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Brooke Burke-Charvet

THE WOMEN’S GUIDE TO ALL AROUND HAPPINESS

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FRESH RECIPES

LIGHT & HEALTHY CHICKEN, PIZZA AND SALAD

LOSE 10 LB IN 3 WEEKS

THE WALKING PLAN THAT WORKS

TRY THESE THREE NEW SUPERFOOD COMBOS SUPERFOODS, BETTER MOODS! P.63

LIGHTEN UP LESS STRESS, ENJOY MORE

HOW SAFE IS THAT FOOD TRUCK? 7 WAYS TO TELL

GET A FLAWLESS FACE FAST

FRESH PICK RUBY RULES

Amanda Maron 74 King St. St. Augustine, Fl 32084

VOL. 27, NO. 3 • APRIL

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ONE MINUTE TO GREAT ABS


ON THE COVER 37 LOSE 10 POUNDS IN 3 WEEKS 98 FRESH PICK 63 TRY THESE THREE NEW SUPERFOOD COMBOS 92 BROOKE BURKE-CHARVET: ONE MINUTE TO GREAT ABS 108 LIGHTEN UP: STRESS LESS, ENJOY MORE 102,115 24+ FRESH RECIPES 76 HOW SAFE IS THAT FOOD TRUCK?

FEATURES 92 BROOKE BURKE-CHARVET ON GETTING IT ALL 98 FIND YOUR GREATSKIN SOLUTION 102 PIZZA REINVENTED 108 LIVE LIGHTER NOW!

Cover photography by Matt Jones. Styling by kate Mofddie. Hair by Campbell McAuley for Solo Artists. Makeup by Amy Nadine for Mativita. manicure by Tracey Sutter for Cloutier Remix Clothing Cover: ERES bikini top ($245; 888-6563737). Vince jeans ($195; bloomingdales.com). Grey 56 leather belt (grey56.com for information). Sosha Classic moon and tag neckalces ($380 and $225; scocha.com). Lola James jewlery Wish necklace ($45; lolajamesjewlery.com). Blu Bijoux stud earrings ($12; maxandchloe.com). Ring (Brooke’s own)


VOL. 27, NO. 3 • APRIL

“Working out is not just about my body. It’s my head, my energy my stress— my everything.” —BROOKE BURKE-CHARVET


BETTER TOGETHER

TRY THESE THREE NEW SUPERFOOD COMBOS

By: Betsy Stephens

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Want to start mixing and matching? These three tasty combos will make your healthy meal greater than the sum of its parts.


Olive oil + leafy green vegetables The healthy fat in extra-virgin olive oil helps you better absorb the vitamins in your greens. So skip the fat-free dressing.

Eggs + cheese This combo protects against osteoporosis. The calcium in cheese is more easily absorbed into the body with the addition of vitamin-D-rich eggs.

Hummus + red bell pepper Vitamin C in the red pepper helps your body make better use of the energy-boosting iron found in all those chickpeas. *

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HOW SAFE IS THAT FOOD TRUCK?

7 WAYS TO TELL Restaurants on wheels are all the rage. But is the food they serve sanitary and safe to eat?

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ith cheap, chic fare, like arugula pizza, squash empanadas and fish tacos, the country’s 15,000-plus food trucks are rolling into virtually every big city and many small towns across the United States. The burning question: Is it safe to grab a bite to eat from a truck that cooks for hundreds in a space that’s a fraction of the size of your kitchen?

cases it will have a date, the name of the town and some type of seal. If you don’t spot a license, your city (like Phoenix) might not require that it be displayed. “You can actually ask to see the license,” says Sarah Klein, a food-safety expert at the Center for the Science in the Public Interest. “If they can’t produce it, find another place to eat and call the local health department.”

For the most part, yes. “Many of the health inspectors in our office buy lunch from food trucks,” says Christie Sweitz, interim supervisor for inspection in Portland, Ore. “Trucks are required to follow strict guidelines and they are inspected as often as restaurants.” Just as with the fare from their brick-and-mortar peers, though, some meals on wheels are better bets, food safety-wise, than others. Before you line up for that lobster roll, here’s what you need to check for.

Good grades.

License. By law, food trucks need one to operate so the local health department can track them for inspections. Why this matters to you: Illegal operators tend to not worry as much about temperature and proper storage as an owner who knows an inspector could drop by at any time. In Seattle, New York City and many other towns, food-truck operators are required to post their license on the window, in a spot where customers can see it. The actual sign looks different from city to city, but in most

North Carolina, Los Angeles County and a handful of other places require that food trucks post their latest inspection grade on the window. The worse the grade, the greater your chance of getting a food-borne illness. “I’d feel uneasy about eating at a truck with a B grade because it could have violations like not keeping food at the right temperature or having no soap. And I would never eat at a truck with a C because that’s close to being shut down,” Klein says. If your city doesn’t post grades, they’re likely available on your local health department’s website.

Gloves. You might think your biggest worry is that the chicken or beef is undercooked, but you’re actually more likely to get sick because a truck (or restaurant) employee has bad hygiene. In fact, one of the leading causes of food-borne illness is contamination from someone’s filthy hands. Ideally, employees should be wearing gloves when handling your

food—and changing them frequently, like after touching raw food—to avoid transferring bacteria from their fingers to your falafel, says O. Peter Snyder, PhD, president of the Hospitality Institute of Technology and Management.

