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Free • Take One

The 2011 ECHO SUMMER GUIDE CRYSTAL RIVER VALLEY AND BEYOND e uid G il Tra 20 y alle 11 V l sta ges Cry pa

Home of the Redstone Castle!

Filoha Meadows Nature Preserve In the middle of the Crystal Valley, Filoha Meadows is part of Pitkin County Open Space and Trails, and is open to the public during the summer. See page 3. Photo courtesy of Roaring Fork Conservancy

A publication of

Redstone Colorado


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2011 ECHO SUMMER GUIDE

Welcome to the 2011 Echo Summer Guide!

We have plenty of updated information here for both the firsttime visitor and longtime local, so take a look at what awaits you. We’ve put together this guide – a special publication of our monthly Crystal Valley Echo newspaper – to help you make your time in the Crystal Valley as wonderful as it can be. Inside these pages, you’ll find extensive trail and fishing guides. You can read about what Marble school kids rate as some of their favorite things to do in the valley. Meet a couple locals: artist Connie Hendrix and environmental biologist Ellie Kershow, who will give you their perspective on this special corner of the world. And get the lowdown on the Crystal Valley’s hot springs. While you’re at it, learn about some of this area’s history, from the Ute Indians to the coal miners who used to call the valley home. We invite you to pay special attention to the businesses that advertise in this guide. And remember to say, “I saw it in the Echo!” Alyssa Ohnmacht Publisher

Carrie Click Editor

DISCLAIMER: Some of the activities in The 2011 Echo Summer Guide carry a significant risk of personal injury or death. Do not participate in these activities unless you are an expert, have sought or obtained qualified professional instruction or guidance, are knowledgeable about the risks involved, and are willing to assume personal responsibility for all risks associated with these activities. The 2011 Echo Summer Guide makes no warranties, expressed or implied, of any kind regarding the contents of this publication and expressly disclaims any warranty regarding the accuracy or reliability of information contained herein. The 2011 Echo Summer Guide further disclaims any responsibility for injuries or death incurred by any person engaging in these activities. Use the information contained in this publication at your own risk, and do not depend on the information contained in this guide for personal safety or for determining whether to attempt any activity described herein.

The 2011 ECHO SUMMER GUIDE

The 2011 ECHO SUMMER GUIDE • Table of Contents • ON THE COVER: Filoha Meadows Nature Preserve

3

MAPS: West Elk Loop Crystal River Valley

4 5

RECREATION: Take your pick: Camping, climbing, horseback riding and more

9

CRYSTAL VALLEY TRAIL GUIDE: Take to the trails

11

RECREATION: Fishing the Crystal

21

RECREATION: Hot Springs offer a refreshing break

25

EVENTS: An eventful valley

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HISTORY: Top “don’t miss” spots

29

CRYSTAL VALLEY ARTIST: Connie Hendrix

31

ECHO LOGIC: Crystal Valley plants and animals

35

WHAT’S HAPPENING: Crystal Valley Calendar

39

KID’S TOP 10

42

CRYSTAL VALLEY QUIZ

42

A special publication of

Alyssa Ohnmacht PUBLISHER Carrie Click EDITOR Sue McEvoy WRITER CONTRIBUTORS Chuck Downey, Ernie Bradley, Molly Jacober, Ellie Kershow, Roaring Fork Conservancy, Julie Albrecht, and Dana Cayton For information and display advertising contact 274 REDSTONE BLVD., REDSTONE, COLORADO 81623 970-963-2373 echo@crystalvalleyecho.com crystalvalleyecho.com


2011 ECHO SUMMER GUIDE

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O N

T H E

C O V E R

Filoha Meadows Nature Preserve By Sue McEvoy

sheep, deer, elk, bears, beavers, more than 40 species of birds, and a rare bat. The preserve is located two miles north of Redstone on the east side of the Crystal River, and is open to the public from July 1Sept. 30 from sunrise to sunset along a designated footpath. Access to the preserve is gained from the north end of Redstone Boulevard via a strip of public access along Dorais Way by foot or bicycle. Once at the gate to the preserve, only foot travel is permitted along the designated path. Parking to access Filoha is at Redstone or Elk Park. No dogs, horses or pets are allowed at any time. For more information, contact Pitkin County Open Space at 9205232 or aspenpitkin.com/openspace.

Filoha Meadows, the 191-acre nature preserve featured on the cover, is a unique parcel of Pitkin County Open Space and Trails. The Roaring Fork Conservancy, a local nonprofit, holds a conservation easement on part of Filoha to protect riparian habitat. Together, these organizations partner to provide educational opportunities for the general public throughout the summer. “Filoha” is the Ethiopian word for hot water. With numerous hot springs on the property, a unique ecosystem developed that supports rare species of orchids, birds, amphibians and even fireflies. The preserve also hosts many other animal species including bighorn Filoha Meadows.

Photo courtesy of Roaring Fork Conservancy.

Roaring Fork Conservancy Events In and Near the Crystal Valley Summer 2011 Saturday, June 4 – 8 am – 12:30 pm River Float 2011 Carbondale to Glenwood Springs on the Roaring Fork River Tuesday, July 5 – 7 pm Filoha Meadows Rare Orchid and Firefly Walk Thursday, July 7 – 7 pm Filoha Meadows Rare Orchid and Firefly Walk Wednesday, July 13 – 7 pm Filoha Meadows Rare Orchid and Firefly Walk

Wednesday, July 27 – 5:30 pm Filoha Meadows Naturalist Walk Saturday, August 27 – 9 am Filoha Meadows Naturalist Walk Saturday, September 10 – 9 am Filoha Meadows Naturalist Walk Tuesday, September 20 – 5:30 pm Bicycle Tour of Carbondale Ditch Thursday, September 29 – 6 pm Elk Bugling at Filoha Meadows

You must register in advance for any event at www.roaringfork.org or by calling 970-927-1290.


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2011 ECHO SUMMER GUIDE

The West Elk Loop Of the 25 Scenic and Historic Byways in Colorado, one of them, the West Elk Loop, snakes right through the Crystal Valley. The 205-mile drive takes you up the Crystal Valley on Highway 133, over McClure Pass, and circles through the wine country and orchards of Paonia, Hotchkiss, Crawford, the Black Canyon of the Gunnison and Crested Butte on Highways 92 and 135 before crossing over from pavement to dirt on Kebler Pass. Surrounding the loop, this region is place of superla-

tives. The Maroon Bells, near Aspen, are one of the most photographed mountains in the world. Glenwood Springs is home to the world’s largest hot springs pool and Grand Mesa to the west is the world’s largest flattopped mountain. For more information on Colorado Scenic Byways, go to coloradobyways.org. – Carrie Click I-70 GLENWOOD CANYON

To Grand Junction

HARVEY GAP

Rifle

Silt

I-70

Parachute

To Denver

New Castle

Glenwood Springs

HOT SPRINGS POOL

Battlement Mesa

82

RUEDI RESERVOIR

Carbondale Basalt Snowmass

Meredith

Woody Creek 133 GRAND MESA NATIONAL FOREST

Snowmass Village

82

Aspen

Redstone INDEPENDENCE PASS

MCCLURE PASS

Marble SCHOFIELD PASS

Chair Mountain

PAONIA RESERVOIR

65

Maroon Bells

Somerset Cedaredge

Mt. Crested Butte

Paonia 133

KEBLER PASS

Hotchkiss 92

Crested Butte

To Delta

WEST ELK SCENIC BYWAY

Crawford

135

Olathe 50

BLACK CANYON OF THE GUNNISON NATIONAL PARK

Gunnison

N

Montrose

W

92 Cimmaron

E

50

Maps and drawings by Bob Carr

S


2011 ECHO SUMMER GUIDE

E

od wo en Gl

W

To

N

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gs rin Sp

S

Carbondale To A spen

133 Redstone The Coke Ovens

Redstone Castle

MCCLURE PASS

To Paonia

Marble

Crystal Mill

KEBLER PASS

To C rest ed B utte

**These maps are artistic renderings, not intended for navigation

The Crystal River Valley

It’s about 40 miles long – a valley full of wildlife, waterfalls, trees, waterways, mountains and unsurpassed beauty. Ancient Native Americans first came to the Crystal Valley up to 20,000 years ago. The Ute Indians lived here seasonally for hundreds of years until white settlers displaced them in the 1880s. Historically, it was black and white – coal and marble, not silver and gold – that drew Anglo industrialists, miners and their families to this valley. In the late 19th century, Coalbasin, now long gone, was a bustling coal mining settlement five miles west of Redstone. By 1915, Marble had three newspapers, a grade school, a high school, a few hotels, a bank and a gigantic marble mill, nearly a quarter of a mile long. There’s a reason why the communities of the Crystal River Valley – Redstone and Marble – are named after rocks. The Crystal River’s first name was Rock Creek. Red sandstone cliffs shoot up all around the aptly-named Redstone, pegged the “Ruby of the Rockies” at the turn of the 20th century. And it’s not a stretch to see why Marble is

named Marble. Blocks from the Colorado Yule Marble Quarry and the old Marble Mill Site can still be seen strewn about the valley.

