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TABLE OF CONTENTS ITEM

FOCUS AREA

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1. Cover Page

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2. Nomination

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Section 3

Letters of Recommendation

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Section 4

Commitment to Service

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Section 5

Commitment to Core Values

9

Section 6

Proof of Attendance

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Section 7

Active Membership

Section 8

Kiwanis Family – Fellowship & Unity

Section 9

Personal Contributions

Section 10

Inspirational Qualities

CERTIFICATION: Vicki Thomson Rancho High School Advisor/Math Teacher vlthomson@interact.ccsd.net (208) 317-1066

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CNH | K E Y C L U B D28N | Statement of Nomination I’ve never believed in fate. I’ve always thought fate was just a comfort mechanism to use as a scapegoat. I’ve lived my whole life believing that we live in a series of coincidental events, as opposed to the idea everything happening for a reason. We are the only species that is aware of our mortality, and because of it, we crave the presence of a mysterious, omniscient power and rely on it to save ourselves. Humans need purpose; we need that impetus of morality and desire to survive our inevitable death in order to evolve. As an incoming freshman in high school, I found adjusting to the new environment increasingly difficult, and the obstacles I faced seemed sky high. I struggled socially, and found it wearisome to make friends. Family problems were immense. On top of everything, school assignments and grades were like shackles around my ankles that became increasingly burdensome the longer they were neglected. Needless to say, I found myself in a free fall spiraling downwards; I often reached out to dark colored liquor for comfort, quick puffs of smoke for stress relief and vomiting after meals as a pick me up. I cried more than I needed, burned several bridges, and grew to hate myself. My pain inevitably reached the point of habitual suicidal ideation and planning. In the midst of all this, however, I was lucky enough to be introduced to “It”, the organization that which saved my life. In a bout of misery, I was persuaded to go to Fall Rally. My division won that year at the spirit competition. However, it wasn’t my personal reaction to winning the spirit stick that changed me. Rather, it was the parade of orange pompoms thrown into the air and the mass of tight hugs and slowly falling tears of those around me. It was the screaming of victory and there, witnessing it as a whole, consumed in every single part - the members, the service events, and the goodness - made me realize I had a purpose, and I could make a difference. I could save someone else’s life, like it did for me. It was when I realized how powerful an organization could be. With a new found perspective and a pursuit to serve, I spent the rest of my four years engulfed in its culture. My freshman year, I educated myself on various trivia, familiarized myself with basic regulations and cheers, and participated in serving my school – helping out at Rancho’s Multicultural Fest, setting up at assemblies, and working concessions at home sports games. The year following, I was forced into two new schools – Mojave and Spring Valley, switching at semester and obtaining membership, and discovered other club’s way of life. I still stayed loyal to my home club, observing other schools’ “ohana” and how to work together to make both my home club and theirs’ better. At RTC that year, as I assisted in designing our shirts and cheers, we went from the club that never made it to the second round in spirit to the winning the divisional spirit stick. Motivated and excited, I vowed to dedicate my senior year to service and inspiring others. I gave countless hours to aiding teachers, volunteering at walks and clinics, and fundraising to bring members to RTC, Fall Rally, DCON and ICON. Not only was I awarded with a “member of the month” certificate, but I was blessed with a divisional spirit stick as well – the true, most nostalgic closure and most satisfying full circle accolade from the orange Region 5 stick we won my first year that changed my life. Now a senior in high school with ten dull razors buried deep in the ground, a cigarette habit long extinguished, and a drinking addiction that ran its course, I look at its members before me, knowing that it’s given them the ability to experience extraction from pain into cheers, friends that will surely become family, and an opportunity to turn community service into fun, inspirational experiences like it did for me – and now it’s time to give back. Wanting to be a part of that legacy – I want Member of the Year recognition not just for me and proof of my dedication and service, but as an impetus to motivate others. As I get ready to say goodbye to it, my dear Key Club, I can definitely say that meeting it, participating in it, and giving back as a part of it, was absolutely fate.

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CNH | K E Y C L U B D28N | Letter of Recommendation Dear Lieutenant Governor Bui / Whomever It May Concern, It is with great pleasure that I would like to recommend Alyssa Sicat for Division 28 North – Member of the Year recognition. In the past 4 years, I have been able to watch her serve and grow as a Key Clubber within our home club. I feel that she has the passion, drive, and overall Key Club attitude that will prove as a top role model for Key Clubbers internationally, as well as a candidate for recognition. Alyssa has served Key Club for her past 4 years in high school and I have had the good fortune to both work and cheer closely with her. She may not have held official officer positions in her time, but she has been a vital part to the success of our home club, especially so in the 2013-2014 year. I truly cannot thank her enough for her striving effort as a servant leader that has motivated others. It is apparent that she would like to give back to the Key Club organization with which she had been able to learn and grow so much through and has been active in growing our home Key Club. She has completed and worked on several projects including completing forms to fundraise for our home group. These are the very forms that allow our club to sell hot chocolate in the morning, sell food at lunch, as well as fundraise via other means. Her original idea of creating a Rancho Key Club yearbook for the 2013-2014 term is also coming to life, with her as the main producer. Alyssa has also worked as a club liaison with our current club president to create joint-school socials between Rancho and other Key Clubs. +Be on the lookout for additional, upcoming project she completes by the end of this Key Club year. It goes without saying that she serves through other means, of which, are intangible or may pass by without notice. Alyssa has personally motivated several people to join, remain active in Key Club, and even run for officer positions. I know for a fact that much of the current Rancho officer board was motivated by Alyssa herself. In addition, she will be the sole Rancho High School member attending DCON 2014. While this may have shied away others, she is enthralled as a representative to vote for the upcoming Cali-Nev-Ha District Board, bring back fresh, innovative ideas from the workshops, as well as telling her story and motivating others to attend DCON next year for themselves. I give Alyssa Sicat my full support to receive this year's Member of the Year recognition. From one person who has received 28N Member of the Year Recognition to the next, I truly believe Alyssa Sicat is the ideal servant leader for this title and recognition, going beyond anything people expect out of a single member. If there is one thing I can assure, by the end of her final year as a Key Clubber, her impact was huge. Yours in service, Marco Cater Past Recipient of 28N Member of the Year Recognition (2011-2012) Past Rancho High School Sergeant at Arms (2011-2012) Immediate Past Rancho High School Member Relations Officer (2012-2013) -If you have any questions, comments, or concerns regarding my recommendation for Alyssa, feel free to contact me at marcocater@gmail.com or at (702)750-4068.