Red flags. Even though you can’t see every potential problem on a food truck (heck, if you’re petite, you can barely reach the window), you still get a closer look at the kitchen than you would in most restaurants. If you spot any of these warning signs, walk away!

Dirty hands. In cities where gloves aren’t required, employees have to wash up frequently. You can get a good idea of someone’s hand hygiene by looking at their nails, Snyder notes. “Dirt under nails is a breeding ground for bacteria,” he says. “Nails should be clipped short to limit dirt accumulation.”

Dangling hair. If employees don’t pull back their hair, they’ll be constantly moving it out of their eyes, then touching your food, which could get contaminated with bacteria from their face. Untidy hair can also be a sign that a business isn’t following the safety rules in general.

Lukewarm food. “Temperature problems are one of the most common violations in food trucks,” says Jonathan Fielding, MD, director of public health for Los


Angeles County. Salads and deli sandwiches should feel like they’re straight out of the fridge, while soup and burgers should be piping hot.

Messy sink. If you have a chance to peer inside the truck, try to find the sink. Look for soap, towels and a clear place for hand-washing. If the area is stacked up with dishes or there’s no soap in sight, where are employees going to wash their hands after coughing, sneezing or touching raw meat? While gloves aren’t an absolute deal-breaker—they aren’t legally required everywhere, and an employee without them can handle food safely with utensils and frequent hand-washing—they’re a good sign that food safety is taken seriously at a business. * APRIL

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BROOKE BURKE-CHARVET ON

GETTING IT ALL The Dancing With the Stars co-host shares her secrets for healthy living: clean food, mind-clearing workouts, and just the right balance of we- and me-time.

Brooke Burke-Charvet’s One-Minute Workout The Dancing with the Stars co-host shares her favorite quick-and easy exercises for your abs, legs, and butt.

Get great abs fast From Health magazine Dancing with the Stars co-host Brooke Burke-Charvet has a few favorite moves from her latest Brooke Burke Body DVDs, 30-Day Slim Down and Sexy Abs. These three exercises will tone your abs, legs, and butt—and they’re so quick you can knock them out during a DWTS commercial break.

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ou’d never guess looking at her now, but just four months ago Brooke Burke-Charvet was undergoing treatment for thyroid cancer. The diagnosis was a shock for the 41-year-old Dancing With the Stars co-host. Newly married to David Charvet, the mom of four was busy juggling her career and blended family when, last spring, her doctor found a lump. She is now cancer-free, and the experience reinforced Brooke’s belief in the importance of taking care of yourself—inside and out. Here’s her everyday advice for eating right, getting fit, and staying grounded.


TRY IT NOW BROOKE’S WAY!

“Do each in 30-second to 1-minute ‘pods,’” Burke-Charvet advises.“Tackling a whole minute is hard every time. And when you get that burn, do 10 more seconds. That’s when your body starts changing.”

THE CHEERLEADER

Lower into squat with hands on thighs—don’t let knees go past toes (A). With core engaged, stand and raise arms straight overhead (B). Lift right leg high while lowering right arm to meet it (C). Return to start. Repeat, alternating sides, for 1 minute.

THE BRIDGE

Lie with knees bent, arms at side, palms down. Tighten glutes and core; raise hips to form a straight line from shoulders to knees (A). Bend right leg toward chest (B); straighten leg and point foot (C); bend leg and return to start. Repeat, alternating sides, for 1 minute.

TRIANGLE CRUNCH

Kneel, place left hand lightly on back of head, right hand on floor to side. Lift left leg 2 inches off floor (A). Crunch to left while raising left leg, so body forms a straight line from hip to toe (B). Lower leg and repeat for 1 minute; switch sides and repeat.*

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FRESH PICK

RUBY RULES Food know-how, By: maggie Meyer Tools and tips for everyone who loves to eat grapefruit. Tangy, tart, and a little bit sweet, vitamin-packed grapefruit sparkles in winter. Try it paired with three of our favorites— avocado, ginger, and goat cheese— for a fresh take on the juicy gem.

1•AVOCADO SALSA Mix together chopped avocado and grapefruit. Add minced serrano pepper. Drizzle with orange juice and extra-virgin olive oil. Sprinkle with coarse salt. Toss to combine. Serve as a relish spooned over grilled chicken or fish.

RUBY RULES:

BUY: Look for fully colored grapefruit with a nicely rounded shape. Juicy grapefruit will be very heavy for its size. The skin should be firm to the touch but give a little when pressed. STORE: Refridgerate up to 2 weeks


2•GINGER BROIL Peel grapefruit and cut into thick slices. Brush with butter; sprinkle with brown sugar and ground ginger. Broil 3 to 4 inches from heat for 2 to 3 minutes until brown sugar is melted and the slices are heated through. Top with a dollop of yogurt and sprinkle with candied ginger for a sweet-tart treat.

3•GOAT CHEESE Add a new crostini topper to your appitizer arsenal. Mix together goat cheese and a little honey. Spread on toasted bagutte slices. Layer with thin slices of samami and grapefruit sections. Top with a drizzle of honey and a big hint freshly ground black pepper.

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Brooke Burke-Charvet

BACK AFTER HER BATTLE WITH CANCER


Health Magazine Redesign