– Carrie Click


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2011 ECHO SUMMER GUIDE

• REDSTONE COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION • redstonecolorado.com CURRENT BUSINESS MEMBERS

ACCOMMODATIONS Amanda’s Hideaway A charming cabin in the heart of the historic village of Redstone. Enjoy the enclosed sun porch, a private outdoor hot tub, beautifully landscaped front and back yards, and a wonderfully decorated interior. Walk to shops and dining. 460 Redstone Blvd. 970-963-1061 • Toll free: 877-963-2701 redstonelodging@gmail.com / alpine-riverlodging.com Avalanche Ranch Cabins, Hot Springs & Antique Shop Thirteen tastefully appointed log cabins with kitchens and threebedroom ranch house on 36 acres with great views! Hot springs, activities, stocked trout pond and private river frontage for fishing. Weddings, retreats and family reunions. Five miles north of Redstone. Pets welcome. No smoking. 12863 Highway 133 970-963-2846 • Toll free: 877-963-9339 avalancheranch.com • info@avalancheranch.com Crystal Dreams Bed & Breakfast and Spa A riverfront bed and breakfast where you receive exceptional service, a sumptuous breakfast and in-house therapeutic facials and massages. Open year round. Call for a spa appointment or room reservation. 475 Redstone Blvd. • Lisa Wagner: 970-963-8240 crystaldreamsgetaway.com • crystaldreams@sopris.net Crystal Valley Manor Located on historic Redstone Boulevard. Relax and enjoy our riverside lodging. Fly fish out the backdoor or sit by the river under our beautiful backyard gazebo and watch the hummingibrds. A completely non-smoking facility, all rooms have kitchenettes, full bath and satellite TV. Open all year and offering reduced winter weekly and monthly rates. We are booking at our 2007 rates; make your reservation today. 215 Redstone Blvd. • 970-963-2365 crystalvalleymonor.com Gamekeeper’s Cottage Originally part of the Redstone Castle estate, this property is on the National Historic Register. Private alpine setting with access to the Crystal River and the village of Redstone. Full kitchen, master suite, wood stove, and an outdoor hot tub with a view of the 18679 Hwy. 133 historic Redstone Castle. Open year round. 970-963-1061 • Toll free: 877-963-2701 redstonelodging@gmail.com / alpine-riverlodging.com Redstone Campground Completely rebuilt in 1995. Thirty-seven units for tents and modern RVs, many with electric and water hookups. Hot showers. Operated by Thousand Trails. 877-444-6777 Redstone Cliffs Lodge On the Crystal River and on Redstone Boulevard in historic downtown Redstone. Rooms with a Western mountain atmosphere. Riverfront hot tub. Cozy studio, one- and two-bedroom rentals, handcrafted furnishings, kitchenettes, cable TV. Catering to outdoor enthusiasts, hunters, fishermen, bicyclists, motorcyclists and, of course, families. 433 Redstone Blvd. 970-963-2691 • Reservations: 888-652-8005 redstonecliffs.com

Redstone Inn, A National Historic Landmark This romantic mountain inn is a renovated four-season resort built in 1902 on 22 acres with dining year round, fitness center, seasonal pool, hot tub, tennis court and trout preserve. Conference room, banquet facilities. 82 Redstone Blvd. • 970-963-2526 • Toll free: 800-748-2524 redstoneinn.com • redinn@rof.net

The River House Located on the banks of the Crystal River in the heart of the village of Redstone, the River House features two suites: the River Suite, which has a large deck overlooking the river; and the Cottonwood Suite, which was originally a 1940’s fishing cabin. Both feature full kitchens, barbecues and riverside amenities. Walk to shops and dining. 385 Redstone Blvd. 970-963-1061 • Toll free: 877-963-2701 redstonelodging@gmail.com / alpine-riverlodging.com

BUSINESSES

Cleveholm Manor / Redstone Castle Visit the Redstone Castle on a guided tour. With an exterior restoration completed in 2010, the Castle is open daily this summer. The Castle is complete with original furnishings,Tiffany light fixtures and gold leaf ceilings. Summer daily tours at 1:30 pm; ask about seasonal fall and winter hours. Tickets are available on the day of the tour at Crystal Club Cafe, Tiffany of Redstone and the Redstone General Store. 58 Redstone Blvd. • 970-963-9656 redstonecastle.us Cross Propane Full service propane company with 37-plus years experience. Above ground or underground tanks, new or rental tanks. Great fuel prices. Ray Cross, owner. 970-384-2222

Crystal River Realty Locally owned and operated in Redstone since 1982. We share a deep personal interest in helping to find that perfect property for you. Specializing in Redstone, Marble and Crystal River Valley property sales, management and vacation rentals. 117-1/2 Redstone Blvd. • 970-963-3408 crystalriverrealty.com

In Touch Healing Center Optimum inner and outer pain relief and healing. Our sessions include any combination of the following services: electric-energy massage and pain relief, transitions life coaching, “she” coaching and intuitive readings. Carolyn Burdick, certified medical masseuse, certified life coach. Corky Beeler, relationship/intimacy coach. By appointment only. 970-963-9064 intouchhealingcenter.biz

Mason & Morse Real Estate Stop in and see Jeff Bier, who has over 40 years of experience with real estate in the Crystal River Valley. Located in the yellow house just past the center of town, Mason & Morse is one of the valley’s oldest and most respected real estate companies, with offices around the valley. Jeff, Sarah and Janette have the resources to handle any and all of your real estate needs. 385 Redstone Blvd. • 970-963-1061 mountainproperties.com

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2011 ECHO SUMMER GUIDE

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• REDSTONE COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION • redstonecolorado.com CURRENT BUSINESS MEMBERS

The Crystal Valley Echo and Marble Times A monthly print newspaper providing a voice for communitybased organizations and individuals that enrich the life of the Crystal Valley. Available throughout the valley, or by annual subscription. 970-963-2373 echo@crystalvalleyecho.com crystalvalleyecho.com

DINING AND RESTAURANTS Crystal Club Café Combines a fun eatery with fine dining plus a full bar. Our menu accommodates everything from a family picnic to a truly romantic dining experience. A good time, every time! Pizzas, burgers, subs, salads, entrees, homemade soups and desserts. Try our riverfront picnic area. Open for lunch and dinner. 467 Redstone Blvd. • 970-963-9515 Hightower Trading Post and Café A great place for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Full café, steakhouse-style dining plus fresh trout. We offer box lunches. Walkin or call ahead. Indoor/outdoor dining. We handle banquets as well as private parties. 363 Redstone Blvd. • 970-963-3520 Redstone General Store Enjoy old fashioned scooped ice cream, hot coffee, lattes, teas, cold drinks, pizza and a wide variety of delicious candy and snacks. We also offer baked goods including cinnamon rolls, fruit pastries, bagels, croissants, muffins, cookies and fudge. Don’t forget to visit the fully stocked liquor store with ice cold beer! Open daily. Across from the park • 963-3126 Redstone Inn Serves food continuously from 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. The Grill and Patio offer breakfast, lunch and dinner in a casual atmosphere overlooking the pool and hot tub. The Dining Room, known for excellence, serves from 5:30 p.m. and hosts a Sunday buffet from 9-11:30 a.m. Reservations suggested. 82 Redstone Blvd. • 970-963-2526

RECREATION

Avalanche Outfitters at Redstone Stables Come join us for your Western adventure of a lifetime. We are the premiere horseback riding, outfitting, fishing, overnight pack trip, carriage, hay and wagon rides in Redstone. You think up the adventure and we will help you make it happen! Run under special use permit from the USFS #2463. 970-963-1144 redstonestables.com

GALLERIES AND SHOPS

Hightower Trading Post and Café Offering vintage and contemporary Native American jewelry, turquoise, sterling silver and coral. A fine selection of antiquities, guns, pottery, artifacts, bottles and art. 363 Redstone Blvd. • 970-963-3520

Redstone Art Center A studio gallery and sculpture garden. Exhibiting sculpture, fine painting, elegant jewelry and handcrafted ceramics. Artist demonstrations and exhibits during summer and fall seasons. Open daily, 10 a.m.-5 p.m 173 Redstone Blvd. • 970-963-3790 redstoneart.com

Redstone Company Store Look no further than the Redstone Company Store for classy mountain home furnishings. Let our experienced staff help you outfit your home or find the perfect gift for any occasion. Please join us for wine tastings at the store and the Farmer’s Market every Friday through the summer from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. 117-1/2 Redstone Blvd. • 970-963-3408 redstonecompanystore.com

Redstone General Store Cookies and candies and snacks galore – you’ll find what you’re craving and then some more. Milk and eggs, butter and bread – they’re here for you if you didn’t think ahead. Lozenges and medicines to help you feel better – we even have stamps to mail your letter. Come see our gifts for your souvenir shopping then check out our liquor to get the party hopping! Open daily. Across from the park • 963-3126

Tiffany of Redstone Spend a harmonious afternoon enjoying our unusual antique furnishings, architectural items, and our backyard wonderland featuring garden accessories and decorative urban artifacts. We are your only source on the Western Slope for charming rustic maple workbenches. Come see how we set the pace in mountain home design and décor. Located in the heart of Redstone at 225 Redstone Blvd. Open all year, daily, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Antiques: Sustainability, Retainability, Sensibility. 970-963-1769

Wild Horse Enterprises Home of Rocky Mountain Teddy Bears and the amazing Rhythm Motion Clocks. We have a large variety of Colorado-style gifts, a wide variety of affordable jewelry, and locally-made fresh chocolates. 306 Redstone Blvd. • Across from park 970-963-8100 • Fax: 970-963-5843

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2011 ECHO SUMMER GUIDE


2011 ECHO SUMMER GUIDE

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R E C R E AT I O N

Take your pick:

Camping, climbing, horse-

back riding and more By Carrie Click Hiking, biking, fishing, four-wheeling, camping, climbing, horseback riding, and river running – the choices in the Crystal Valley for outdoor fun in the summer months are as varied as the people who live and visit here. Here’s a quick cheat sheet about some of the Crystal Valley’s best recreation options: Camping • There are loads of Crystal Valley camping choices in the White River National Forest, managed by the U.S. Forest Service. For car and camper camping, there is Avalanche (about seven miles south of Redstone), Redstone (a mile north of the village of Redstone), and Bogan Flats (five miles east of Marble). Contact the Sopris Ranger District (963-2266, fs.fed.us) about reservations (some campgrounds take reservations, some don’t), fees, etc. The district office can also give you information on backpacking in and around the area. • The Crystal Valley is home to two commercial RV and camping parks. In Marble, try Mari-Daes RV Park (963-2479), and south of Carbondale, try BRB Campground Resort (963-2341).