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CNH | K E Y C L U B D28N | Letter of Recommendation To Whom It May Concern, It is my great pleasure to recommend Alyssa Sicat as a very likely candidate for Member of the Year. I have had the opportune pleasure of being Alyssa’s Key Club president during the 2011-2012 school year and have seen her develop into a sophisticated young lady who is motivated academically and dedicated to serving her community. Alyssa is a hard working student who finds time to contribute to the community, especially through Key Club. Even after all these years, I have not seen her love for this club and desire to serve diminish. She is a driving and spirited member of the Rancho High School Key Club and I have never seen anyone as dedicated as she. I see so much potential in Alyssa and she puts so much effort into making a change. She is, truly, the living, breathing example of working to create a difference in the world. She has put so much of who she is into the Rancho High School’s Key Club and I believe that it would not be the organization it is today without her. She has given so much of her time and efforts into to this club and has inspired many others to do the same. She understands that a little person can make a big difference and I believe that she has found herself by losing herself in the service of others. Alyssa Sicat is an extraordinary young lady who exemplifies the definition of being a well rounded, determined, and motivated individual, and I recommend her without reservation for Division 28 North’s Member of the Year. Sincerely,

Juanne Deguzman University of California, Irvine B.S. Pharmaceutical Sciences MSII Cadet, US Army ROTC Circle K Member Center Attendant, Mesa Court Housing Past Rancho High School Key Club President (2011-2012) Past Division 28 North Technical Editor (2010-2011) Past Rancho High School Treasurer (2009-2010)

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CNH | K E Y C L U B D28N | Letter of Recommendation My name is Laurel De Leon, a physics teacher at Rancho High School in Las Vegas Nevada. Alyssa Sicat is a member of Rancho High School’s Key Club and has been nominated as Key Club International’s Member of the Year for Division 28 North. I first met Alyssa sometime in October, and while I have only known her for this short period of time, I have a hard time imagining another member more worthy of this distinction. If you are wondering why I only met one of my students in October when school started in August the answer is simple. Alyssa Sicat isn’t one of my physics students. Unable to find her actual physics honors teacher after school to help her understand “projectile motion”, she went to another physics teacher that was available. Her initiative to ask a teacher for extra help, let alone a teacher she didn’t know impressed me from the very start. With an open 1st, she doesn’t stay at home and come in later like most of her peers. Instead, she often shows up whenever she has to work on homework or prepare for a test. If I have too many students coming in for extra help, she likes to help out and answer whatever questions she can, run errands, and organize papers while I’m busy. Alyssa is not only willing to do what is necessary for her own personal success, but what will also help others succeed. That’s just Alyssa’s regular school life. Her love and commitment for Key Club is on another level altogether. To be honest, I didn’t really understand how much she loved Key club at first. Around the time RTC and Fall Rally were coming up, she would worry about not having enough money to buy all the Key Club “merch.” Once she showed me a picture of all her club shirts and I wondered how someone could collect that many in only a 3 year high school career. Then she started to talk more and more about Key Club; who they are, what they do, and what the club did for her and her life. Eventually, I grew to understand it wasn’t just “somewhere to kill time with friends” to her. She believes their message of helping and changing the lives of others for the better. A perfect example of this was when she asked me to be a chaperone at the RTC held in 2013. A-Tech Academy needed more chaperones in order to meet the chaperone to student ratio. I don’t know how she learned of it or if they asked her, but the day before RTC Alyssa was walking around Rancho looking for volunteers to help A-Tech. She wasn’t going to get any kind of credit, her school was ready, and helping out another school would just mean more competition. Still, she walked around asking all her teachers if they would give up a Saturday to help out another Key Club. Alyssa is a caring individual who truly appreciates and loves Key Club more than I thought was possible. She shows great initiative and leadership by seeking help and taking charge to provide or find help for those who need it. If Key Club is a place for enthusiastic students who earnestly want to change the lives of people for the better, then Alyssa Sicat would definitely be one of the best examples. Sincerely, Laurel Deleon ldeleon@interact.ccsd.net

