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Sports Alva Cardinals in League Championship Page 10

News Officers break up local bridge party Page 3

Today’s weather 40% chance of showers. High near 88. Page 3

Alva Review-Courier Vol. 121 No. 60

Sunday, July 28, 2013 - $1.00

www.alvareviewcourier.com

620 Choctaw, Alva, OK 73717

Justin Jones a friend to Alva Departing as Okla. DOC director

By Lynn L. Martin Department of Corrections (DOC) Director Justin Jones announced at a staff meeting in Oklahoma City on June 17 that he was resigning his position with the DOC effective Oct. 1. According to reports in the state’s two major newspapers, Gov. Mary Fallin said she had lost confidence in Jones. The issue is that the DOC had asked for $6.4 million supplemental appropriation at a time when it had about $22 million in three agency revolving funds, according to the Daily Oklahoman. The Bill Johnson Correctional

Evans named interim director

In a meeting Friday, the Department of Corrections board named former JCCC warden Ed Evans as the interim director after Justin Jones leaves and before a new warden in found. Representative Jeff Hickman says that is good because we still have a friend who understands the facilities in Northwest Oklahoma.

Center (BJCC) Community Advisory Board met Wednesday, July 24, and Justin Jones was invited to attend. Others in attendance included Rep. Jeff Hickman and Sen. Bryce Marlatt. Hickman expressed his outrage at the metro area headlines that read all this money was “found” or that dollars were “uncovered.” These words implied the Jones was sitting on hidden funds while the DOC was asking for more. Hickman told the BJCC advisory board, “Justin Jones told us about the amount of these revolving funds at a public budget meeting two weeks before the legislative session started.” He explained, “Every governor since David Boren has told the Department of Corrections director not to use the revolving funds to hire staff because we don’t know what funds are going to be there next year. Use it, instead, to fix locks, to fix roofs and to fix the fences. Use the revolving funds for maintenance items that do not need to be done again in the next year. “The director needed money to hire staff because the agency is woefully understaffed. Year after year we have cut the budget. He has to do his job of housing prisoners and because the prison population continues to grow each year, he has to employ more staff to do handle that,” Hickman said. Because of the allegations of hidden funds, the legislative lead-

Bids are opened for Avard Rail Park road By Helen Barrett Members of the Avard Regional Rail Park Authority met Wednesday in special session to open bids for construction of a new road inside the Avard Rail Park to provide access to one of the tenants. Members present were Ed Sutter, Joe Royster, Stan Bixler, Les Kamas and Todd Holder. Others present at the meeting were Economic Development Executive Director Sonja Williams, County Clerk Shelley Reed, Woods County Commissioner Mike Goucher, Joe Mathea of Martin Marietta Materials and Woods County Commissioner Clint Strawn. Prior to opening the bids, the authority approved minutes of the previous meeting. Reed opened the bids submitted as following: Shirley Dozer, Alva: complete project – $43,825; road prep $14,000; mat 13 roll #8, $8,825;

limestone/granite, $22,500. Litzenberger Construction, Waynoka: labor and materials, complete project – $46,410 total; build road only for $8,980; mat, $9,000; hauling stone, $21,430; labor only, $17,410. CP3 Enterprises: complete project – $158, 503.05; price road prep and application – $113, 322.75. After looking at all the bids, Ed Sutter moved to table them and take them up at the next regular meeting on Aug. 13. “I’d like to thank our bidders,” Sutter said. “There have been times we asked for bids and received none. It looks to me like we’ve had some very competitive bids. I think there would be benefit to study the bids and determine the availability of each company before making a decision.” The board voted unanimously to approve Sutter’s motion.

ers decided to give the DOC a standstill budget for the next fiscal year, despite a growing number of inmates. “The governor is not comfortable giving the agency more resources until it has thoroughly investigated these issues,” a spokesman for the governor said. Corrections board member Steve Burrage, who also has “The director needbeen criti- ed money to hire cal of the staff because the agency’s agency is woefully financial understaffed.” – transparRep. Jeff Hickman ency in regards to revolving funds, said he was not aware of any direct pressure for Jones to resign, but he mentioned that Jones was at odds with some legislative leaders over the way the agency presented its financial problems. Private vs. State Prisons Hickman was emphatic in emphasizing a difference in philosophy between the DOC and private prisons groups. “Our goal is when someone leaves here, we don’t want

them to come back. It’s not that we don’t like them, we just don’t want them to come back. We’ll be happy to see them somewhere else as productive citizens who have families, have jobs and who are taxpayers. “The goal of reducing the returns to prison does not play into the financial plans of some private institutions,” he said, implying that a for-profit prison’s income is increased when people return to prison. Another point that Hickman hammered was that it is a myth that private prison are cheaper. He said, “There may have been a time when it was cheaper to house prisoners in private prisons but that’s not true anymore. “On maximum security inmates, sure; if you lock them up and don’t provide services for mental health or medical help for the elderly, it is cheaper. But court rulings have made it clear we don’t have that option. Those concerns cannot be neglected.” The representative wound up his remarks by praising Jones. He said, “I don’t know of a more credible person. I don’t know of a more ethical person or one who has more integrity than Justin Jones. The state has benefited from his service over several decades. We here at BJCC not only recognize his expertise, but he has been called upon by several states and other countries to consult about corrections.”

Sen. Bryce Marlatt Marlatt likened the problems facing the DOC to the problems he encountered as chairman of the transportation committee. He said, “The problem we were facing is we have gone 22 years without ever addressing the infrastructure. One day we woke up and discovered we had major, major, problems that we had to address. We’re on the way to catching up, “Corrections is not but it will something that is take many sexy for politicians to talk about.” - Sen. years. Bryce Marlatt “Corrections is not something that is sexy for politicians to talk about. We face the same problem in corrections as we did in transportation. We’ve got to get caught up before it runs away with us. “Those legislators in Edmond, who do not have a prison in their area, do not understand the challenges. Because we live in a district with two prisons, we see DOC employees at the Little League games

See Jones Page 2

‘Big Mac’ in decline Oldest prison in state is crumbling

Corrections (DOC) officials say there are no plans to close the prison, the state’s only one that is solely maximum-security. Some inmates, such as those on death row and with serious mental illnesses,

could not be moved to private prisons for legal, public-policy and cost reasons, they say. But the steadily deteriorating facilities

By Clifton Adcock See Decline Page 2 and Shaun Hittle The Oklahoma State Penitentiary (OSP) in McAlester, the oldest prison in the state, has seen its inmate population fall to less than half of what it was five years ago as officials move hundreds of the state’s most dangerous convicts to private prisons. The decline has been so steep that some state lawmakers, corrections guards and others wonder if “Big Mac,” as it is called, will become home to only death row and the execution chamber, or if the prison will eventually be closed. One by one, cell houses have been shuttered, including several in recent years. As of the last weekly count, 574 inmates were at the facility, compared with close to This is the entrance to the Oklahoma State Penitentiary in McAlester. The warden, Anita Trammell, is the first woman to head the 1,400 in early 2008. Oklahoma Department of prison. Photo by Clifton Adcock


July 28, 2013

From Front Page

Alva Review-Courier

Jones

and at the grocery store and we hear about your challenges on almost a daily basis.” Marlatt praised Jones for being a very “stand-up” guy. He said, “I don’t know what your plans are, but you are going to be very, very successful and we appreciate your services and everything you’ve done.” A Friend to Alva Long before he was director, Jones spent several weeks in Alva helping oversee the construction of BJCC. He told of living in a motel up the road, and how kind they were to let him leave his stuff in the room over the weekend and not charge for those couple of days when he went home for the weekend. Hickman said as director, Jones has saved the treatment programs in Alva several times when others wanted to do away with the treatment areas and turn them into bed space. Director Justin Jones When he spoke, Jones said he did not know what Warden Melton had in mind when she invited him to Alva and had he known it was a tribute meeting, he wouldn’t have come. He explained that he and Janice Melton both joined the DOC and entered the Kate Barnard Community Corrections training camp together. He said he was two weeks shy of his 22nd birthday at the time. “There were 46 or 47 of us and Janice and I are the last of the group to still be with DOC. That was in 1977, and I thought I would outlast her. In my 36-plus years, I don’t look back. It’s gone in the blink of an eye.”

Jones briefly told why he felt those pushing for closure of Helena and Granite facilities are wrong. He explained that if they closed those facilities and moved the inmates to private prisons, the growth rate in the number of prisoners would force the agency to re-open Helena and Granite in a couple of “ I knew I would pay a price, but I just years. “A lot didn’t know how of people nasty it was going to don’t un- get.” - Justin Jones, director derstand that it costs about $10 million to close a facility. You’ve got to buy everybody’s annual leave; you’ve got to give them next year’s longevity and you’ve got to give them 18 months of insurance premiums at $400$500 per month. Then the employees scatter. It simply doesn’t make sense to close these facilities when the legislature is backing away from the prison sentence reform Speaker Chris Steele pushed though a couple of years ago. Instead, some are once again promoting the attitude of “Let’s lock them up for even longer times.” I refused to make that impractical decision. I knew I would pay a price, but I just didn’t know how nasty it was going to get.”

OHP pilot in stable but serious condition BETHEL ACRES, Okla. (AP) — The Oklahoma Highway Patrol says the pilot of a plane that crashed while searching for a suspect is in serious but stable condition at a hospital. The highway patrol on Saturday identified the pilot as Trooper Dennis Dickens.

The agency says Dickens is a veteran pilot with “many years’ service” flying for the patrol. Dickens was airlifted to an Oklahoma City hospital after being pulled from the burning wreckage of the plane, which went down at 7 p.m. Friday in Pottawatomie County. The National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration are investigating the circumstances of the crash. The OHP says the suspect in the Friday search, 50-year-old Brent McKenzie of Shawnee, was caught and charged with DUI, leaving the scene of an accident and other counts.

From Front Page

Page 2

Decline

raise questions about the prison’s future. In a June 11 statement, the DOC said that it plans to keep the penitentiary in operation “for years to come,” although “the goal is to reduce the facility offender population to approximately 600 offenders.” The agency received money in fiscal year 2012 to build a new administration building, install a stun fence and move inmates to other facilities. Cell houses were closed because they were “old and not cost-efficient to operate” or posed safety issues, the statement and corrections officials said. Meanwhile, the state’s prison population keeps rising, and county jails are overcrowded with inmates who are supposed to be transferred to the state prisons. Tulsa County has sued the state over the issue. The corrections department says its system is 98 percent full and it lacks the funds to contract for many more private-prison beds. Recent efforts at criminal justice reform haven’t cut the incarceration rate in Oklahoma, which has the third highest in the nation. Critics of the decline at McAlester say it represents a refusal by political leaders to invest more in a state-run prison system and to further privatize incarceration. They point to private prison companies’ campaign donations to lawmakers and intensive lobbying at the State Capitol. Sean Wallace, executive director of Oklahoma Corrections Professionals, said staffing levels are so poor in the prison system that even legislators who used to oppose privatization now see few other options. “We are starting to wonder if there really is a scheme to put the agency in such a bad situation that we have to privatize it.” Wallace said. State Sen. Clark Jolley, R-Edmond, who chairs the Senate appropriations committee, said the corrections department should look at keeping more maximum-security inmates in private prisons. The penitentiary has “been a lawsuit waiting to happen for many years” because of its aging buildings, Jolley said. “Obviously, we’ve been utilizing OSP because of necessity,” he said, adding the older housing units should be shut down, leaving only the unit with death row and disciplinary segregation and the mental health units. Jolley said the legislature should seriously consider building a new state-run maximum-security facility in McAlester or elsewhere. Signs of Decline Tour the penitentiary prison today and you’ll see many signs of age and abandonment. The closed buildings and prison cells nearly outnumber the open ones. The facility is tidy. But razorwire is rusted, floors are stained from leaky roofs and stark white paint peels from building exteriors. The air conditioning has been spotty in recent years. The famous McAlester prison rodeo hasn’t been held since 2009; the large arena sits empty. In 1973, when a massive, deadly riot occurred at the prison, there were more than 2,000 inmates packed into the facility, about double its capacity. They torched and ransacked most of the place. Afterward, a consultant hired by the stated advised that the prison, built in 1908, be torn down and rebuilt, as the infrastructure was shattered. Doing so would

The East Cell House of the Oklahoma State Penitentiary is closed. Photo by Clifton Adcock

The state prison’s “C Unit” was closed earlier this year, leaving one general-population cell house. Photo by Clifton Adcock give Oklahoma “an unparalleled opportunity to develop a modern correctional system, truly responsive to contemporary criminal justice needs” that would be more cost-effective. The demolition and rebuilding of the prison never happened. Rather, the state decided to keep the facility open, although with hundreds of fewer inmates and, until years later, only maximum security. Some buildings were razed, others repaired. New units were added in the 1980s and 1990s. The inmate population declined after the riot and has never again reached the same levels. But in the 1990s, it rose again to above 1,600. At the same time, private prisons began springing up in Hinton, Holdenville, Cushing, Lawton, Sayre and Watonga, holding medium- and minimum-security inmates. In 2007, an audit by a private consultant, MGT, criticized the state for reclassifying inmates from maximum to medium security in order to shift them to other prisons. It also recommended the state enact a plan to add maximumsecurity beds at the prison and to keep more such prisoners at private prisons. The plan to add the beds in McAlester never came about. Late last decade, the legislature approved a law allowing maximumsecurity inmates to be held in private prisons. In 2008, 360 went to Holdenville’s Davis Correctional Facility, run by Corrections Corp. of America. The number of inmates at the penitentiary began to drop at that point even as the system’s total population climbed, corrections department records show. In 2009, another consultant, the Durrant Group, recommended abandoning all housing units at the McAlester prison except the one containing death row and building new facilities there. “Savings in the operating costs would offset the increased cost of

construction of a new center,” the consultant said. Some legislators criticized the report because it didn’t address in detail use of private prisons. Today, about 5,000, or 20 percent, of Oklahoma’s inmates are in private prisons, up about 1,000 inmates since 2011. Jolley said the state’s percentage of prison beds used that are private is lower than it was a decade ago. Two private prisons in Watonga and Hinton would likely re-open if more Oklahoma inmates became available, he said. “I think both companies would accept new inmates tomorrow,” Jolley said. In June, another 180 maximumsecurity inmates from McAlester were sent to the Cimarron Correctional Facility in Cushing, also run by Corrections Corp. of America. The shift occurred after Puerto Rico decided to pull its roughly 400 inmates from the facility, which followed a major disturbance there in March in which inmates smashed windows and property and fashioned weapons. The outbreak was quelled with pepper-spraying and bean-bag shooting, the Tulsa World reported. Corrections Director Justin Jones, who is stepping down, said the available beds at Cimarron allowed him to move inmates out of the penitentiary and close units there, which he had wanted to do for years. “It was not a safe environment,” he said. Jerry Massie, corrections department spokesman, said the shift was part of the effort to reduce the population to around 600 inmates. The cost of incarcerating each maximum-security inmate at Cimarron, $57, is lower than the $78 daily rate at the penitentiary. However, the private prison rate excludes major medical, mental-

See Decline Page 7


July 28, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

Page 3

Officers break up Woman arrives for visit, local bridge party calls 911 after assault By Marione Martin Seven people apparently decided to enjoy a Friday afternoon with some fun at the river bridge north of Alva. Unfortunately, they did not have permission from the landowner. According to documents on file, on July 19 about 4:45 p.m. Woods County Sheriff’s Deputy Adam Honeyman was contacted by Alva Police Officer Ron Vasquez about some vehicles he could see underneath the river bridge on US281 just north of Alva. When Honeyman and Vasquez arrived, they saw five men and two women under the bridge on the land adjacent to the south side of the river on the west side of US281. The people said they had been there for several hours riding their ATV and Jeep in the riverbed and on the land adjacent to the river. There was a cooler with beer cans beside the river as well. The officers talked to each individually and learned that all but one had been consuming alcoholic beverages in a place where they did not have permission to be. They were placed under arrest for trespassing and public intoxication

and transported to the Woods County Jail. Willhite had not been consuming alcoholic beverages so he was the only one arrested who was not charged with public intoxication. Honeyman noted in his report that while on the way to the jail, Steve Stone was in the back passenger seat of his patrol vehicle. Since he had been cooperative, Honeyman had placed handcuffs on him in front instead of behind his back. Stone was able to remove Honeyman’s hat and place it on his own head, exiting with it on his head while walking into the jail. David Allen Willhite, 43, of Sedalia, Mo., was charged with trespass after being forbidden. The other six people were charged with both public intoxication and trespass after being forbidden. They are Tina Marie Gallegos, 38, Alva; Cody William Gronemeier, 26, no address; Wade Lewis Lightsey, 31, Universal City, Texas; Ashley Gay Price, 23, Pampa, Texas; Steve William Stone, 32, Granbury, Texas; and Shane Michael Warner, 27, Alva. All charges were misdemeanors.