RENTALS

Play it safe Before you venture outdoors, there are some basics to remember: • The Crystal Valley has no cell phone service, so if you get lost somewhere in the backcountry, you won’t be able to call for help. Keep that in mind as you plan your outdoor adventures here. • Know where you are and know where you’re going. Besides our overall map of the area on pages 3-4, if you’re venturing off the beaten track, get outfitted with Forest Service and topo maps of the area. In Carbondale, try Independence Run & Hike (7040909) near the Highway 133/Highway 82 intersection, and the Redstone General Store (963-3126). • Tell someone – even someone out of town – where you’re going so in the unlikely chance you don’t come back when expected, folks will know where to start looking for you.

Around the river • The Crystal River is beautiful but it’s also deadly. Wear life vests around the water, and insist on life jackets for your children if they are playing near or especially in the river. • With rapids with names like Meat Grinder, the Crystal River is nothing to mess with. If you’re interested in a whitewater excursion, go with a licensed, professional guide service. Up tha Creek (947-0030) rafting company runs trips on the Crystal. Other companies run trips on the Roaring Fork and Colorado rivers nearby. Try Whitewater Rafting (945-8477, coloradowhitewaterrafting.com) for a safe, fun experience.

Climbing • The Crystal Valley is full of enticing technical climbing and bouldering. Again, if you’re a novice and interested in climbing, visit a local mountaineering store – in Glenwood, try Summit Canyon Mountaineering (9456994) – for advice and instruction recommendations.

Horseback riding The Crystal River Valley is a great place to discover by horseback. Avalanche Outfitters (963-1144, redstonestables.com) in Redstone can take you on day rides, pack trips and fly-fishing. They’re also fully outfitted for hunting trips come fall. Outwest Guides in Marble (963-5525, outwestguides.com) can also accommodate horseback adventures and guided fly-fishing and hunting trips.

ATV RENTALS IN MARBLE! Please contact us for reservations Email: RentFromRPS@aol.com

Website: www.RPSrentals.net 970-963-3747

Four-wheeling • If you want to get into the backcountry by motorized vehicle, it’s a good idea to save the wear and tear on your own wheels (even if you own an SUV) and leave the driving to the folks at Crystal River Jeep Tours in Marble (9631991, crystalriverjeeptour.smithfamilycolorado.com).

For hiking and mountain biking, check out our detailed Crystal Valley Trail Guide on pg. 11; for choice fishing spots, see pg. 21. Enjoy the Crystal Valley!


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2011 ECHO SUMMER GUIDE


2011 ECHO SUMMER GUIDE

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C RY S TA L This trail guide is sponsored by:

VA L L E Y

T R A I L

G U I D E

"The Crystal Valley's #1 Hiking, Running & Outdoor Store" See ad on page 29

Take to the trails

Whether walking, hiking, horseback riding, mountain biking or four-wheeling, plenty of Crystal Valley routes await adventurers By Chuck Downey

Fun and exhilarating trails can be found throughout the Crystal Valley. They range from short and easy walks to allday adventures into the Maroon Bells Snowmass Wilderness. From left, Frodo, Becky Trembley and Janice Ingram at the top of Silver Creek Pass in Lead King Basin. Photo by Sue McEvoy

If you are a visitor, the two best maps for the Redstone/Marble area are the U.S. Forest Service map of the White River National Forest and the Trails Illustrated topo map of Maroon Bells, Redstone and Marble. Maps and guidebooks are available at the Redstone General Store, Independence Run & Hike in Carbondale, and at other sporting good stores. If you are a local, you likely have a good map, and the listings below will remind you of the many opportunities right here in our backyard. This guide covers three geographic areas of the upper Crystal Valley: • Redstone area • Marble area • Lead King Basin

REDSTONE AREA • Redstone Boulevard: A walk down the Boulevard through Redstone to the Forest Service campground entrance is a fun, one-hour excursion. This is an opportunity to see the village and sample the 7,200-foot altitude.

Continued on page 13


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C RY S TA L

VA L L E Y

T R A I L

G U I D E

continued from page 13 Starting at the Redstone Inn, it’s a safe walk, run, or bicycle ride with little traffic to with which to compete. If you’d like to do a loop, a hiking path lies parallel to the east of Redstone Boulevard. An idyllic single-track trail runs behind Redstone’s commercial and residential district all the way to the Redstone campground. Be sure to pay attention to private property signs and stay on the path. • Filoha Meadows Nature Preserve (featured on our cover): This remarkable meadow is on the east side of the Crystal River and is open to the public during the months of July, August and September. To get there, park in Redstone and hike north on the Boulevard and then onto Dorais Way, a total distance of a couple miles. The preserve is marked with a number of information signs. • East Creek Trails: East Creek is the gateway to several trails that go to a range of destinations in the Maroon Bells Snowmass Wilderness. Lower East Creek Trailhead: The lower trailhead for East Creek is on the Boulevard about a half mile north of the Redstone Inn, on the right, past the house with Mona Lisa painted on the front. The first 0.8 mile can either be hiked or negotiat-

ed with an SUV to a turn-around and a small parking area at the high trailhead at 7,800 feet. High East Creek Trailhead: Starting at this trailhead, the trail becomes a formal Forest Service trail, which goes about one and a half miles and then splits. The left-hand fork climbs about 3,000 feet over three steep miles into the upper East Creek basin, Gift Creek and beyond. Route finding gets challenging high in the East Creek meadow above timberline. The right-hand fork at the split is another Forest Service trail which takes you over three passes and three tributary creek crossings to the junction of the Placita Trail, or beyond to Lily Lake. Both of these are hard, one-day hikes and route finding can be challenging. Consult a topo map for excursions beyond the split at mile one, and be sure to have a pick-up vehicle for point-to-point hikes. • Coal Basin Trails: There are many running, hiking and mountain biking trails in Coal Basin. The Coal Creek Road is immediately west of the main entrance to Redstone on Highway 133. The paved 4.4-mile road from Highway 133 to the vehicle closure gate at the end of the road offers wonderful walking, running and biking opportunities for all. The

CRYSTAL FLY SHOP & OUTDOORS

Beaver Lake near Marble.

Echo file photo

Continued on page 15

GUIDED FLY FISHING WADE & FLOAT TRIPS ON THE ROARING FORK, FRYING PAN, COLORADO & CRYSTAL RIVERS Friendly, experienced staff

Bigger, better location in City Market Plaza Fishing, camping, outdoor gear & clothing. EVEN MORE HIGH-QUALITY, AFFORDABLE GEAR FROM: WINSTON • REDINGTON • PATAGONIA GALVAN • ST. CROIX • FISHPOND • PETZL WILLIAM JOSEPH • HARDY • AND MORE

ALWAYS GREAT DEALS ONLINE WWW.CRYSTALFLYSHOP.COM

970-963-5741 1087 Highway 133 • Carbondale City Market Plaza next to Domino’s


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Redstone Rally Event Schedule Friday 24 Vending 1:00 P.M. – 8:00 P.M. At The Crystal Club, Hightower Café, Off Season Grill & The Redstone Inn Info Booths & Poker Run Registration 3:00 P.M. – 9:00 P.M. at The Hightower Café Live Music 6:30 P.M. – 9:30 P.M. at the Redstone Inn Silent Auction begins 6:00 P.M. – 9:00 P.M. at the Redstone Inn

Saturday 25 Info Booths & Poker Run Registration – 10:00 A.M. – 5:00 P.M. Vending 10:00 A.M. – 8:00 P.M. at The Crystal Club, Hightower Café, & The Redstone Inn Tribute to our Fallen Soldiers - 10:00 A.M. through the town of Redstone Poker Run with Cash Prize ending at the Crystal Club with Live music & more 10:30 A.M. – 3:00 P.M. – Last hand in by 3:00 P.M Silent Auction begins 2:00 P.M. concluding at 8:00 P.M. at the Redstone Inn Ride in Bike and Classic Cars Show 2:30 P.M. – 5:00 P.M. (see www.redstonerally.com for details) at The Redstone Cliffs Lodge & Hightower Cafe A benefit for:

Slow Race 4:00 P.M. at The Redstone Cliffs Lodge Music all evening at the Redstone Inn & Crystal Club

Special thanks to: The Redstone Community. Holy Cross Energy, Alpine Bank, Mountain Roll-off, Marble Custom Cycles, Getsurfed.net, Tiger Law, Sun Harley Davidson, Clearview Windshields, Slow Groovin BBQ, Aspen Valley Harley Davidson, HenryHam Insurance Agency, ThunderBird Motorcycles, Bitchin Stitchn, The Crystal Valley Echo, Thunder Roads Magazine, Scooter News Magazine, Berthod Motors, NAPA Autoparts, The Valley Cruisers, Rise Above Consulting, Aspen Skiing Company, Lafore's Custom Motorcycles, Biker Garage101, Avalanche Outfitters, Crystal Dreams B&B and my Mother!