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CNH | K E Y C L U B D28N | Commitment to Service Every Wednesday for four years, I would wake up, shower, and pull my black, Rancho High School Key Club shirt, a pair of khaki jeans, and Converse sneakers on. Then, I would go to school, and eagerly run to the lecture hall once my last period ended to attend our weekly Key Club meetings. I would sit in the front row, excited to learn more about the organization and service events that I could go to so I could be more involved. This year, being my last term as a key club member, I’ve experienced all the major events: Alzheimer's Walk, Santa Run, Opportunity Village, Magical Forest, Aki Matsuri, homeless shelters - you name it, I’ve served. I can say with confidence that I’ve specifically saved time and have gone out of my way to go to these events; going as far as to rushing out of SATs to serve at this year’s Santa Run, running around with the hot sun beating on my face to set up chairs for festivals, throwing “color bombs” and handing out water to those at the Color Run, directing lost children to their respective parents at Opportunity Village, and even helping my own club by taking pictures for our historian at events like RTC, Fall Rally, and DCMs. I’ve sacrificed social events in exchange for something even more rewarding: helping others. The events prior to the Alzheimer’s Walk led me to a friend’s house 10 miles away from the venue, two hours of sleep, and five dollars on hand. With drowsy eyes and a strong will, I forced myself awake at five in the morning, walked two miles to the nearest bus stop, purchased an all day bus pass with the last of my money, and spent the next two hours on my way to Fashion Show Mall. Once there, our club discovered our shirts were taken by other volunteers, our signs were gone, and the only things that were truly reserved for us were flowers and small encouraging posters. Regardless, we strove to make the best of the event for those walking; we spent all morning yelling words of support, handing out high fives, helping walkers in the right direction, and displaying our sense of awareness and care. This was not only an act of service, but a display of commitment to helping my community. At a divisional level, as someone who has personally contributed to the design and merchandising aspect to raise funds and awareness of not just my home club, but Key Club as an entity, I find particular value in Key Club goods. Experiencing long, grueling hours and countless effort and patience in pixeling programs to produce these goods, sacrificing time and energy to contact and distribute during events to effectively sell to others, and carefully calculating profits that can benefit Key Club has grown special to me. Due to this bond with club merchandise, I think an important part of my dedication is purchasing other clubs’, divisions’, and districts’ designs - lanyards, buttons, apparel, key chains - not just as a collection of memories and as artifacts for reminiscing, but as a statement of service. I can rest assured the donations asked for in exchange of these items will be used to benefit fellow members. However, despite social satisfaction and the inevitable larger impact due to a considerably higher amount of attendees, I’ve realized service does not just exist at widespread events, but also finds habitat at home. I’ve put a specific emphasis on helping at Rancho itself this year, in addition to just the large events. I’ve committed myself to helping Student Council set up for dances, teachers grade papers, and tutoring non proficient seniors.

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CNH | K E Y C L U B D28N | Commitment to Service At the beginning of this term, I spent the last few months of my junior year cleaning out an Algebra II/Trigonometry classroom for a departing teacher. On his last day, he wrote me a card, telling me the impact that I’ve made on him, from showing him students really do care to the small things I would do to make his job less stressful. When my senior year began, I spent my morning open period and an extra two hours after school preparing daily to serve any teachers that need help; running errands and work order forms, reviewing pages and pages of rhetoric, Newton’s laws, osmosis labs, mathematical worksheets, and preSAT essays, organizing lesson plans, and providing encouragement. Every Wednesday for four years, I would wake up, shower, and pull my black, Rancho High School Key Club shirt, a pair of khaki jeans, and Converse sneakers on. Then, I would go to school, and eagerly run to the lecture hall once my last period ended to attend our weekly Key Club meetings. This Wednesday, however, I will wake up, button a crisp, white oxford shirt, slip on black slacks, and walk out of my house with shiny, formal shoes. Then, I’ll go to school, and prepare to speak at inductions to our new hopefuls smiling, fresh faces with their official membership card in hand - and emphasize the change a commitment of service can do.

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CNH | K E Y C L U B D28N | Commitment to Core Values LEADERSHIP Rancho High School Key Club has always been a home, a strong foundation - a spirited board of experienced upperclassmen to train the incomers, a protective roof and secure doors - a pair of wildly dedicated and refreshing advisors to help lead the way and establish rules and ensure safety, and furnishings and small, but largely impactful details that make the place unique - a body of inspired, service hungry members. This year, however, feels as though our functioning house has been replaced with a set of cards; carefully chosen elitists that have been cautiously positioned to form a display, with the ever growing concern that it will inevitably fall apart. First, one by one, then, all together, crashing down, just to start over again. Our elected president had resigned at the beginning of the new school year, scaring away loads of potential members and suddenly shoving another unprepared officer in place to take on the hefty workload. Our club numbers dropped drastically and rapidly, shifting from a solid one hundred and eight member count to a shocking sixty eight. The newly installed board frantically stepped up to the plate, taking on roles far beyond what their job entitled. I couldn’t let one of the most important things in my life crash and burn. I couldn’t watch my board - my Key Club family - squander and struggle to keep things together, so along with my officers, I took on an overwhelming amount of responsibilities as a dedicated member. It began with dropping notes in our suggestion box every week, hoping to help with fresh ideas to help organize events and clubs. Then, RTC season approached us and hit our club. With my bulletin board filled with post it notes of snippets of new cheers, prop ideas and tips, my bulletin editor, Ia, and I spent three weeks writing four original cheers, utilizing rhythms, streamers, bubbles, and crowns. Over a course of four RTC preps, I worked as an alternate sergeant at arms, quieting our club so they could effectively learn them with my loud voice and expressive body motions. The day before RTC, a desperate tweet appeared from a friend from Advanced Technologies Academy, explained the danger their club may be in of not going to RTC at all, due to a lack of chaperones. Taking initiative, I begged twelve teachers to give their time to A-tech, although they were competition in the spirit rally, a competition I was hopeful to win. I was able to find them one, to my good fortune - a physics teacher whose class I had never taken. That night, my secretary, Dominique, Ia and I spent the entire twelve hours designing, spray painting, Burger King crowns until our hands were stained black, hot gluing hand cut ribbons to sticks to use as streamers, sewing four kinds of fabric to make spirit capes, and cutting and coloring countless shields and signs to promote our school. My historian wasn’t able to attend due to personal matters, so I acted as historian, bringing two cameras and captured every moment, making sure everyone was photographed. I aggressively cheered and led my club to performing cheers cleanly and with the most spirit they could muster, in addition to spirit battling other clubs. Although our school did not win this year, I’m satisfied knowing that I used the leadership Key Club had graced me with to bring our club back on its feet, with fifty of our sixty eight members attending. With stress quickly building up among board, finding service projects apart from the general Key Club provided ones was particularly difficult. Finding myself with extra time, I searched for volunteer opportunities across the valley for members to participate. Among these events included Run or Dye and Color in Motion. In addition, fundraising was hard to organize, so I took it upon myself to design lanyard