Apply now for absentee ballots

Voters in the City of Alva who want to have absentee ballots mailed to them for the Sept. 10 special municipal election should apply now, County Election Board Secretary Wylodean Linder said today. Although the County Election Board can accept applications for absentee ballots until 5 p.m. on Wednesday, Sept. 4, Linder urged voters who want to vote by absentee ballot to apply early. Absentee ballot application forms are available at the County Election Board office located at the Woods County Courthouse. The absentee ballot application forms also can be downloaded and printed from the Internet at www.elections. ok.gov. “At least two mail transactions must be made,” Linder said. “The County Election Board must mail the ballots to the voter and the voter

must return the voted ballots by mail.” Ballots must be in the hands of the County Election Board by 7 p.m. on election day in order to be counted. Linder said that any registered voter may vote by absentee ballot in any election in which he or she is eligible to vote. However, a voter must be registered and reside at an address within the geographical boundaries of a school district or a municipality to be eligible to vote in school district or municipal elections. It is not necessary to give a reason – or excuse – for voting absentee. “While anyone can vote absentee without giving a reason, the law still provides several excuses, and it is to the advantage of some voters to use one of them,” Linder said. By stating one of the following

See Ballot Page 8

Woods County Forecast Sunday A 40 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 88. South wind 14 to 22 mph, with gusts as high as 31 mph. Sunday Night Showers and thunderstorms likely. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 70. South southeast wind 17 to 22 mph decreasing to 11 to 16 mph after midnight. Winds could gust as high as 31 mph. Chance of precipitation is 70%. Monday Showers and thunderstorms likely, mainly before 1pm. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 91. South southwest wind 9 to 16 mph, with gusts as high as 23 mph. Chance of precipitation is 60%. Monday Night A 30 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 71. Light and variable wind becoming north north-

east 9 to 14 mph after midnight. Winds could gust as high as 20 mph. Tuesday A 20 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Partly sunny, with a high near 92. Tuesday Night A 20 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Partly cloudy, with a low around 71. Wednesday Mostly sunny, with a high near 91. Wednesday Night Partly cloudy, with a low around 72. Thursday Mostly sunny, with a high near 96. Thursday Night Partly cloudy, with a low around 74. Friday Mostly sunny and hot, with a high near 98. Friday Night Partly cloudy, with a low around 73. Saturday Mostly sunny, with a high near 95.

By Marione Martin A Mississippi woman told police she came to Waynoka to visit her boyfriend. She said when he became physically abusive, she pulled a pocket knife to defend herself and asked the motel manager to call 911. Timothy Daryl Sanders, 41 of Lucedale, Miss., is now facing five charges in Woods County. According to documents on file, the trouble began on July 16 at the Trails Inn Motel in Waynoka. At 11:29 p.m. Waynoka Police Chief Brian Whitney was dispatched to the motel after a call from the manager saying a man in room No. 8 appeared to be extremely intoxicated and was physically battering a woman staying in the room. While he was driving to the motel, Whitney received another call from dispatch with a description of the male aggressor who was now outside in the parking lot yelling and had walked to the motel office where he attempted to break in by repeatedly kicking the door. Whitney called in help from off-duty Waynoka Reserve Police Officer Randy Stewart and Oklahoma State Park Ranger Jason Badley. When Whitney and Stewart arrived they could hear a man hollering. As they approached room No. 8, they saw a man outside room No. 9 pointing toward room 8. The officers could hear a female voice inside the room crying and yelling “get off of me, get off of me and quit beating me.” A male voice was heard saying, “You don’t worry about me, I’ll do what I want and you won’t tell me what to do.” Chief Whitney knocked on the door and announced “Police Department.” Sanders opened the door then attempted to slam the door shut. Whitney saw blood on the floor just inside the room. He told Sanders to show his hands and exit the room. Whitney could see a woman sitting on the edge of a bed in the room, crying and with blood on her clothing and face. Sanders eventually exited the room, and he was told several times to face away from Whitney and place his hands behind his back. After numerous commands, Sanders complied briefly before turning toward Whitney and attempting to lunge at him. Whitney deployed his taser at Sanders who began falling inside the room. With his right hand, Sanders reached up and removed the lead wires. He said, “What the

f--- did you do that for?” Whitney immediately reloaded a second taser cartridge and told Sanders to turn away from him and place his hands behind his back or he would be tased again. Sanders complied and was handcuffed and placed on the sidewalk outside the motel room. Whitney noted that Sanders had a strong odor associated with the consumption of alcohol about his breath and person. Whitney went inside the room to talk to the woman, Sonya Cook. He noticed severe bruising, bleeding and injuries to Cook’s face, head, neck and arms and contacted dispatch to send EMS. Cook said Sanders was staying in Waynoka doing contract work with a local company, and she had arrived from Mississippi about three hours earlier to visit him. She said that when she arrived, Sanders had been drinking and continued to drink “beer and Wild Turkey” throughout the evening. She said Sanders became aggressive and verbally abusive after her arrival. Cook said Sanders told her he was leaving to “find a black man with some crack.” When he returned, he said he had fallen down, skinning his knees, and he told her it was her fault. Cook said at that time Sanders became physically abusive and punched her several times in the face and head. She said when she tried to call 911 from the room, she reached the motel office and requested 911. She said Sanders continued to beat her, and when she screamed for help, he grabbed her “windpipe” with his hands and squeezed her throat so she could not breathe or yell for help. Cook said Sanders would take his hand off her throat and cover her mouth while telling her “I will kill you.” Cook said at some point in the attack, she was able to leave the motel room, but Sanders grabbed her, pulling her back inside and continued to hit her and block the doorway telling her, “you are mine, you’re my woman and you’re not leaving.” Cook said at one point after Sanders struck her

in the head she tried to pretend she was knocked out so he would stop. But he started “jerking” her and saying, “Wake up; there ain’t nothing wrong with you.” Cook said at one point she was able to retrieve a small pocket knife from her purse, located in the night stand drawer, and attempted to stab Sanders while being attacked. She said she “might have cut him a time or two” but was never able to gain enough control during the attack to stop him. When EMS arrived to care for Cook, Whitney spoke to the other witnesses. Edward Mazur, motel manager, said when he received the call from room No. 8 wanting 911, he went to investigate. When he approached the room, he could hear a woman yelling “let me go.” Mazur said he began pounding on the door, and Sanders came out and began physically attacking him. Mazur was able to break free and returned to the motel office to call 911 again. Sanders followed him to the office and forced his way in by kicking in the locked door. Other witnesses stated they did not see any physical assault but did hear the screams of a woman hollering for help. One witness stated that Sanders had approached him saying, “If you see a black man, I need to talk to him.” Sanders was taken to the Woods County Jail for booking and incarceration. He continued to be aggressive and uncooperative. He was placed in a holding cell for a time until jailers were able to complete the booking process. During an inventory of Sanders’ property at the jail, a small green baggie commonly used for illegal narcotics was discovered. It contained a screen that is commonly used to filter a “crack pipe.” Sanders has been charged with two felonies: domestic assault and battery and kidnapping. He has also been charged with three misdemeanors of resisting an officer, assault and battery and breaking and entering.


July 28, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

Page 4

Obamacare battle takes bizarre turn By Byron York The Affordable Care Act originally passed the House in 2009 with 220 votes, all but one of them Democrats. Recently 251 members of the House, including 22 Democrats, voted to postpone for one year

implementation of the heart of the act – the individual mandate to purchase health insurance. If this were any other issue, liberal commentators might see a governing majority emerging in favor of delaying Obamacare. In the last couple of years, House Republicans have voted over and over to repeal the president’s health care plan. It

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got to be routine. Not long ago, however, the Obamacare battle took a turn toward the bizarre. The cause was the administration’s decision to delay by one year the mandate requiring big businesses to provide health coverage for employees or pay a fine. The White House acted in response to complaints from business owners, who called the mandate burdensome. So Republicans thought: What about all those individuals out there who believe the mandate requiring them to buy coverage or pay a fine is just as burdensome? As the GOP saw it, the White House listened to big business but ignored the little guy. So Republicans came up with a two-part strategy that would, among other goals, sound out House Democrats’ attitudes toward Obamacare less than three months before it is to become a reality in American life. First, Republicans introduced a bill that would write into law what the president had already done by fiat – that is, delay the employer mandate a year. That seemed unnecessary, and a little mischievous, but the serious point, according to one House GOP aide, was to emphasize that “the president can’t just determine which laws he’s going to follow and when he’s going to follow them.” Even though it was largely moot, Obama took the move seriously enough to take the somewhat odd action of threatening to veto a bill that would duplicate his own policy. And when the White House argued that the postponement legislation “would cost millions of hardworking middle-class families the security of affordable health coverage and care they deserve” – remember, the bill would simply codify an action Obama had already taken – the White House’s position veered into the surreal. The House voted on July 17, and in the end 35 Democrats voted in favor of the president’s delay, while 160 voted against it. It’s hard to interpret exactly what that means, but it doesn’t seem good for Obama. The second part of the GOP strategy was introducing the bill that would delay the individual mandate the same way Obama had delayed the employer mandate. The purpose, Speaker John Boehner said in a special floor appearance, was “to make

Junkman’s Gems

Detroit’s financial turmoil By Jim Scribner Detroit has declared bankruptcy. I’m not sure what you do with a city that has $18.5 BILLION in debt and liabilities. Maybe the city could be sold to stockholders. I have helped several towns survive (Alva, Laughlin, Wichita, Enid, Avard, to name a few), so why not Detroit? Just from a nostalgic view the finest cars I have ever driven came from there. One thing that bothers me is why no one took the bull by the horns a long time ago and figured out a solution. It seems that the norm is to ignore problems until they are at a critical stage. I do find it laughable that the federal government has taken the stance of not helping Detroit financially at all. As we speak politicians are trying to decide how much money to send to some foreign country. I think as long as there are hungry people in our country, drug dealers running loose, people needing medical help and homeless people there should be a moratorium on sending ANY money out of our country until all Americans are taken care of. My grandpa John Scribner said charity

begins at home. We need politicians to take his stance. I feel sorry for other countries having problems, but let’s get back to taking care of our own. Don’t get me wrong, I am not in favor of throwing money at Detroit indiscriminately; let the city do what it has to as far as the bankruptcy goes, but use federal funds to pay all necessary personnel like firemen, police, trash and office personnel to keep the city moving. Pay only for what is necessary to assist them. Fuel, minimal repairs, light, water and gas come to mind as necessities. Cut wages to the quick and let them be glad for the money. All the fat cats (mayor, councilmen, city managers, graft collectors and their staffs) that ignored Detroit’s plight can work for nothing or just go away and quit contributing to the problem. Plan B will work well too. Instead of making New York City a maximum security prison (“Escape from New York”), let’s use Detroit. You surround the city and put criminals there; let them run it with no guards. Great incentive to not commit crimes if you get out alive the first time. It sounds far fetched, but would alleviate overcrowding all over the country. Move all the employable citizens to the Bible See Gems Page 5

Justin Jones’ resignation a blow to Oklahoma corrections

By The Tulsa World’s Editorial Writers Only 10 men have headed the Oklahoma Department of Corrections (DOC) since its modern-day creation 46 years ago. The average time spent in the most punishing job in state government has been 4.5 years, a tenuous tenure that Director Justin R. Jones will have doubled when he departs Oct. 1. The phrase “departs” is, of course, a euphemism. Ostensibly, Jones, who announced his resignation Monday, will leave on his own terms. Surviving eight years in a political shark tank is an eternity when political forces, or, more aptly, political foes – from the governor to the legislative leadership – want you gone. To his credit, Jones does not share their short-sighted vision for privatization of prisons. “You know, just because it’s legal See York Page 5 doesn’t make it ethically and morally right

for shareholders to make a profit off of incarceration of our fellow citizens,” Jones said. “I guess with my Christian upbringing, there always has been a conflict with that.” That conflict means that a very good man, well-suited for the job, is being shoved out for all the wrong reasons. It also means that the state’s absurdly high per-capita incarceration rate likely will never come down. Why would it when there are private cells to be filled and a private prison lobby passing out campaign donations? Jones leaves at the same time that major prison reforms, passed under former House Speaker Kris Steele in 2012, are being gutted, starved and ignored. It’s no coincidence. Similar reforms adopted by Texas and several other states are reducing See Corrections Page 5


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Click and Clack Talk Cars

Little boys can be emotional, too Tie rod needing repairs Dear Annie: Would you please give me your opinion on the “man up” issue when raising boys? When my 2-year-old grandson falls down, he is told to tough it out, that he is OK, and to “man up.” There is no hugging or wiping of tears, because that’s considered babying. I consider it compassion. I didn’t raise my kids like this. Why do parents want their boys to be tough and hide their emotions? Isn’t it OK to cry if you are hurt, especially if you are 2 years old? Should I continue to comfort them anyway? How do I handle this? – Sad Grandma Dear Grandma: It’s perfectly OK for boys of any age to cry when hurt (physically or emotionally). And while our society has been conditioned to react negatively toward men who weep at the drop of a hat, it is generally considered sensitive and attractive for them to shed a tear when the occasion calls for it. Thought minor hurts should not be turned into major crises, a toddler should be able to cry without worrying that he is angering or disappointing his parents. When he is with you, feel free to treat him as you would any child who needs some TLC. The world certainly does not need more men who are emotionally closed off because their parents taught them that expressing themselves was somehow not masculine.

From Page 4

was not treated as well as his younger siblings. We were heartsick at the way he was singled out for unkind treatment. He was berated for every little thing. Yet he was a good boy with excellent grades who graduated from school with top honors. We took “Johnny” whenever possible, sometimes for a week at a time, and stayed closely in touch until, not surprisingly, it reached the crisis stage and he threatened suicide. They disregarded it, and he ran off. We found him and took him to live with us. His parents were angry, and there was a yearlong estrangement, but we stuck to it, knowing it was the right thing to do. Today, “Johnny” is a successful student at college and reunited with his parents and siblings. It won’t be easy, but I know if “Grandparents” continue to support and love “Hayden,” they will not regret it. – Grandparents, Too Annie’s Mailbox is written by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar, longtime editors of the Ann Landers column. Please email your questions to anniesmailbox@ comcast.net, or write to: Annie’s Mailbox, c/o Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd Street, Hermosa Beach, CA 90254. To find out more about Annie’s Mailbox and read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate Web page at www. creators.com.

York

sure families and individuals get the same break from Obamacare that the president wants for big businesses.” The 22 Democratic votes in favor of the delay provided another sign that doesn’t look good for the president. Boehner sent out a press release claiming “bipartisan opposition to a partisan train wreck.” Seemingly unsteadied by a turn of events that included his own threat to veto himself, Obama took to the White House East Room for an Obamacare pep rally. The Republicans were clearly on his mind. “Yesterday, despite all the evidence that the law is working the way it was supposed to for middle-

From Page 4

Dear Annie: My husband and I have disagreed about this since the day we married. I was divorced, and he was divorced twice. Let’s call him “Joe Smith,” and I’ll be “Jane Doe.” After my divorce, I went back to using my maiden name. I didn’t want to be the third “Mrs. Smith.” Here’s the problem: Mail, holiday cards and invitations all come addressed to “Mr. and Mrs. Joe Smith.” I feel it should be “Mr. Smith and Ms. Doe.” It irks me to no end that people cannot grasp this simple concept. I am right, aren’t I? – Who Am I? Dear Who: Basic etiquette says a married couple is address as “Mr. and Mrs. Whatever” unless informed otherwise. Even if people are aware that you use your maiden name, they may think it is only for business purposes and not for social invitations. This is not an unreasonable assumption, so you need to clarify your preference. You should let your friends and family know that you use your maiden name for all forms of address and would appreciate it if they would respect that. Some folks may need to be reminded more than once, so please be patient. Dear Annie: Your advice to “Grandparents” was right on the money. Our son and daughter-inlaw also have three children, the eldest from a previous relationship. It was obvious that “Johnny”

class Americans, Republicans in the House of Representatives voted – for nearly the 40th time – to dismantle it,” the president said. “We’ve got a lot of problems in this country ... and yet, instead we’re refighting these old battles.” Perhaps the battles would indeed be old if Democrats had written a law that went into effect a year or even two years after it was passed. But Obamacare became law more than three years ago and still hasn’t gone into effect. Of course the battle is still going on. Now the House bills go to the Democratic-controlled Senate, where they will die. But Republicans will try to ensure a noisy death. “We can make sure it doesn’t get bottled

up in committee,” says one Senate GOP aide, “and then try to attach it to something on the floor.” That means there will at least be some debate on the delays, even though Majority Leader Harry Reid will never allow a vote on them. And after that? Republicans don’t quite know. But they are confident that the coming implementation of Obamacare will give them more chances to undermine the health care law. “We had these two votes,” says the GOP House aide, “because the president gave us an opportunity to take another whack at it.” (Byron York is chief political correspondent for The Washington Examiner.)

Gems

belt where jobs are plentiful, and leave the criminals right there. Well, as 65 approaches, so does senility, I guess. Last week I wrote my story. It was a little short and Cleo had vetoed the Rivera joke. I rewrote the story and then proceeded to send my story to Linda twice. Somehow I sent both the original and the rewritten copies and then Murphy’s Law kicked in. Linda reads the first version and figured they were both the same and printed it. Here is what I missed last week. The out-of-town visitors on memorial weekend had to wonder if they had missed the mark. For as many years as I have been decorating graves we have had a showcase cemetery until this year. The fearless leader for the cemetery had quit his job to move to greener pastures, as it were. The city leaders decided to not get inmate help to polish it up until after Memorial weekend.