2011 ECHO SUMMER GUIDE

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VA L L E Y

T R A I L

G U I D E

continued from page 13 road carries little vehicle traffic and has a fairly constant grade with a vertical rise of 800 feet. Lower Coal Basin: The closest Coal Basin trail to Redstone is the Braderich Trail, which starts at a formal Forest Service trailhead about two miles up Coal Basin Road from Redstone, just past the second cattle guard. Starting from the Braderich trailhead, the initial rise is steep, but it levels off to a gradual grade to an unnamed pass at 9,100 feet for a total vertical rise of 1,600 feet. This formal Forest Service trail rises to the pass, and then descends into south Thompson Creek where it eventually joins the unpaved south Thompson Creek Road and leads to Carbondale. If going all the way, this is a hard, oneday hike and is popular with strong mountain bikers. Be sure to have a pick-up vehicle in Carbondale or on the south Thompson Creek Road. Middle Coal Basin: About four miles above Redstone, at the third cattle guard, a well-tracked trail takes off to the south. This is not a Forest Service trail, but is generally easy to follow. The trail crosses Coal Creek on a log bridge and initially rises steeply, but Anthracite to Kebler Pass.

Photo by Sue McEvoy

settles down and goes in a generally eastern direction for about 2.5 miles to a fork at the top of a broad pass at 9,400 feet. The left-hand fork goes another quarter mile to an overlook that provides commanding views of the valley below and wilderness area to the east. It is of moderate difficulty and is popular with locals. The righthand fork initially wanders through tall grasses and down timber, crosses Hays Creek, and descends back into the Crystal Valley and Highway 133 about 2.5 miles south of Redstone. Route finding is challenging from the pass to the Hays Creek crossing. Total distance from the cattle guard to Highway 133 is about five miles. Upper Coal Basin: There is a vehicle closure gate on the Coal Basin Road about 4.5 miles above Redstone. This is the starting point for two old mine roads that wander for miles at a fairly constant grade into upper Coal Basin and several old mine portals. These are exceptional mountain bike routes and easy but long hikes into the White River National Forest. Prior to the closure gate, the right-hand fork (unpaved road) goes about 2.5 miles to a private prop-

Continued on page 16


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T R A I L G U I D E continued from page 15 erty barrier and numerous threatening signs. If you want to continue to the upper basin, hike right (north) at the private property signs and follow the barbed wire fence around the private property and eventually you will return back to the mine road on Forest Service land and continue on the road to upper Coal Basin and the old mining town site at 9,500 feet. From the vehicle closure gate at the Coal Basin trailhead/parking lot, the unpaved road ascends gradually to the old lamp house at 8,600 feet, and then splits into two mine roads, each going to old mine portals that have been long closed and blasted shut. Both mine roads have gradual grades and are excellent for hiking and mountain biking. • Avalanche Creek: Avalanche Creek joins the Crystal River about 4.5 miles north of Redstone. Turn east from Highway 133 on the unpaved Avalanche Creek Road and go about three miles to the Avalanche Creek campground and trailhead. The Avalanche Creek Trail is a formal Forest Service trail that ascends gradually into the Maroon Bells Snowmass Wilderness. Several trail options exist from the Avalanche Trail, including routes to Avalanche and Capitol lakes as well as to Lead King Basin. These are serious, multi-day trips and one should refer to a topo map before undertaking a trip to them. However, the main Avalanche Creek Trail is a delightful and gradual

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Continued on page 17

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continued from page 13 hike that is a rewarding out-and-back trip into the Maroon Bells Snowmass Wilderness. • Huntsman Ridge Trail: This trail is really a very rough four-wheel drive road and is only passable by ATVs in summer and snow machines in winter. However, it is a popular hike and provides great views of the valley below and wilderness areas to the east. The Huntsman Ridge trailhead is about 7.5 miles south of Redstone on Highway 133, about a quarter mile short of the McClure Pass summit. Park at the large pullout on the right, about 200 yards below the summit. The trailhead is about 100 yards below the pullout. For the first two miles, the trail rises 1,600 feet to a rounded summit. This is a good stopping spot, but for the energetic, the trail (road) continues west over several more small summits and eventually connects to an old mine road that leaves Huntsman Ridge and descends north into Coal Basin. The road goes by an old mine portal and then joins one Above Lead King Basin.

Photo by Sue McEvoy

of the closed mining roads that returns to the vehicle closure gate on the paved Coal Basin Road. Be sure to have a pickup vehicle waiting in Coal Basin if you choose this option. • Old McClure Pass Trail: The Old McClure Pass trailhead is about three miles south of Redstone on the west side of Highway 133, across the highway from the old Placita town site. The trailhead is small and unmarked, but is the only pullout on the west side of Highway 133 in the vicinity. The trail is a delightful two-mile route on the original roadbed up McClure Pass that was used before the current Highway 133 was improved to the summit. It has a gradual grade and rises 900 feet to where it rejoins Highway 133 about half mile from the McClure Pass summit. This trail is popular with locals, both winter and summer, and affords an excellent hiking, running or mountain biking excursion. • Ragged Mountain Road and Trail: The Ragged Mountain Road is accessed from the top of McClure Pass at the large pullout on the left. A lowgrade gravel road, it’s an easy walk or bike ride. At mile

Continued on page 18


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continued from page 17 two, a gate prohibits vehicles but is open to hikers and bikers for two more miles to a private gate. Mile two is also the beginning of the Ragged Mountain Trail that winds all the way to Erickson Springs on the Kebler Pass Road. • Perham Creek Trail: This trail starts on Highway 133, goes over a broad 7,900-foot pass and descends into south Thompson Creek, eventually going on to Carbondale. The Perham Creek trailhead is about six miles north of Redstone on the west side of Highway 133. The trail starts in a dry vegetation zone but quickly rises into a beautiful aspen forest. Directly across the valley, the trail affords unique and spectacular views of Mount Sopris.

MARBLE AREA • Carbonate Creek Trail: The Carbonate Creek trailhead is located on the main road through Marble, behind the Beaver Lake Lodge. The trail follows Carbonate Creek, rising 3,800 feet over five miles to the top of Avalanche Pass, which can be looped with Lost Trail Creek and a car shuttle. • Raspberry Loop/Anthracite Pass trails: The trailhead for these trails is on the road to the Colorado Yule Marble Quarry, but parking is best at the Mill Site Park. The two trails start out on the same track and split after a mile. The Raspberry Creek Trail falls into the Raspberry drainage and follows it to a pass at 11,300 feet, then descends into the

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continued from page 13 Anthracite drainage. The Anthracite Pass Trail follows Raspberry Ridge to Anthracite Pass at 10,200 feet, where you can descend on the five-mile loop, back to Yule Creek. Be sure to arrange for a pick-up vehicle for this option. A map for this hike is highly advisable. LEAD KING BASIN AREA • Lead King Basin Road: This is a four-wheel-drive loop that starts and finishes in Marble, skirting the edge of the Maroon Bells Snowmass and Raggeds wilderness. Starting just east of Marble at Beaver Lake, the entire loop is about 14 miles long. This is a tough four-wheel experience, but strong SUVs with competent drivers can handle the loop. It is a spectacular four-wheel experience as the road rises to 10,800 feet and affords access to numerous hiking trails that extend deep into the Maroon Bells Snowmass Wilderness. Alternatively, this loop is a very physical and rewarding mountain biking experience for the hardy. The loop goes through the historic Crystal town site and passes by the famous, much-photographed, historic Crystal Mill, Lead King Basin wildflowers.

Photo by Sue McEvoy

located about five miles up the Lead King Loop Road from Marble. Hike, bike or four-wheel to this destination. The first mile and a half mile to the top of Daniels Hill is a steep, four-wheel undertaking. At the top of Daniels Hill, take the right hand fork and go another 3.5 miles over an easier road to Crystal. The loop also provides access to the infamous Schofield Pass Road to Crested Butte. Standard-track vehicles are strongly advised against trying this route, but hikers and strong mountain bikers will be challenged by the slog. • Lost Trail Creek: Taking the Lead King Loop in the clockwise direction, the Lost Trail Creek trailhead is located just before the road crosses North Lost Creek, about two miles from Beaver Lake. The Forest Service trail goes three miles and up 2,700 vertical feet on a scenic rise to the top of Avalanche Pass. A long loop trail back to Marble via Carbonate Creek is possible from here, as well as a loop to the Silver Creek trailhead described below. Consult a topo or Forest Service map before trying these loops. • Silver Creek Pass Trail: Taking the Lead King Loop in the clockwise direction, the Silver Creek Pass trailhead is

Continued on page 20

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continued from page 19 about 4.5 miles from Beaver Lake. From the trailhead, a Forest Service trail goes 2.5 miles and up 1,700 feet to the top of Silver Creek Pass. Along the way is one of the most spectacular alpine flower shows in Colorado, generally peaking between early July and mid-August. • Geneva Lake: Continuing the Lead King Loop in the clockwise direction, the Geneva Lake trailhead is about seven miles from Beaver Lake. This 1.5-mile hike is a particularly rewarding backcountry experience into the Maroon Bells Snowmass Wilderness. From the Lead King Road to Geneva Lake is a two-hour hike on a Forest Service trail with a vertical rise of 1,200 feet. The lake, at an elevation of 10,900 feet, is nestled at the base of 14,092-foot Snowmass Peak and 13,900-foot Hagerman Peak. This trail also provides access to Trail Rider and Frigid Air passes. Consult a topo or Forest Service map for details.

