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Amanda Mauser 630.881.7622 amauser@umich.edu Master of Architecture University of Michigan 2018


BARRANQUILLA, COLOMBIA

The city of Barranquilla began development due to its role in international trade. This network led to economic development in addition to cultural growth, stemming from its port. Growth continued to move westward, away from its port, developing in generic urban styles that ignored the unique ethnic, clutural, and ecological features of the city. Additionally, infrastructure and poor planning create many divides throughout the city.

Spring 2017 Partner: Lauren Miller


BARRANQUILLA, COLOMBIA

The aim of this project was to return focus of the city back towards its port, establishing a renewed relationship with its historic and cultural port identity. The selected site exists as an island surrounding the port. The proposal includes the establishment of a water taxi system that will create important connections between the historic center, port, and the Puente Pumarejo, a bridge that serves as a primary entrance into the city. This system will aid low income residents in access to jobs as well as cultural hubs and additionally promote tourism.


BARRANQUILLA, COLOMBIA The growth and historical signification of Barranquilla stems from its relationship with the Magdalena River. Reliant upon it for trade as well as tourism, the Magdalena became the core of the city. Initial city development

The Puente Pumarejo bridge serves as an entrance into the city. Our project strove to stitch across the solid industrial corridor, circuitously moving through the various sectors of the city. We chose the site indicated in red to be revitalized and serve as a place of gathering to increase, tourism, commerce, jobs, as well as a cultural hub for this city of great social divide. Our strategy was create a porous site, filled with a mixture of residential, commercial, and recreation that would seep seamlessly into its context. A water taxi moving along the channels supplement and support these connections between entry into the city and tie these districts to its historical center.

City growth after 100 years

Anomalies within pockets of grid-like systems that divide neighbors and social strata.


BARRANQUILLA, COLOMBIA BARRANQUILLA, COLOMBIA

FLOATING MARKETS

MARKETPLACE

WATER TAXI STOP


BARRANQUILLA, COLOMBIA


BARRANQUILLA, COLOMBIA


HELIX STREET

Detroit, MI

Collaborators: Amanda Mauser, Lianyuan Ye, Xuran Yuan

Our site is situated along Baltimore Ave. in between Woodward Ave. and Cass in Detroit, both major roads through the entire city as well as within the neighborhood of New Center. It is also located directly north of the Amtrak lines, with a station on the existing site. We wanted to connect with the adjacent commercial corridor, universities, artistic spaces, as well as the multitude of transportation options such as the train, city bus, Q-line, and Greyhound bus. Our initial design strategy was to take the city street and make it vertical; creating a sense of community amongst the residents, opting for unique communal spaces over isolated individual terraces. This “city street� took the shape of a spiral, ascending from the existing street and carving out the high-rise massing, giving us our form.


HELIX STREET

We placed our communal programs along this climbing spiral that would bring dynamic, rich experiences to the public as well as to the residents with immediacy and density. The existing site is quite bleak, primarily consisting of parking garages and lots, with little green space to be found anywhere in the immediate vicinity. We absorbed both the Greyhound bus station as well as the Amtrak train station, pulling them under our building and allowing for green spaces to surround it to the confines of the block. We wanted to incorporate “green” into our building but in a way that would allow for unique spaces; places with a character of their own that could be enjoyed by all. We began with a list of numerous programs that we felt could both engage the residents and surrounding public, as well as provide jobs and places to gather as a community. One of the programs was an ecological museum that would connect with a nearby farm and farmer’s market on another level. We then expanded the museum to run throughout our public program, creating microclimates unique to the individual spaces that serve to both support and enhance the program.

PUBLIC PROGRAM


HELIX STREET

The spaces were placed in such a way to bleed into another; supporting each other through their adjacency both physically as well as programmatically. For example, our indoor gym has a tropical climate that helps users to sweat as they work out or do hot yoga. Our kid’s play area is on the north facade, unenclosed so it is filled with plants that can survive year round in Michigan, taking on the nature of a forest. An outdoor movie theater gathers the residents together, as well as offering unique views for those with units facing the space. We distributed the programs to constrict the entirely public spaces to the lower 30% of the floors, while the upper 70% are public spaces for the residents only, offering some level of privacy yet maintaining our initial concept of the city street and the accessibility and public nature that that entails. Helix Street aspires to become a new anchor to the neighborhood, solidifying its role as both a destination along the train route, but a dynamic place to live.

PUBLIC PROGRAM


HELIX STREET FISHER

CADILLAC PLACE

up

up

up up

up

COLLEGE FOR CREATIVE STUDIES

PARKING LOT

PARKING GARAGE (REMOVED)

GREYHOUND BUS N

Site Plan Scale:1/8”=1’-0”

LANDSCAPE DIAGRAM+GROUND PLAN QLINE

SITE DIAGRAM SITE

PUBLIC TRANS.