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CNH | K E Y C L U B D28N | Commitment to Core Values and implement a scrapbook/yearbook idea in hope to fundraise money for Fall Rally and District Convention. Fall Rally had come mercilessly to our exhausted board. Dominique and I spent our night making tutus as spirit gear, and preparing food for any of members to endure the long, four hour bus ride. By the end of the night, we had five containers of fruit, sweets, bread, an obscene amount of chips, and tons of aloe vera juice and water. I once again had to take on the role of historian, due to our technical one not being eligible to go because she couldn’t attend RTC. I fought to keep Rancho organized in the Division 28 North mix, paying attention to the cheers, and showing respect when necessary. With a spirit stick back in the order of the phoenix and a satisfied, sleeping eighteen Rancho members on the ride home, I know that this home will not be falling anytime soon.

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CNH | K E Y C L U B D28N | Commitment to Core Values CHARACTER BUILDING Young and naive, she sat holding her knees against her chest with her head resting on the wall behind her. Another day spent in her personal purgatory - junior year. It was childish - stupid even, for her to feel insecure, when it was repeated time and time again that junior year was the most difficult, three advanced placement classes would be grueling and heartbreaking, SATs were long and stressful, friends would become cold from the same experience, and tired would become a way of life. Feeling exhausted, passive and worthless, she picked herself up off the ground and attended her weekly Key Club meeting. Usually excited and eager, today, she was lifeless from working on a ten page Biology lab report the night before. This meeting, however, was special. It was the new Rancho board installation, and each freshly elected officer would give a word of thanks, encouragement and honor. They lined up, and one by one, gave their speeches. By the end of it, her best friend, the 2013-2014 secretary, approached her and pulled her to the side. Sincerely and quickly, the secretary thanked her for coaxing her to join Key Club, for her never ending passion, and her contributions to making the club as great as it was that day. With a cynical attitude, the girl bitterly snapped that it didn’t matter, that she didn’t do something. Gently pushing her lower lips out in a strike of disappointment and sadness, the secretary told her that if she didn’t like something, she should change it. That evening, the girl was livid, but inspired. She pulled a Division One shirt over her head and onto her arms, cleared her bulletin board, and furiously wrote away at post it notes with ideas, words of encouragement from Kiwanis, and memories that had ignited her passion in the past. She dug through her Key Club box and hung up old spirit gear to remind her to keep going. She looked in the mirror and told herself to be a more intelligent, aggressive, and serviceable citizen. From then on, she attended every meeting with gusto, DCMs with willingness, and a majority of service events provided to her. She worked in every situation possible with conflict to rid of her passive, shy, quietness, and filled the room with respectable opinions. Her board needed new fundraising ideas? She quickly responded with a list of original ideas, and shot down the ones that wouldn’t work. Her peers said something condescending towards her club? She responded with disapproval, informing them of Key Club’s true intentions and the amazing things they do. She built her true, honest aggressive character. She attended her first DCM since the change in July 2013. It was the first time she witnessed the new Region 5 LTGs in action, and it gave her the inspiration to become hardworking and passionate again. The organization, the spirit, and the excitement of the division team brought her to making powerpoints for meetings, making posters for freshmen recruiting, and talking to members to hear their suggestions and desires, all in her own time management. Her grades the upcoming school year shot up, leaving her with a 3.5 grade point average for the first quarter. Her agenda was clean and color coded, complete with family events, Key Club events, and social events. It was there that she learned that hard work and discipline really does pay off. After a harsh break up in October, her Key Club secretary invited her to volunteer at a festival with her. They spend the day setting up chairs, and sharing old stories of how much they’ve grown as people. The secretary told her she was proud of her, for involving herself whole heartedly in Key Club once again and becoming the helpful, aggressive, persevering girl she once knew. She then treated her to Ramen and ice cream, and allowed her to sleep over so she wouldn’t cry alone that night. The following morning, her

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CNH | K E Y C L U B D28N | Commitment to Core Values Key Club president invited her to lunch and shopping to make her feel better, and even bought her a new pair of shoes, just to see her smile. At school the next morning, her friend graced her with a division 13 silicone bracelet. She used it as a reminder - she smiled at everyone she saw and offered her help to struggling teachers, because it was the end of the grading term. This made her realize and develop the importance of kindness and strength. That young girl, the essentially depressed, passive, timid, and easily detestable girl, was me. I was ruthless, stubborn in my rut, lazy, uninspired, weak and cynical. Now, I’ve grown to be hardworking, strict about my ambitions, kind, and strong. Demonstrating these attributes, I’ve applied for countless colleges and scholarships with a resume and a character to match. I’m happily earning acceptances and college money, a goal I did not have in the past. The eliMiNaTe project has grown to be something very dear to me, with a newfound kindness and amazement in our community. With that being said, our next social will be “Ice Skate to eliMiNaTe”. That young girl built character, and look at all that she’s accomplished with it, and look at all she will be accomplishing.