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2011 ECHO SUMMER GUIDE

Fishing the Crystal:

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Many options, scenic views

By Ernie Bradley

The Crystal River provides excellent fishing opportunities not only for fly fishermen, but also for artificial lure and bait fishermen, too. The fishing regulations, managed by the Colorado Division of Wildlife, vary on the Crystal River, depending on the area to be fished. Some spots are private, which requires landowner approval prior to fishing. The penalties for trespassing on private lands without permission can be quite steep. Thus, one of the first things a fisherman new to the area should do is to stop at one of the local fishing shops that handle fishing supplies to obtain a valid fishing license, a current edition of Colorado’s fishing regulations, and maps of the fishing area desired to determine which lands are private and which ones allow public fishing. In Carbondale, try Crystal Fly Shop (1087 Highway 133, 963-5741, crystalflyshop.com) in the City Market Plaza for full expert advice, information and service. In Redstone, try the Redstone General Store (Redstone Boulevard, 963-3126) for supplies. The Crystal River is designated as a “put and take” stream. This means that its waters are supplemented with fish that have been raised in a hatchery, and then transplanted (“put”) into the stream. Fish in the Crystal River do not naturally reproduce sufficiently to provide a large, self-

As you fish in the Crystal River Valley, keep these suggestions in mind: • Respect private lands and other wildlife that you encounter • Become familiar with the fishing regulations before you begin fishing • If fish are not to be kept for eating, use barbless hooks or pinch down the hook barbs to allow fish to be released in a healthy condition • Take a youngster fishing!

sustaining population in much of the river. The “take” portion of the designation refers to this stream being managed for fishermen to be able to keep a limit of fish for their use if desired. Although the Crystal does not carry the special Gold Medal designation provided to the nearby Roaring Fork and Fryingpan rivers, parts of it are considered to be very good fishing waters. The Crystal varies significantly from slow to fast, and shallow to deep, affording great opportunities for bait, artificial lure and fly fishermen to catch fish up to around 20 inches in length, with the norm being around 12 to 14 inches. The Crystal is also a great stream for those new to the sport, both young and old, to hone their skills before tack-

Continued on page 23

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Fishing the Crystal ling larger, more difficult fishing waters. In addition to the Crystal River, there are many streams as well as numerous high altitude lakes in and near the Crystal Valley that provide great fishing opportunities. The White River Forest map is an excellent resource for locating these waters. In the Crystal Valley, there are great fishing opportunities at Avalanche Creek, a tributary to the Crystal River, which can be accessed via a Forest Service road between Carbondale and Redstone. This stream offers more than 10 miles of great fishing where the angler could get lucky and catch all four species of trout – the rainbow, brown, cutthroat and brook. At the head of Avalanche Creek, accessible only by backpack or horseback trip, lies the picturesque Avalanche Lake at the base of 14,130-foot Capitol Peak. The lake is home to armlong cutthroat trout that can be a bit difficult to catch at times but you won’t care as your breath is taken away with the scenic views in this area. Beaver Lake, just east of the town of Marble, is a very Fly fishing in the valley.

Photo courtesy of Ernie Bradley

continued from page 23

popular fishing destination for all ages. The fishing here can be very successful for artificial lure, bait and fly fishermen alike. This lake is generously stocked several times each summer, with some large trout getting hooked periodically, although the norm is about 12 to 14 inches. Motorless watercrafts are permitted. This is a lake that can be driven to easily and affords a good opportunity for everyone to help catch that mess of fresh trout for dinner. Further down the Crystal Valley, Thompson Creek flows into the Crystal River several miles south of Carbondale. Its tributaries higher in the mountains to the west can provide good small stream angling for rainbow, cutthroat and brook trout. These waters can be accessed from the road going west at the City Market traffic light in Carbondale. Again, a White River Forest map is a good source for finding the roads and trails to these small streams. Many who fish here may soon forget all the details of the fish they caught and the ones that got away, but they will long remember the wildflowers, the wildlife, the scenic views, and the fresh air that they experienced while fishing.

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PREVENT WILDFIRE • Be careful with campfires. Fully extinguish your fire when leaving your campsite.

• Use of fireworks is strictly prohibited on ALL Federal and State lands.

• Remember sparks from chainsaws, welding torches, and other equipment can cause wildfires.

• Do not throw cigarettes from a vehicle. Do not leave a burning cigarette on the ground.

• Information on protecting your home is available at the FireWise website: www.firewise.org

• Call Carbondale Fire District when you plan to burn brush. (970) 963-2491

HAVE A SAFE SUMMER!


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Hot springs offer a refreshing break By Carrie Click and Sue McEvoy Thank Mother Nature, because the Crystal Valley is right in the middle of hot springs country. The Rockies are well known for these hot water wonders, and lucky for us, this region contains quite a few. The Ute Indians discovered these naturally hot pots, and later Doc Holliday convalesced in Glenwood’s hot springs. The Crystal River Valley, too, has its own hot springs, so if you need to relax and rejuvenate, you’ve come to the right place.

In the Crystal Valley • Avalanche Ranch Hot Springs – The hottest new springs in the area belong to Avalanche Ranch Cabins and Antiques. Just completed in May of 2011, these hot springs consist of three outdoor pools fed by a 200-foot well of natural hot springs on the property. Temperatures range from 93 to 105 degrees in the soaking pools, so there is certainly one just right for you. With stupendous views of Mount Sopris and Avalanche Creek Avalanche Ranch hot springs.

Photo by Molly Jacober

Valley, a quieter and more serene getaway is unimaginable. The pools are reserved for resort guests during the busy season but available for public day use on a limited basis. Avalanche Ranch is at 12863 Highway 133, just north of Redstone; 963-2846, avalancheranch.com.

• Penny Hot Springs – Between Avalanche Ranch and the Redstone campground turnoff, be on the lookout for a big unpaved turnout off the east side of Highway 133. The springs were originally named Granite Hot Springs, for the big granite cliffs called Hell’s Gate that shoot up on both sides of the valley here. Later, these springs were named after Dan Penny, becoming Penny Hot Springs. Dan set up a little commercial operation here, complete with men’s and women’s bathhouses. Today, the bathhouses are all gone, and you’re roughing it. There are no fees, no maintenance, no restroom facilities and occasionally, no clothes. Bathers create pools by positioning river rocks for sitting and to regulate the springs’ temperature. Watch out; the springs are hot! BYOT (bring your own towel) and leave the place like you found it – or better.

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Hot springs

from page 25

Nearby in Glenwood Springs • Glenwood Hot Springs Pool – If you’re a hot springs aficionado, you must make a visit to the Glenwood Hot Springs Pool located down the road at the junction of I-70 and Highway 82 (Grand Avenue) in Glenwood Springs. Glenwood’s hot springs pool is the world’s largest (really!). Contact 947-2955, hotspringspool.com. • Yampah Vapor Caves: While you’re at Glenwood’s hot springs, a trip next door to the Yampah Vapor Caves will be just what you need to make it virtually impossible to drive home (because, of course, you’ll be so thoroughly relaxed). Discovered and named by the Ute Indians (yampah means “ big medicine”), these hot mineral steam baths reach up to 112 degrees. It’s hot and sweaty going, and yes, rejuvenating. Contact 945-667, yampahspa.com.

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E V E N T S

An eventful valley Festivals, special events fill the summer In the Crystal River Valley

Redstone Rally: The second annual Redstone Rally promises to be as much fun as the first. Headquartered in Redstone June 24-26, the rally’s focus is on motorcycles, and on raising funds for Project Sanctuary, a Colorado nonprofit that organizes getaway vacations for military families. Expect: motorcycles everywhere, bike show, poker run, muscle cars, live music, vendor booths, and a military tribute. Info: redstonerally.com MARBLE/marble XXIII: Now in its 23rd year, this symposium brings marble sculptors to Marble to carve in an open, non-competitive atmosphere. This year’s sessions are July 2-9, July 15-22, and July 29-Aug. 5. The marble sculpting site is open to the public, so stop by behind the Marble Gallery when you’re in town. Expect: sculptors, from novice to experienced, carving shapes out of stone, a lot of white dust, and the sound of power tools. Info: marbleinst.org Redstone’s July 4th parade.

Photo by Dana Cayton

OldFashioned Fourth of July in Redstone: We might be a little biased, but Redstone’s Fourth has got to be one of the best times around. And others agree. People, dogs and kids show up in droves in Redstone for this patriotic day. Expect: the parade to go down and back up Redstone Boulevard, ice cream, games in Redstone Park, fire hose water fights for the kids, good food and fun, but not fireworks. Info: redstonecolorado.com

Marble Fest: Marble holds its own arts and music festival at Mill Site Park. This year, the festival runs Aug. 5-7. Organizers Meagan Goodwin and Shanti Gruber say it’s the “best hidden secret in the summer music festival circuit.” Expect: to see practically everyone who lives in Marble and the Crystal Valley, talented bands and music from near and far, and good eats. Info: marblefest.org

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An eventful valley

Redstone Art Foundation Labor Day Weekend Art Show: Sept. 2-5, the front lawns at the Redstone Inn transform into a showcase for local and regional artists. This juried show, now in its 16th year, is the Redstone Art Foundation’s annual fundraising event and brings art lovers to Redstone every year. Expect: sculpture, photography, jewelry, woodturnings, paintings, pastels, glasswork, and mixed media. Info: redstoneartfoundation.org For overall info on these and other Crystal Valley activities, go to redstonecolorado.com and mcrchamber.org.