I guess your priorities get hazy when your tunnel vision is on a $5 water bill raise and all else goes by the wayside. The city hired a new sexton for the cemetery. I know Chris and he will get it back to showcase quality in no time. My friend Charlotte Edwards had to endure her brother’s headstone being moved, not put back and ultimately paying to have it replaced herself. She took the bill to the city and was told that things

are tough all over. I have no clue what the policy is on replacement time, but after it had been from April 13 to a week after Memorial weekend and she had to get it replaced herself, I think if I had been the city manager I would have just paid the cost and not made it an issue. Thanks again for the anniversary well wishes. When Cleo asked what I wanted, I told her to make it to 47!

is a serious matter By Tom and Ray Magliozzi Dear Tom and Ray: I have a 1987 Honda Accord, and the right front CV boot on the drive axle is torn. Mechanic said it would be about $250 to replace, but then said that the tie rod must be removed and needs to be replaced, so it amounts to $500 to repair. The car has 198,000 miles and is not worth too much more than that. Should I repair, or find another beater? Meanwhile, I wrapped the boot with plastic bags from the grocery store and wrapped duct tape around the bags and then used wire to hold it in place. I did squirt some grease into the boot before I did this. Can I get along with this for a while? Is this safe? I’m afraid to go too far from home. -- Bo TOM: Fears often are irrational and misplaced, Bo. Not yours -your fear of not straying too far from home in this heap is entirely justified. And we’d encourage you to abide by it. RAY: I’m actually less worried about the CV boot than I am about the tie rod. Long before the CV joint fails, the car will make a terrible clacking noise and eventually stop moving. But that’s it. TOM: On the other hand, if the tie rod breaks, you suddenly won’t be able to steer the car. RAY: So if you trust your mechanic, and believe the tie rod really does need to be replaced, I’d spend the $250 on that. That’s a threat to your existence; the CV boot is just a threat to your transportation. TOM: Eventually, the CV joint will degrade and fail due to lack of lubrication. The repair you did with the plastic bags and duct tape won’t help. As you probably know by now, the centrifugal force of

From Page 4

the spinning wheel will make that stuff fly off. Or even if it doesn’t fly off completely, it won’t do much to keep the grease packed into the joint. RAY: There IS something that does a very good job of holding the grease in there, Bo. It’s called a CV boot. And it costs $250. TOM: But if you’re willing to put in a little more time maintaining it, you can pick up a tube of CV grease from your Honda dealer, and then once a week get under the car and squirt some grease into the joint. RAY: That would push out all the water, rocks and pedestrians that the joint accumulated from the road during the week, and replace it with life-sustaining lubricant. And if you were diligent, and did that once a week or so, the joint could soldier on for a long time. TOM: It’ll take you five minutes every weekend. Well, five minutes to grease the joint, then 15 minutes to clean your hands and two hours to go out and replace the clothes you stained. But that’s a safe, acceptable, midrange solution. RAY: But you can’t Mickey Mouse the tie rod, Bo. If that breaks, you’ll lose control of the car. So get that fixed right away. Good luck. * ** If it ain’t broke, you won’t have to fix it! Order Tom and Ray’s pamphlet “Ten Ways You May Be Ruining Your Car Without Even Knowing It!” Send $4.75 (check or money order) to Ruin, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475. *** Get more Click and Clack in their new book, “Ask Click and Clack: Answers from Car Talk.” Got a question about cars? Write to Click and Clack in care of this newspaper, or email them by visiting the Car Talk website at www.cartalk.com.

Corrections

prison populations, dropping crime rates, increasing public safety, cutting costs and lowering recidivism. Not here. As director, Jones will never see that reform package, the Justice Reinvestment Initiative, come to fruition, and neither will Oklahomans, who support 25,000 inmates in prisons that are woefully understaffed. Jones, 58, will leave behind a distinguished career that he began at DOC in 1977 as a probation officer, and culminated with his appointment as director in 2005. He garnered national prominence for his expertise.

As director he has struggled to apply that expertise in the face of resistance – to be more than just an innkeeper, in an inn that never has enough room. Jones tried hard to create programs, only to see them stripped away, to support community sentencing, drug courts, substance abuse treatment and other strategies that might make inmates less likely to re-offend. For years, the legislature has played games with the DOC budget and in the past few years has hardened its position on privatization. Justin Jones fought the good fight for a long time. Too bad for Oklahoma that he didn’t win.


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Prison became ‘mini-hell’ during riot built in 1908. Overcrowding, filthy and degraded facilities, untrained and low-paid guards, bad communication and other factors had combined to sow the seeds of the revolt. Although the riot’s death toll was far short of the 39 who died in the Attica Prison riot in New York two years earlier, it gutted most of Big Mac and reinforced claims in a lawsuit that eventually brought reforms to the Oklahoma Department of Corrections. The Riot In the months and years leading up to the 1973 riot, signs of trouble at the prison were evident. Earlier in the year, prisoners organized a three-day hunger strike protesting a wide variety of problems within the prison, including poor health care, racial discrimination and censorship of mail, according to “History of Corrections in Oklahoma,” a book that details aspects of the riot. The prison had also seen its This guard tower is located next to the F Cell House which was closed last year because it was not cost- share of violence, with 19 violent efficient to operate. Photo by Clifton Adcock deaths and 40 stabbings occurring in the three years preceding the riot. Lionel Johnson, now 71, had smoke, stabbing victims, beatings, was estimated at more than $20 been working inside the penitentiary hostages and looting. The National million. for two years, supervising inmate An outside consultant brought Guard and Oklahoma Highway cooks, when the violence erupted. in by the governor to advise on Patrol were called in. The governor, By Shaun Hittle He described a rough-andForty years ago this month, David Hall, implored rioters to give how to rebuild the facility after tumble atmosphere at the prison pent-up rage among inmates at the up and met with some to hear their the riot called the incident “one where fights were commonplace. of the most disastrous events in Oklahoma State Penitentiary in demands. On the day of the riot, though, it When the siege ended three American correctional history.” McAlester erupted in murderous The McAlester riot also was clear something larger was days later, three inmates were violence. happening. On July 27, 1973, “Big Mac,” dead, more than 20 people had highlighted issues that had been “I didn’t know what was going brewing for years behind the as it’s commonly called, became been injured and 24 buildings had on,” he said. “Looked out the door gates of the state’s oldest prison, a mini-hell of fire and black been destroyed. Total damage and everyone was running every which way.” According to various news reports, several inmates, who were drunk off homemade alcohol, collected long knives and stabbed two correctional officers. From there, the mayhem spread to the entire prison, with inmates taking prison employees hostage and using the public address system to announce a “revolution.” An inmate held a butcher knife to Johnson’s throat and took him to a cell along with several other prison staffers. The riot erupted around them. Forty years later, in his kitchen at his home in McAlester, Johnson makes a swift, crossbody motion with an imaginary knife in his hand, describing the stabbing death of an inmate he witnessed. Containment While fires burned buildings, and nearly two dozen prison staffers such as Johnson were This is a hallway inside the now-vacant East Cell House at the state prison. Photo by Clifton Adcock taken hostage, Dale Nave, a 31-year-old McAlester police officer, was finishing up his 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. daily shift. “I was just trying to go home,” said Nave, who, along with the other officers, was sent to the prison down the road. As Nave pulled up, he saw fire and smoke and knew this “was not a little deal inside.” By the time he arrived, inmates at the prison were demanding a meeting with Gov. Hall. Outside the prison, Nave and a few other officers were tasked with standing guard, using the threat of firearms to keep inmates inside the prison. “All we was trying to do was contain it,” Nave said. “There were thousands of them, and 15 or so of us.” Local police kept the inmates from leaving the prison until hundreds of reinforcement troops from the National Guard and other agencies arrived. Inmates set buildings ablaze,

Forty years ago at state penitentiary

but otherwise from the outside it was difficult to tell what was going on inside. Johnson and other staff members tried to keep a low profile behind the gates. In his two years working at the prison, he had made friendships with some of the prisoners, having grown up with several. As violence and fires sprang up, his friends made sure he was safe. “It wasn’t really holding hostage. It was just a safe place to be,” Johnson said. “They (The inmates) saved us.” Hall and police negotiators were able to secure the release of the hostages in less than 24 hours, although complete containment of the riot would take two more days. Tear It Down Following the riot, Lawrence Carpenter, a consultant from the American Corrections Association, at the governor’s request, toured the facility, which was in ruins. In a written report, he called the uprising “unquestionably … the most destructive of any riot that has ever taken place in American prisons.” “From my observations it was clear that the riot at McAlester is one of the most disastrous events in American correctional history,” Carpenter said. Committees and task forces convened for years, with one common theme: The prison should be torn down. “The McAlester facility should not be rebuilt,” read a 1973 recommendation from the National Clearinghouse for Criminal Justice Planning and Architecture. The report went on to recommend that the state “bulldoze remaining building elements at McAlester.” A federal lawsuit that had been filed in 1972 by Bobby Battle, an inmate at the penitentiary, led to a court finding that some conditions at the prison violated the U.S. Constitution, leading to implementation of a number of reforms. Despite the riot and recommendations that the prison be razed, it has endured for four decades, although the population has steadily declined from the levels seen in 1973, from well over 2,000 to fewer than 600. Scars Perhaps more than anyone else living, John and Dolly Barrier bear the scars of the prison uprising. John Barrier, 75, was a corrections officer at the time and was seriously beaten by inmates during the riot. In the four decades since, he has suffered strokes and seizures and undergone brain surgeries as a result of his injuries, said his wife Dolly. “We never had no life,” she said of the decades of care her husband has needed, listing the more significant medical events that have left her husband paralyzed and confined to a wheelchair at a McAlester nursing home. Two years ago, Corrections Director Justin Jones visited John Barrier and presented him with a folded American flag that had flown in Barrier’s honor over the agency’s offices in Oklahoma City. “We never want to forget those people,” Jones told Oklahoma Watch. Oklahoma Watch is a nonprofit organization that produces indepth and investigative journalism on important public-policy issues facing the state.


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Decline

health and death row expenses, plus certain oversight expenses by the state. Because the penitentiary is aging and is a lock-down facility, operations cost are higher, Massie said. Jolley said the cost of housing prisoners in public facilities does not incorporate building and maintenance costs, yet he added that it’s difficult to get a true comparison. The state should rely mainly on public prisons but balance that more with increased use of private ones, Jolley said. Although Big Mac is at 64 percent capacity, the prison system as a whole is 98 percent full, with prison-bound inmates waiting in county jails. Massie said an additional 1,000 beds will be needed next year, which will require more funding. How or when the state will get those beds is unclear. The corrections department could move other offenders into about 300 empty beds in McAlester, but Massie said there are no plans to do so. Capacity at Big Mac is expected to remain at about 575. State Rep. Donnie Condit, who represents the McAlester area, said the corrections department’s hands are tied because no additional funding has come from the legislature. “We don’t fund the prison at what we should,” Condit said. “We’ve kind of backed ourselves in a corner.” Many of the prisoners at OSP are those who could not be housed at other facilities because of behavior issues, said Deputy Warden Terry Crenshaw. About 60 percent of the inmate population there is prescribed psychotropic drugs. “OSP has always been known, if individuals have problems or are problematic at other institution, they’re sent here,” Crenshaw said. Randall Lopez, who retired last year after working 20 years as an

officer at the penitentiary, said risks of violence are higher at the prison because of certain issues with the aging facility, including ongoing problems with air conditioning. Still, the prison is not the same facility it was at the time of the riot in 1973. Crenshaw, Lopez and others said thanks to additional security measures, it is highly unlikely that in the event of an inmate uprising, a whole unit would be lost, much less the whole prison, as it was in 1973. New facility layouts have improved security and inmates are on lockdown 23 hours a day, with one hour of “outside time” by themselves or with a cellmate in an enclosed structure. Outside their cells, inmates are restrained by belly chains, handcuffs and leg shackles, Crenshaw said. Next steps In June, after several decades with the agency, Corrections Director Justin Jones resigned, effective Oct. 1. The move followed months of strained relationships between Jones, who sought more funding and was opposed to aggressive expansion of private prisons, and legislative leaders like Jolley, who support greater use of private prisons. Gov. Mary Fallin was critical of Jones’ office after questioning whether his agency had been open about the existence of $22 million in revolving funds. Jones said the department had been transparent. Despite the corrections department’s request for a $60 million increase next year to deal with the rising inmate population, the legislature approved only a $1 million increase. Earlier this month, Fallin called for an audit of the state’s correctional system. “They’re going to be looking at all the operations,” said Alex Weintz, Fallin’s spokesperson. The audit will be a starting point for

developing plans to address prison containing death row and the “I would hope … that OSP is a overcrowding, he said. mental health units. modern facility, that it’s lean, mean Some political leaders say the “I would be surprised if OSP is and efficient. And I think that’s heart of the overcrowding issue not completely different,” he said, what we’ll see.” is the state’s failure to carry out programs that would reduce its high incarceration rate. NOTICE OF PERSONS APPEARING In 2012, Oklahoma passed a TO BE OWNERS OF ABANDONED PROPERTY measure, the Justice Reinvestment Initiative, aimed at lowering the inmate population, in part by improving parole supervision and requiring mental health and substance abuse evaluation at the time of arrest. Critics have said many of the provisions are being ignored. Former state Speaker of State Treasurer Ken Miller wants you to get the House, Kris Steele, R-Shawnee, said he doesn’t think that, as www.YOURMONEY.ok.gov implemented, the measure will Please take a few minutes to see if your name is included on this list of all new affect the prison population. names to see if you have money waiting to be claimed. Also, current laws in the state, such as requiring offenders to serve WOODS COUNTY at least 85 percent of their sentences for certain crimes, keep the inmate MD INC GREGORY G ALVA FREEDOM population high. PINEGAR BADLEY JASON L GERLOFF GARY L PO BOX 846 Jolley said there’s little political 723 CENTER ST HC 60 BOX 107 MEYER FLORENCE C BAXTER RUTH REED CHRISTINA will to release offenders early, and P O BOX 83 RR 2 BOX 1 32293 CO RD tough-on-crime legislation that PALMER REYNOLDS BAYS JEREMY HOPETON EDEN L lengthens sentences or creates P O BOX 98 300 W CHEROKEE MYERS ASHLEY new crimes will cause the inmate BEBERMEYER BEN 805 LAS CINAS PKWY PISTOLE JUDITH 203 RIDGWAY RD population to increase. 701 7TH ST SPURGEON RUTH BENSON JAMES Coupled with the aging 14435 CR 440 REYNOLDS ROBERT J 1519 YOUNG 929 LOCUST ST infrastructure at OSP and other BOUZIDEN DONNA WAYNOKA SCHWEERDTFEGER 40417 US HIGHWAY 64 state facilities, Jolley said, it is time BARKER ALYCE JEFFERY A CARMICHAEL YVONNE 610 SANTA FE state leaders had a discussion about 4300 W NORTH AVE 1521 MURRAY DR BOWMAN GENEVA building a new facility. SMITH GINGER CASE BARBARA J MARIE 816 14TH ST “I would be very interested in RR 3 BOX 210 RT 2 BOX 50 TANNER DAVID H CUNNINGHAM REX D seeing a new maximum-security HANES NANCY 829 SKYLINE RR 2 BOX 97 716 MAIN ST facility being at least discussed,” TRI K EQUIPMENT JANA MORRIS PA MATTESON IRR TR PROFIT SHARING TRUST Jolley said. “As we transition into PO BOX 727 605 E ELM ST 3126 COLLEGE BLVD a new DOC leader, maybe now KINZIE RENTALS NINTH STREET WISDOM GRACE 129 E FLYNN PROPERTIES-USPCI is the time to begin having those PO BOX 37 RT 2 BOX 170 LABANI TROY B JT discussions on what the future of 1301 LOCUST ST DACOMA RILEY DANIKA L corrections in Oklahoma looks PO BOX 135 LEDFORD STANDLEY & KOVAT REMMI A like.” ALICE JTS 1215 CHOCTAW AVE 1029 CHURCH STEET Jolley said he did not have a preference for where a new facility would be located, but that A MESSAGE FROM consideration should be given to STATE TREASURER KEN MILLER locations near medical facilities More than 600,000 Oklahomans do have unclaimed property and used for treating prisoners to reduce we’d like to return it! Oklahoma businesses bring unclaimed cash, transportation costs. rebates, paychecks, royalties, stock and bonds to my office at the As for the penitentiary, Jolley State Capitol and it’s my job to return the money to the owners and heirs. said within 10 years the facility Our service is always free and there is no time limit on claiming will likely be reduced to the unit

Got unclaimed property?

