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PORTFOLIO Alvaro Arias M.S. in Advanced Architectural Design GSAPP May 2012

Columbia University


M.S. in Advanced Architectural Design Columbia University GSAPP 05/09/2012


CONTENTS

CORE STUDIOS Cidade do Samba 2.0

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5

Terra Encharcada

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23

Evasive Maneuvers

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35

Compressed Pixel

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45

Fabric-ation

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53

Roll Play

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63

Gateway

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77

Digital Craft

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83

BUILDING TECHNOLOGY

VISUAL STUDIES


SUM. 2011 FALL. 2011 SPR. 2012

4

Cidade do Samba 2.0


IMAGINING THE ULTRAREAL

FAST PACE/SLOW SPACE

MATERIALS AND METHODS IN ARCH.

SURFACE, SCREEN & STRUCTURE

ADVANCED STUDIO IV

Juan Herreros Studio

DIGITAL CRAFT

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil CORE STUDIO

Advanced Studio VI

ADVANCED STUDIO V

ADVANCED STUDIO VI

Cidade do Samba 2.0

5


SUM. 2011 FALL. 2011 SPR. 2012

6

Cidade do Samba 2.0


DIGITAL CRAFT

IMAGINING THE ULTRAREAL

FAST PACE/SLOW SPACE

MATERIALS AND METHODS IN ARCH.

SURFACE, SCREEN & STRUCTURE

ADVANCED STUDIO IV

Juan Herreros Studio

CORE STUDIO

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Advanced Studio VI

ADVANCED STUDIO V

Cidade do Samba 2.0

7

ADVANCED STUDIO VI


Cidade do Samba 2.0 Juan Herreros Studio

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

T

SUM. 2011 FALL. 2011

he existing Cidade do Samba exposes a distinct paradox in urban planning schemes in the city of Rio de Janeiro. All schools share a common space despite the fact that competition and espionage between them is fierce and unrelenting. The highly secretive fabrication process demands minimal access to the premises and no visitors are allowed. This has generated a void in the fabric of the city as the cidade do samba acts as a fortress of disruption. Because samba schools are highly competitive and don’t collaborate with each other it seems illogical to establish them within the constraints of a single building.

SPR. 2012

8

Cidade do Samba 2.0

The cidade do samba is centrally located in the city of Rio de Janeiro but the potential in its location has been underutilized. By lacking any connection to the urban fabric the site acts as a void in the city. The future of the site is grim. Large office developments will be built against the waterfront and large scale transport system will circumnavigate the site providing no connection between Morro do Providencia (favela) and the rest of the city. The Porto de Maravilha area would benefit from a connection that would reconnect the favelas with the rest of the city. This connection could be made through important icons of the city like the cidade do samba and the sambodromo.

The first attempts at establishing this connection were strictly literal. The existing sambodromo building was extended through the whole site to create a connection through the favelas until the waterfront that could also serve as a catalyst of public activities. The proposal then shifted from an attempt at a complete physical connection to a less literal one. This was done by using each samba schools as a node that could freely connect and influence the context around it. The parameters by which this dismantling engages with the city have been taken into account.

Instead of “dropping� samba schools wherever, each samba school attaches itself to an existing infrastructural element in the city which is either underutilized or abandoned. This strategy attempts to spark a discussion on what should be preserved and on what basis. Another main argument is that planned developments in the city will continue to dismember the existing fabric by prioritizing real estate value over much needed infrastructural investments.


ADVANCED STUDIO VI jacarepagua imperatriz mangueira

vita isabel

unidos da tijuca

liesa

bejia flor

salgueiro sao clemente

mocidade

Samba school distribution

SURFACE, SCREEN & STRUCTURE

Exsiting samba city

x

x

void

x x x

FAST PACE/SLOW SPACE

Its current situation makes the samba city a void in the city

IMAGINING THE ULTRAREAL

Complete disconnection between the city and the samba city.

DIGITAL CRAFT

x

MATERIALS AND METHODS IN ARCH.

porto da pedra

ADVANCED STUDIO V

unidos da ilha

ADVANCED STUDIO IV

portela grande rio

This project aims to enable connectivity through a dismantling of the existing samba city.

CORE STUDIO

Advanced Studio VI

9


vita isabel

mangueira

rio harbor unidos da tijuca

bejia flor

cidade do samba mocidade

imperatriz

sao clemente

salgueiro

porto da pedra

liesa

SUM. 2011 FALL. 2011 SPR. 2012

10

Cidade do Samba 2.0


ADVANCED STUDIO VI ADVANCED STUDIO V ADVANCED STUDIO IV MATERIALS AND METHODS IN ARCH.

central station

portela

FAST PACE/SLOW SPACE

grande rio

governador

DIGITAL CRAFT

sambodromo

IMAGINING THE ULTRAREAL

jacarepagua

SURFACE, SCREEN & STRUCTURE

providencia

By dismantling the cidade do samba into single nodes the project aims to provide a much needed connection between the central station and the waterfront

Advanced Studio VI

11


harbor

visible

BRT station

dance studio LRT station

unidos da tijuca

auditorium ampitheatre

gondola station

public pools

exhibition area

port olympic venue

blurred rehearsal area

location

providencia

jacarapagua

mixed sports field

central station market

samba circuit

imperatriz

hidden

quarry elevator

train station

costume fitting rooms carriage fabrication

The inner workings of samba schools are immensely secretive. This project will organize the program depending on the level of permeability permitted. Each samba school will change depending on the context it latches on to. Three samba schools have been chosen for further detail.