And in Carbondale

Right down the road, Carbondale hosts an array of summer festivals and events. Here are a choice few:

Wild West Rodeo: Every Thursday evening from June 2-Aug. 18, a party comes to the Gus Darien Riding Arena just outside Carbondale. In its ninth season, the Wild West Rodeo is produced by a community-based, nonprofit volunteer group, and is “the place to be Thursday night,” says rodeo association president, Dave Weimer. Expect: mutton busting, barrel racing, team roping, bull riding, cow hide races, food and fun. Info: carbondalerodeo.com

from page 27

Mountain Fair: Now celebrating its 40th year, 2011 is going to be extra special, according to Carbondale Council on Arts and Humanities, the group that organizes the yearly event. Held during the last weekend in July each year, this year it’s July 29-31, and the whole town transforms into fair mode, though the main action is at Sopris Park. Expect: lots of people (this is a popular shindig), young women dancing in circles, high quality arts and crafts booths, drum circles, live music all day/night, contests from log splitting to pie-baking, and world cuisine. Info: carbondalearts.com

National Sheep Dog Finals: These dogs really are smarter than your honor student. Close out summer by watching these amazing canines at this week-long event, Sept. 13-18, at the Strang Ranch just north of Carbondale. Expect: to appreciate chess-game maneuvers, instinct, and athleticism these top dogs display during competition, a hoedown downtown, a food and craft fair, and dog handling demonstrations. Info: sheepdogfinals.com

For overall info on these and other Carbondale activities, go to carbondale.com.

– Carrie Click

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2011 ECHO SUMMER GUIDE

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Crystal Valley history: top “don’t miss” spots

Everywhere you look in the Crystal Valley, historical relics remind us what came before our time. The Ute Indians treaded so lightly they left little evidence of their long existence here, but it’s different for the Anglos who first came to the valley in the mid-1800s. Reminders of their lives here are plentiful. Here are a few “don’t miss” landmarks you’ll want to see while in the Crystal Valley: • Redstone Coke Ovens: This summer marks the beginning of an extensive restoration project to stabilize the beehive-shaped ovens that line Highway 133 at the entrance to Redstone. In the early 1900s, the ovens were used to turn coal from the mines around Redstone into coke, or pure carbon. Pull off the highway and check out the information signs and the ongoing work that Pitkin County, the Redstone Historical Society and others are doing to preserve these landmarks. • Village of Redstone: The Redstone Inn, and portions of the village, have National Historic designation. At the turn of the last century, industrialist John Cleveland Osgood of Colorado Fuel & Iron built the inn, cottages, civic buildings and businesses for his coal workers and their families here. Be sure to stop by the Redstone Museum – it’s the tiny log structure in the middle of Redstone Park – to learn more. • Redstone Castle: Originally named Cleveholm Manor, the castle was Osgood’s personal 42-room estate that once welcomed Teddy Roosevelt and John D. Rockefeller as guests. Today, tours run every day during the summer. Stop by Tiffany of Redstone, Redstone General Store, or the Crystal Club Café for tickets and info. • Mill Site Park: Marble is aptly named for the stone that comes out of the Colorado Yule Marble Quarry above town. The mill site, located to the right past the Marble Fire Station, once housed an enormous industrial mill that processed the marble before it was transported downvalley. Marble from Marble was used to construct the Lincoln Memorial and the Tomb of the Unknowns. Today, marble blocks of all sizes are scattered throughout the park, which now contains recreation areas and a sculpture garden. • Marble City State Bank Building: The Marble Historical Society worked with the Town of Marble to preserve this structure on West Main Street. It’s now on the National Register of Historic Places, and is home to The Marble Hub (704-9482), a community and visitor cooperative. While on West Main, stop by the Marble Museum (963-9815), located adjacent to the Marble Charter School. • Crystal Mill: Quite possibly one of the most photographed places in Colorado – except maybe the Maroon Bells near Aspen – the Crystal Mill is also on the historic register. Built in 1893, this antiquated mill is perched above the Crystal River, about four and a half miles above Marble. Walk, bike, ride, or drive (with someone you trust; this road is hairy) and see one of the most photogenic scenes around.

– Carrie Click


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Connie Hendrix By Sue McEvoy Growing up between Colorado and Iowa, Connie Hendrix thought she had seen everything there was to see in Colorado while traveling the state with her mother. But In 1990, Connie arrived in Marble for the second MARBLE/marble stone-sculpting symposium (see page 27). Smitten with the beauty of the area, she phoned her husband, Charlie Manus, to tell him they had just bought property in Marble. Since then, the couple has built a home and the two have become an integral part of life year-round in the small mountain town.

A lifetime artist Connie says she knew from the first grade she wanted to be an artist, and she continually broke ground as she pursued her career. She was the first woman to be hired as an artist in the advertising department of Look magazine. Following that, Connie became the first female creative director at a top advertising agency in Memphis, Tenn. And after 10 years in Memphis, she opened her own ad agency, Connie Connie Hendrix.

Photo by Sue McEvoy

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A R T I S T

Hendrix and Associates. All the while, she was painting, teaching watercolor, attending classes and workshops, and working in different mediums of sculpture.

A true pro While some artists are happy to paint a picture to hang on the wall or sell in a show, Connie enjoys being part of artist associations. She is a signature member of the Tennessee Watercolor Society and the Southern Watercolor Society, and has aspirations of becoming a signature member of the Colorado Watercolor Society and the American Watercolor Society. To do this, she explains, you have to qualify several times. “The paintings have to be recent in the past three years and there are great rules that keep you on your toes,” she says. “Watercolor styles change because of new mediums, new papers and new kinds of brushes.” Teaching watercolor is a highlight in Connie’s life – and

Continued on page 33


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2011 ECHO SUMMER GUIDE

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A R T I S T

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• Over 2100 square feet • 3 Bedrooms/2 Baths • .4 acres tucked in the aspens • Awesome large deck • Open feel, charming loft space • Recycled antique beams • Solid oak flooring/pine ceilings • Landscaping & irrigation system • 2 car garage conversion would make great shop or easily reconvert to garage • Private well, brand new septic

BARGAIN PRICED AT $339,900 970-963-9620

This home is located in beautiful Redstone Ranch Acres. Walk to the historic town of Redstone and access endless fishing and hiking. This property is a great starter home, vacation home, or real estate investment. The home is well constructed with recycled timbers spanning the open living area. Solid oak floors and pine cathedral ceilings in the living area add warmth, and a large wraparound deck provides ample room for entertaining, grilling, and plenty of outdoor furnishings. The house is fed by a private productive deep mountain well and has a brand new septic system. Along with seclusion and privacy this property is surrounded by flower gardens, trees, and lawn areas and everything is kept lush by an irrigation system.

Serving authentic North Indian Cuisine at Carbondale Mountain Fair & Jazz Aspen Snowmass since 1995!

Art for all Not only is Connie a professional artist and teacher, but she promotes incorporating art into her surroundings. She serves on the board of the Redstone Art Foundation, and heads up the subcommittee of the Marble Mill Site Park’s Sculpture Garden. “It’s supposed to be a long term project,” she says, “which is perfect as some sculptor might not even be born yet.” More recently, Connie named The Marble Hub, a newly opened community and visitors center, and became its marketing director. Connie says being the Grand Marshall in Redstone’s Fourth of July parade in 2010 was a highlight for her. Connie's sculptures are on display at the Redstone Art Center on Redstone Boulevard, and some of her paintings are at Hightower Trading Post, on the Boulevard past Redstone Park. Connie will also have some pieces in the Redstone Art Foundation Labor Day Weekend Art Show (see page 28).

Open Tuesday – Sunday Lunch: 12 - 3 Dinner: 5 - 10 CLOSED MONDAYS

1054 Highway 133 • Carbondale 970-963-0515

www.gandhicarbondale.com


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2011 ECHO SUMMER GUIDE

ars ! e Y sic 0 1 Mu of

Redstone Community Association and

BIGHORN TOYOTA present

Magical Moments Summer Concert Series 2011 A fusion of Music and Nature

Sat. June 11 HOWARD BERKMAN Kickin’ Chicago Blues, Jazz and Rock Internationally known composer/songwriter 6 – 8pm • Redstone Park Sat. July 2 HONEY DON’T Traditional Folk, Bluegrass & Original Songs, Beautiful Harmonies with Bill Powers & Shelley Gray 6 – 8pm • Redstone Park Sat. July 16 KRAIG KENNING Slide key Guitarist 20 years of writing songs and performing music; sharing a mix of folk, country and rock 6 – 8pm • Redstone Park

Sat. Aug. 6 STROLLING SCONES Rick & Helen Stockton & Friends Dance to 60’s music 6 – 9pm • Redstone Park Sat. Aug. 20 PETER KARP & SUE FOLEY Sue Foley critically acclaimed U.S. Singer/songwriter and Blind Pig artist Peter Karp show encompasses folk, jazz and blues… moving, rocking and exciting. ••Please do not bring any alcohol or food to this concert.••

