PORTFOLIO 2017 FOURTH-YEAR ARCHITECTURE STUDENT AT BALL STATE UNIVERSITY

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My statement of purpose was written when I was asked by a professor why I had chosen to study architecture, as opposed to a less strenuous art form.

At first thought, I would say that I want to become an architect because I like designing, creating, and building. I like how architecture relates to people, art, music, travel. However, if I merely liked all these things, I would not be going through such intense schooling for such a challenging career involving so much time and dedication. All the late nights in studio, the models students build over and over again, the struggle to live up to our professors’ expectations, the immense amount of work that must be put in outside of class - I could always pick an easier career path. But I don‘t just like architecture. I fell in love with architecture. I don’t just like designing, creating, and building - I love it. The way we as architects have to work together to produce something sustainable, useful, and affordable - something real - enthuses me. I want to face challenges and think creatively to overcome them in ways that seem impossible; I want to doubt that everything I know to be true just so I can begin to design outside of truth. I want to constantly push my boundaries, to design in the future and not in the here and now. I don’t just want to be, I want to create.

“You see things; and you say, ‘Why?’ But I dream things that never were; and I say, ‘Why not’?” 2

- George Bernard Shaw


Design of a microhome community for struggling homeless veterans in Muncie, IN.

Biophilic renovation of a vacant pier in New York City, NY, overlooking Ellis Island.

Honors Award Recipient, 2016 Cripe Design Competition.

BIOPHILIC INSTITUTE p. 12-15

microGROW p. 4-7

P.19 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

contents

MISCELLANEOUS

INTERNATIONAL STUDIO D E C

2 0 1 6

COMPETITION STUDIO

P. 2 STATEMENT OF PURPOSE

O C T

2 0 1 6

D E C

2 0 1 5

DESIGN STUDIO

CAVVANBAH p. 8-11

TBC

MISCELLANEOUS p. 16-18

A multi-hazard relief-response centre for citizens and refugees occupying Byron Bay, Australia. 3


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Site Plan

scale 1’=1/16”

to downtown

GROW

micro

a homeless veteran housing community

In Delaware County, IN, more than 100 veterans struggle with homelessness, often as a result of disability, trauma, or the challenge of adapting to an unstructured, unfamiliar living-working environment. Located just south of Muncie’s downtown district, Muncie’s microGROW housing addresses this need by providing an encouraging atmosphere towards self-sustainment and social responsibility. MicroGROW accommodates six veterans in need of shelter while providing direction and education towards an adaptable, meaningful societal role. Veterans contribute to the operations of the project’s net-zero site energy and zero water waste initiatives. This project was designed in collaboration with fellow fourth-year student Megan Stenftenagel.

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Ross Community Center and Gardens

Maring-Hunt Library

Greenhouse Entrance


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community centre

greenhouse community centre

community centre

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community centre community centre

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garden/

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garden/

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gardens/ greenhouse

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garden/ greenhouse

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garden/ greenhouse

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garden/ greenhouse

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garden/ greenhouse

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bike storage

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gardens

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gardens s

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community centre

gardens/greenhouse

community centre d

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gardens/ greenhouse community centre

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gardens

greenhouse s

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gardens/greenhouse

community centre

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s gardens/ greenhouse

open space

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community centre

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community centre

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community centre

site design process diagrams

MicroGrow’s site consists of a community centre, two greenhouses, and six tiny homes designed for individual, pet, ADA-needs, or single parent conditions. These houses are located on the perimeter of the given property line to provide a central space for community connection that is sheltered from the public environment. Each unit is equipped with spaces for sleeping, storage, restroom amenities, food preparation, and workspace needs. To promote a sense of security and comfort, veterans can see their entrance door from all positions, except for the lavatory. Additionally, the units’ occupants can control their own heat and coolth through an energy efďŹ cient air-to-air pump, a ceiling fan, and operable windows for natural cross-ventilation. 5