SUM. 2011 FALL. 2011 SPR. 2012

12

bus parking

Cidade do Samba 2.0


ADVANCED STUDIO VI ADVANCED STUDIO V

PROGRAMATIC OPPORTUNITIES

gondola system

warehouse

ampitheatre subway

subway

samba class

gondola system

samba class

samba circuit

gondola system

auditorium

auditorium

gondola system

auditorium

LRT

LRT

BRT

LRT

BRT

BRT

dance rehearsal

ampitheatre

ampitheatre

ampitheatre

exhibition area

samba circuit

subway

samba class

subway

samba circuit

gondola system

auditorium

samba class

samba circuit

gondola system

scenic view

BRT

gondola system

scenic view

scenic view market

LRT

samba class

auditorium

auditorium

market

IMAGINING THE ULTRAREAL

subway

exhibition area

MATERIALS AND METHODS IN ARCH.

x

market

LRT

LRT

BRT

BRT

warehouse entry bus parking

DIGITAL CRAFT

headquarters

FAST PACE/SLOW SPACE

auditorium

SURFACE, SCREEN & STRUCTURE

ADVANCED STUDIO IV

gondola system

bus parking dance rehearsal

dance rehearsal

dance rehearsal

ampitheatre

ampitheatre

exhibition area subway

LRT

exhibition area

ampitheatre exhibition area

subway

subway

13


Unidos da Tijuca Sao Cristovao, Rio de Janeiro The elevated highway next to the harbor has completely disconnected the city from the waterfront. Although the elevated viaduct is scheduled to be torn down, no real connection has been planned by city officials. By placing a samba school over this point I wish to not only provide a direct connection but also to engage with our understanding of preservation. The project preserves a section of the elevated highway to provide a path with existing infrastructure and attach the existing warehouses in the harbor.

Juan Herreros Studio

ampitheatre samba circuit

city center

l

erimetra Vevd. P

waterfront

o

f Ri

o Port

reconnect the city and the water

SUM. 2011 FALL. 2011 SPR. 2012

14

Cidade do Samba 2.0

integrated samba features


ADVANCED STUDIO VI ADVANCED STUDIO V ADVANCED STUDIO IV SURFACE, SCREEN & STRUCTURE MATERIALS AND METHODS IN ARCH. FAST PACE/SLOW SPACE IMAGINING THE ULTRAREAL rehearsal area

BRT

costume fitting rooms auditorium

carriage fabrication

DIGITAL CRAFT

dance studio

exhibition area

LRT

ferry

potential transport hub

programatic explorations

CORE STUDIO

Advanced Studio VI

15


Imperatriz Ramos, Rio de Janeiro The neighborhood of Ramos is located 7 kilometers from the cidade do samba. This proposal will bring the headquarters od this samba school from the outskirts of the city into a central area. By lacking the program of the samba school onto an existing infrastructural element the purpose is to have them coexist and influence each other: a sort of symbiosis. In this particular moment the school will latch onto the elevators that take people from ground level up to the favelas. The main idea is to spark activity into these once abandoned spaces.

sculpture garden NF + 90.00

+ 90.00 m

obsevation deck NF + 85.00

+ 80.00 m

NF + 80.00

auditorium

NF + 75.00

viewing area NF + 70.00

+ 70.00 m

dance studio

NF + 65.00

administration

+ 60.00 m

NF + 60.00

NF + 55.00

cafeteria

+ 50.00 m

NF + 50.00

media floor NF + 45.00

exhibition area

+ 40.00 m

NF + 40.00

funicular station NF + 35.00

+ 30.00 m

NF + 30.00

NF + 25.00

rehearsal area

+ 20.00 m

NF + 20.00

fitting rooms NF + 15.00

today’s events:

IMPERATRIZ

studio x rio exhibition history of samba auditorio madera

escola de samba

NF + 10.00

Rua Ebroino Uruguai

NF + 5.00

fabrication floor

FALL. 2011 SPR. 2012

16

BRT station

NF + 0.00

SUM. 2011

1

CIDADE DO SAMBA 2.0 Alvaro Arias __ Juan Herreros __GSAPP__ spring 2012

Cidade do Samba 2.0

2

3

4

5

6

7

8


ADVANCED STUDIO VI ADVANCED STUDIO V

gravel, plastic sealing layer, thermal insulation, sheetaluminum casing

ADVANCED STUDIO IV

extensive planting on 150 mm substrate filter

safety-glass element

double glazed glass roof. + photovoltaic cells facade veg. for sunshading aluminum handrail

0

SURFACE, SCREEN & STRUCTURE

light fixture with aluminum reflector

steel skeletal structure system trussed beams

steel reinforced concrete slab extruded light fixtures for mobile exhibitions

Morro do Providencia

MATERIALS AND METHODS IN ARCH.

suspended ceiling. allows cross ventilation

aluminum mesh facade system

translucent glass blocks

steel supporting brackets for stairway and elevator shaft

sliding door system

FAST PACE/SLOW SPACE

trussed steal structure for funicular system

IMAGINING THE ULTRAREAL

strip for electric operation

aluminum mesh facade system

DIGITAL CRAFT

30 cm reinforced concrete slabs

IMPERATRIZ

samba school 9

1

5

10

20

meters

CORE STUDIO

Advanced Studio VI

17


Jacarepagua Ramos, Rio de Janeiro The Jacarepagua samba school will be located in Rio’s central station. This site is one of the city’s most vibrant places with hundreds of train and buses connections between the city and the rest of the region. This samba school will flow over the existing rail tracks and provide an opportunity for the commuters to blend with the samba activities. This school would benefit from a site which has high pedestrian traffic both during the day and the evening.

a

b

c

e

d

f

observation deck

NF + 16.50

dance studio viewing area NF + 12.30

Terminal Rodoviário Américo Fontenele

c

NF + 12.30

NF + 7.80

NF + 7.80

a

f

fabrication area

b

FALL. 2011 SPR. 2012

18

administration

LRT station

NF + 0.00

SUM. 2011

ampitheatre

d

e


ampitheatre

DIGITAL CRAFT

NF + 16.50

g

Terminal Rodovi谩rio da Central

Advanced Studio VI

IMAGINING THE ULTRAREAL

CENTRAL STATION

Plaza Proc贸pio Ferreira

g

19

FAST PACE/SLOW SPACE

MATERIALS AND METHODS IN ARCH.

SURFACE, SCREEN & STRUCTURE

ADVANCED STUDIO IV

ADVANCED STUDIO V

ADVANCED STUDIO VI


SUM. 2011 FALL. 2011 SPR. 2012

20

Cidade do Samba 2.0


CORE STUDIO

Advanced Studio VI

21

DIGITAL CRAFT

IMAGINING THE ULTRAREAL

FAST PACE/SLOW SPACE

MATERIALS AND METHODS IN ARCH.