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CNH | K E Y C L U B D28N | Commitment to Core Values INCLUSIVENESS I once had a close friend that despised Key Club. He thought the members were falsely doing community service - only pretending to care about the world, and he blamed the organization for brainwashing thousands of teenagers into a publicity act. Key Club, being one of the only things I was passionate about, aside from ceramics and photography, was my staple for interesting stories and memories, being the main subject of conversation. Due to this, he would find it wearisome to talk to me, but described our friendship as too important to him to let dissipate, so he tolerated it and eventually found entertainment and purpose in the subject by provoking me about it. He often challenged my devotion to the organization, making off putting and condescending comments that immediately enticed an aggressive, heartfelt response. One night, after a stress induced emotional meltdown from college applications, member duties and intense AP assignments, I received a call from my friend, looking to once again elicit my anger from his rhetorical questions about Key Club. Letting my sensitivity get the better of me, I told him the honest truth, that my relationship with Key Club is one that’s stronger than any of my friendships. This intrigued him. I said that a majority of people gauge how special a friendship is by determining the extreme that particular person would go for them. However, Key Club demands the opposite - it wants you to go out of your way for it. It screams for service, time, sacrifice and love. If you’re lucky, you may or may not take something away from it, and I love that. I love feeling needed, I love belonging somewhere that I was essential, but I also loved knowing that there were no obligations. I could generally leave the organization if I truly wanted to - and I stayed because I wanted to, not because I had to. There was a long pause, and an epiphany had dawned on me - he didn’t understand for one reason: he had never had that true feeling of inclusiveness. You see, insecurity and isolation is the monster that slowly eats away at our confidence, clarity and passion. One of the only cures is inclusiveness; it’s the light that shines upon the soul sucking vampire, making it wither in fear. The following week, he was dragged to a Key Club meeting by your truly, and was subjected to special icebreakers my board happily implemented just for him. I watched as my fellow members teasingly stopped him from getting to the other side when “I LOVE MY NEIGHBOR WHO IS WEARING BLUE” was called. I watched as my club welcomed him by making him ride around that pony. He was taught cheers, and was called out and coaxed to come out of his shell by screaming that he felt good, oh he felt so good, or by shimmying his way D-O-W-N. The wonder in his eyes and the first appearance of his dimples I’ve seen in months told me that he felt a sense of family, the same foreign tingle Key Club gave me at Fall Rally my freshman year. He didn’t go to my school, but luckily for me, I’m not the only one at Rancho who fully embraces the power of inclusiveness. My president began to form strong bonds with neighboring Key Clubs - including his school, A-tech, and we were invited to every social, event, and volunteer opportunity. He found himself the beginning of senior year at ice skating rinks, lecture halls, ramen nights, and meetings galore. There’s an old Chinese proverb that states, “Tell me and I’ll forget; show me and I may remember; involve me and I’ll understand.” Unfortunately, like a good majority of seniors, the academic nature of his school ate him alive; taking any time for extracurricular that weren’t particularly educational in essence with it. He called me as I was typing this excruciating E-portfolio, ready to tease me about it. 16


CNH | K E Y C L U B D28N | Commitment to Core Values However, this time, there was a little smile tugging on his lips, one that travelled in his voice. Not of amusement and slight irritability, but one of true understanding and belief in the power of the Key Club bond. Although he didn’t stay with us, it remains a joyous secret between him and I - the inclusiveness and sense of heightened unity he felt with this amazing organization. To me, that’s worth all the teasing in the world.

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CNH | K E Y C L U B D28N | Commitment to Core Values CARING With officer applications due in a week and a majority of my friends in frenzy to fill out transcript information, Key Club essays, and fight for letters of recommendation for their coveted positions, running seemed like the practical thing to do. Three years of Key Club culture, passion, and the newly purchased DSLR in my hands with basic photography skills seemed like a good staple for Historian. Unfortunately for me, two of my close friends, Sharemene and Numfon, were also running, and the competition had created a large emotional drift in their friendship. Clichés will tell you not to let anybody get in the way of your ambitions, goals, and dreams. I’m going to tell you that those clichés are wrong, and I’m going to tell you the most valuable thing Key Club has taught me: Sometimes, you have to step back and sacrifice your desires to the people you love most, because there will always be a spare key to open up a new door of opportunity. Caring is something that’s displayed in all kinds of gauges, and the smallest acts can really make a world of difference. At an ice skating social for A-tech, Rancho Key Club was also invited, although we weren’t properly introduced to any of the members from the opposite school. A majority didn’t know how to ice skate, so the white sheets were filled with fifty Key Clubbers falling everywhere. Being one of the only people who could balance (although I couldn’t skate that well), I helped those around me, people I didn’t know at all, to take slow, steady steps on the frozen ground, until they could balance, too. I was rewarded with sincere smiles. Needless to say, at the next ice skating social, there were more people that could skate, and more stranger turned friends. At a larger scale, the Bone Game is the biggest fundraiser at Rancho for charity, specifically the Make A Wish Foundation. The premise of the cause is to grant a child’s, usually one with a terminal illness, one wish. To raise money, a select few of students sell “spirit links”, strips of paper that people can decorate and hand back so the council can link them together to form a chain of charity, over a course of two weeks in September to faculty and peers for a quarter. Being one of the few with spirit links to sell, I rallied hard to get them out to all of my friends, teachers, and family to send one of the young girls at Make A Wish to Disneyland. In addition to the hope of reaching our goal, it was also about caring about my school. Judges, you told me to tell you about how I demonstrate caring daily. We’re a community service club, meaning we implement the core value of caring daily, in every event, social, and meeting. I could go on about the countless walks, hospitals, dodgeball and board game socials, and Wednesday afternoons I’ve been to where it’s been displayed timelessly. However, I want to give you a part of me, and show you the heartbreak, dedication and love true caring elicits. It’s no secret that my best friend is my secretary Dominique, the most beautiful, intelligent, and strongest young lady I’ve ever had the fortune to meet. With that close relationship comes a side of her that no one else has seen but me. Among her past and horrible experiences, the one I’d like to emphasize on is her sister, Donnabelle. At the beginning of this term, she was on her way to immune disintegration due to her rapidly growing cancer. An emotional rollercoaster that was, paired with raging teenage hormones, typical angsty situations, boys, advanced placement classes (5 of them, to be exact), college applications, and other family issues, I often spent long, late nights on the phone with an anguished, desperately sobbing best friend on the other end and school lunches using all my terrible jokes, exaggerated smiles, and sarcastic energy to cheer her up. Some would say this is an exhausting lifestyle, but the devotion and level of extreme, delicate care is something 18