COMMERCIAL

INDUSTRIAL

OFFICE

PARKING

RESIDENTIAL

EDUCATION

GREEN SPACE

N

SCALE:1ʼʻ=64ʼ

GLASS

METAL MESH

DENSE GREEN CABLES OVER EXPOSED RESIDENTIAL

CONCRETE

CORE

UNITS DIAGRAM

STRUCTURAL DIAGRAM

PLAN

LESS DENSE CABLES

FACADE DIAGRAM

STRUCTURAL DIAGRAM


Section A-A Scale 1/8”=1’-0”


HELIX STREET


HELIX STREET


HELIX STREET


THESIS

DISSOLVING PLANES, CONSTRUCTING LIGHT Architecture has typically been limited by physical constraints that determine boundaries and dominate our perception of space, traditionally shaped by material elements. Proliferation of images have defined our reality of the built environment, and furthermore, our understanding of interior and exterior. Architecture has been defined in this manner by its representation and visual characteristics seemingly innate to us. Challenging this, phenomenology began to find its way into art and architecture mid-century, altering the spatial experience. What happens when architecture defies these conditions? How can we play with this rule-set to create an indoor space that makes one feel displaced? Without enclosure? How can the envelope of a building begin to spill out, losing its role as barrier and becoming something in-between? Furthermore, how does illusion facilitate this departure from the norm, disrupting these relationships and finding a place of suspension? Illusion can supersede our understanding of spatial reality, taking on a physical nature. Through this method, light and optics have the ability to define volumetric spaces, moving the ephemeral into the physical realm. My experiments have used optics to stretch these definitions of space, dissolving them and creating architecture from light. Employing apertures, projections, and controlled light, a suspension of our understanding of space and materiality is created as light can become palpable and encompassing. This thesis seeks to break down the visual and physical understanding of space through a dematerialization of architecture, by coordinating optical effects; resulting in new, non-physical materials.


GRAPHIC DESIGN


GRAPHIC DESIGN

936,666 16%

2,919,633 49% 1,850,000 31%

PORTUGAL

206,333 3%

GREECE

AVERAGE TOTALS AND PERCENTAGES BETWEEN 2011-2014

CYPRUS

81,833 1%

Orange PRODUCTION IN EUROPE SPAIN ITALY


INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

PUSHBACK PARTNER: XURAN YUAN MATERIAL: CONCRETE


INDUSTRIAL DESIGN


INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

THE WAVE WALL


INDUSTRIAL DESIGN Folding study

Before folding

30° fold

60° fold

Increasing oblique porosity/transparency

90° fold


INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

Before folding

30째 fold

60째 fold

In

cr

ea

si

ng

90째 fold

ob

li

qu

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po

ro

si

ty

/t

ra

ns

pa

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nc

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135째 fold

Screen folding variation

CONCEPT


INDUSTRIAL DESIGN


PHOTOGRAPHY


PHOTOGRAPHY


PHOTOGRAPHY


Amanda Mauser

630.881.7622

amauser@umich.edu

1400 Packard St. #1 Ann Arbor, MI 48104

EMPLOYMENT +Studio Dwell Intern

February-March 2018

+OX Studio Architects: Intern/Admin

July/Aug. 2017

+VHT, Inc.: Real Estate Photographer +Essence Photo & Video:

March 2015- present April 2013- June 2015

+Freelance Photographer

July 2011- present

_Code review for a residential project in Detroit as well as preparing presentation drawings: rendering plans, sections, and elevations.

_I prepared an RFP for an Ann Arbor Park Department project; prepared, tagged, and cross-linked items within construction documents in Blue Beam for a hospital project, organized the materials library, and helped prepare a specifications document. _Wedding Photographer _Office Administrator and Editor

SKILLS +Adobe Creative Suite: Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, Lightroom +Autocad +Rhinoceros +Vray Rendering +Revit +Microsoft Office Suite +Digital and Analog Photography EDUCATION +University of Michigan M. Arch Candidate +University of Illinois at Chicago _Major: Photography (BFA) Minor: Mathematics _Received Departmental Award for Photography +Illinois Institute of Technology _Major: Architecture EDUCATIONAL TRAVEL +Ukraine/Poland +Bangkok +Colombia REFERENCES Perry Kulper (professor at Michigan) Alexis Guzman (supervisor at VHT) Andrew Moddrell (professor at Michigan)

Graduating April 2018 2008-2012 2007-2008

May 2016 June 2011 March 2017

pkulper@umich.edu 847.299.7150 moddrell@ porturbanism.com 312.519.1103

Amanda Mauser Work Sample  
Amanda Mauser Work Sample  
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