12%

Homelessness Demographics Homeless Veterans

Energy Consumption

Delaware County

Homeless who identify as veterans

Homeless veterans with disability

Water Demand

PV Energy Generation

Homeless veterans, single male

25,200

21,400

PV monocrystalline cells w/ vertical-axis tracking

104,200

City Water

excess to grid 25920

Lighting

2830

Equipment

2240

Fans

6600

Heating

3020

Pumps

3710

Cooling

2980

36° average tilt 180° orientation 20.8 kWh /ft2/year w/ 1,210 ft2 space for rooftop PV cells Maximum Energy Output 25,210 kWh/yr

Gal/year

Faucets 38025

19500

30875

Clothes

29900

Misc/Leaks

for on-site irrigation or off-site parks

Muncie rainfall 38 in/yr roof catchment area 4,050 ft2 rainwater collection 91,000 gal/yr + 74140 gal /year Living Machine Intake w/ 25% loss factor

Toilets

Showers

123,900 gal / year Total Water Output w/ additional 25% loss factor

1.

EVACUATED TUBE

SOLAR COLLECTOR

123,900

Gal/year

kWh/year

kWh/year

SYSTEM CONTROL PANEL

Water Conservation

88%

68%

104

Zero Water Waste

Net Zero Site Energy

Veteran Community

INSTANTANEOUS

HEATER CITY WATER

PHOTOVOLTAIC CELLS

HOT WATER STORAGE

DC/AC CONVERTER

GRID -

ELECTRICITY PRODUCED BY RENEWABLE POWER

Roof Detail 0’

LED

1”

4’

LIGHTING

2.

AIR to AIR PUMP

COMMUNITY CENTRE

UNITS x6

GREENHOUSE RAIN CATCHMENT

POTABLE WATER

Roof Detail

LIVING MACHINE CELLS

0’

3/4’ 1”

3.

SELL EXCESS

SHOWER DISHES LAUNDRY HANDWASHING

TOILETS WASTE PRE-TREATMENT

FOOD WASTE

COMPOST

COOKING

OCCUPANT ELECTRIC DEVICES

GRAYWATER SURGE TANK

Roof Detail 3/4’

0’ 1”

Environmental systems and operability are expressed boldly in microGrow’s design. Photovoltaic panels with vertical tracking are integrated into the tiny homes’ roofs, generating enough energy to power the entire site (see calculations above). Graywater, collected under each unit from showers and faucets, is reused for flushing water closets. The resulting blackwater and excess graywater flow into a purification system with living machine cells. Two greenhouses, located on the southern site edge between three micro-homes, accommodate these living machine cells. Purified water is utilized to nourish the abundant gardens on site or donated off-site to the neighborhood’s gardens at Ross Community Center. 6

2.

1.

3. Unit Roof


56°

Wall Section not to scale

winter 33°

equinox

personalized green screen

12.5°

summer

pivot support recycled metal standing seam roof

monocrystalline pv cells

North Elevation scale 1’=1/8”

roof membrane sheathing cavity insulation

gutter system

graywater storage

dual glazing sleeping space

from shower pump

blackwater to living machine

from sink

Building Section scale 1’=1/8”

steel plate 1/2” finish PV panel w/ vertical tracking

interior counter water break 2” rigid insulation sheathing metal shoe

cavity insulation

Wall Section

rigid insulation grade

finished flooring slab on grade

scale 1’=1”

South Elevation scale 1’=1/8”

moisture barrier compact gravel

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fire

In order to best react in a timely fashion to a fire emergency, the design must reflect the capacity to have a quick exodus for the voluntary fire department.