11 women sue Okla. prison over sexual assaults McLOUD, Okla. (AP) — A federal lawsuit filed by 11 inmates of a female prison claims the women were sexually assaulted by guards and that the prison system allowed the attacks. The lawsuit, filed July 19, alleges that three guards assaulted the women between December 2010 and late 2012 and that the attacks were made easier because prison administrators didn’t fix a broken video surveillance system. The Corrections Department is a defendant in the lawsuit, along with two former prison guards, the prison’s former warden and a guard who still works at the Mabel Bassett Correctional Center in McLoud. The Oklahoman reports (http:// is.gd/S3pbjs) two of the former guards named as defendants, David Juber and Jamie Baker, already have been charged with numerous sex crimes in Pottawatomie County. The guard who still works at the prison, Gilbert Dildine, has not been charged. The women claim in the lawsuit that surveillance cameras in parts of the facility “were either not properly installed in the area or kept in an ongoing state of disrepair,” and that Juber, Baker and Dildine took advantage of the security

lapse. The suit accuses the Corrections Department and upper management at the prison of allowing the assaults through negligence. Former Warden Millicent Newton-Embry and the facility’s current Deputy Warden Carla King are named in the suit. NewtonEmbry is now the department’s coordinator for the Prison Rape Elimination Act. The position was created through a federal law enacted in 2003 to cut down on sexual assaults in the nation’s prisons. Corrections Department spokesman Jerry Massie would not comment on the allegations. He said the agency had not been served the lawsuit. The women are seeking a judgment of more than $100,000. “Prior to the incidents ... (Newton-Embry and King) had a long history of ignoring complaints of inmates and daily notices of guards which indicated that video surveillance cameras, lights, doors and buzzers were either improperly installed in a particular area or kept in a state of disrepair,” the lawsuit states. “This has been known for some time, especially when inmates

were involved in an altercation or something was stolen ... On such occasions, inmates had been told that it would be impossible because the cameras were not working,” the complaint alleges. The lawsuit claims the majority of assaults were carried out in a staff bathroom or a supply closet. Lawyers for the women allege Baker, Juber and Dildine would concoct reasons to remove the prisoners from their cells, including fictitious appointments to see the prison nurse or to perform chores. The guards allegedly offered favors to the women for not reporting the sexual contact. The criminal cases in Pottawatomie County against Baker and Juber are pending.

your property! These are just the most recent names we have received. Our online database contains thousands of names dating back to 1967. If your name is not on this list, check our website at:

www.yourmoney.ok.gov

If you find your name, start your claim online or use the form below.

ONLY NEW NAMES! If you find your name, fill out the form and mail it to our office at the State Capitol, or you can start your claim on our website at www.yourmoney.ok.gov. For any questions about unclaimed property, give us a call at 405-521-4273. NOTICE OF NAMES OF PERSONS APPEARING TO BE OWNERS OF ABANDONED PROPERTY

The names and addresses contained in this notice are as they were reported by the holder. Information concerning the the names and last-known addresses of the property holders may be obtained by any person possessing an interest in the property by submitting an online claim or addressing an inquiry to the Unclaimed Property Division. The property is in the custody of the State Treasurer and all claims must be directed to the Unclaimed Property Division. You may mail this form to:

Unclaimed Property Division • Oklahoma State Treasurer 2300 N. Lincoln Blvd., Rm. 217, Oklahoma City, OK 73105 • (405) 521-4273 STATE LAW REQUIRES that before information may be obtained concerning reported unclaimed property, there must be a valid proven interest in the property. To allow the Unclaimed Property Division to process your inquiry, please send a black & white copy of your driver’s license and provide the following information.

Name of listed owner: __________________________________________________ (Exactly as it appears in this publication)

SSN/FEI No. of Listed Owner: ____________________________________________ (Not Required but failure to do so might delay claim processing)

Your relationship to listed owner: _________________________________________ (i.e., self, spouse, divorced, heir — son, daughter, grandson, etc.)

If listed owner is deceased, please check ( ✓) here: _________ Your name: ___________________________________________________________

(Attach a black & white copy of your driver’s license)

SSN/FEI No.: _________________________________________________________ (Not Required but failure to do so might delay claim processing)

Current Address: ______________________________________________________ (If filing for a business give current business address.)

City:____________________________________ State: _________ Zip:___________ E-mail: ______________________________________________________________ Day time phone number: (__________) ____________________________________ Area code

_____________________________________________ (Your Signature)

______________

(Date)

Our only goal is to reunite property with its true and lawful owner. Upon review of your claim, the Unclaimed Property Division may ask for additional documentation. To save processing time, please attach to your claim copies of any documentation that verifies your relationship to the listed owner.


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Traffic stop nets drug arrest From Page 3 Ballot By Marione Martin A man was stopped on Highway 281 after he apparently went over the center line, causing a Woods County deputy to take evasive action. According to information in the case, Woods County Sheriff’s Deputy Adam Honeyman was traveling eastbound on US281 near County Road 360 about 3:50 p.m. on July 23. He met a blue Jeep that was traveling left of center in a marked zone, causing him to take evasive action to avoid a head-on collision. Honeyman turned around and activated his emergency lights. It took about a mile before the driver stopped the Jeep. Honeyman approached the vehicle and told the driver why he had been stopped. He noticed the driver had slowed reactions and difficulty processing simple information such as presenting his driver’s license. His license identified the driver

as Charles Kyle Williams, 56, of Aline. Honeyman told Williams to exit his vehicle and have a seat in his patrol car. As Williams walked, Honeyman saw that he was unsteady on his feet and struggling to stay standing. Once inside the patrol car, Honeyman could detect an odor of burnt marijuana about Williams’ breath and person. He asked him if he had consumed any drugs today, legal or illegal, and he said no. Williams was given a battery of field sobriety tests and did not perform well. Honeyman saw that Williams had elevated taste buds on the back of his tongue and a lack of coordination. Honeyman told Williams he believed he was under the influence of a narcotic and/or marijuana. Williams denied it although he said he had a prescription for morphine but had not taken it that day.

Williams was placed under arrest and agreed to the state’s blood test. In searching Williams, Honeyman found a small white metal pipe in his left front pocket. Williams’ head dropped when Honeyman pulled out the pipe, and he denied ownership immediately. The pipe had an odor of burnt marijuana and a green leafy substance inside that field-tested positive for marijuana. When Honeyman asked Williams where the rest of the marijuana was, he replied, “That’s all I have man, I am dry.” Williams was transported to Share Medical Center in Alva where blood was drawn for testing. He was then taken to the Woods County Jail where he was released to the jailer. Williams has been charged with DUI, possession of CDS (controlled dangerous substance), and possession of paraphernalia, all misdemeanors.

Program brings Rwandan hotelkeeper to Okla. resort By Cathy Spaulding WAGONER, Okla. (AP) — Rwandan hotel owner Anne Marie Kantengwa snaps pictures of steel preparation tables, paper towel dispensers, chefs — nearly everything in The Canebrake kitchen. She has a lot to learn during her stay at this resort east of Wagoner. She also has a lot to pass on to other businesswomen in her country. Kantengwa is visiting Oklahoma through Peace Through Business, an initiative of the Institute for Economic Empowerment of Women. The program seeks to inspire women around the world to grow

their businesses and become more active in public policy. Kantengwa has been at The Canebrake since Saturday. “When I came to the U.S.A., my wish was to connect with people and to let people know about my hotel,” said Kantengwa, the chief executive officer of the Chez Lando Hotel in Kigali, Rwanda. “Even with a tragic history, we are a beautiful country.” Rwanda was the scene of a civil war during the 1990s between the country’s Tutsi and Hutu ethnic groups, culminating in genocide in 1994, according to the CIA Factbook. The country had local elections in 1999 and national elections in 2003. The Chez Lando, built in 1986, was destroyed during the genocide but has been rebuilt, said Kantengwa, who has operated the hotel since 1996. Lisa Bracken, an owner of The Canebrake, said, “If you look at the hotel’s website, it’s just beautiful.” Kantengwa added: “It stays open and has just been expanding. We are a family business, and our accommodations are 82 rooms.” Kantengwa told the Muskogee Phoenix that she has learned a lot about American hospitality and business during her first few days at The Canebrake. “The owners here are very committed,” she said. “My

expectation from this is to bring back the good friendliness at The Canebrake and new friends for the Hotel Chez Lando. This helps me to have more ambition.” Kantengwa has had a busy week. Saturday night, she was an “expediter” in the kitchen, making sure every plate is perfectly prepared, Bracken said. She spent Sunday working the front desk and Monday visiting Tulsa and taking yoga lessons at The Canebrake’s Yoga Barn. She spent Tuesday morning in Muskogee, even visiting Walmart, and working in the kitchen in the afternoon. Peace Through Business includes one week of mentoring or shadowing at an American business. When the women return to their country, they are to pass what they learn on to other women, according to a website by the Institute for the Economic Empowerment of Women. “I have been inspired to join the program,” Kantengwa said. “It could help future generations of women in this country.” Bracken said she was learning a lot about Rwanda during Kantengwa’s visit, including that “after genocide, Rwanda was 70 percent women.” She said she also learned “that I really want to go to Rwanda.”

reasons on their applications, these voters can activate some special conditions that make it easier for them to use absentee ballots. The reasons are: • Voters who are physically incapacitated and voters who care for physically incapacitated persons who cannot be left unattended may vote absentee. They may apply only by mail, by fax, or by telegraph. • Voters who are confined to nursing homes in the county may vote absentee. An Absentee Voting Board actually goes to the nursing home a few days before the election, sets up a small polling place and allows these people to vote under circumstances similar to those at a regular precinct polling place. They may apply only by mail

or by fax. • Military personnel and residents of the county living overseas and the spouses and dependents of each group are eligible to vote absentee without being registered. These voters may apply by mail, by e-mail, or by fax. Military personnel should contact the Voting Service Officers in their units for application forms and additional information. Residents of Oklahoma living overseas can obtain the same materials from any United States military installation and from United States embassies and consulates. Military personnel and overseas citizens also can download the appropriate application form from the Internet at www.fvap.gov.

Kan. official estimates Common Core test costs LAWRENCE, Kan. (AP) — Kansas education officials believe the cost of testing students on the new Common Core standards will be less than national estimates but more than what the state has currently been paying. Kansas schools will start testing students on the Common Core reading and math standards in 2015. The standards were developed by a national consortium of states and other educational interests and adopted by Kansas in 2010. The state spends about $4.6 million annually to give the current battery of tests to about 250,000 students a year. Kansas Department of Education Commissioner Diane DeBacker told the Lawrence Journal-World the cost of the Common Corebased tests will be below the national estimate of $11.2 million to $13.4 million because Kansas won’t use all the services offered by test developers. “We’re expecting it to be more than what we’re paying now because we’re asking the assessment to do more,” DeBacker said. Kansas has contracted with the Center for Educational Testing and Evaluation at the University of Kansas, and those tests have always been multiple-choice exams graded by machines. The new Common Core process asks states to use complex testing that includes more writing by students. “We’ve said for many years (the current test format) doesn’t tell us what students know and can do,” DeBacker said. “It’s just regurgitation of information. When you enhance a test or want to make it more relevant and informative, then you have to look at constructive responses. ... That’s

going to cost more money.” The State Board of Education has yet to decide what test will be used in 2015. Critics of the Common Core who have urged the board to back out of using those standards are urging the state to continue to use the center’s examinations. A few years ago, Kansas joined the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium, comprised of 22 states developing a common testing document. The consortium estimated that a basic, end-of-theyear exam used to comply with federal reporting requirements would be $22.50 per student. A fuller package of tests that would include quizzes and exams would be $27.30 per student. DeBacker and others say that cost reflects expenses, including hiring an outside vendor to host the computer-based testing, that Kansas won’t need to incur. Kansas already has that function through the KU testing center, known as the Kansas Interactive Testing Engine, which was used to administer the entire 2013 battery of state assessments. Marianne Perie, co-director of the university center, said regardless of the test selected, the center can provide administrative services at a lower cost than the SBAC estimate. “Honestly, we’re still not completely sure what’s in their cost estimate,” she said. A legislative audit released in December 2012 estimated that it would cost Kansas school districts between $34 million and $63 million to implement the Common Core standards, with most of the expenses coming from teacher training and purchasing new classroom materials.

By Rick Callahan INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — A bus carrying teens coming home from a church camp crashed Saturday on a busy Indianapolis thoroughfare, killing three people and sending 26 others to hospitals, officials said. Indianapolis Fire Department Lt. Ato McTush said the dead included a man and a woman. He did not have information about the third victim. Witnesses said the bus came off the interstate at a high rate of speed Saturday afternoon, struck a retaining wall as it tried to round a curve and overturned. WTHR-TV reported the bus driver told witnesses his brakes

failed. An Indiana Department of Transportation camera showed the bus overturned on its side near an Interstate 465 overpass. The Indianapolis Fire Department said crews had to free five people who were trapped inside after the crash. Four good Samaritans helped before first responders could arrive, including one man who helped pull the driver out, the agency said. The bus was carrying 40 passengers who are members of Colonial Hill Baptist Church in Indianapolis and were returning from a summer camp. The Fire Department said those injured included children and adults.

3 dead when bus carrying teens crashes in Indiana


July 28, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

Beat back-to-school blues by budgeting Last year, back-to-school shopping hit a record average $689 for families with school-age kids for items like clothing, school supplies and electronics. This year the cost won’t be nearly as high – $635 per family, the National Retail Federation predicts. However, that’s quite a bit of money for many Oklahoma families, so it’s best to try and make that dollar amount stretch as much as possible. Here are some ways to ace your back-toschool budget problems: Take Advantage of a Tax-Free Weekend Oklahoma’s tax-free weekend is Aug. 2-4 (see www.tax. ok.gov/stholiday.html). The goal is to assist Oklahoma parents with back-to-school shopping expenses. Many other states offer similar sales tax holidays at back-to-school time. During this period, shoppers will have the opportunity to purchase certain clothing and shoes sans sales tax. In Oklahoma, to qualify for the savings, the sale of clothing and shoes priced at less than $100 are free from sales taxes. Oklahoma’s CPAs caution, however, that a good deal shouldn’t be an excuse to overspend. Do a Closet Inventory Everyone knows kids grow out of clothes quickly. However, before counting out last season’s garments, check the closet to see if those khaki pants or that t-shirt still fit and are in good shape. Maybe an older sibling’s gently-worn clothes could be used to supplement a younger child’s back-to-school wardrobe. And don’t forget to check out some resale shops for cool vintage clothing at a fraction of the retail price. As part of your spending plan,

figure out how many pairs of pants, shirts and socks your child needs. Remember, buying mix-and-match clothing may be less expensive in the long run than buying pants that can only be worn with certain tops, and vice versa. Also, make sure to consult the school’s dress policy first to ensure your child can actually wear what you buy. Organize a Sswap Get with other parents – in the neighborhood, PTA or church – and, rather than buy all new items, figure out what you can each trade. You can also check out swapping sites like SwapMamas.com. Items should be in like-new or good condition. Set a spending plan. Before you head to the nearest mall, make sure you have your shopping list in hand. Without a pre-determined list of needed items, you could be asking for trouble. Items to possibly include on your list besides clothing and shoes are sporting or hobby equipment like cleats or ballet slippers; class supplies like notebooks, binders and crayons; and electronic devices and computer equipment. Involve Your Children Back-to-school shopping provides an excellent opportunity to teach your children money management skills. Concepts like comparison shopping, distinguishing needs from wants and sticking to a budget may all be taught during back-to-school shopping. By involving your children in the decision-making process, you can help them learn life-long financial lessons. Pack Lunches Making meals at home is almost always less expensive and more nutritious. Get older kids

Ark. officials to meet tribe about Indian site LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — Arkansas economic development officials and an archaeologist are to meet with the Quapaw Tribe of Oklahoma to discuss a recently discovered Indian village in northeast Arkansas where a $1.1 billion steel mill is to be built. Tribal spokesman Sean Harrison said the meeting is scheduled for Wednesday in Osceola, where the Big River Steel mill is planned. Mississippi County has allocated $14.5 million and the state promises $125 million in bonds for the mill that officials say will create 525 jobs at an average annual salary of $75,000. The meeting will be closed out of concern that publicizing the location of the village could lead to plundering, according to Clif Chitwood, director of economic development for Mississippi County. But the Arkansas DemocratGazette reported Friday that it has asked Arkansas Economic Development Commission Director Grant Tennille to open the meeting under the Arkansas Freedom of Information Act. Ann Early, the state archaeologist, said in an email to the newspaper that she was not familiar with provisions for open meetings under either the

state or federal FOIA laws. “Specific locations of archaeological sites listed in our database are not made public . unless the sites are protected (like Toltec Mounds Archaeological State Park),” she wrote. “This is Arkansas law . designed to protect sites from looting and grave robbing, and to help protect landowners from trespassers.” Tribal council chairman John Berry told the newspaper: “We want to be cautious and careful. We want to know the impact on the sites.” Chitwood said that the county is prepared to spend approximately $200,000 to move a planned railroad spur “a few hundred feet” from the site that he said is about 0.9 acres. “We’re not going to put a shovel anywhere near it,” Chitwood said. “We’ll put a fence around it before construction starts,” which is expected later this year. An archaeological firm hired by the county used sonar to find the village site 4 feet below ground, Chitwood said. There were an estimated 50,000 Indians in Mississippi County when Spanish explorer Hernando De Soto arrived in about 1540. Berry said the Indians were Quapaw.

more excited about taking lunch by getting them in the kitchen and letting their creative juices flow. With younger kids, give them special surprises, like cutting their sandwiches using fancy cookie cutters. Also, buy in bulk, but don’t buy snack-size. You can make your own snack-size portions using reusable containers or snack-size baggies and save lots of money in the process. Plus, showing your kids the per-unit cost is another great financial lesson. Look for Deals Year-Round. Nothing says your children must start the first day of school with a closet full of new outfits. Buy the necessities prior to the first day of class and then keep an eye on sales and other bargains throughout the year to finish out the rest. Plus, if your child experiences a huge growth spurt, you won’t have wasted your entire year’s clothing budget at the beginning of the school year. If you buy out-of-season (e.g., buying winter clothes in the summer and summer clothes in the winter), you can estimate what size you think your child will be or you can buy a couple of sizes larger and give your child room to grow. It’s best, however, to only use this strategy with clothing basics. Buying trendy items means you run the risk of buying clothes your children won’t want to wear because they are no longer in style. For more money tips, visit www.KnowWhatCounts.org where you can sign up for a free e-newsletter, try out financial calculators or ask a CPA a question. Visit www.FindYourCPA.com for a free CPA referral and free 30-minute consultation.