SURFACE, SCREEN & STRUCTURE

ADVANCED STUDIO IV

ADVANCED STUDIO V

ADVANCED STUDIO VI


SUM. 2011 FALL. 2011 SPR. 2012

22

Terra Encharcada


IMAGINING THE ULTRAREAL

FAST PACE/SLOW SPACE

MATERIALS AND METHODS IN ARCH.

SURFACE, SCREEN & STRUCTURE

Keith Kaseman Studio

DIGITAL CRAFT

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil CORE STUDIO

Advanced Studio V

ADVANCED STUDIO IV

ADVANCED STUDIO V

Terra Encharcada

23

ADVANCED STUDIO VI


x

!

x

!

x

x !

! x !

Terra Encharcada Keith Kaseman Studio

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

I

n April 2010 20 cm of rain fell in the Rio area in less than 24 hours. The city’s transport system collapsed, thousands of homes were swept away and at least 110 people lost their lives. Less than a year later the city was once again hit by a massive storm surge that triggered violent floods and mudslides. The majority of casualties were in poverty-stricken areas where homes cannot withstand heavy rainfall and the absence of permeable surfaces turn streets into rivers. The sense of urgency is palpable and perhaps it is time to design in conjunction with the natural ecosystem. Not long ago Barra da Tijuca was a flood plain and current events suggest a return to its origins

SUM. 2011 FALL. 2011 SPR. 2012

24

Terra Encharcada

Terra Encantada will give way to Terra “Encharcada” (soaked land) where the flood plain will be a defining factor within Barra’s new landscape. Instead of setting boundaries to the natural ecosystem the project will collaborate with the water by allowing flooding to occur. The steady increase in the city’s construction and population has overwhelmed its transportation system and although new systems like the teleferico have been implemented I believe its potential has not been truly explored. Current gondola stations are strikingly empty and desolate and could serve as a junction point for cultural events within the urban fabric. Terra Encharcada will both serve as a transportation hub as well as the city’s cultural core.

Schools, workshops, exhibition spaces and amphitheaters will be attached to this system to address the lack of public and cultural spaces within the city. By cantilevering over the surface the rise in water level will provide a host of new spatial paradigms. In dry season the water recedes to a lively and lush marshland environment that can set the conditions to a new landscape in Barra. The free movement of the water will help the remediation process of the lakes that are now serving as dumping grounds. Fishing will once again be a stable business in Barra’s Lakes. In the event of a storm surge Terra Encharcada can serve as a relief site to neighboring condominiums and favelas, which are especially hard, hit by these events.

The system combined will set a new standard for public space not only in Rio but also beyond. In this way engaging present concerns with future conditions. The ultimate goal of this project is to be sustainable from an environmental, technical and cultural standpoint that has the potential to improve the quality of life of Barra’s inhabitants.


Shopping Via Parque

Shopping Via Parque

From Centro

ADVANCED STUDIO VI

Shopping Via Parque

Elevated Bike + Pedestrian walkway

AVAILABLE AREA

ADVANCED STUDIO V

Saco Grande

Saco Grande Hospital Barrador

Casa Shopping

Casa Shopping

Hospital Barrador Hipermercado MAKRO

Hipermercado MAKRO

Hipermercado MAKRO

ENCLOSURE

Completely built on

ENCLOSURE + FABRIC

CATALYST

Peripheral Housing

ADVANCED STUDIO IV

Helicopter Canopy

280 meters tallest tower in Brasil

Helicopter Hub

office or residential

Shopping Via Parque flaps around the building

Subway System

EXTREME DENSITY Office Buildings

FABRIC

Building + Commercial Flaps

ANIMAL SANCTUARY

MASSIVE TRANSPORTATION TERMINAL Helicopter + Train + Bus

National Park Reserve

C

C Lagoa da Tijuca green market C Lagoa da Tijuca

Maritime Terminal A

urban farms

Av. Ayrton Senna

water treatment and storage A B Av. Via Parque da Lagoa da Tijuca

B

B

CRISS-CROSS HOUSING Housing Complex

Operation Barra Megamix Mission C

green market

stage 2

maritime terminal

C

Lagoa da Tijuca urban farms

stage 1 water treatment and storage

samba path stage 3 A

stage 3

A

B B

barra public pools

Programatic Explorations

“This phase will involve an obsessive and systematic development of spatial / programmatic mixes on our site, developed with rigorous play through a host of primarily manually-driven techniques. While we will initially kick into action in a productive vacuum with respect to site inputs, adjacent forces and parameters will be injected into the work as projective scenarios develop and accumulate. Students will work individually to build up a catalog of resources to be exploited and / or questioned by the collective group.”

DIGITAL CRAFT

stage 2

stage 1

FAST PACE/SLOW SPACE

Hipermercado MAKRO

IMAGINING THE ULTRAREAL

BRT Termianl

Hospital Barrador

MATERIALS AND METHODS IN ARCH.

SURFACE, SCREEN & STRUCTURE

Saco Grande

CORE STUDIO

Advanced Studio V

25


SUM. 2011 FALL. 2011 SPR. 2012

26

Terra Encharcada


Advanced Studio V

27

DIGITAL CRAFT

IMAGINING THE ULTRAREAL

FAST PACE/SLOW SPACE

MATERIALS AND METHODS IN ARCH.

SURFACE, SCREEN & STRUCTURE

ADVANCED STUDIO IV

ADVANCED STUDIO V

ADVANCED STUDIO VI


SUM. 2011 FALL. 2011 SPR. 2012

28

Terra Encharcada


Site Explorations

CORE STUDIO

Advanced Studio V

29

DIGITAL CRAFT

IMAGINING THE ULTRAREAL

FAST PACE/SLOW SPACE

MATERIALS AND METHODS IN ARCH.

SURFACE, SCREEN & STRUCTURE

ADVANCED STUDIO IV

ADVANCED STUDIO V

ADVANCED STUDIO VI


Post Rio Visit After our trip to Rio I was struck by the order in the apparent chaos. I was specifically interested in the intricate nature of favelas and how they work as sophisticated networks. Nodes of activity like soccer fields or markets served as attractor points that weaved the urban fabric. The frequencies between these nodes revealed an imperceptible network of activities and movements. This understanding of the unconventional urban fabric had a profound influence on the development of my project. I decided to experiment with network system that could work in coexistence with the environment. In this case I was interested in creating an overarching network that could benefit the inhabitants of Barra, by serving as a transport hub, and also have a positive effect on the ecosystem by allowing the plain to flood and self-remediate.

emergency relief helicopters

evacuation route

BRT lines to Centro

from Rio das Pedras

storm shelters

SUM. 2011 FALL. 2011 SPR. 2012

30

Terra Encharcada

Terra “Encharcada� /storm shelters


DIGITAL CRAFT

IMAGINING THE ULTRAREAL

FAST PACE/SLOW SPACE

MARCH 6, 2012

Advanced Studio V MATERIALS AND METHODS IN ARCH.