CNH | K E Y C L U B D28N | Commitment to Core Values I hold very special and dear to my heart. Key Club taught me to be patient in love, and I now have a bond I know will never sink. When the day the officer applications were due approached, I kept mine in the forgotten depths of my backpack, hugging Numfon and Sharemene for support. I cared about them too much to let this relationship disintegrate; after all, in my heart, I knew Key Club was still important to me and this way, I would get to keep both. The lessons Key Club taught me still hold true, new doors opened up: Sharemene won Historian, Numfon was elected as Technical Editor on the Division Leadership Team, and I get to apply for this snazzy recognition.

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CNH | K E Y C L U B D28N | Proof of Attendance Nominee Information: Nominee Name: Alyssa Sicat Key Club: Rancho High School Club Number: H88705 District: California-Nevada-Hawaii Division: 28 North Region: 5 Certification: E-Signature: Dominique Tolentino E-Signer’s Email: rancho.secretary@gmail.com, tolentinodominique@gmail.com E-Signer’s Position: Club Secretary E-Signer’s Phone Number: (702) 501-8334

Kiwanis/Key Club Family Meetings and Events Level of Activity Project, Activity, Event

Date

Club Division

District

International

Service Hours

Divisional Council Meeting

7/17/13

X

1

Divisional Council Meeting

8/15/13

X

1

Divisional Council Meeting

9/19/13

X

1

Regional Training Conference

10/12/13

Divisional Council Meeting

11/22/13

Fall Rally South

11/9/13

Divisional Council Meeting

12/12/13

Winter Banquet

12/17/13

x

8

X

1 x

12

X

1

x

2 Total Hours:

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For club meeting hours, see next page. For sole community service events and hours, please see “Involvement & Accomplishments”. 21


CNH | K E Y C L U B D28N | Proof of Attendance Kiwanis/Key Club Family Meetings and Events Level of Activity Project, Activity, Event

Date

Club

Division District

Service Hours

International

Rancho Key Club Meeting

9/4/13

x

1

Rancho Key Club Meeting

9/11/13

x

1

Rancho Key Club Meeting

9/18/13

x

1

Rancho Key Club Meeting

9/25/13

x

1

Rancho Key Club Meeting

10/2/13

x

1

Rancho Key Club Meeting

10/9/13

x

1

Rancho Key Club Meeting

10/16/13

x

1

Rancho Key Club Meeting

10/23/13

x

1

Rancho Key Club Meeting

10/30/13

x

1

Rancho Key Club Meeting

11/6/13

x

1

Rancho Key Club Meeting

11/13/13

x

1

Rancho Key Club Meeting

11/20/12

x

1

Rancho Key Club Meeting

11/27/13

x

1

Rancho Key Club Meeting

12/4/13

x

1

Rancho Key Club Meeting

12/11/13

x

1

22


CNH | K E Y C L U B D28N | Proof of Attendance Kiwanis/Key Club Family Meetings and Events Level of Activity Project, Activity, Event Rancho Key Club Meeting

Date 1/8/13

Club

Division District

Service Hours

International

x

1 Total hours:

23

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CNH | K E Y C L U B D28N | Active Membership

INVOLVEMENT AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS Level of Activity Project, Activity, Event

Date

Club

Division

Region

International

Service Hours

1. Student Aide (Alg II/Trig) (Before and After School)

4/1/135/31/13

x

20

2. RTC Prep – Spirit Gear Making

9/27/13

x

2

3. Water Walk

10/5/13

X

4

4. Walk to End Alzheimer’s

10/26/13

X

4

5. Color in Motion

11/23/13

X

4

6. Run or Dye

12/7/13

x

4

7. Holiday Toy Distribution

12/8/13

X

6

8. Holiday Toy Distribution

12/15/13

X

3

9. Student Aide (Physics) – Before School

9/30/131/10/13 (Current)

x

18

9. Student Tutor (Physics) – After School

9/30/131/10/13 (Current)

x

10

Total Hours:

*November Member of the Month

25

75


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CNH | K E Y C L U B D28N | Kiwanis Family – Fellowship & Unity My birth certificate may say that I was born to Aurelia and Angel Sicat, but as far as I’m concerned, I was born to Kiwanis as my parents, Circle K as my aunts and uncles, and Key Club as my siblings. Kiwanis International has provided me with the necessities needed to survive in the real world with class and kind assertiveness. In order to be an active part of this organization, it is absolutely essential to establish deep rooted connections to all of Kiwanis through social media, meetings, and updates. During the district administrative year, I’ve personally interacted with me school’s Key Club Kiwanis advisor, made an extreme effort to meet new people and serve them as family, and kept in touch with those in Circle K. To establish these intimate relationships with other Key Club members, I personally love to step away from my comfort zone and not only introduce myself to others, but also maintain a friendship with these service loving peers. Free hugs at Fall Rally are one of my favorite past times, and doing simple things such as updating my facebook status to connect with those I’ve met internationally keeps my “ohana” intact. As for Key Club alumni and new Circle K members, I like to ask specially UNLV and UNR about their projects and meetings. I use these conversations as motivation to continue and aspire in Kiwanis, and as inspiration for my own Key Club. Advice from these elders really keeps the spirit alive by reminding me, as a senior, that there is always some more service to be done and more of this organization to experience. I’ve personally met with our Kiwanis advisor, Pete Fallger, and have talked to him about adult projects, and how Key Club and get more involved with their community. We’ve discussed Kiwanis breakfast and events like Salvation Army Bell Ringing.

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CNH | K E Y C L U B D28N | Personal Contributions There are 300,000 members in the California-Nevada-Hawaii district, and any of them could be applying for member of the year. There are countless inspirational stories, memories, and community service shared among these Key Clubbers, and it feels as I am merely a blip in the consensus. However, despite this, Key Club reminds us that “you may not always be the change in the world, but you have the opportunity to help someone that just might”. It’s with that mindset that I continue to strive to assist others. To put it simply, I have the drive, the motivation, the resources, the persistence and the consistence to always give more of myself. In the 2013-2014 term alone, I’ve not only exceeded the expectations of a member by constantly taking on officer responsibilities in my hunt for service, photography, discipline, and design, but also created and pursued three projects - two for fundraising, and one for member recruitment -, and aimed to help other clubs in my division as well. I’ve strongly inhibited and demonstrated all of the Key Club core values, and I am always thinking about how I personally can do better, serve more, make this organization greater. My newest recruitment project combines photography, inclusiveness and social media. Inspired by Irvington High School’s “eliMiNaTe” collage, it’s concept involving twenty four of our members to be separately photographed, holding up signs with individual letters spelling “Ask me about Key Club Int!”, complete with pictures of the Key Club Logo, a Phoenix, and a CNH bee in place of the spaces between the words. Combining the pictures into one big collage, it was be posted with our website link and my contact information in large hard copies around the school and all over social media websites. Anyone truly interested can ask me about the organization, and will be given a Kiwanis provided recruitment postcard. This project was created in hopes of bringing a fresh visual aid to promote Key Club with familiar faces, and to remind other Key Clubs of the innovation shared that is now being used and revamped to contribute to the organization. Within two weeks of this project, all of my recruitment post cards have been given away to curious newcomers, rendering it a success. My fundraising project from November 2013 to January 2014 was a lanyard sale to raise funds for my members to go to DCON. I spent four hours the night of Fall Rally drawing precise pixels to create a simplistic, spirited design that fellow Key Clubbers from all over the world would buy and support. The design was made to match my home club’s RTC shirts, which were based around the Japanese animated movie “Spirited Away”. The lanyard features a hand crafted, white “No-Face” with the phrase “Ask me how I feel” embedded in eighteen inch polyester, complete with a metal lobster clasp. Selling them at five dollars a piece with each one costing a dollar and eighty cents to make and needing a minimum of one hundred orders to produce it, I spent two months marketing, merchandising and advertising to students worldwide. Within a month of physically receiving the lanyards, I’ve sold the entire lot, making $500 in total for District Convention. My final project of the term is a long term fundraiser, not just for profit, but for the benefit of my members and to jumpstart funds for the next school year. It’s essentially a Key Club yearbook, complete with “professional” photos of each member, a section dedicated to each event with statements, articles and memories, this year’s cheers, and pages for fellow members to sign. The premise of this project was introduced in March 2013, and is currently in progress through my facilitation. It is to be printed in petite, artisan leather bound photo books, which would cost twenty dollars total to produce and ship. It is to be sold at a mere thirty dollars, a large jump from the eighty three a typical school yearbook would cost – 29


CNH | K E Y C L U B D28N | Personal Contributions which makes it the perfect alternative to those who find Rancho yearbook prices steep and unreasonable. In addition to all that I’ve done for my club, I have made efforts to share the gift of Kiwanis with my next home - Dixie State University. A college that just obtained their University credentials in Southern Utah, a Circle K has not yet been chartered. I’ve taken it upon myself to recruit members, plan socials, implement MNT and PTP awareness and bring my university a taste of the organization that changed my life - and give the world eager new college students ready to serve. On the whole, I am the glue that is relentless in not allowing my “house of cards” to fall apart. I try to be the living definition of leadership; I am the striving force behind being relatable. I work every day to keep my club in order from my position as a member, and establish the resources and foundation we need to succeed. If Key Club is a reverse hierarchy, with the members on top, it is my duty to tend to them as an equal. There are 300,000 members in the California-Nevada-Hawaii district, and any of them could be applying for member of the year. Out of all of these courageous, caring, people, I deserve this award because I am the one that has used her flaws, past experiences, and bad decisions to improve and inspire, and serve others. I am the one that you’ll be hearing about ten years from now; about my journey through Circle K and Kiwanis. I am the one who will make a change - the one that won’t just try, but succeed. I am the one that will carry on this organization’s legacy for the next generation to come.