FREE • Starts at 6:30 • Crystal Club Cafe Sun. Sept. 4 LABOR DAY WEEKEND ART SHOW THE DEFIANCE STRINGBAND Acoustic eclectic Americana April & Don Paine • Robert Rosenberg Don Kaufman • John Sommers 5:30 – 7:30pm • Redstone Park SPONSORED BY:

FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT LISA WAGNER 970-963-8240

Crystal Club Cafe • Alpine Bank • Redstone Inn Crystal Dreams Bed & Breakfast & Spa • Crystal Valley Echo & Marble Times KMTS • Avalanche Ranch Cabins, Hot Springs and Antique Shop Redstone Art Foundation • Mason Morse Real Estate


2011 ECHO SUMMER GUIDE

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E C H O

L O G I C

Crystal Valley plants and animals By Ellie Kershow Ellie Kershow lives in the Crystal Valley and has a master’s degree in environmental and science policy. She writes a monthly column, Echo Logic, for The Crystal Valley Echo newspaper. Summer is a really great time to get to know the nooks and crannies of the Crystal River Valley by hiking, biking, fishing, horseback riding, and much more. So while you’re in the Crystal Valley, look for:

FLORA Common chokecherry (Prunus virginiana) are native to the area and its leaves are green (paler underneath) and alternate on the branches. Chokecherries get a large white conical flower head and berries in the fall. Also native, quaking aspen trees (Populus tremuloides) and narrowleaf cottonwoods (Populus angustifolia) are some of the most common deciduous trees in the Fox in Redstone.

valley. Aspens usually grow on mountain hillsides mixed with conifers, and cottonwoods line the riverbanks. The crisp verdant green of leaves from the poplar family is welcoming through the summer. Dandelions are non-native weeds found throughout the Crystal and Roaring Fork valleys. Fields of them can be seen outstretched for miles. A green rosette appears first with long soft serrated leaves followed by bright yellow aster flowers. After flowering, dandelions produce white fluffy seeds that are mesmerizing as they fly effortlessly through the air. If you aren’t positive it’s a dandelion you are seeing, cut the stem and white milky sap will ooze out, confirming what you’ve already suspected.

FAUNA One of the most intriguing things about the mountains are the wild animals that live here. Residents and visitors often can’t help but be fascinated by a deer feeding in the forest or a squirrel nibbling on something. There is something that compels us to want to feed a begging squirrel or fox that looks so hungry. It may seem like we are helping these wild creatures out, when really

Photo by Sue McEvoy

Continued on page 37

HIGHTOWER TRADING POST & CAFÉ OUR CAFÉ FEATURES QUALITY HOMEMADE FOOD FOR EVERYONE TO ENJOY.

A JEWELRY EMPORIUM Featuring an exquisite collection of Vintage and contemporary Native American pieces. Specializing in Turquoise and Red Coral designs. Showing numerous artists of the Southwest. Also a fine selection of Sterling Silver and semi-precious stones, antique bottles and a variety of items from around the world.

FULL COOK TO ORDER BREAKFAST 7am - 11 am daily • 7 am - noon Sunday Steak & Eggs • Pancakes • Fresh Shredded Hashbrowns LUNCH & DINNER 11 am - 9 pm Daily • Noon - 9 pm Sunday FRESH SEAFOOD SPECIALS Sandwiches • Salads • Steaks Local Favorites: Pan Fried Trout / Pan Fried Walleye & Mushroom Cheese Bubbly Homemade Strudel

Ice Cream

363 REDSTONE BLVD., • REDSTONE, COLORADO •

Fresh-Baked Pies

970-963-3520


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2011 ECHO SUMMER GUIDE


2011 ECHO SUMMER GUIDE

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E C H O

Pilates

in

Redstone

Peak Pilates Certified Instructor SUE MCEVOY

MAT CLASSES AT THE HISTORIC REDSTONE INN Mondays & Thursdays 8:00 a.m. - Advanced 9:30 a.m. - Beginner Also Offering Private Universal Reformer Sessions by Appointment.

704-1843

L O G I C

continued from page 35

we may be causing them harm. The Humane Society of the United States spells out the specific reasons why it is not a good idea to feed wild animals: 1. People food isn’t good for animals – They aren’t designed to digest food made for humans and getting continual handouts may discourage them from finding their own food. 2. Animals can learn negative behaviors – When animals figure out humans are an easy food source, they begin to associate humans with food and lose their fear of people. This lack of fear can lead to increased confrontations with sometimes negative results for humans and animals. 3. Feeding animals can cause crowding – Animals can be drawn to certain areas where there is available food, which sometimes creates unnatural population levels that are unsustainable and could spread disease. It’s important to simply be prepared for the consequences of our actions when it comes to feeding wildlife because it may result in undesirable encounters or longterm cycles that are hard to break once established.

No matter what you do in the Crystal Valley, remember that life moves at a slower pace up here. People often slow down to look at the view of the mountains and sometimes stop on the sides of the roads to take it all in. So leave your cell phone at home, come on up to the Crystal Valley, and enjoy one of the most beautiful places on earth.

NOW OPEN AT THE REDSTONE INN!

In Marble… A salon experience in a natural setting. In Redstone… a convenient location for all your beauty needs.

THE HEART OF REDSTONE OFFERING A UNIQUE SELECTION OF CENTERPIECES FOR YOUR HOME! REDSTONE CASTLE TOUR TICKETS AVAILABLE HERE! OPEN YEAR ROUND • DAILY 10 am - 5 pm Bob and Pat Stifter

Lower Level of the Redstone Inn • 970-963-2526 170 Crystalline Drive • Marble CO 81623

970-963-0998 • 970-319-5716

970-963-1769 225 Redstone Blvd. • Redstone, Colorado


PAGE 38

2011 ECHO SUMMER GUIDE All courses may be competitively run or hiked (with an earlier start time). LEAD KING LOOP - 25K The 25K dirt road course starts in the quaint and historic town of Marble. Rounding Beaver Lake, the course then climbs 2900 vertical feet in about 4 miles into Lead King Basin, a beautiful backcountry area. The course then switchbacks down past waterfalls, rolls through the old mining town of Crystal, passes the famous 110-year-old Crystal Mill, climbs out of the river valley then has a fast downhill finish to the lodge on one of the peak color weekends of the fall! QUARRY CLIMB - 12.5K The 12.5K quarry climb winds through the historic town of marble before passing through huge blocks of marble near the Crystal River. The 2 mile climb out of the valley floor begins through aspen groves and pines to reveal majestic views of the valley. Run to the base of the marble quarry then scream downhill back to the finish. LAKE KIDS LOOP - 2.5K Starting at the lodge kids run a gentle loop around scenic Beaver lake. Have fun on the dirt trail and a short jaunt through the woods before returning back to town. This casually timed race is great fun and you may run with your little ones if you wish.

Marble - Colorado September 18, 2011

www.leadkingloop25k.com


2011 ECHO SUMMER GUIDE

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W H AT ’ S

Crystal Valley Calendar Summer 2011

H A P P E N I N G

July 7: Filoha Meadows Rare Orchid and Firefly Walk is at 7 p.m. near Redstone. Pre-registration required; 927-1290, roaringfork.org for details

July 12: James McMurtry at Performing Arts Center at Third Street Center (PAC3) in Carbondale; for tickets and time: pac3carbondale.com, 925-1663

June 3-5: Eighth annual Roaring Fork Valley Studio Tour. 963-1680, roaringforkstudiotour.org.

July 13: Filoha Meadows Rare Orchid and Firefly Walk is at 7 p.m. near Redstone. Pre-registration required; 927-1290, roaringfork.org for details.

June 5: Visit the late illustrator’s Jack Roberts Studio in Redstone’s Ranch Acres. Betty Daniel at 963-7461, redstoneartfoundation.org.

July 15-16: Viva La Woman at Performing Arts Center at Third Street Center (PAC3) in Carbondale; for tickets and time: pac3carbondale.com, 925-1663.

June 11: Howard Berkman and Big Bottom, kicking Chicago blues, live at Magical Moments summer concert series, Redstone Park, from 6-8 p.m. 963-8240.

July 16: GrassGames Festival at Sopris Park, Carbondale features fun yard games, live music, barbecue and beverages; fundraiser for GrassRoots Community TV. 925-8000, grassrootstv.org

June 16: Summer Community Potluck Picnic at Redstone Park at 6 p.m. 963-0326, redstonecolorado.com.

June 17-19: The second annual Rocky Mountain Ominium Bike Race in Carbondale; carbondale.com.

June 23: Hayes Carll at Performing Arts Center at Third Street Center (PAC3) in Carbondale; for tickets and time: pac3carbondale.com, 925-1663

June 24-25: Tenth annual Sopris Music Fest hosted by Steve’s Guitars features local bands, food, and more. 9633304, stevesguitars.net

June 24-June 26: The second annual Redstone Rally: motorcycles, food, special events; 963-2691, redstonerally.com.

June 25: GreenLeaf Run – 5K and 10K – begins and ends at the Carbondale Recreation Center; carbondale.com June 25: A Tribute to the Fallen honors military veterans and is part of Redstone Rally at 10:30 a.m. in Redstone; redstonerally.com

July 16: Kraig Kenning, slide key guitarist, live at Magical Moments summer concert series, Redstone Park, from 6-8 p.m. 963-8240.

July 22: Dave Alvin and the Guilty Ones at Performing Arts Center at Third Street Center (PAC3) in Carbondale; for tickets and time: pac3carbondale.com, 925-1663.