Okla. attorney general moves to seize nearly $8M OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Oklahoma’s attorney general is being allowed to continue an effort to seize nearly $8 million from an Anadarko couple and the corporations they control that prosecutors say is tied to an illegal gambling operation in Florida. Assistant Attorney General Kris Jarvis says an Oklahoma County District Court judge on Friday denied a defense motion for the return of the money and the dismissal of the forfeiture hearing and upheld the attorney general’s authority to seize money laundering proceeds. The state seized $7.8 million in March and filed a notice of intent to forfeit against Chase Egan Burns and his wife, Kristin Burns. They’re among 57 people arrested on felony charges related to the Florida case. His attorney has said Burns is merely a software provider who sold an Internet service.

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Kansas at crossroads of marijuana trafficking By Roxana Hegeman WICHITA, Kan. (AP) — This is not your old man’s marijuana. As more states decriminalize marijuana, a burgeoning domestic pot industry has transformed the quality and potency of the weed now hitting the streets — not only in western states which have made it legal to smoke it, but in neighboring states like Kansas that have become reluctant way stations for the highgrade marijuana flowing across their borders to more populated cities out east. In the past, law enforcement seized mostly compressed marijuana bricks — much of it coming from Mexico — that fetch between $400 and $500 a pound. Now authorities are mostly intercepting medical-grade, domestically grown marijuana that people typically buy for around $1,500 a pound in Colorado and can sell for double or more of that back east, said Dale Quigley, manager of the Rocky Mountain High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area’s investigative support center. The group represents a coalition of law enforcement agencies in the region, created by Congress to address drug trafficking. Among those on the front lines of the nation’s narcotics trade is Lt. Chris Bannister with the undercover narcotics division of the Wichita Police Department. Only a few years ago, 70 percent of the pot seized in the city was pressed marijuana, mostly coming in from Mexico, he said. Today, about 85 percent of the marijuana seized is medical-grade and just 15 percent “traditional marijuana.” “The quality is there, the demand is there and the price reflects that,” Bannister said. “And it is driving down the price of traditional pressed marijuana.” California’s Emerald Triangle — encompassing Mendocino, Trinity and Humboldt counties — produce some of the nation’s finest marijuana, said Lt. Brian Smith, who oversees the Kansas Highway Patrol’s drug interdiction unit. Other major domestic marijuana comes from Colorado, Washington and Oregon. Busts involving Colorado weed were made last year in at least 23 states, according to a RMHIDTA study. “Drugs go east, cash goes west. Really the Colorado angle is that it is just a different source, it is not so much that the amount of drugs and money on the highways has really changed,” said Chris

Joseph, a Topeka attorney who specializes in drug-related traffic cases. “I mean, like in any business, logistics matter. If your source can be Colorado instead of California and you are on the East Coast, hey, save a little bit of cost and risk by buying from Colorado.” The Kansas Highway Patrol alone made 468 felony trafficking arrests and seized nearly 7,000 pounds of marijuana last year, according to information obtained by The Associated Press through an open records request. The agency seized 2,654 pounds and arrested 187 people during the first five months this year. A KHP analysis of those 133 felony pot trafficking cases in early 2013 showed 79 seizures were of Colorado marijuana, with California weed next in 35 incidents. “When we talk to people they have been told to stay out of Kansas, or go around Kansas,” Smith said. Kansas troopers also seized roughly $4 million in drug-related cash last year, and about $1.3 million during the first five months of this year. Nineteen states and the District of Columbia allow medical marijuana use, and Illinois has passed a bill legalizing medicinal pot that is awaiting the governor’s signature, according to the National Conference on State Legislatures. Washington and Colorado became the first states last fall to enact laws legalizing recreational marijuana. Marijuana remains illegal under federal law. Justice Department spokeswoman Allison Price would say only that it is “considering all aspects of this issue” as it continues to review the ballot initiatives. But conservative states like Kansas, where pot remains illegal, aren’t waiting for the feds to act. When a Kansas judge acquitted a Colorado man caught with medical marijuana — ruling his prosecution “impermissibly interfered with his constitutional right to interstate travel” — authorities appealed to the Kansas Supreme Court. In March, the justices ruled that people who bring marijuana into Kansas can be prosecuted. The practice of setting up bogus signs — such as “Drug Check Ahead” and “Drug Dogs in Use” — along highways, then stopping motorists who took rural exits to avoid them, spurred a ruling last year by the 10th Circuit Court of Appeals to curb abuses. The

See Crossroads Page 14


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Lynn and Linda Rhodes awarded Garden Club July Yard of the Month Selected by Alva Council of Garden Clubs

By Barbara Case Lynn and Linda Rhodes have lived at 1002 Choctaw for 37 years and both contribute to its beauty. Linda got her love of flowers from her mother and sisters. Her mom always had a beautiful yard and taught her a lot about flowers. Over the years, Linda has collected iron wheels, pots and yard ornaments as seen in the photos accompanying this article. The yard features water pumps, benches and, on the west side bricked patio, a tree swing and decorative iron patio table and chairs inviting you to take a break and sip some iced tea in this hot summer season. A few years ago, Lynn brought her some huge rocks and this started her rock garden. Most of their yard consists of full sun perennials. She said that Lynn

does the mowing and edging and is happy to help with her projects. The yard and home is very noticeable as you drive down Choctaw Street where it sits on the corner. In fact, it made this gardener stop and back up slowly to observe the beauty of the grounds and the attractiveness of bright flowers that are so eye-catching! Linda indicated that she replaces annuals and adds perennials and has no special plan when she begins each spring. Alva Council of Garden Clubs sponsors the “Yard of the Month” program from June through September each year. To be nominated for consideration, a yard must be within the city limits and must not have won the award for three years or more. To nominate a yard, contact members of the committee by calling April Ridgway at 580917-0331, Evelyn Hofen at 580327-7506 or Barbara Case at 580-327-0753.

Lynn and Linda Rhodes stand by the Yard of the Month sign at 1022 Locust Street. They were chosen for the July Yard of the Month by the Alva Council of Garden Clubs.

Lynn and Linda Rhodes’ bricked side patio invites visitors to pause and sip some iced tea.

August Yard of the Month: Lynn and Linda Rhodes’ home at 1022 Locust Street.

Woods County Senior citizen report

By Betty Riggins Friday, July 19, we had another low attendance. Glenda Mitchell is gone to Tulsa to help take care of her granddaughter for several months. We will miss her as she is a great cook. We will welcome her back. We are blessed to have

two correctional boys helping Nita in the kitchen. They are learning to be pretty good cooks. We had a big turnout for our Friday night covered-dish supper and games. We had some newcomers this week. Our attendance keeps growing. Monday was another very warm day. Doris Schupbach is back. She had a great time. Vaughn Caldwell brought Elsa Lee of Enid as his guest. Earlene Evans is still under the weather but she is doing better and will be back soon. Tuesday was a beautiful morning but it soon warmed up to a very hot day. Thank goodness for air conditioners. We had a great meal plus a good attendance. Erick, one of our helpers is turning into a great cook as he makes cookies plus he made the coleslaw and it was

very good. Too bad we can’t keep him, but he will soon be moving elsewhere. Wednesday we had a fair attendance with great ham and cheese sandwiches. We need some new people to come and join us at the center. Donations are always welcome to help with expenses at the center. Thursday was another great day to be alive and up and around. Ross and Charlene Graham had their grandson as their guest today. We had a very good ham dinner. Alan and Pam Smith have returned again from working on their retirement home in Colorado. Next week we have a covereddish supper and games on Aug. 2 at 6:30 p.m. Come join us.

Menus for the week of July 29 – Aug. 2 Menu for Woods County Senior Citizens Monday – Chicken pot pie, broccoli, biscuit, lemon tea cookie Tuesday – Ham and beans,

cabbage, corn, cornbread Wednesday – Sausage and cream gravy, eggs, oven-fried potato wedges, applesauce Thursday – Chicken tetrazzini, winter vegetables, green beans, wheat bread

Beta Sigma Phi celebrates freedom Wearing red, white and blue, 14 members of Beta Sigma Phi met in the home of Becky Marshall for their July meeting. The group reviewed the new program book produced by Marshall and Linda Tutwiler and approved the budget. To guide upcoming meetings, Pam Jones provided the results of a survey regarding the most popular program topics, which included fashion, cell phone use, memory exercises and possible volunteer positions in

the community. Tutwiler’s program asked members to write brief positive comments about each of their sisters. The comments were packaged and given to sisters to take home and read. After consuming red, white and blue refreshments, members moved outside to enjoy their own fireworks display. The August meeting, reflecting the theme “Carnival Lights,” will be at the home of Peggy O’Neil.


July 28, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

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Alva Cardinals win League Championship

LEAGUE CHAMPIONS – The 12 and under Alva Cardinal team went undefeated in the Little Sun Flower League. They then went on to sweep the league tournament on June 28-29 at the Alva Recreation Complex. The team finished the year with an 11-0 record in their league and won the champtionship game 19-6 against Kiowa. Front row, from left, are: Byson Harting, Bentley Tomberlin, Casey Harting, Trey Bogdanovecz, Jacob Dotterer, Ethan Nusser, Gavin McCullough, Bryn Cormack. Back row: Coach Max Rose, Assistant Coach Scott Cormack, Bryce Cormack, Micah Carter, Dalton Rose, Braeden Cook, Jaylin Graybill and Coach Brent Bogdanovecz.


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Alva Review-Courier

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Alva Cardinal Bryce Cormack blasts one in the 12 and under championship game at the Alva Recreation Complex. The Cards defeated Kiowa 19-6 to win the league championship.

Not on my watch! Alva Cardinal Trey Bogdanovecz looks a runner back.

Soccer wars rumbling in Oklahoma City By Adam Troxtell OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — DOWN AND READY – The 12 and under Alva Cardinals infield is ready for action. Braeden Cook is on Ten years ago, professional soccer first base, Trey Bogdanovecz on second, Casey Harting at short stop and Jacob Dotterer on third. was still fighting for fame in the American sports landscape. Times have changed. This is evident by the fact that two different management groups are currently planning on two completely separate teams to begin playing in Oklahoma City within the next two years. As their efforts unfold, it has become clear they overlap in more — to produce seamless views of used for the Oct. 5 Notre Dame- ways than one way, and caught By Beth Harris Arizona State game, and the Oct. in the middle is Oklahoma City’s BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. (AP) the action. “Sunday Night Football” 13 Washington Redskins-Cowboys soccer future and its soccer fans. — NBC Sports Group and the Mayor Mick Cornett has taken up a Dallas Cowboys are partnering producer Fred Gaudelli said game at the stadium. Fans in the stadium will see red spectator’s role. on a new 360-degree look at red the system will give fans a new “I’ll admit, it’s interesting,” zone plays for TV viewers and perspective on big plays during zone replays on the scoreboard at fans attending the game at AT&T games. The 360-degree view will all Cowboys home games, as well Cornett said. “There is definitely Stadium in Arlington, Texas, this debut on the Sept. 8 broadcast of as on the team’s local programming a void for soccer. I think the marketplace is there to sort that out.” the New York Giants-Cowboys during the season. season. In one corner, there’s Prodigal “You can now move all the way The network will use 24 high- game. The Giants have yet to lose at around the play without changing LLC, who earlier this summer speed cameras — 12 in each red zone on both sides of the field from newly christened AT&T Stadium. the camera angle,” Gaudelli told announced they will have a team to play in the United Soccer Leagues The system, known as FreeD the 20-yard line to the goal line See View Page 14 PRO (USL PRO) league starting and in the back of each end zone or free dimensional video, will be in spring of next year. To top that, Prodigal — the same company that runs Oklahoma City Barons hockey team — revealed plans to build a 7,000 seater soccerspecific stadium, with an option to expand it to 20,000 seats. In the much more distant future, Prodigal has indicated they might like to move the team into the pinnacle of American soccer, Major League Soccer (MLS), assuming their club becomes as popular as they anticipate. The challenger: Sold Out Strategies, who is currently in talks with the North American Soccer League (NASL) about creating a completely separate team to play in their league in the spring of 2015. In addition, Mayor Cornett says based on talks he has had with SOS co-owner Brad Lund, they also have long-term plans to build their own soccer specific stadium in the city. This means that, at some point, Oklahoma City could have two separate professional teams in two different leagues competing for the same fans and resources. There is only one other city in the United States where a similar system sustains: Los Angeles,

NBC Sports, Cowboys partner on red zone view

where the Galaxy and Chivas USA compete as MLS rivals and the Blues ply their trade in USL PRO. In 2015, New York will be only the second U.S. city to support two MLS teams. How a two team system would work in Oklahoma City, Cornett said, is for the companies to decide. “It’s the companies that make that decision,” Cornett said. “I’m not a referee here. It’s not for me to decide what’s in the best interest of the city.” One thing is certain: SOS’s NASL team will have a place to play in two years’ time. Oklahoma City Public Schools awarded SOS a two year lease on Taft Field earlier this year, giving the company a leg up in the battle for soccer supremacy since, at the moment, Prodigal have no place to play their team. There is no date for construction to begin on their planned 7,000-seater stadium, and alternative possibilities to pass the time appear to be anything but endless. “What I have heard is they are looking at several sites, but I don’t know any more,” Cornett told the Express-Star. There is yet another twist in the tale, and it’s one that could leave even the top experts of the American soccer landscape scratching their heads. Oklahoma City FC is the current semi-professional and amateur team that began playing in the Premier Development League (PDL) just this year. The PDL belongs to USL, and the team is owned by SOS. They play at Star Field on the Oklahoma City University campus, and their contract to stage matches here appropriately eliminates a venue option for Prodigal’s USL team. Here’s the issue: since SOS began pursuing the creation of a separate team to play in the NASL, they have become ensnarled in a legal dispute with the USL, the organization in which their Oklahoma City FC team play. USL says the company would violate its contract with the league by bringing a team from NASL, a

See Soccer Page 14


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Alva Review-Courier

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Woods County Woods County, Okla. Court Filings Communication Call Center According to the affidavits and petitions on file, the following individuals have been charged. An individual is innocent of any charges listed below until proven guilty in a court of law. All information is a matter of public record and may be obtained by anyone during regular hours at the Woods County Courthouse. The Alva Review-Courier will not intentionally alter or delete any of this information. If it appears in the courthouse public records, it will appear in this newspaper. Criminal Filings Timothy Daryl Sanders, 41, Lucedale, Miss.: (1) Domestic assault & battery; (2) Kidnapping ($531). Misdemeanor Filings Tina Marie Gallegos, 38, Alva: (1) Trespass after being forbidden; (2) Public intoxication ($539.50). Cody William Gronemeier, 26, no address listed: (1) Trespass after being forbidden; (2) Public intoxication ($539.50). Wade Lewis Lightsey, 31, Universal City, Texas: (1) Trespass after being forbidden; (2) Public intoxication ($539.50). Ashley Gay Price, 23, Pampa, Texas: (1) Trespass after being forbidden; (2) Public intoxication ($539.50). Steve William Stone, 32, Granbury, Texas: (1) Trespass after being forbidden; (2) Public intoxication ($539.50). Shane Michael Warner, 27, Alva: (1) Trespass after being forbidden; (2) Public intoxication ($539.50). David Allen Willhite, 43, Sedalia, Mo.: Trespass after being forbidden ($310.50). Charles Kyle Williams, 56, Aline: (1) DUI; (2) Possession of CDS; (3) Possession of paraphernalia ($1,432). Timothy Daryel Sanders, 41, Lucedale, Miss.: (1) Resisting an officer; (2) Assault & battery; (3) Breaking & entering ($1,020.50). Civil Filings Alva State Bank & Trust Company vs. Christopher Wharton Et Al: Money judgement for an amount $10,000 or more ($223.70). Midland Funding LLC vs. Johnnie Kimberlin: Money judgement for an amount $10,000 or less ($205.70). Discover Bank vs. Becky G. Sharp: Money judgement for an amount $10,000 or less ($205.70). Protective Order Filings Ginny Marie Miner vs. Lawrence Compo ($125.70). Traffic Filings Ramon A. Carrasco, 46, Oklahoma City: Operating motor vehicle in manner not reasonable and proper ($256.50). Ryne K. O’Neal, 23, Wister:

Defective equipment ($241.50). Joshua Reigh Longhurst, 25, Alva: Reckless driving ($455). Antonio Escarsega, no age listed, Hennessey: Reckless driving ($455). Ronald Dean Ferrell, 38, Park City, Kan.: Operate vehicle in unsafe condition ($241.50). Ronald Dean Ferrell, 38, Park City, Kan.: Failure to yield from stop sign ($211.50). Debra Lee Carson, 57, Dacoma: Operating a motor vehicle at a speed greater than reasonable and proper ($256.50). Ramon Gardiola Mendoza, 46, Oklahoma City: Transporting open container of beer ($316). Narith Chan Chhun, 24, Long Beach, Calif.: Operate vehicle improperly equipped ($211.50). Jose Medina-Munoz, 31, Oklahoma City: Operating motor vehicle without valid driver’s license ($256.50). The following individuals were cited for speeding: Jeremiah Eugene Davis, 41, Killeen, Texas: 73 in 65 ($188.50); Michael T. Runyon, 44, Ovalo, Texas: 86 in 65 ($281.50); Joseph W. Horton, 33, Vici: 77 in 65 ($226.50); Tom D. Miller, 65, Chico, Texas: 69 in 55 ($226.50); Edgar De La Cruz Fernandez, 26, Tulsa: 73 in 65 ($188.50); Tracy Jonelle Wilson, 42, Laverne: 91 in 65 ($341.50); Alyssa N. Brown, 19, Alva: 83 in 65 ($241.50); Stanley D. Jones, 28, Alva: 74 in 55 ($241.50); Clinton Lewis Ray Pittman, 31, Eufaula: 75 in 65 ($188.50); Kameron Charles Brooks, 20, Tuttle: 100 in 65 ($341.50); Ramon Gardiola Mendoza, 46, Oklahoma City: 75 in 65 ($188.50); Eric Dewayne McDowell, 43, Forest Hill, Texas: 85 in 65 ($241.50); Sonia Arana, 25, Enid: 75 in 65 ($188.50); Nathan Scott Thomason, 40, Willia, Texas: 80 in 65 ($226.50); Montana Shantee Quinby, 18, Waynoka: 75 in 65 ($188.50); Damon Lynn Pummel, 36, Woodward: 75 in 65 ($188.50); Kimberly Ann Daniels, 53, Hopeton: 75 in 65 ($188.50); Steven Leigh Gonzales, 27, Kinsley, Kan.: 73 in 55 ($241.50); Darren Ray Mann, 47, Mooreland: 75 in 65 ($188.50); Cesar Ortiz Guerrero, 34, Longview, Texas: 90 in 65 ($281.50); Leslie Bixby Weeks, 41, Wichita, KS: 93 in 65 ($341.50); Amber Leann Trejo, 26, Haltom City, Texas: 75 in 65 ($188.50). The following individuals were cited for failure to wear seatbelt ($20): Kimberly Ann Daniels, 53, Hopeton.