SURFACE, SCREEN & STRUCTURE

Operation Barra Megamix Exhibition Studio X Rio de Janeiro

31

ADVANCED STUDIO IV

ADVANCED STUDIO V

ADVANCED STUDIO VI


private helicopter incentives

cultural events area

BRT lines

gondola system

fishing harbor

community schools

barra beach

Terra “Encharcada� / school /workshop /beach node

SUM. 2011 FALL. 2011 SPR. 2012

32

Terra Encharcada


CORE STUDIO

Advanced Studio V

33

DIGITAL CRAFT

IMAGINING THE ULTRAREAL

FAST PACE/SLOW SPACE

MATERIALS AND METHODS IN ARCH.

SURFACE, SCREEN & STRUCTURE

ADVANCED STUDIO IV

ADVANCED STUDIO V

ADVANCED STUDIO VI


SUM. 2011 FALL. 2011 SPR. 2012

34

Evasive Maneuvers


IMAGINING THE ULTRAREAL

FAST PACE/SLOW SPACE

MATERIALS AND METHODS IN ARCH.

Cristina Goberna &Urtzi Grau Studio

DIGITAL CRAFT

Infiltrating the Higline CORE STUDIO

Advanced Studio IV

SURFACE, SCREEN & STRUCTURE

ADVANCED STUDIO IV

Evasive Maneuvers

35

ADVANCED STUDIO V

ADVANCED STUDIO VI


The Highline The workings of real estate gimmicks disguised through design

T

he recently opened section of New York’s High Line Park was celebrated by tourists and residents alike. The park has added an iconic image to the cityscape by converting an abandoned elevated train track into a public promenade. The project extends along 22 city blocks and has been hailed as a triumph of public over private interests. Actually, I would argue the park’s very existence was made possible by the city’s finest real estate moguls. A closer look into the park’s conception will reveal the workings of a common real estate strategy in New York City. In the early1900’s Manhattan’s West Side was a bustling center for goods coming into the city awaiting distribution. To handle the high demand for transportation the city set freight tracks on street level that could easily load and un-load their cargo. But having the tracks on street level resulted in a deadly mix between pedestrians and freight traffic. Because of its dangerous intersections the site was nicknamed “Death Avenue”. A first solution was placing men on horses, known as West Side Cowboys, which signaled incoming train traffic. But this option slowed traffic and efficiency in transporting goods was compromised. Therefore, as part of the West Side Improvement Plan of 1911,the city unveils a strategy for an elevated freight line. Trains were active on the High Line from 1934 until the early 1960’s, when rail traffic declined and a southern section of the structure was torn down. In 1980 the last train rolled down its tracks and the Line, less than 40 years old, went silent. During this time the tracks underwent a period of natural colonization brought about by seeds dropped by trains, birds, and breezes that grew in the gravel ballast. This natural reclamation was best captured by photographer Joel Sternfeld between 2000 and 2001. The images show a self-sown landscape,which seemed undisturbed with the dense urban landscape around it. The site became the city’s best-kept secret as the last uncorrupted natural landscape,which hadn’t cost the city a single dollar in developing. But in 2002 the secret was out and real estate agents keen on demolishing the tracks for development targeted the site.

SUM. 2011 FALL. 2011 SPR. 2012

36

The Chelsea Property OwnersOrganization (people who owned land under the HighLine) called for the immediate demolishing of the tracks, claiming they were a blight and a hazard for the city. But the CPO’s real interest was an expected rise in their property value stemming from the removal of the tracks.

The Highline

Although efforts to save the tracks as a public space were voiced, city officials were interested in its potential for revenue. Therefore the CPO would be granted permission to level the tracks if they could provide evidence that the city would gain considerable income by taxing this land based on its future value. Consequently the onlyavailable option for the survival of the highline as a public space was conditioned to its effectiveness as a development strategy. Following this conclusion an organization called Friends of the High Line was created to save the tracks by proving its survival was in the developer’s best interest. An extensive document was drafted to demonstrate that converting the tracks into a public space would actually raise the value of land adjacent to the site and taxation on future developments would also increase revenue. But the document also mentioned that the structure’s restoration and maintenance as a public space would cost the city over 7 million dollars annually. Therefore whatever was going to be constructed on the tracks, had to follow a specific design rulebook to maximize its ability for providing additional revenue. But this clause was not publicized in the design competition in a clear attempt to showcase the project’s “public” agenda. The winners of the competition were the partnership created between James CornerField Operations and Diller, Scofidio + Renfro. The design was simple yet ingenious. By placing their digital renders over Joel Sternfeld’s photographsthey vowed to preserve the existing fabric and imagery of the abandoned HighLine. The design proposal managed to keep the nostalgia of the scenery and promised little interference with the existing natural environment. Today, almost a decade after the competition, section 2 of the High Line has been opened to the public and we can begin to see how the architectural design cleverly hid the frameworks of real estate operations. The price of the land adjacent to the project is expected to rise between 5 and 30 percent in a few years; several examples provide evidence to this effect. The Promenade Plantée, a lushly planted park created atop an elevated viaduct running through the city’s 12 arrondissement in Paris witnessed a 15 % rise in land prices in its first year. In Seattle, homes bordering the Burke Gilman Trail, a 12-milepublic trail that runs through the city, sell for 10% more than houses of comparable size in other locations.