July 27: Filoha Meadows Naturalist Walk is at 5:30 p.m. near Redstone. Pre-registration required; 927-1290, roaringfork.org for details

July 29-31: The 40th annual Carbondale Mountain Fair at Sopris Park. Carbondale Council for Arts and Humanities, 963-1680, carbondalearts.com.

Aug. 5-7: Marble Fest arts and music festival at Mill Site Park; marblefest.org.

Aug. 6: Strolling Scones, 60’s dancing music, live at Magical Moments summer concert series, Redstone Park, from 6-9 p.m. 963-8240.

June 25: Valley Cruisers Car Club display their classic cars and motorcycles at the Redstone Rally in Redstone; valleycruisers.org.

Aug. 20: Peter Karp and Sue Foley, folk, jazz and blues, live at Magical Moments summer concert series, Crystal Club Cafe, Redstone Boulevard, starting at 6:30 p.m. No brought-in alcohol or food. 963-8240

July 2-9: MARBLE/marble Symposium XXIII attracts sculptors of all levels of experience to carve marble in Marble, Also held July 15-22, July 29-Aug. 5; marbleinst.org, 303-297-1429.

Aug. 16: Robert Earl Keen at Performing Arts Center at Third Street Center (PAC3) in Carbondale; for tickets and time: pac3carbondale.com, 925-1663.

July 2: Honey Don’t, folk, bluegrass and original songs, live at Magical Moments summer concert series, Redstone Park, from 6-8 p.m. 963-8240.

July 3: Steve Earle and the Dukes (and Duchesses) at Performing Arts Center at Third Street Center (PAC3) in Carbondale; for tickets and time: pac3carbondale.com, 925-1663.

July 4: Fourth of July in Redstone includes a village parade and old fashioned, small-town family activities all day; redstonecolorado.com July 5: Filoha Meadows Rare Orchid and Firefly Walk is at 7 p.m. near Redstone. Pre-registration required; 927-1290, roaringfork.org for details

Aug. 17: Leon Russell at Performing Arts Center at Third Street Center (PAC3) in Carbondale; for tickets and time: pac3carbondale.com, 925-1663

Aug. 20: Blues & BBQ at the Fourth Street Plaza in downtown Carbondale. Contact KDNK, 963-0810, kdnk.org.

Aug. 27: Filoha Meadows Naturalist Walk is at 9 a.m. near Redstone. Pre-registration required; 927-1290, roaringfork.org

Aug. 28: Festival Las Americas is a day of cultural, artistic and recreational activities at Sopris Park, Carbondale; festivallasamericas.net.

Continued on page 41


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2011 ECHO SUMMER GUIDE


2011 ECHO SUMMER GUIDE

PAGE 41

W H AT ’ S

H A P P E N I N G

continued from page 39

Sept. 2-5: Redstone Art Foundation Labor Day Art Show is at the Redstone Inn and features a juried selection of local and regional artists in a range of mediums; redstoneartfoundation.org

Sept. 4: Defiance String Band, acoustic eclectic Americana, live at Magical Moments summer concert series, Redstone Park, from 5:30-7:30 p.m. 963-8240.

Sept. 10: Filoha Meadows Naturalist Walk is at 9 a.m. near Redstone. Pre-registration required; 927-1290, roaringfork.org.

Sept. 13-20: National Sheepdog Finals at the Strang Ranch above Carbondale, sheepdogfinals.com.

Sept. 18: Lead King Loop races in Marble. leadkingloop25k.com.

Sept. 20: Bicycle Tour of Carbondale Ditch at 5:30 p.m. Pre-registration required; 927-1290, roaringfork.org.

Sept. 29: Elk bugling excursion is at 6 p.m. at Filoha Meadows near Redstone. Pre-registration required; 9271290, roaringfork.org.

ONGOING THROUGH THE SUMMER

Most every day, horse-drawn carriage rides around Redstone. 963-2526, redstoneinn.com.

Every day at 1:30 p.m., tours of the historic Redstone Castle. Tickets available at Tiffany of Redstone, Redstone General Store, and the Crystal Club Café all on Redstone Boulevard

Every Tuesday, Independence Run & Hike hosts a trail run at 5:45 p.m. Rain, cold or sun. 995 Cowen Dr., Carbondale, 704-0909.

Every Wednesday from June 15-Oct. 5, the Carbondale Farmers’ Market from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. at Fourth and Main; 704-4190, carbondalefarmersmarket.com.

Every Thursday from June 2-Aug. 18, the Wild West Rodeo at the Gus Darien Riding Arena on Catherine Store Road (County Road 100), Carbondale. Gates open at 5:30 p.m., slack at 6:30 p.m., grand entry at 7:30 p.m. carbondalerodeo.com. Every Friday during the summer, the Redstone Company Store hosts Fresh Fridays for organically grown produce, meats, poultry, jams, cut flowers and more; from 3-7 p.m. on the Boulevard on the lawn outside the store. 963-3408.

Every Saturday at 7:30 a.m., Independence Run & Hike hosts a group run. Rain, cold or sun. 995 Cowen Dr., Carbondale, 704-0909.

Every week from June 17-July 23, Carbondale Summer of Music presents free evening concerts in Sopris Park. Check the schedule at carbondalearts.com under “Events.”

Throughout the summer, Carbondale Recreation offers classes and programs for a range of activities for kids and adults. 704-4190, carbondalerec.com.


PAGE 42

K I D ’ S

2011 ECHO SUMMER GUIDE

T O P

1 0

We asked the students (kindergarten-eighth grade) at Marble Charter School to tell us about their favorite things to do in the Crystal Valley during summer. Here are their top 10: 1. Walking down Redstone Boulevard during the Fourth of July Parade. 2. Going fishing in the Crystal River. 3. Eating black cherry ice cream from the Redstone General Store. 4. Going to The Marble Hub. 5. Horseback riding in the forest. 6. Listening to the birds.

PROVIDING A VOICE FOR COMMUNITY-BASED ORGANIZATIONS AND INDIVIDUALS THAT ENRICH THE LIFE OF THE CRYSTAL VALLEY

If you have enjoyed reading the 2011 Echo Summer Guide - why not subscribe to The Crystal Valley Echo? You will receive monthly issues of good news from the Crystal Valley, and a winter and summer guide for only $35! Name: __________________________________ Address: ________________________________ City: ___________________________________ State: ______________ Zip: ________________

7. Going to Crystal City and the Crystal Mill. 8. Hiking, running and jumping.

Please complete this form

9. Catching crawdads at Beaver Lake and McKee Pond.

& submit $35 per year to:

10. Climbing on rocks near the Redstone campground.

THE CRYSTAL VALLEY ECHO 274 Redstone Blvd., Redstone, CO 81623 We appreciate your support!

Your very own Crystal Valley multiple choice quiz

2. Penny Hot Springs are named after: A) A man named Dan Penny B) Duh…a copper-colored coin C) A turn of the 20th century lady named Penny 3. What part of the State Capitol in Denver is made of marble from Marble? A) The columns B) The dome C) The floors 4. How many stoplights are in the upper Crystal Valley? A) 17 B) 2 C) 0

5. Marble from Marble was used in the construction of: A) The U.S. Capitol B) The Lincoln Memorial C) The Acropolis 6. A portion of the Crystal Valley was featured in a movie called “Tall Tale” starring what actors? A) John Belushi and Dan Aykroyd B) Patrick Swayze and Scott Glenn C) Laurel and Hardy 7. John Cleveland Osgood built the village of Redstone, the Redstone Castle and the Redstone Inn. At one time he was rated as one of the wealthiest men in America. How rich was he? A) He was the wealthiest man in the U.S. B) He was the 100th wealthiest man. C) He was the sixth wealthiest man. 8. What was the original name of the Crystal River? A) Rock Creek B) Boulder Creek C) Marble Creek Answers: 1. B 2. A 3. C 4. C 5. B 6. B 7. C 8. A

1. Which of the following movies was filmed in part at the Redstone Castle? A) “The Sound of Music” starring Julie Andrews and Christopher Plummer B) “The Prestige” starring Michael Caine and Scarlett Johansson C) “The Shining” starring Jack Nicholson and Shelley Duvall


CRYSTAL VALLEY ECHO • 2008 SUMMER GUIDE

PAGE #

i|á|à exwáàÉÇxVtáàÄx‹ REDSTONE CASTLE TOUR SCHEDULE Now seven days a week • 1:30 p.m. Tickets: $15 adults, $10 seniors, $10 children 5-18, Children under 5: FREE (FOR GROUP TOURS CALL 970-963-9656) Tickets available at: Tiffany of Redstone, the Redstone General Store and Crystal Club Cafe. n

Listed #11 o ver Metromix Den ry 101 Things Eve uld Coloradan sho try in 2011.

CASH OR CHECK ONLY

www.redstonecastle.us


50 B WEANT BLVD., CARBONDALE, CO 81623 970-963-1401 • RAVENHEARTGALLERY.COM FORMERLY PARKSIDE GALLERY

274 Redstone Blvd. Redstone, CO 81623

Thank you to the many people who have made this 2011 Echo Summer Guide possible. Special thanks to the many contributors and advertisers - your support is invaluable.

ENJOY THIS BEAUTIFUL SUMMER!

2011-Summer-Guide  

-20 alVa railG lleyT Home of the Redstone Castle! uide Cryst Redstone Colorado Filoha Meadows Nature Preserve Apublication of In the middle...

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