Woods County Sheriff’s Report July 17, 2013 6:27 p.m. Person called for a warrant check on individual. July 20, 2013 7:30 a.m. Individual’s boss called asking the charges against him. 1:55 p.m. Individual’s sister called wanting to know if he was still in jail. 1:58 p.m. Individual’s mother called wanting to know if he had been bailed out and what were his charges. 5:15 p.m. Dispatch called for warrant check on an individual.

5:45 p.m. Individual’s fiance called asking if she had been released. July 21, 2013 7:56 p.m. Horse out on Highway 64 and ¼ mile east of CR 290. July 22, 2013 8:30 p.m. Phone call for info on an inmate. 8:40 p.m. Bondsmen called to inform that they’re on their way. July 23, 2013 8:35 p.m. Kingfisher County called to see if we had a warrant on a person they have in custody.

July 17, 2013 11:40 a.m. Hunting/fishing license in Waynoka. 12:06 p.m. Number for locksmith. 3:26 p.m. Seizure at Corner Stop in Freedom, 32 year-old female. 3:36 p.m. 911 call, controlled burn 3 miles east on Cimm. in Waynoka. 4:30 p.m. Bag of weed at Jiffy Trip, some guy dropped it. 8:09 p.m. At 100 block of Flynn, toddler walking across street, almost got hit by a car, no parents watching, people across the street. July 18, 2013 5:06 a.m. Allstate roadside assist, needing tow number. 8:40 a.m. Individual needs Tulsa Police Department number. 8:46 a.m. Porcupine on Church. 8:57 a.m. Shooting range still closed to the public. 9:04 a.m. Back pain and sweating at 900 block of Maple. 9:37 a.m. Three blocks north of university on Seventh, semi with no driver, someone lying under cab. 9:40 a.m. Pickup truck all over the road headed east on Highway 64. 10:16 a.m. Two dogs heading east on 500 block of Barnes, Pit Bull or Rottweiler. 3:26 p.m. Controlled burn at 420 and Harper. 3:32 p.m. Black cat at 500 block of Maple, called animal control. 6:12 p.m. Advised OHP of a green pickup headed east of Alva on Highway 64, open container, possibly intoxicated. 10:12 p.m. 911 call, transfer to Grant County, report of a stolen TV at Lamont and Main, 48” Samsung. 11:03 p.m. 911 call, one black cow 6 ½ miles west of Carmen on north side. July 19, 2013 5:10 a.m. Man in ditch north of Alva west on 64 to Avard the north gravel blacktop curves, stay on gravel. 6:05 a.m. Individual for jail, employees arrested this morning. 8:34 a.m. Greyhound out on Hunt St., large and brown, purple collar, called animal control. 9:26 a.m. Red semi all over road east on 64. 9:47 a.m. Officer calling to ask about a runaway. 12:58 p.m. Dead cat in road at 400 block of Church, called animal control. 2:52 p.m. Grass fire southwest of Alva on Greer/CR 400 on east side of railroad tracks. 3:53 p.m. Barrels blocking lane on Highway 45 before Greensburg corner. 4:36 p.m. Domestic at 1200 block of High. 4:48 p.m. Controlled burn 3

miles west of Pond Creek on Highway 60 on north side of highway. July 20, 2013 3:48 a.m. 911 call, Lane and Maple, just passing through town. 8:28 a.m. Driver’s license renewal question. 9:45 a.m. Controlled burn 3 miles south of Four Corners on 81, notified Pond Creek Fire Department. 12:58 p.m. Controlled burn at CR 820 and Latimer. 9:23 p.m. Car stolen from 400 block of Oklahoma Blvd. 9:58 p.m. Shots fired at Baptist Church. July 21, 2013 2:49 a.m. 911 call, Loves, a man was threatening us, male Hispanic, white t-shirt and jeans, two pizza boxes and bag of chips. 2:51 a.m. Officer letting us know wrecker has vehicle. 12:13 p.m. Parts stolen from shop on 800 block of Meno, officer notified. 3:37 p.m. Truck stolen at Walmart. 4:08 p.m. Officer recovered vehicle, released to owner. 6:58 p.m. Child locked in car at Walmart. July 22, 2013 12:23 a.m. 911 call, broke into her house at 700 block of Maple. 2:23 a.m. Pickup on side of road with lights on. 9:34 a.m. Dead cat in driveway on 1400 block of Young. 12:31 p.m. Ditch burning at Short Springs Cemetery on south side. 2:08 p.m. Bird out of nest at 1200 block of Noble, Mississippi kite/hawk. 2:22 p.m. Car stolen, needs report, transfer to police department. 3:19 p.m. Call referring closest hospital to Waynoka. 4:50 p.m. Stolen pistol on Cotton Rd., notified deputy. 7:50 p.m. House broken into, gave deputy message, will stop by her house. 8:23 p.m. 911 call, bowel obstruction and throwing up blood at 200 block of Apache in Medford, paraplegic. 8:34 p.m. Miller EMS asked to take call, Medford not responding, told them to go ahead. 9:21 p.m. Fire on a pole 2 miles east of sale barn half-mile south of railroad on Jefferson, blown main fuse, dead pole lying on the ground, service pole on fire, contacted OG&E. 10:45 p.m. Headlights from west side of bridge north of town by Salt Fork Bridge. July 23, 2013 8:47 a.m. Trucks going fast in Avard. 8:57 a.m. Controlled burn on Logan and CR 980 on south side. 4:04 p.m. Jackson County ar-

rested individual on warrant. 5:34 p.m. 911 call, need ambulance to residence, not feeling well for work, fell out of vehicle in front parking lot at 100 block of S. Fourth. 6:51 p.m. White Ford truck all over road, pipe hanging out of the back, ran stop sign. 7:52 p.m. Harassment since June 4 from wife’s boyfriend at 100 block of Flynn. 9:32 p.m. Transformer blew up at 600 block of Hart. 9:35 p.m. No power at 9th and Church. 9:35 p.m. No power at 1200 block of S. 10th. 9:38 p.m. No power on Murray Dr. 9:39 p.m. Big tree limbs blocking on 12th between Locust and Maple. 9:42 p.m. Tree limbs on Oklahoma Blvd. by college. 9:46 p.m. At 700 block of Maple, loose cable in tree and in the yard at back of house. 9:55 p.m. Caller about “chaotic” traffic at stoplights. 10:20 p.m. Question on storm siren. 10:21 p.m. Power out at 200 block of Seventh St. 11:15 p.m. Parked truck at Little Sahara State Park, white F250, couple of hours, far northern campground, only camper, notified officer. 11:34 p.m. Officer advised truck is a waste management guy, needed a place to sleep for a few nights until he can get motel. 11:52 p.m. Drug activity at Hart/Monroe, parole. July 24, 2013 12:17 a.m. Cops to 1100 block of Santa Fe for domestic. 1:07 a.m. Needs water turned off at 1000 block of Flynn, notified individual. 5:58 a.m. Black man in dark clothes in a white car with white girl at 600 block of Hart. 8:57 a.m. Individual for officer regarding daughter. 9:20 a.m. 911 call, two semis blocking one lane of traffic in front of Garnetts, officer notified. 9:20 a.m. Two-semi wreck in front of McDonalds, one smoking. 10:46 a.m. 911 call, electric box open in alley of Third and Barnes, fire department and OG&E notified. 11:25 a.m. Checks stolen, big check written at Walmart Friday, called officer. The call center also handled the following calls: abandoned calls – 25, accidental calls – 33, wrong number – 2, hang ups – 7, animal control – 9, sheriff – 54, police – 77, general info – 127, fire dept. – 23, ambulance – 11, road conditions – 7, weather – 2.


July 28, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

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Woods County Real Estate Transactions Beginning book 1162 page 591 Real Estate Transfers Monte Cluck to Katsy Mullendore Mecom Cluck, Kaysha Sparling and Kallie Hauschild, as CoTrustees of the Monte Dean Cluck II 2012 GST Trust: an undivided 1/3 in all of my right, title and interest in all of the oil, gas and other minerals I may own in Woods Co, including but not limited to (1) Section 11, Township 27 North, Range 15, WCM; (20 Section 11, Township 27 north, Range 15, WIM: Warranty Deed. The Barbara Struckle Living Trust U/T/A May 20, 2002 to Joe Jay Struckle and Jeffrey Jack Struckle: (1) Government Lots 2 & 3, Southeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter, Northeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter, South Half of the Northeast Quarter, North Half of the Southeast Quarter, Southeast Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of Section 30, Township 27 North, Range 17, WIM; (2) Northeast Quarter of Section 29, Township 27 North, Range 17, WIM; (3) East Half of the Southwest Quarter and South Half of the Southeast Quarter of Section 19, Southwest Quarter and Southeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of Section 20, and West Half of the Northwest Quarter of Section 29, all in Township 28 North, range 17, WIM; (4) East Half of Section 19 and the North Half of the North Half of Section 30, Township 27 North, Range 17, WIM; (5) West Half and Southeast Quarter of Section 20, Township 27 North, Range 17, WIM: Warranty Deed. The Joe Struckle Living Trust U/T/A May 20, 2002 to Joe Jay Struckle and Jeffrey Jack Struckle: (A) a tract of land out of the

Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of Section 35, Township 27 North, Range 18, WIM; (B) a tract of land out of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of Section 35, Township 27 North, Range 18, WIM: Warranty Deed. Larry D. Oller, as Agent for Jennie J. Oller to Larry D. Oller, Trustee of the Jennie J. Oller Irrevocable Trust dated Dec. 14, 2012: the West Half of Section 16, Township 29 North, Range 19, WIM: Quit Claim Deed. Jesse Schwerdtfeger & Sarah Schwerdtfeger to Tia Whitely: the West 115 feet of Lot 1 in Block 15 in Bower’s 4th Addition to the City of Alva: Corrective Warranty Deed. C.R. Nixon & Tana J. Nixon to Kari Woodall: the East 612 feet of the Northeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of Section 35, Township 27 North, Range 18, WIM: Warranty Deed. Wayne Kinzie & Beverly Kinzie to The Wayne E. Kinzie Trust dated Dec. 30, 1999: Lot 1 and the East

LEGAL NOTICE

Mississippi Lime common source of supply underlying the 640-acre drilling and spacing unit comprised of Section 5, Township 27 North, Range 14 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma, and to establish proper allowables for such well and such unit. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the application in this cause requests that the order entered in this matter (amending applicable orders of the Commission, including Order No. 154482) be made effective as of the date of the execution thereof or a date prior thereto, and that the authorization and permission requested herein run in favor of one or both of the Applicants, including Chesapeake Exploration, L.L.C. acting by and through its agent, Chesapeake Operating, Inc., or some other party recommended by Applicants. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this cause will be referred to an Administrative Law Judge for hearing, taking of evidence and reporting to the Corporation Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this cause will be heard before an Administrative Law Judge on the Conservation Docket at the Corporation Commission, First Floor, Jim Thorpe Building, 2101 North Lincoln Boulevard, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, at 8:30 a.m., on the 20th day of August 2013, and that this notice will be published as required by law and the rules of the Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the Applicants and interested parties may present testimony by telephone. The cost of telephonic communication shall be paid by the person or persons requesting its use. An interested party who wishes to participate by telephone shall contact the Applicants or Applicants’ attorney, prior to the hearing date, and provide his or her name and phone number. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that all interested persons may appear and be heard. For information concerning this action contact Paul Willis, landman, (405) 935-8350, or Emily P. Smith, attorney, OBA No. 20805, (405) 9358203, Chesapeake Operating, Inc., P.O. Box 18496, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73154-0496. Please refer to Cause CD Number. DONE AND PERFORMED THIS 25th day of July 2013.

(Published by the Alva Review-Courier on Sunday, July 28, 2013.) BEFORE THE CORPORATION COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF OKLAHOMA APPLICANTS: CHESAPEAKE OPERATING, INC. AND CHESAPEAKE EXPLORATION, L.L.C. RELIEF SOUGHT: INCREASED WELL DENSITY LEGAL DESCRIPTION: SECTION 5, TOWNSHIP 27 NORTH, RANGE 14 WEST OF THE IM, WOODS COUNTY, OKLAHOMA Cause CD No. 201304913 NOTICE OF HEARING STATE OF OKLAHOMA TO: All persons, owners, producers, operators, purchasers and takers of oil and gas, and all other interested persons, particularly in Woods County, Oklahoma, more particularly the parties set out on the Exhibit “A” attached to the application on file in this cause, and, if any of the named individuals be deceased, then the unknown heirs, executors, administrators, devisees, trustees and assigns, both immediate and remote, of such deceased individual; if any of the named entities is a dissolved partnership, corporation or other association, then the unknown successors, trustees and assigns, both immediate and remote, of such dissolved entity; if any of the named parties designated as a trustee is not presently acting in such capacity as trustee, then the unknown successor or successors to such trustee; if any of the named parties designated as an attorney-in-fact is not presently acting in such capacity as attorney-in-fact, then the unknown successor or successors to such attorneyin-fact; and if any of the named entities are corporations which do not continue to have legal existence, the unknown trustees or assigns of such parties. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Applicants, Chesapeake Operating, Inc. and Chesapeake Exploration, L.L.C., have filed an application in this cause requesting the Corporation Commission to enter an order amending applicable orders of the Commission, including Order No. 154482, to authorize and permit an additional well for the production of hydrocarbons from the

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the Television Critics Association on Saturday. He compared the view to what it’s like playing a video game. Gaudelli said it takes a month to install the system, so NBC had to put it at a stadium where the network knew it would televise at least twice during the NFL season. He said the Cowboys wanted to partner on the replay system because the team is focused on cutting edge technology and innovation. The FreeD system is from Replay Technologies Inc., which has worked on Olympic broadcasting and live telecasts of New York Yankees games. In other “Sunday Night

50 feet of Lot 2 in Block 1 of the Legion Heights 2nd Addition to the City of Alva: Warranty Deed. Mortgages Tia Whitely to Primesource Mortgage Inc.: the West 115 feet of Lot 1 in Block 15 in Bower’s 4th Addition to the City of Alva: $81,734. Kari Woodall & Marvin Woodall to The Freedom State Bank: the East 612 feet of the Northeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of Section 35, Township 27 North, Range 18, WIM: $10,000. Jeannie C. Smith to Banccentral NA: Lot 3 and the North Half of Lot 4 in Block 9 of the East View Addition to the City of Alva: maximum obligation limit $44,500. Randy J. Rhodes & Jovita L. Rhodes to Mortgage Investors Corporation: a tract of land in the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of Section 35, Township 27 North, Range 18, WIM: $203,908. appeals court said in a Kansas case that the ruse alone was not enough to justify stopping vehicles. KHP says it still uses them and insists it has additional probable cause when troopers stop vehicles. The Marijuana Policy Project claims legalization will curb But there is still a long way to trafficking because dealers will go before the smoke clears and not risk losing their state licenses. Oklahoma’s soccer future comes It argues tightly controlled into view. Not since the Tulsa regulation is better than the current Roughnecks, which played in the old uncontrolled trafficking. NASL back in the 1970s before the “Our goal should be to reduce league folded, has the fastest growing the trafficking of marijuana into the sport in America caused this much of United States from drug cartels in a stir in the state. Mexico — and Colorado is taking “If you look at Oklahoma City steps to eliminate that drug cartel and what it has to serve soccer fans, activity,” said Mason Tvert, the this really fills a void in the city,” group’s spokesman. “The goal Cornett said.