In New York, the city’s expenditure for the Central Park land was quickly compensated by the taxes generated by the increased value of the adjacent property. To capitalize on this strategy the design of the High Line had to allow future private entry points in any given spot of the project. Diller, Scofidio and Renfro created a system of modular, precast concrete planks that would permit unscripted movement in and out of the park at any point. The tapering of planks into planting beds formed anintegrated and combed carpet of natural elements and also allows future private entry points to easily blend with the existing fabric. Developers would also expect to generate additional revenue by renting public space on the High Line for private gatherings. Clearly marked rules of the High Line can be seen on any entry point and that allow private gatherings by permit. Thereforethe design generated a considerable amount of open area that was not disturbed by high-density vegetation and could easily accommodate large groups. Developers expect to gain $ 280,000 annually from these operations. Open areas at most entry points would also be beneficial spots for merchandising campaigns like gift shops. The design would also have to consider the integration of the park with clear points of revenue potential along the line. The image depicts the location immediately adjacent to the second level of the Chelsea Market building, located between 15th and 16th streets. The design of the space provides 6,600 sq. feet ofarea that could be used as holiday markets and semi-weekly Greenmarkets. The design of a 4,020 sq. foot, vegetation-free, area at the Gansevoort entry pointwas a clear intention at developing its potential as a future concession space. With the construction of the future Whitney Museum at this point, a restaurant area would generate revenue both from the visitors of the museum as well as those from the park. Ultimatelythe design of the High Line was a success the minute it was created at the drafting tables of Diller, Scofidio and Renfro. A space that has quickly shaped itself as an icon of the city was at one point doomed by the shortsightedness of the development agents. By identifying the mechanisms and tactics of the developers through the design proposal I merely wish to uncover their true nature. Although the design has served as a recue vessel for this public space it is also being used as a disguise for a larger development strategy. If this continues unchecked it will ultimately prove that the real estate market is a juggernaut for policy making and public projects are at their mercy.


Metropolis

37

DIGITAL CRAFT

IMAGINING THE ULTRAREAL

FAST PACE/SLOW SPACE

MATERIALS AND METHODS IN ARCH.

SURFACE, SCREEN & STRUCTURE

ADVANCED STUDIO IV

ADVANCED STUDIO V

ADVANCED STUDIO VI


Highline Infiltration Guide

Evasive Maneuvers Cristina Goberna &Urtzi Grau Studio

SUM. 2011

More than a public promenade and reclamation of an abandoned space the Highline unveils the workings of a real estate strategy. Since its opening in June 2009 the Highline had been responsible for $ 2 billion of private investment, 12,000 new jobs and 29 development projects. Developments around it are trying to establish private connections to the elevated park and soon it will become more of a private sector. Maintenance in the highline is expensive and the organization that is in charge of the park (Friends of the Highline) is struggling to make ends meet.

FALL. 2011 SPR. 2012

38

Evasive Maneuvers

Infiltrating the Higline

Therefore, permitting private connections to the High Line through connection concession agreements represents the single largest potential source of revenue to offset High Line operating costs. Other strategies for revenue are seasonal cafes in the West 13th street entrance and an extension of the Chelsea market. The Gansevoort Entry will have a concession area of over 4,000 square feet with potential expansion into the Whitney Museum. Food carts and other concession spaces will generate a commercial area at the expense of the park. This project demonstrates this grim future by establishing that only by means of infiltrating the Highline can a person enjoy the park.

Evasive Maneuvers must be taken to avoid falling into the commercial revenue areas. I identified that the one and only person that has truly unlimited access to the highline is the gardener. It is only through the impersonation of this individual that one can avoid the real estate schemes that are located throughout the park. The final delivery of this project demanded that both juries and critics see the future of the High line as part of premeditated real estate strategy. To effectively “sell” this idea I worked over the original Diller Scofidio + Renfro drawings to blur the line between what is original and what has been “modified”.


ADVANCED STUDIO VI ADVANCED STUDIO V ADVANCED STUDIO IV SURFACE, SCREEN & STRUCTURE MATERIALS AND METHODS IN ARCH. FAST PACE/SLOW SPACE DIGITAL CRAFT

IMAGINING THE ULTRAREAL

This chart demonstrates that maintenance costs are much higher than what can be gained from typical revenue generating strategies. Real Estate concessions in the park are the only way to balance the costs.

Advanced Studio IV

39


Gansevoort entry point

SUM. 2011

West 13th st. Underpass

FALL. 2011 SPR. 2012

40

Evasive Maneuvers


Gansevoort entry point

Advanced Studio IV

41

DIGITAL CRAFT

IMAGINING THE ULTRAREAL

FAST PACE/SLOW SPACE

MATERIALS AND METHODS IN ARCH.

SURFACE, SCREEN & STRUCTURE

ADVANCED STUDIO IV

ADVANCED STUDIO V

ADVANCED STUDIO VI


SUM. 2011 FALL. 2011 SPR. 2012

42

Evasive Maneuvers


Advanced Studio IV

43

DIGITAL CRAFT

IMAGINING THE ULTRAREAL

FAST PACE/SLOW SPACE

MATERIALS AND METHODS IN ARCH.

SURFACE, SCREEN & STRUCTURE

ADVANCED STUDIO IV

ADVANCED STUDIO V

ADVANCED STUDIO VI


SUM. 2011 FALL. 2011 SPR. 2012

44

Compressed Pixel


DIGITAL CRAFT

IMAGINING THE ULTRAREAL

FAST PACE/SLOW SPACE

Joseph Vidich, critic Surface, Screen and Structure BUILDING TECHNOLOGY

BUILDING TECHNOLOGY

Surface, Screen and Structure

MATERIALS AND METHODS IN ARCH.

SURFACE, SCREEN & STRUCTURE

Compressed Pixel

45

ADVANCED STUDIO IV

ADVANCED STUDIO V

ADVANCED STUDIO VI


SUM. 2011 FALL. 2011 SPR. 2012

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Compressed Pixel


ADVANCED STUDIO VI

T

DIGITAL CRAFT

IMAGINING THE ULTRAREAL

FAST PACE/SLOW SPACE

he idea was to design a thoughtful solution that would graphically, spatially and creatively resolve light transmittance and structural requirements in an existing faรงade . Using folding as a means of mass-customization of identical sheet metal units, a highly adaptable system opens at moments of steep curvature and closes when flat, wrapping the faรงade in a breathing membrane that controls views, air flow, and shading At the building scale, the pixelated system was designed, iterated and optimized using Rhino. At the scale of the panels and connection details, a full-scale prototype was designed using Solidworks. Several prototypes were fabricated from stainless steel sheet metal.