Cavvanbah a multihazard response centre

Located in Byron Bay, Australia, Cavvanbah is a multihazard response-refuge centre designed to protect and shelter the community during a natural disaster and benefit the town’s growing economy throughout the rest of the building’s life. The design is inspired by the skeleton of a whale’s ribcage, of which the function is to protect the mammal’s heart at all times, and to give structure to the whale’s body. In the design, timber is bent to form a structural “rib” around the people that it protects, who are the heart of the project and of the city. The design of these ribs was adjusted according to a number of potential threats, such as cyclone wind pressure and storm surge seepage. 8

flood

The most common situation of the four, in a flooding situation the design must be able to protect its inhabitants. Lifting the main level off the ground floor will keep the heart of the building mostly undamaged.

storm surge

Since storm surges are quite common at the SLSC site location, this hazard is the most affective to the design. The design must reflect the capacity to “close up,” or withstand and block the town from the wild surges.

cyclone

Due to high wind pressures during a cyclone hazard, the building must have the capacity to withstand strong forces. Horizontal bracing will help the structure stand against prevailing winds.


storm surge

flood

cyclone

fire

climate change

The design hosts a number of resiliency features, such as a breathable structural skin that can open or close according to climatic conditions. The project was designed to include Byron Bay’s Surf Lifesaving Club (SLSC), a voluntary rescue mission guarding the seas during public hours, and therefore dedicates some space to their efforts. The building is designed using wood as a medium, due to its intimate connotative qualities, and steel connection joints for strength. The rendered photograph above depicts a nine-meter flood condition, which is the current 100-year flooding prediction. In the event of an emergency, the town’s citizens would be rushed to the inside of Cavvanbah (”Meeting Place” in the native tongue), and the skin of the building would slide closed for protection. 9


Structural System Concept

Vicinity Map and Site Plan SLIDING STEEL SKIN FOR PROTECTION AGAINST HAZARDS

storm surge

The structural system is designed to “breathe,” by dually letting light in through a louver system and letting natural air in through a second steel skin, which is meant to open during daylight hours and close during night or an emergency.

cyclone

LIGHT CURTAIN WALL SYSTEM GLULAM “RIBS” FOR STRUCTURAL STABILITY SMALL LOUVERS FOR SHADING/ VENTING TECHNIQUES

fire

flood

Location of city centre ① Location of site in proximity to city centre

Biodiversity

In an effort to endorse biodiversity within the site, the design allows for small cavities to nurture endangered plant species, which can be fed through a compost system, saving both money and energy.

The City Centre

These diagrams show a progression of where Byron Bay is in relation to the rest of the world.

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The city centre sits just south of Cavvanbah. This way, the refuge center stands between the people and the danger.

Site Section

0

25

50

Cavvanbah becomes a celebrated destination point, as it opens to the main street running parallel to this section.

The dropoff becomes a vantage point for the lifesaving efforts of Cavvanbah.

The Tasman Sea is where the most prominent danger to the site (storm surges/cyclones) originates from.


Cavvanbah Building Plans nature

GLULAM RIB CAGE TO PROTECT INTERIOR

heart

nature

COLUMNS FOR REINFORCED STRUCTURE

lung/cavity

lung/cavity

COMMUNITY CENTRE/OFFICES

function

cavity

OPEN TO COMMUNITY, CLOSED TO SHORE WHEN A DISASTER STRIKES BIODIVERSE WATER SINK/RAIN GARDEN BEACH CONNECTION/SHADED HANGOUT

water collection/sink

Level Two

circulation

hostel dorms

HOUSING/DORMS

The hostel dorms each have an extra pull-down bed for emergency housing. The community/flex space provides space for tents or relief housing if extra room is needed. During the times the emergency housing is not needed, the hostel will help boost the growing tourist economy of Byron Bay.

community/ flex space

HAZARD RESPONSE STORAGE WATER WATCH, INSIDE-OUTSIDE SPACE COMMUNITY CENTRE/OFFICES COMMUNITY MEETING PLACE BIODIVERSE RAIN GARDEN

kitchen

bathrooms

dining

Initial Concept volunteer dorms

Volunteer dorms are for firefighters who might need to take a rest between shifts of sacrificing for the community. They are located above the apparatus to allow for quick and direct response.

Entrance to Hostel Hostel Reception Offices

Level One

Community Development Centre Beach Overlook SLSC Office Space

Community Development Centre will be used as flex space for renting to local businesses, becoming a shelter during a hazard, and hosting shows, gatherings, or art events.

Beach overlook allows parents to watch over their children while having a cup of locally-brewed coffee from the cafe upstairs. The height of the outlook, designed to outlast a 3m rise in sea level, also gives an advantage to lifeguards on duty.