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Crossroads

Soccer

direct competitor, into the market. This ongoing litigation is the reason co-owner Lund was unable to speak to the Express-Star candidly about this soccer war. He did say his partner at SOS, Tim McLaughlin, will go before the NASL on July 25 and present the company’s plans for a team in Oklahoma City. This is expected to go “very well”, Lund said. Since they already locked down the Taft Stadium deal, SOS appear to be confident in their plans.

CORPORATION COMMISSION OF OKLAHOMA PATRICE DOUGLAS, Chairman BOB ANTHONY, Vice Chairman DANA L. MURPHY, Commissioner BY ORDER OF THE COMMISSION: PEGGY MITCHELL, Commission Secretary

LEGAL NOTICE

(Published by the Alva Review-Courier on Sunday, July 28, 2013.) BEFORE THE CORPORATION COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF OKLAHOMA APPLICANTS: CHESAPEAKE OPERATING, INC. AND CHESAPEAKE EXPLORATION, L.L.C. RELIEF SOUGHT: WELL LOCATION EXCEPTION LEGAL DESCRIPTION: SECTION 5 , TOWNSHIP 27 NORTH, RANGE 14 WEST OF THE IM, WOODS COUNTY, OKLAHOMA Cause CD No. 201304914 NOTICE OF HEARING STATE OF OKLAHOMA TO: All persons, owners, producers, operators, purchasers and takers of oil and gas, and all other interested persons, particularly in Woods County, Oklahoma, more particularly the parties set out on the Exhibit “A” attached to the application on file in this cause, and, if any of the named individuals be deceased, then the unknown heirs, executors, administrators, devisees, trustees and assigns, both immediate and remote, of such deceased individual; if any of the named entities is a dissolved partnership, corporation or other association, then the unknown successors, trustees and assigns, both immediate and remote, of such dissolved entity; if any of the named parties designated as a trustee is not presently acting in such capacity as trustee, then the unknown successor or successors to such trustee; if any of the named parties designated as an attorney-in-fact is not presently acting in such capacity as attorney-in-fact, then the unknown successor or successors to such attorneyin-fact; and if any of the named entities are corporations which do not continue to have legal existence, the unknown trustees or assigns of such parties. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that

Football” news, NBC Sports Group said a new bus will travel the country during the season visiting the 17 cities where the games originate. The bus will arrive two or three days before each game. Along for the ride will be four fans of the week chosen based on their social media activity, team pride and interest in “SNF.” Besides the bus trip, they’ll also receive game tickets. Also debuting on Sept. 8 will be Carrie Underwood singing “Waiting All Day for Sunday Night,” the show’s theme song that opens the “SNF” telecast. She replaces fellow country music star Faith Hill, who decided not to return for a seventh season.

Applicants, Chesapeake Operating, Inc. and Chesapeake Exploration, L.L.C., have filed an application in this cause requesting the Corporation Commission to enter an order, as follows: (i) authorizing and permitting an exception to the permitted well location tolerances in the 640-acre drilling and spacing unit comprised of Section 5, Township 27 North, Range 14 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma, for the Endicott, Tonkawa, Cottage Grove, Lansing Kansas City, Big Lime-Oswego, Red Fork (Cherokee) Sand and Mississippi Lime separate common sources of supply, so as to allow a well to be drilled as follows: Location of Wellbore at Completion Interval: The proposed location of the end points for the completion interval for the Mississippi Lime common source of supply will be no closer than 165 feet from the north line and no closer than 560 feet from the west line and no closer than 165 feet from the south line and no closer than 560 feet from the west line of the unit comprising said Section 5, Township 27 North, Range 14 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma, and the location of the end points of the completion interval for the Endicott, Tonkawa, Cottage Grove, Lansing Kansas City, Big LimeOswego and Red Fork (Cherokee) Sand separate common sources of supply will be no closer than 330 feet from the north line and no closer than 560 feet from the west line and no closer than 330 feet from the south line and no closer than 560 feet from the west line of the unit comprising said Section 5, Township 27 North, Range 14 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma, and to be completed in and produce hydrocarbons from the above-named separate common sources of supply; (ii) providing for the re-opening of the cause at such time as the bottom hole location of the well proposed hereunder has been determined; and (iii) establishing a proper allowable with no downward adjustment made thereto. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the application in this cause requests that the order be entered in this matter be made effective as of the date of the execution thereof or as of a date prior thereto and that the authorization and

should be to control it and Colorado is taking steps to do that. I cannot see a single reason why other states would find that problematic.” But authorities contend demand and greed will boost the black market in states where pot remains illegal. “If it didn’t work with medical (marijuana) when it was regulated there is no indication it will work with this,” said Thomas Gorman, director of the RMHIDTA. “It is going to be more available, the competition is going to lower the price, there is going to be less perception of risk — and with all that you have increased use and increased use and increased diversion.”

permission requested herein run in favor of one or both of the Applicants, including Chesapeake Exploration, L.L.C. acting by and through its agent Chesapeake Operating, Inc., or some other party recommended by Applicants. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the legal descriptions for the land sections adjacent to said Section 5 are Sections 4, 6, 7, 8 and 9, Township 27 North, Range 14 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma and Sections 31, 32 and 33, Township 28 North, Range 14 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this cause will be referred to an Administrative Law Judge for hearing, taking of evidence and reporting to the Corporation Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this cause will be heard before an Administrative Law Judge on the Merits Docket at the Corporation Commission, First Floor, Jim Thorpe Building, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, at 8:30 a.m., on the 20th day of August 2013, and that this notice will be published as required by law and the rules of the Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the Applicants and interested parties may present testimony by telephone. The cost of telephonic communication shall be paid by the person or persons requesting its use. An interested party who wishes to participate by telephone shall contact the Applicants or Applicants’ attorney, prior to the hearing date, and provide his or her name and phone number. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that all interested persons may appear and be heard. For information concerning this action contact Paul Willis, landman, (405) 935-8350, or Emily P. Smith, attorney, OBA No. 20805, (405) 9358203, Chesapeake Operating, Inc., P.O. Box 18496, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73154-0496. Please refer to Cause CD Number. DONE AND PERFORMED THIS 25th day of July 2013. CORPORATION COMMISSION OF OKLAHOMA PATRICE DOUGLAS, Chairman BOB ANTHONY, Vice Chairman DANA L. MURPHY, Commissioner BY ORDER OF THE COMMISSION: PEGGY MITCHELL, Commission Secretary


July 28, 2013 LEGAL NOTICE

(Published by the Alva Review-Courier on Sunday, July 21 and 28, 2013.) NOTICE OF 2012 DELINQUENT REAL ESTATE TAXES LOCATED IN WOODS COUNTY, STATE OF OKLAHOMA. Notice is hereby given that pursuant to 68 O.S. Section 3101 et seq., the tax liens on the hereinafter described lands, lots, tracts and parcels of real estate, all situated in Woods County, Oklahoma, will be sold at public auction pursuant to the provisions of 68 O.S. Section 3105 unless the delinquent taxes, interest and penalty are paid in full prior to the time of tax sale. The said list contains all the lands on which the ad valorem taxes of the taxable year 2912 remain due, delinquent and unpaid together with any delinquent and unpaid ad valorem taxes of other years, and including any personal taxes which are by law Made a lien upon the real property owned by such person or persons; and further including delinquent special improvement and maintenance assessments separately stated and described for the year or years as specifically stated in said list for certain lands, lots or tracts of real estate having special improvement and maintenance assessments which are by statute a lien upon realty. As to each class and year of tax, the delinquent interest separately computed to August 15, 2013, together with advertising cost and listing fees, having been included in the total amount of all such taxes, interest and cost remaining due, delinquent and unpaid. The delinquent taxes hereby advertised may involve a manufactured home which may be subject to the right of a secured party to repossess. A holder of a perfected security interest in such manufactured home may be able to pay ad valorem taxes based upon the value of the manufactured home apart from the value of real property. This notice applies to the following lands, lots, tracts and parcels of real estate, to wit: Witness my hand this 19th Day of. July, 2013. 0000-15-23N-13W-1-062-RA BARNETT, LANETTE E/2NE, 15-23-13 1138/282 Acres 80.000 Ad Valorem Due 520.00 Penalty 54.60 Mailing Fee 9.81 Advertising Cost 30.00 TOTAL DUE: 614.41 0000-01-24N-14W-4-874-RA MADSEN, CRAIG & SHAREE’ TR IN SE 1-24-14 BEG 630’E. OF SW COR SE TH E.325’,N.2010’,W. 325’,S.2010’TO POB 1114/753 Acres 15.000 Ad Valorem Due 668.00 Penalty 70.14 Mailing Fee 9.81 Advertising Cost 30.00 TOTAL DUE: 777.95 0000-03-24N-15W-1-126-RA WOLTZ, PAUL DEAN LIFE EST W/2NE, 3-24-15 853/408 Acres 93.560 Ad Valorem Due 53.00 Penalty 5.57 Mailing Fee 9.81 Advertising Cost 30.00 TOTAL DUE: 98.38 0000-05-24N-16W-3-664-RA MEADE, DIANNA & JOHN E LOT 10, 5-24-16 1009/688 Acres 7.620 Ad Valorem Due 1.00 Penalty 0.11 Mailing Fee 9.81 Advertising Cost 30.00 TOTAL DUE: 40.92 0000-06-24N-16W-2-296-RA MEADE, DIANNA & JOHN E LOT 2; 6-24-16 1009/688 Acres 34.600 Ad Valorem Due 33.00 Penalty 3.47 Mailing Fee 9.81 Advertising Cost 30.00 TOTAL DUE: 76.28 0000-06-24N-16W-3-686-RA MEADE, DIANNA & JOHN E LOT 8 & SESW 6-24-16 1009/688 Acres 73.440 Ad Valorem Due 49.00 Penalty 5.15 Mailing Fee 9.81 Advertising Cost 30.00 TOTAL DUE: 93.96 0000-15-24N-16W-1-050-RR TUNE, CHUCK B & SUSAN K TR IN NE 15-24-16 BEG NE COR S.844’,W.158’TO POB S.275’,W.158’,N.275’,E. 158’. 1005/32 Acres 1.000 Ad Valorem Due 36.00 Penalty 3.78 Mailing Fee 9.81 2011 Tax Past Due 275.46

LPXLP Advertising Cost 30.00 TOTAL DUE: 355.05 0000-21-25N-15W-3-686-RR SMITH, CORY L & AMANDA K TR. SE COR SWSW, 21-25-15 BEG SW COR SWSW,W.295.16’,N.295.16’ ,E.295. Acres 2.000 Ad Valorem Due 637.00 Penalty 66.89 Mailing Fee 9.81 Advertising Cost 30.00 2011 Taxes 859.38 TOTAL DUE: 1,603.08 0000-35-25N-15W-3-563-RA WOLTZ, PAUL DEAN LIFE EST N/2SW, SESW, 35-25-15 853/408 Acres 120.000 Ad Valorem Due 100.00 Penalty 10.50 Mailing Fee 9.81 Advertising Cost 30.00 TOTAL DUE: 150.31 0000-35-25N-15W-3-656-RA WOLTZ, PAUL DEAN LIFE EST SWSW, 35-25-15 853/408 Acres 40.000 Ad Valorem Due 34.00 Penalty 3.57 Mailing Fee 9.81 Advertising Cost 30.00 TOTAL DUE: 77.38 0000-31-26N-16W-1-015-RR HUFFORD, CASEY B & MISTY J TR IN NE, 31-26-16 BEG.AT NE COR,TH.(N89-17-14W)340’TO POB, TH( 1070/1064 Acres 4.290 Ad Valorem Due 165.50 Penalty 9.93 Mailing Fee 9.81 Advertising Cost 30.00 TOTAL DUE: 215.24 0000-18-27N-13W-2-316-RA NEILSON INC. TRS IN LOT 1 OF 18-27-13. TR #1=BEG 827.54’E.OF NW COR, S.1074.89’TO CEN RR R/W,(W.17 /32S).FOL CEN LN RR TO 475’ E OF W.BDRY; N.1189.60’,E.352.54’ TO POB. TR #2=BEG 827.54’E. OF NW COR, S.1074.89’ TO CEN RR R/W, (W17-32S)FOL CEN LN RR TO 475’E OF W BDRY; N.484.6’; E.211.3’; N.705’; E.141.24’ TO POB... 1132/684 Acres 10.190 Ad Valorem Due 13.00 Penalty 1.37 Mailing Fee 9.81 Advertising Cost 30.00 TOTAL DUE: 54.18 0000-13-27N-14W-1-140-RC TIDWELL, HENRY TR IN SENE 13-27-14 BEG 785.6’W & 262.6’N SE COR NE W.197.7’,N.585.6’ NELY 207’ S.646.6’ LESS.24ac TO RR 969/20 Acres 2.550 Ad Valorem Due 440.00 Penalty 46.20 Mailing Fee 9.81 2010 Tax Past Due 677.87 2011 Tax Past Due 606.24 Advertising Cost 30.00 TOTAL DUE: 1,810.12 0000-18-27N-15W-2-376-RA MITCHELL, CHARLOTTE L FAMILY NW & LOT 3, 18-27-15 634/50, 997/1 Acres 191.000 Ad Valorem Due 139.00 Penalty 14.60 Mailing Fee 9.81 Advertising Cost 30.00 TOTAL DUE: 193.41 0000-03-27N-17W-2-375-RA WHITAKER, TRAVIS NW, 3-27-17 966/207 Acres 160.000 Ad Valorem Due 162.00 Penalty 17.01 Mailing Fee 9.81 Mfg Vin Advertising Cost 30.00 TOTAL DUE: 218.82 0000-33-29N-14W-4-875-RA RHODES, EARNEST D & MARY E N/2SE 33-29-14 747/261 & 749/255 Acres 80.000 Ad Valorem Due 62.00 Penalty 6.51 Mailing Fee 9.81 Advertising Cost 30.00 TOTAL DUE: 108.32 0000-24-29N-15W-2-436-RA RHODES, EARNEST D & MARY E W/2NW,24-29-15 747/263 Acres 80.000 Ad Valorem Due 941.00 Penalty 98.81 Mailing Fee 9.81 Advertising Cost 30.00 TOTAL DUE: 1,079.62 0003-00-054-001-0-000-RR SEIL, WILLIAM J AVARD O T,BLK 54,LOT 1, 24/241

Alva Review-Courier Ad Valorem Due 3.00 Penalty 0.32 Mailing Fee 9.81 2010 Past Tax 44.99 2011 Past Tax 43.41 Advertising Cost 30.00 TOTAL DUE: 131.53 0003-00-078-009-0-000-RR CUNNINGHAM, DYLAN RAY AVARD O T;BLK 78,LOTS 9-12 1060/241 Ad Valorem Due 117.00 Penalty 12.29 Mailing Fee 9.81 2011 Past Tax 191.18 Advertising Cost 30.00 TOTAL DUE: 360.28 0003-00-097-013-0-000-RR CUNNINGHAM, REX D & DEBORAH AVARD O T,BLK 97,LOT 13 & S.5’ OF LOT 14 866/320 Ad Valorem Due 21.00 Penalty 2.21 Mailing Fee 9.81 2010 Taxes 71.36 2011 Taxes 66.54 Advertising Cost 30.00 TOTAL DUE: 200.92 0003-00-100-009-0-000-RR CUNNINGHAM, REX D & DEBORAH AVARD O T,BLK 100,LOTS 9-13 Ad Valorem Due 83.00 Penalty 8.72 Mailing Fee 9.81 2010 Tax 81.61 2011 Tax 147.49 Advertising Cost 30.00 TOTAL DUE: 360.63 0003-00-100-015-0-000-RR CUNNINGHAM, REX D & DEBORAH K AVARD O T,BLK 100,LOTS 15 & 16 Ad Valorem Due 70.00 Penalty 7.35 Mailing Fee 9.81 2010 Taxes 144.61 2011 Taxes 129.50 Advertising Cost 30.00 TOTAL DUE: 391.27 0003-00-119-001-0-000-RR CUNNINGHAM, RYAN GENE& CHRISTIE AVARD O T;BLK 119,LOTS 1-5 1059/1004 Ad Valorem Due 149.00 Penalty 15.65 Mailing Fee 9.81 Advertising Cost 30.00 TOTAL DUE: 204.46 0003-00-119-013-0-000-RR CUNNINGHAM, REX DUANE JR AVARD O T;BLK 119,LOTS 13-16 1019/301, 1020/804 CSS007638YXAB/720706352011 Ad Valorem Due 575.00 Penalty 60.38 Mailing Fee 9.81 Advertising Cost 30.00 TOTAL DUE: 675.19 0110-00-001-002-0-000-RR KELLEY, ALINDA K WESTLAKES, BLK 1 LOT 2 882/518 Ad Valorem Due 401.00 Penalty 42.11 Mailing Fee 9.81 Advertising Cost 30.00 TOTAL DUE: 482.92 1001-00-003-011-0-000-UR CHAPMAN, LAURA ALVA O T;BLK 3,LOT 11,1080/213 Ad Valorem Due 231.00 Penalty 24.26 Mailing Fee 9.81 Advertising Cost 30.00 TOTAL DUE: 295.07 1001-00-009-012-0-000-UR PARKER, SAMUEL GLEN JR ALVA O T;BLK 9,LOT 12 1011/394 Ad Valorem Due 43.00 Penalty 4.52 Mailing Fee 9.81 Advertising Cost 30.00 TOTAL DUE: 87.33 1001-00-017-006-0-002-UC MUSTARD, RODNEY G ALVA O T;BLK 17,N.80’LOTS 6-8 831/431 Ad Valorem Due 234.00 Penalty 24.57 Mailing Fee 9.81 Advertising Cost 30.00 TOTAL DUE: 298.38 1001-00-023-001-0-000-UR MURRY, JENNETTA S ALVA O T;BLK 23,LOT 1 698/264 1085/7 Ad Valorem Due 125.00 Penalty 13.13 Mailing Fee 9.81 Advertising Cost 30.00 TOTAL DUE: 177.94 1001-00-023-002-0-000-UR MURRY, JENNETTA S ALVA O T;BLK 23, LOT 2,803/406 1085/7 Ad Valorem Due 57.00 Penalty 5.99 Mailing Fee 9.81 Advertising Cost 30.00 TOTAL DUE: 102.80 1001-00-044-016-0-002-UR