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CNH | K E Y C L U B D28N | Inspirational Qualities During my freshman orientation, there were two upperclassmen that persuaded me to join Key Club. Away from the Rancho Key Club booth, they greeted all who were exiting. With bright smiles and a genuine positivity, they didn’t hand me a brochure, they didn’t tell me about their experiences, and they didn’t bombard me with extraneous questions about my ambitions. They simply told me that if I wanted to be the changed I needed to see in the world, I should attend one meeting of Key Club. They promised it would change my life. For this application, I desperately tore through letters and letters of recommendation, looking for the perfect heartfelt arrangement of words to embody my love and dedication for this club, and the growth I’ve achieved through it. One letter in particular ripped through my lungs and forced a cry of perfection from me, but was too long to put in that section and too fitting for “Inspirational Qualities. The letter was written by the boy supplement in my “Character Building” essay, and I would like to include it now and let it speak for itself. “To Whom It May Concern, Just over five years ago, Alyssa Sicat came into my life in the most awkward fashion imaginable. Little did I know, she would affect my life more drastically than nearly anyone else. Little did I know, Alyssa's story would remind me every day of what true passion and dedication looked like. When Alyssa asked me to write this letter for her, I realized that there's nobody that I would rather write this letter for. This applicant who submitted their application to you, one of my closest friends and confidantes, Alyssa Sicat, has given to you a polished, shining copy of her life. This application, with its perfectly prepared headers and letters of recommendation, shows to you an idealized and impeccable Key Club member, with charts of service hours and pages of warm, kind words exalting her. Just as one might suspect, however, there’s more to Alyssa than meets the eye. If Alyssa was a book, this application would be the cover, and, as we all learned in elementary school, we ought to never judge a book by its cover. When Alyssa asked me to write her this letter of recommendation, I decided that I ought to open the book, and expose to you, the judges, not only her exceptional traits (of which there are many), but also her flaws and imperfections. I want to do so because, to me, those imperfections are what make her such an inspirational figure. There simply isn’t anything to be learned from or to be inspired by in something perfect; it’s stale, boring, and uninteresting. It’s because I believe this that I find Alyssa to be one of the most inspirational people that I’ve ever met. Alyssa and I first met in the halls of Roy W. Martin Middle School, where we attended the International Baccalaureate Middle Years Program. Before Key Club, Alyssa was unsociable and awkward, abrasive and cynical. In fact, it took us eighteen months of mutual classes and interests before she came up with the courage to speak to me. She made short and insignificant comments about the choir concert we had just finished, and, overall, made no impression on my life. I went about the rest of my day, thinking nothing of her. Little did I know, six years later, she would become one of my closest friends. It's between here and there that I discovered who she was (open the book, as it were). I learnt that she was a flawed human being. Between that fateful meeting and today, she developed an addiction to vices and ran away from home. She dropped out of her magnet high school, and languished in the poorly staffed and maintained zoned high school near her home. The key difference between Alyssa and other troubled 32


CNH | K E Y C L U B D28N | Inspirational Qualities youth is the fact that none of those things are true today. Today, Alyssa hasn't touched any of her vices in over eight hundred days, she's living in the room across the hall from her parents, and is proud to call herself a Rancho Ram once again. After a year at her zoned high school, she returned to her magnet school through hard work and dedication. Alyssa didn't just accept, tolerate, or bemoan her flaws, she fixed them. This passion for self-improvement is the same passion she not only promotes, but reserves for only two things: her friends, and Key Club International. This passion, that I see from Alyssa every day, in every conversation and interaction, every action she does and word she says, is inspirational to me. Three years ago, as Alyssa and I were freshman in high school, I watched her as her life started to fall apart. She struggled through her classes, relationships, and even her family life. If I was to predict how Alyssa would turn out, I would have said that she was destined to become another community college student, doing nothing with her life, and never could make an impact on the world around her. Never before have I been so wrong about someone. She has, in these past several years, through her involvement in service through this organization, turned her life around, and became one of the best people that I know. I said that her flaws are what make her inspirational to me, and I meant it; her flaws and her ruthless, systematic elimination of those flaws is awe-inspiring and incredibly powerful. Just over five years ago, Alyssa Sicat came into my life in the most awkward fashion imaginable. Today, she's changed my life forever. Today, she's one of the most inspirational people I know, and that's because of her flaws and her challenges, her ordeals and her struggles through Key Club. It was through this passion, dedication and change that I decided to join Key Club myself. Watching Alyssa Sicat overcome those struggles has been a privilege, and there is nobody more deserving of this award than her. Joshua Nelson Advanced Technologies Academy Computer Science Major National Youth Training Course Leader Advanced Placement Scholar Vigil Honor Recipient Key Club Member If you have any questions, comments or concerns, please contact me at (702) 622-7987 or joshua.tn@cloud.com.� This is proof that I can inspire someone. This proof that my qualities have driven people to be the best they can be. During my freshman orientation, there were two upperclassmen that persuaded me to join Key Club. Today, I am the upperclassman who’s bringing people on the road to making caring a way of life. Today, I am an inspiration to thousands of service driven teenagers across the district. Soon enough, today will become four years ago, and one of those freshmen will be the change we need to see in the world through the influence of me.

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Member of the Year - Alyssa Sicat  
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