Reception Control Center

Offices

Entrance Energy Room/Storage

Open “breathable” structure proviodes a multitude of opportunities to interact with both inside and outside space.

Apparatus Exterior Walking/ Gray Space

Easy access to the one-way-out street in the city center gives the firefighters the fastest chance to respond to an ongoing emergency.

The concept diagram in the top left corner is modeled after a ribcage. The heart of the building is in the center of the ribs for maximum protection. The lung/cavities are a collapsible barrier in case the glulam structure fails. The plans for Cavvanbah include office space for the SLSC and operators of Cavvanbah’s additional programing, a community development centre for public art and market outreach, an apparatus for the volunteer fire brigade (with dorm space for tired fighters/police during an emergency directly above), storage space, energy room space, a kitchen and exterior dining area, and a hostel for use when the building is not under emergency lockdown (which will be the majority of the building’s life). The hostel and community outreach centre will help control Byron Bay’s growing population and boost the economy. 11


plan level 2 5

+

10

20

50

= plan level 1 5

10

20

50

BIOPHILIC INSTITUTE research center in New York City

The Biophilic Institute is located on the south side of Brooklyn, New York City, on a pier overlooking Ellis Island. The pier initially was nothing more than an abandoned soccer field, and a client in NY wanted a creative interpretation of what the field could become. Using the concept of biophilia in design, my studio individually redesigned the pier to reflect a center for learning, research, science, relaxation, and a working-living environment. Included in the design is an auditorium/cafe, a docking bay for water taxis, community gardens, on-site housing, small laboratories, and a swooping, open boardwalk overlooking the City That Never Sleeps. 12

auditorium and cafe docking bay community gardens and park open boardwalk

open water on-site housing laboratories and enclosed walkway open boardwalk 10

20

40

100


+

=

Biophilia is essentially the design implementation of this idea: that being immersed in nature can be mentally restorative and spiritually reconstructive. In fact, the University of Washington conducted an extensive research on the topic, compiling over 50 different sources in support of biophilia. In relation to design, their research site concludes: “Effective architectural design is not easy

to achieve: built objects and spaces that are too complex at first glance can become daunting, overwhelming, and too difficult to understand, while those that are easily scanned do not encourage interaction. If the built environment simulates the layered complexity of ecosystems, a person’s sensory systems will be engaged to explore and learn about the built object or space, which encourages cognitive function through a high level of visual fascination and mystery.” https://depts.washington.edu/hhwb/Thm_Mental.html 13


base Bolt

building structure: double skin facade

pin cable

0" 1"

3"

6"

0" 1"

3"

6"

12"

suspension cable attachment detail

heating and fresh air from radiant system insulating buffer passive heating double skin

One of the goals of this design project was to explore connections between two objects or points of connection in a structural frame. Two such connections are the suspension bridge cable connections and the connection of a dual skin facade on the main living building. These concepts are rudimentary but represent an understanding of the importance of connections in design. Below the two details is a site-wide section showing the bridge as the centerpiece of the design, with connections to both the community plaza and the housing building. After running Sefaira calculations on the spaces above with a slightly above average rating, the site performs with an average of 17 kBTU ft2/yr, with a square footage of 28,588. 14


Based on biophilic design patterns, this project’s main purpose is to give inhabitants, employees, and visitors a taste of how biophilic architecture can positively impact both people and the built environment. The main goal of the project is to draw citizens in to share with them a safe place where they can relax, and sub-goals of the project include producing a stress free environment using a psychological notion called soft fascination, and spreading awareness of sustainable design and its positive impact on the city. The four biophilic patterns addressed are (1) the presence of water, (2) a visual connection to nature (addressed by the green roofs and tree lines), (3) a connection to natural systems (community gardens and circulation), and (4) complexity and order (the structural system and language of the project as a whole). 15