ADVANCED STUDIO V

team: Aaron Manns, Andres Correa

ADVANCED STUDIO IV

Surface, Screen and Structure

SURFACE, SCREEN & STRUCTURE

Joseph Vidich, critic

MATERIALS AND METHODS IN ARCH.

Compressed Pixel

BUILDING TECHNOLOGY

Surface, Screen and Structure

47


Shop drawings

SUM. 2011 FALL. 2011

Elevation/Section/Axon: Attachment of cluster to curtainwall

SPR. 2012

48

Compressed Pixel


Construction sequence

BUILDING TECHNOLOGY

Surface, Screen and Structure

49

DIGITAL CRAFT

IMAGINING THE ULTRAREAL

FAST PACE/SLOW SPACE

MATERIALS AND METHODS IN ARCH.

SURFACE, SCREEN & STRUCTURE

ADVANCED STUDIO IV

ADVANCED STUDIO V

ADVANCED STUDIO VI


Aggregation on facade

Ventilation strategy

SUM. 2011 FALL. 2011

Interior view

SPR. 2012

50

Compressed Pixel


DIGITAL CRAFT

IMAGINING THE ULTRAREAL

FAST PACE/SLOW SPACE

Paper prototype Sheet metal prototype

Paper prototype. Cluster view

BUILDING TECHNOLOGY

Surface, Screen and Structure

51

MATERIALS AND METHODS IN ARCH.

SURFACE, SCREEN & STRUCTURE

ADVANCED STUDIO IV

ADVANCED STUDIO V

ADVANCED STUDIO VI


SUM. 2011 FALL. 2011 SPR. 2012

52

Fabric-ation


ADVANCED STUDIO VI ADVANCED STUDIO V ADVANCED STUDIO IV MATERIALS AND METHODS IN ARCH.

SURFACE, SCREEN & STRUCTURE

Keith Kaseman, critic

Materials and Methods in Architecture

team: Charlie Able, Eliza Montgomery

DIGITAL CRAFT

IMAGINING THE ULTRAREAL

BUILDING TECHNOLOGY

FAST PACE/SLOW SPACE

Fabric-ation

BUILDING TECHNOLOGY

Materials and Methods in Architecture

53


Fabric-ation Keith Kaseman, critic

Materials and Methods in Arch.

team: Charlie Able, Eliza Montgomery

W

SUM. 2011

e explored the properties of fabric formwork to create complex concrete shapes. We were especially interested in fabric because it allows a very efficient formwork to final a resulting form. Also, because fabric is porous, excess water drains out. This means you can pour a very liquid mix in order to get the concrete into complex shapes without sacrificing the strength of the final dry concrete. We pushed this technique to the limit to find out how complex a concrete shape can become. Ultimately the formworks allows concrete to take an organic form.

FALL. 2011 SPR. 2012

54

Fabric-ation

Through our tests early in the semester and our final experiment we were able to test this method on a range of scales as well as a assortment of fabric types and shapes. We also tested different methods for texturizing the concrete. Our initial approach was to stitch patterns in the fabric so that the sewn thread resists the stretched fabric creating an imprint of the pattern on the concrete. Other texturizing methods include cutting patterns into a non-stretchy fabric and cut with a laser cutter. The fabric is then wrapped around a fabric so that when concrete is cast inside a bulging out effect occurs where the laser cut fabric is.

This process was the most successful and provided an array of unique textures. Our final prototype was an experiment where we were interested in pushing the scale of the fabric technique. We used some of the shapes and tolerances that we had tried earlier, but this time sewed into one large continuous mold. We also pushed the final cast to stand on its own so we sewed the fabric pattern into a cylinder. We discovered the potential lied in using more durable fabrics and adding zippers or a connection that would allow the bag to be removed and reused between casts.

In moving forward we would like to continue testing texturing techniques and large complex shapes, hopefully combining the two. This process could potentially be converted into a parametric designing technique once the rules and allowances of the fabric are further explored.


BUILDING TECHNOLOGY

Materials and Methods in Architecture

55

DIGITAL CRAFT

IMAGINING THE ULTRAREAL

FAST PACE/SLOW SPACE

MATERIALS AND METHODS IN ARCH.

SURFACE, SCREEN & STRUCTURE

ADVANCED STUDIO IV

ADVANCED STUDIO V

ADVANCED STUDIO VI


rhino file ready for laser cut

fabric with laser cut shapes

SUM. 2011 FALL. 2011 SPR. 2012

56

Concrete prototype

Fabric-ation


ADVANCED STUDIO VI ADVANCED STUDIO V ADVANCED STUDIO IV SURFACE, SCREEN & STRUCTURE MATERIALS AND METHODS IN ARCH. FAST PACE/SLOW SPACE IMAGINING THE ULTRAREAL DIGITAL CRAFT

Initial clamping system for casting

Sewing Fabric Formwork The first step is to sew the fabric formwork. We used a simple muslin fabric. For our previous studies we experimented with two kinds of fabric, a stretchier fabric inside of a non-stretchy fabric. This gave us many interesting textures which we could design through laser cutting fabric patterns onto the nonstretchy outer fabric.

However, when we moved to the larger scale of cast we only used one kind of non-stretchy fabric so that we could focus on getting the concrete into all parts of the complex shape. The fabric formwork is make up of two rings of fabric that are sewn together with shapes that were designed on a 2D pattern. BUILDING TECHNOLOGY

Materials and Methods in Architecture

57


Milling + adding clamps We milled the remaining shapes that weren’t sewn into the fabric and bolted them onto the fabric in the correct positions. We intentionally left them loose so that the concrete could get through them at the top. cut files for wooden clap location

nested file for frame

SUM. 2011 FALL. 2011 SPR. 2012

58

all materials needed for fabrication

Fabric-ation


ADVANCED STUDIO VI ADVANCED STUDIO V ADVANCED STUDIO IV MATERIALS AND METHODS IN ARCH.

SURFACE, SCREEN & STRUCTURE

Because our final design is quite large (4 feet tall) we had to make a substantial frame that could support all the weight of the concrete as we pour. Throughout our studies we have found that the fabric casts work better if they are in tension because then the final hardened concrete will always be in the most structural position. We made a cylindrical frame that our fabric sewn bag would fit into. We suspend the bag upside down in the frame so that we are pouring through the biggest openings into the smallest openings

FAST PACE/SLOW SPACE

Fabricating the Frame

IMAGINING THE ULTRAREAL

Adding bolts and wing-nuts

DIGITAL CRAFT

Organizing the wooden clamps

Frame construction BUILDING TECHNOLOGY

Materials and Methods in Architecture

59


pushing the concrete to the bottom of the mold

Curing time was approximately 24 hours

Mixing and Pouring Concrete For the final design we used Quickrete 5000. The mix had aggregate, but we sifted out most of the large pieces because we were concerned it would get stuck in the small fabric openings. The ideal mix was very liquid, almost like pancake batter. For most molds this would be too watery, but because we are using fabric, all the excess water seeps out. The concrete was poured through the top so that gravity pulls it all down into its natural position.

We had to vibrate and shake the mold substantially as we were filling it with concrete so that all the openings get filled. Some of the wooden clamps had to be removed so that we could ensure we were getting concrete to all the spaces at the bottom. This made some of the legs larger than we had designed but we would rather have the legs larger than to have unfilled openings. The fabric was filled almost to the top until all the legs were approximately the same height.

Removing the Formwork

SUM. 2011 FALL. 2011 SPR. 2012

60

Concrete was poured from the top opening Fabric-ation

Because the fabric is such a cheap easy to make formwork, the best way to remove it is to just cut it off. Again, it is essential for these complex shapes that we use flexible fabric because there would be no way to remove a hard formwork. Because the fabric is so thin, we can just peel it off, cutting wherever we need to. We then sand the concrete slightly wherever the seam of the fabric shows and grind the bottom legs down so that it sits flat


Final prototype

BUILDING TECHNOLOGY

Materials and Methods in Architecture

61

DIGITAL CRAFT

IMAGINING THE ULTRAREAL

FAST PACE/SLOW SPACE

MATERIALS AND METHODS IN ARCH.

SURFACE, SCREEN & STRUCTURE

ADVANCED STUDIO IV

ADVANCED STUDIO V

ADVANCED STUDIO VI


SUM. 2011 FALL. 2011 SPR. 2012

62

Roll Play


ADVANCED STUDIO VI ADVANCED STUDIO V ADVANCED STUDIO IV SURFACE, SCREEN & STRUCTURE MATERIALS AND METHODS IN ARCH.

Mark Bearak & Brigette Borders, critics Fast Pace / Slow Space

BUILDING TECHNOLOGY

DIGITAL CRAFT

team: Fiona Booth, George Dolidze, Kyle Hovenkotter, Trevor Lamphier, Luisa Mendez, Tiffany Rattray, Bryce Suite, Rachel Villalta, Heidi Werner

IMAGINING THE ULTRAREAL

FAST PACE/SLOW SPACE

Roll Play

BUILDING TECHNOLOGY

Fast Pace / Slow Space

63


Roll Play Mark Bearak & Brigette Borders, critics Fast Pace / Slow Space team: Fiona Booth, George Dolidze, Kyle Hovenkotter, Trevor Lamphier, Luisa Mendez, Tiffany Rattray, Bryce Suite, Rachel Villalta, Heidi Werner

SUM. 2011 FALL. 2011 SPR. 2012

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Roll Play


ADVANCED STUDIO VI ADVANCED STUDIO V ADVANCED STUDIO IV SURFACE, SCREEN & STRUCTURE MATERIALS AND METHODS IN ARCH. FAST PACE/SLOW SPACE

Created to be showcased at the End of the Year show at Columbia University the schedule for design and fabrication demanded a tight deadline. Our group of 10 students distributed and collaborated on all stages of the process from initial schematics to material cost and distribution.

The main concept of the course was to have students engage a design solution based on factual parameters like cost and tight deadlines that will challenge the fabrication process and delivery. To meet these demands we designed an installation based on low cost material (concrete) to create an urban landscape. The process is an iteration of individual concrete benches that can work together or individually. Roll Play is an installation of rolling concrete furniture, creating an urban space for public gathering in uptown Manhattan. Assembled from many small pieces, Roll Play works both together and split up. On their own, the pieces become seats and tables, but together they form a continuous surface replete with everything neede for a gathering.

Roll Play’s digitally created topography allows for infinite surface variability and programmatic specificity. Valleys become lounges, holes are filled with ice to become coolers and cupholders.

Rigorous testing and experimentation with these techniques have led us to believe we can perfect their various aspects to create a public landscape that will offer both excitement and repose in the city.

To achieve this we have incorporated two main technologies: fiber reinforced concrete and a flexible mold. The glass-fiber reinforced concrete allows for very thin but very strong concrete forms. Traditional steel reinforcement is thicker and much heavier. The flexible mold facilitates the production of endless unique forms from one mold. Aside from the economic benefit, this technique is a smarter construction system than traditional formwork.

BUILDING TECHNOLOGY

IMAGINING THE ULTRAREAL

arametric and computational software offer designers a high degree of specificity which can be used to create complex forms, intricate details, and material efficiency, yet high-level results become insignificant if construction methods are too complicated to be timely*. This was the premise of the course and became the guide of our team’s project. We were especially interested in creating an installation using a sophisticated fabrication process but with relative low cost and constructive complexity.

DIGITAL CRAFT

*course objective

P

Fast Pace / Slow Space

65


3.3’

1.6’

Individual piece

Aggregated composition

SUM. 2011 FALL. 2011 SPR. 2012

66

User defined opportunities Roll Play


sit

drink

lounge rest

BUILDING TECHNOLOGY

Fast Pace / Slow Space

67

DIGITAL CRAFT

IMAGINING THE ULTRAREAL

FAST PACE/SLOW SPACE

MATERIALS AND METHODS IN ARCH.

SURFACE, SCREEN & STRUCTURE

ADVANCED STUDIO IV

ADVANCED STUDIO V

ADVANCED STUDIO VI


Concrete bench matrix

SUM. 2011 FALL. 2011 SPR. 2012

68

Roll Play


Aggregated composition

BUILDING TECHNOLOGY

Fast Pace / Slow Space

69

DIGITAL CRAFT

IMAGINING THE ULTRAREAL

FAST PACE/SLOW SPACE

MATERIALS AND METHODS IN ARCH.