In the spring of 2016, I participated in Ball State University's world study abroad program, where a team of ďŹ fteen students, two professors, and myself traveled through 30+ countries over a period of fourteen weeks. We studied architecture, city planning, urban design, landscape architecture, language, cultural design inuences, cultural philosophy, sustainable theory, and more. During the course of the 15-credit hour trip, my colleagues and I sketched, noted design details, interacted with guides and salespeople, wrote journals, designed, and dreamed. The trip has not only changed the way I approach design as a result of understanding architecture, but also my everyday life as I interact with co-workers, friends, and fellow students. 16

WORLD TOUR 2014-2017


FREEHAND ILLUSTRATION 2013-2017

The top sketch was drawn in Greece during a 14-week study abroad around the world. My team and I spent about a day in the Acropolis, gazing and sketching the buildings as old as age. The second sketch (middle) is a hand drawn perspective of Fallingwater, based on an original sketch of the building I found in my research on Wright’s famous residence. The final sketch (bottom) is Wright’s Unity Temple, drawn to scale on a two-point perspective drafting board.

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CITY DEMOGRAPHICS AROUND TH HE WORLD

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3 4

The data set to the left diagrams the location of the nine largest cities (population-wise) around the world. The cities are majorly divided by East and West, with the majority of the cities collating in the East. This is due to high density and birth rates, and also poor incomes.

9

7

2 6

5 These maps illustrate each of the nine most populated cities by area, and are choreo graphed by number to match a relevent data set to the lower right of the map.

1

North American South American Asian

White skin Medium/light skin Medium/dark skin Dark skin

San Paulo, Brazil

1

Mexico City, Mexico

2

New York, USA

3

Delhi, India

4

Jakarta, Indonesia

5

Manilla, Phillippines

6

Shanghai, China

7

Seoul, South Korea

8

Tokyo, Japan

9

The data set to the left illus trates with icons the reli gion and product of that country/city. The cross stands for Catholicism/Christianity, the moon and star for Islam, and so forth. If there is more than one icon for the pro duce part, it is because the country/city has equally high exports in both prod ucts. The graphs to the left of the data set depict eth nicity and skin color per centages of the cities.

Each of these data sets are easily available through a quick “Google” search. More information can be gathered through these websites: http://www.newgeography.com/content/002808-world-urban-areas population-and-density-a-2012-update http://www.businessinsider.com/usa-manufactured-products-exports-america-2012-3 (America) http://www.worldstopexports.com/mexicos-top-exports/2636 (Mexico) http://www.worldstopexports.com/chinas-top-10-exports/1952 (China) http://www.worldstopexports.com/south-koreas-top-10-exports/2302 (Korea) http://www.worldstopexports.com/japans-top-10-exports/2097 (Japan)

HUMAN

CULTURE

TRAVEL

GLOBAL

Tokyo, Japan Jakarta, Indonesia Seoul, South Korea

The graph to the left depicts the population and density of the cities The people icons at the bottom represent people in thousands for the populations, and people per square mile.

Delhi, India Manila, Phillippines Shanghai, China New York, USA Sao Paulo, Brazil Mexico City, Mexico

Population Density

5,000

10,000

15,000

20,000

25,000

30,000

I got into graphic design in my second year of architecture studio. I thought it important to develop a sense of visual aesthetics, so I spent many hours putting together color sheets, learning Adobe Creative Suite, and running through multiple versions of poster design. Above are two examples: the graphic to the left is a poster I designed for Ball State University’s Honors College, to receive a colloquium credit for my world tour study abroad. It documents a moment on the trip in which I experienced a deep moment of silence. The second graphic was made for a digital design class, in which I researched demographics from large cities and arranged them into an infographic. Both graphics were designed with Adobe Illustrator and Adobe Photoshop. 18

35,000

40,000

45,000

GRAPHIC DESIGN 2014-2017


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My special thanks to Professor Joe Bilello, who has spent countless hours patiently answering my never-ending questions; Professor Andrea Swartz, who told me that I was only limited by my imagination and gravity; to Megan Stenftenagel, for surviving Cripe with me; and to my mother for teaching me how to dream.

thank you

TBC

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Amanda Rider, Undergraduate Architecture Portfolio 2017