SURFACE, SCREEN & STRUCTURE

ADVANCED STUDIO IV

ADVANCED STUDIO V

ADVANCED STUDIO VI


top wood tuning frame concrete cast silicone backup eggcrate topography wooden tuning frame wooden base

Exploded axo.

SUM. 2011 FALL. 2011 SPR. 2012

70

Roll Play

Complete system setup


ADVANCED STUDIO VI ADVANCED STUDIO V ADVANCED STUDIO IV SURFACE, SCREEN & STRUCTURE

Add top wood tunning frame

Lift frame and cast concrete

Lower frame and trowel concrete

Let sit for 10-15 minutes then slump!

MATERIALS AND METHODS IN ARCH.

Jig set up

DIGITAL CRAFT

IMAGINING THE ULTRAREAL

FAST PACE/SLOW SPACE

Assembling waffle

BUILDING TECHNOLOGY

Fast Pace / Slow Space

71


Site plan

SUM. 2011 FALL. 2011 SPR. 2012

72

Roll Play


DIGITAL CRAFT

ruber peg

steel leg IMAGINING THE ULTRAREAL

FAST PACE/SLOW SPACE

Leg construction detail MATERIALS AND METHODS IN ARCH.

BUILDING TECHNOLOGY

Fast Pace / Slow Space

SURFACE, SCREEN & STRUCTURE

Joint bench connection node

concrete cast

Leg construction. Exploded Axo.

73

ADVANCED STUDIO IV

ADVANCED STUDIO V

ADVANCED STUDIO VI


SUM. 2011 FALL. 2011 SPR. 2012

74

Roll Play


BUILDING TECHNOLOGY

Fast Pace / Slow Space

75

DIGITAL CRAFT

IMAGINING THE ULTRAREAL

FAST PACE/SLOW SPACE

MATERIALS AND METHODS IN ARCH.

SURFACE, SCREEN & STRUCTURE

ADVANCED STUDIO IV

ADVANCED STUDIO V

ADVANCED STUDIO VI


SUM. 2011 FALL. 2011 SPR. 2012

76

Gateway


DIGITAL CRAFT

Kevin Cimini & Chris Hoxie, critics

VISUAL STUDIES

Imagining the Ultrareal VISUAL STUDIES

Imagining the Ultrareal

IMAGINING THE ULTRAREAL

Gateway

77

FAST PACE/SLOW SPACE

MATERIALS AND METHODS IN ARCH.

SURFACE, SCREEN & STRUCTURE

ADVANCED STUDIO IV

ADVANCED STUDIO V

ADVANCED STUDIO VI


Gateway Kevin Cimini & Chris Hoxie, critics

*course objective

Imagining the Ultrareal

T

he architectural rendering—be it photo-realistic, analytic, or abstract— captures the energy of an idea about space and the forces that act within it. The challenge of this course is to convey that dynamism—whether it is the movement of a set of bodies, a change in lighting and material qualities, or any other dynamic quality of architecture— with a set of static images. My specific intention was to generate an image of a place which embodies motion. A specific transition gate between the water and the ground.

SUM. 2011 FALL. 2011 SPR. 2012

78

Gateway


Studio lighting view

VISUAL STUDIES

Imagining the Ultrareal

79

DIGITAL CRAFT

IMAGINING THE ULTRAREAL

FAST PACE/SLOW SPACE

MATERIALS AND METHODS IN ARCH.

SURFACE, SCREEN & STRUCTURE

ADVANCED STUDIO IV

ADVANCED STUDIO V

ADVANCED STUDIO VI


SUM. 2011 FALL. 2011 SPR. 2012

80

Gateway


HDRI lighting scene

VISUAL STUDIES

Imagining the Ultrareal

81

DIGITAL CRAFT

IMAGINING THE ULTRAREAL

FAST PACE/SLOW SPACE

MATERIALS AND METHODS IN ARCH.

SURFACE, SCREEN & STRUCTURE

ADVANCED STUDIO IV

ADVANCED STUDIO V

ADVANCED STUDIO VI


SUM. 2011 FALL. 2011 SPR. 2012

82

Seoul National University Museum of Art


Josh Uhl & David Fano, instructors

VISUAL STUDIES DIGITAL CRAFT

Digital Craft

VISUAL STUDIES

Digital Craft

83

IMAGINING THE ULTRAREAL

FAST PACE/SLOW SPACE

MATERIALS AND METHODS IN ARCH.

SURFACE, SCREEN & STRUCTURE

ADVANCED STUDIO IV

ADVANCED STUDIO V

ADVANCED STUDIO VI


Digital Craft Josh Uhl & David Fano, instructors

D

igital Craft investigates the concepts, techniques, and working methods of computer aided ‘drawing’ in architecture. We studied the operative relationship between 2d and 3d data, exploring the reache of their analytic and representational potential. The class build on the our advanced ability to question, shape, and interrogate space and time. To develop a first approach to these architectural drawing tools I choose to construct Rem Koolhaas’s National University Museum in Korea. The object of the course was to construct a digital and physical model.

SUM. 2011 FALL. 2011 SPR. 2012

84

Seoul National University Museum of Art


VISUAL STUDIES

Digital Craft

85

DIGITAL CRAFT

IMAGINING THE ULTRAREAL

FAST PACE/SLOW SPACE

MATERIALS AND METHODS IN ARCH.

SURFACE, SCREEN & STRUCTURE

ADVANCED STUDIO IV

ADVANCED STUDIO V

ADVANCED STUDIO VI


Rendered view

SUM. 2011 FALL. 2011 SPR. 2012

86

Seoul National University Museum of Art


Physical model

VISUAL STUDIES

Digital Craft

87

DIGITAL CRAFT

IMAGINING THE ULTRAREAL

FAST PACE/SLOW SPACE

MATERIALS AND METHODS IN ARCH.

SURFACE, SCREEN & STRUCTURE

ADVANCED STUDIO IV

ADVANCED STUDIO V

ADVANCED STUDIO VI


Alvaro Arias M.S. in Advanced Architectural Design Columbia University GSAPP May 2012


Architecture Portfolio. Columbia University