Page 15 MUSTARD, RODNEY & TAMMY ALVA O T;BLK 44,N.45’LOTS 15&16 1116/768 Ad Valorem Due 80.00 Penalty 8.40 Mailing Fee 9.81 Advertising Cost 30.00 TOTAL DUE: 128.21 1001-00-050-010-0-000-UC PARKER, TINA M & RANDY ALVA O T;BLK 50,LOT 10, 945/454 Ad Valorem Due 297.00 Penalty 31.19 Mailing Fee 9.81 Advertising Cost 30.00 TOTAL DUE: 368.00 1001-00-055-004-0-000-UR KORNELE, JO ELAINE & ETALS ALVA O T;BLK 55,LOT 4 868/189 PATRICK E COVERT & CASSIE JO NORTHCROSS Ad Valorem Due 120.00 Penalty 12.60 Mailing Fee 9.81 Advertising Cost 30.00 TOTAL DUE: 172.41 1001-00-055-011-0-000-UR WIERSIG, KURTIS TODD ALVA O T;BLK 55,LOT 11, 821/395 Ad Valorem Due 154.00 Penalty 16.17 Mailing Fee 9.81 Advertising Cost 30.00 TOTAL DUE: 209.98 1001-00-058-012-0-000-UR TALLEY, KRISTIN ALVA O T,BLK 58,LOT 12 1082/306 1085/952 Ad Valorem Due 58.00 Penalty 6.09 Mailing Fee 9.81 Advertising Cost 30.00 TOTAL DUE: 103.90 1001-00-062-005-0-000-UR RODKEY, MIKE & SHEILA ALVA O T;BLK 62,LOT 5 779/246 Ad Valorem Due 178.00 Penalty 18.69 Mailing Fee 9.81 Advertising Cost 30.00 TOTAL DUE: 236.50 1001-00-065-004-0-000-UR ZOLLARS, MARY E ALVA O T;BLK 65,LOT 4;E.5’LOT 5 Ad Valorem Due 122.00 Penalty 12.81 Mailing Fee 9.81 Advertising Cost 30.00 TOTAL DUE: 174.62 1060-00-006-011-0-000-UR LEE, BILLY EDWARD & SANDY ANN COLLEGE HILL;BLK 6,LOT 11 978/531 Ad Valorem Due 284.00 Penalty 29.82 Mailing Fee 9.81 Advertising Cost 30.00 TOTAL DUE: 353.63 1060-00-006-014-0-000-UR STEFFEN, LESTER COLLEGE HILL;BLK 6,LOT 14 768/370 Ad Valorem Due 257.00 Penalty 26.99 Mailing Fee 9.81 2011 Taxes 258.00 Advertising Cost 30.00 TOTAL DUE: 581.80 1085-00-004-006-0-000-UR HARTMANN, STEVEN & EAST HILL;BLK 4,LOTS 6 - 8 1079/133 Ad Valorem Due 641.00 Penalty 67.31 Mailing Fee 9.81 Advertising Cost 30.00 TOTAL DUE: 748.12 1085-00-006-022-0-000-UR KORNELE, PEARL CINDY LIFE EST EAST HILL;BLK 6,LOTS 22-25 775/121, 1006/1030, 1031/673 Ad Valorem Due 196.00 Penalty 20.58 Mailing Fee 9.81 Advertising Cost 30.00 TOTAL DUE: 256.39 1095-00-007-012-0-000-UR OWEN, AARON EAST VALE;BLK 7,LOT 12, 954/449 Ad Valorem Due 243.00 Penalty 25.52 Mailing Fee 9.81 2011 Taxes 351.81 Advertising Cost 30.00 TOTAL DUE: 660.14 1235-00-015-005-0-000-UR TREKELL, VIOLA LINDA & HATFIELD; BLK 15, LOT 5 395/34 1001/311 Ad Valorem Due 105.00 Penalty 11.03 Mailing Fee 9.81 2010 Taxes 239.83 2011 Taxes 183.47 Advertising Cost 30.00 TOTAL DUE: 579.14 1245-00-004-013-0-000-UR MORROW, CHARLES E HESS;BLK 4,LOT 13 1083/201

Ad Valorem Due 258.00 Penalty 27.09 Mailing Fee 9.81 Advertising Cost 30.00 TOTAL DUE: 324.90 1245-00-006-010-0-000-UR STEWART, KENT HESS;BLK 6,LOT 10,806/92 1070/818 Ad Valorem Due 331.00 Penalty 34.76 Mailing Fee 9.81 2011 Taxes 448.63 Advertising Cost 30.00 TOTAL DUE: 854.20 1245-00-007-003-0-000-UR ALTOBELLA, TERESA LORENA HESS; BLK 7, LOTS 3 & 4 959/285 Ad Valorem Due 172.00 Penalty 18.06 Mailing Fee 9.81 Advertising Cost 30.00 TOTAL DUE: 229.87 1245-00-009-012-0-002-UR SMITH, JEDEDIAH T HESS;BLK 9,E.6’LOT 12 & W.44’ LOT 13 1080/216 Ad Valorem Due 81.00 Penalty 8.51 Mailing Fee 9.81 Advertising Cost 30.00 TOTAL DUE: 129.32 1255-00-024-001-0-002-UR PETERMANN, MISTI DAWN HESS 3RD;BLK 24,S.50’LOTS 1 & 2 742/39 987/960, 881/86 Ad Valorem Due 166.00 Penalty 17.43 Mailing Fee 9.81 2010 Taxes 149.00 2011 Taxes 245.15 Advertising Cost 30.00 TOTAL DUE: 617.39 1265-00-002-004-0-000-UR TOMPKINS, MONICA L INDIAN HILLS;BLK 2,LOT 4 1077/730 Ad Valorem Due 724.00 Penalty 76.02 Mailing Fee 9.81 2010 Taxes 998.70 2011 Taxes 932.63 Advertising Cost 30.00 TOTAL DUE: 2,771.16 1330-00-002-004-0-000-UR PARKER, TINA M & RANDY PETERMANN; BLK 2, LOT 4 942/478&479 Ad Valorem Due 618.00 Penalty 64.89 Mailing Fee 9.81 Advertising Cost 30.00 TOTAL DUE: 722.70 1330-00-002-006-0-000-UR PETERMANN, ROBERTA A & ETAL PETERMANN;BLK 2 LOTS 6 & 7 394/249 Ad Valorem Due 105.00 Penalty 11.03 Mailing Fee 9.81 Advertising Cost 30.00 TOTAL DUE: 155.84 2010-00-002-006-0-000-UR MURPHY, RAMONA A CAPRON;McCLURE’S 1ST,BLK 2,S/2 LOT 6 & ALL LOT 7, 1150/530 Ad Valorem Due 95.00 Penalty 9.98 Mailing Fee 9.81 Advertising Cost 30.00 TOTAL DUE: 144.79 3001-00-006-010-0-002-UR WILLIAMS, DOROTHY SHERFY WAYNOKA O.T., BLK 6 W. 85’ OF LOTS 10-12 629/367 Ad Valorem Due 144.00 Penalty 15.12 Mailing Fee 9.81 Advertising Cost 30.00 TOTAL DUE: 198.93 3001-00-011-014-0-002-UR LOPSHIRE, MONTE LANE &/OR WAYNOKA O.T., BLK 11 E.96’ OF LOTS 14,15 & A 924/199 Ad Valorem Due 87.00 Penalty 9.14 Mailing Fee 9.81 Advertising Cost 30.00 TOTAL DUE: 135.95 3025-00-003-002-0-002-UR BOATMAN, KENNETH D & DAVIDSON’S 1ST, BLK 3 W. 46’ OF LOT 2 E. 4’ OF LOT 3 Ad Valorem Due 36.00 Penalty 3.78 Mailing Fee 9.81 2011 Taxes 92.24 Advertising Cost 30.00 TOTAL DUE: 171.83 3030-00-011-007-0-000-UR ARDNAS, INC DAVIDSON’S 2ND, BLK 11 LOTS 7&8 DR 709/543 Ad Valorem Due 20.00 Penalty 2.10 Mailing Fee 9.81

See Legal Page 16


LPXLP

July 28, 2013

From Page 15

Legal

2010 Taxes 69.89 2011 Taxes 65.25 Advertising Cost 30.00 TOTAL DUE: 197.05 3040-00-014-001-0-000-UR ROSS, NATHAN A & BECKY L WAYNOKA;EAST HILL,BLK 14,LOT 1 999/449 Ad Valorem Due 28.00 Penalty 2.94 Mailing Fee 9.81 Advertising Cost 30.00 TOTAL DUE: 70.75 3050-00-003-008-0-000-UR ORCUTT, RUSSELL & EVA WAYNOKA; ELM GROVE; BLK 3 S.42’ OF LOT 8 943/540 Ad Valorem Due 125.00 Penalty 13.13 Mailing Fee 9.81 Advertising Cost 30.00 TOTAL DUE: 177.94 3050-00-004-001-0-001-UR CARSON, GRETA C WAYNOKA; ELM GROVE, BLK 4 N.50’ LOTS 1-3 902/26 Ad Valorem Due 87.00 Penalty 9.14 Mailing Fee 9.81 Advertising Cost 30.00 TOTAL DUE: 135.95 3050-00-008-005-0-000-UR ORCUTT, RUSSELL G & EVA M WAYNOKA;ELM GROVE,BLK 8,LOT 5 923/118 Ad Valorem Due 84.00 Penalty 8.82 Mailing Fee 9.81 Advertising Cost 30.00 TOTAL DUE: 132.63 3050-00-008-006-0-000-UR ORCUTT, RUSSELL G & EVA M ELM GROVE; BLK 8, LOT 6 845/133 Ad Valorem Due 80.00 Penalty 8.40 Mailing Fee 9.81 Advertising Cost 30.00 TOTAL DUE: 128.21

3050-00-008-007-0-000-UC ORCUTT, RUSSEL & EVA WAYNOKA;ELM GROVE,BLK 8,LOT 7 943/539 RUSSELL WRONG ON DEED Ad Valorem Due 1,025.00 Penalty 107.63 Mailing Fee 9.81 Advertising Cost 30.00 TOTAL DUE: 1,172.44 3050-00-009-007-0-000-UR ORCUTT, RUSSELL G ELM GROVE, BLK 9;LOT 7 &*TR 30’ON N.SIDE OF ST BTWN BLKS 9 & 12 Ad Valorem Due 15.00 Penalty 1.58 Mailing Fee 9.81 Advertising Cost 30.00 TOTAL DUE: 56.39 3050-00-013-010-0-000-UR RAUH, STARLENE ELM GROVE; BLK 13, LOT 10 931/170 Ad Valorem Due 119.00 Penalty 12.50 Mailing Fee 9.81 2010 Taxes 324.00 2011 Taxes 188.61 Advertising Cost 30.00 TOTAL DUE: 683.92 3055-00-001-001-0-000-UR CHAPMAN, WILLIAM LEWIS EUTSLER, BLK 1, LOT 1, 1014/96 Ad Valorem Due 189.00 Penalty 19.85 Mailing Fee 9.81 2011 Taxes 283.70 Advertising Cost 30.00 TOTAL DUE: 532.36 3060-00-001-001-0-002-UR PEPPER, REBEKAH WAYNOKA; GORINS SUB, BLK 1, E/2 LOTS 1 & 2 804/364; 807/475 Ad Valorem Due 93.00 Penalty 9.77 Mailing Fee 9.81 2010 Taxes 173.91

Alva Review-Courier

Page 16 LEGAL NOTICE

(Published by the Alva Review-Courier on Sunday, July 28, 2013.) BEFORE THE CORPORATION COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF 2011 Taxes 160.34 OKLAHOMA Advertising Cost 30.00 APPLICANT: SANDRIDGE TOTAL DUE: 476.83 EXPLORATION AND 3075-00-002-002-0-000-UR PRODUCTION, LLC QUARLES, SHERRY ANN & RELIEF SOUGHT: POOLING WAYNOKA; HIGHLAND; BLK 2, Cause CD No. 201304872 LOT 2 983/966, 1040/678 LEGAL DESCRIPTION: Section 19, Ad Valorem Due 9.00 Township 28 North, Range 19 West of Penalty 0.95 the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma Mailing Fee 9.81 NOTICE OF HEARING 2010 Taxes 53.78 STATE OF OKLAHOMA TO: All 2011 Taxes 51.12 persons, owners, producers, operators, Advertising Cost 30.00 purchasers and takers of oil and gas, and TOTAL DUE: 154.66 all other interested persons, particularly 3075-00-003-001-0-000-UR in Woods County, Oklahoma, including MEADE, JOHN E & DIANNA the following: Bar D. Ranch, Ind.; WAYNOKA; HIGHLAND, BLK 3 Episcopal Royalty Company; Cascade LOTS 1 & 2 1008/222 Resources, LLC; RABSM, LLC; Ad Valorem Due 336.00 Universal Resources Corporation; Penalty 35.28 Galatyn Minerals, LP; Arrowhead Mailing Fee 9.81 Resources, Inc.; and if any of the aboveAdvertising Cost 30.00 named parties is a dissolved partnership, TOTAL DUE: 411.09 corporation or other association, then 3075-00-003-008-0-000-UR the unknown successors, trustees and MARTINEZ, FRANSISCO assigns, both immediate and remote, of WAYNOKA;HIGHLAND,BLK 3,LOT such dissolved entity. 8 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that 993/143 FRANCISCO MISSPELLED Applicant, SandRidge Exploration and ON Production, LLC, has filed an application DEED in this cause requesting the Corporation Ad Valorem Due 143.00 Commission of Oklahoma to enter an Penalty 15.02 order pooling the interests of oil and Mailing Fee 9.81 gas owners, and adjudicating the rights Advertising Cost 30.00 and equities in connection therewith, TOTAL DUE: 197.83 in the 640-acre non-horizontal drilling 3085-00-001-003-0-000-UR and spacing units formed in Section ROSS, DOROTHY L 19, Township 28 North, Range 19 West WAYNOKA; HINK’S 1ST, BLK 1, of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma, LOT 3 for the Oswego and Cherokee separate 1004/391 common sources of supply and in Ad Valorem Due 129.00 the 640-acre horizontal well unit to Penalty 13.55 be formed in said Section 19 for the Mailing Fee 9.81 Mississippian common source of supply, 2011 Taxes 206.60 in respect to the development of such Advertising Cost 30.00 separate common sources of supply in TOTAL DUE: 388.96 such units. The interests of the oil and 3085-00-001-015-0-000-UR gas owners involved herein and the rights CRISWELL, NELSON BRUCE & and equities in respect thereto are sought TRACY herein to be pooled and adjudicated HINK’S 1ST; BLK 1 LOTS 15 & 16 pursuant to 52 O.S. §87.1 within and 850/350 852/351 on the basis of the units covered hereby Ad Valorem Due 268.00 as a group or unit, and not limited to a Penalty 28.14 single wellbore. The application in this Mailing Fee 9.81 cause states that Applicant has proposed Advertising Cost 30.00 the development of the separate common TOTAL DUE: 335.95 sources of supply in the units involved 3090-00-002-002-0-000-UR herein under a plan of development and TALLEY, JOHN R & WENDY L has proposed to commence such plan of WAYNOKA;HINK’S 2ND, BLK 2 LOT development of such units by an initial 2 1014/979 well in the lands covered hereby. Such Ad Valorem Due 129.00 application further states that Applicant Penalty 13.55 has been unable to reach an agreement Mailing Fee 9.81 with the owners of drilling rights named Advertising Cost 30.00 as respondents herein with respect to TOTAL DUE: 182.36 such proposed plan of development of the 3095-00-002-001-0-000-UR separate common sources of supply in the NICKELSON, JACK units covered hereby. Such application WAYNOKA;HINK’S 3RD,BLK further requests up to 365 days within 2,LOTS 1-3 which to commence operations on or 1080/1099 in connection with such initial well Ad Valorem Due 365.00 under such plan of development. Such Penalty 38.33 application Mailing Fee 9.81 further states that there is currently 2011 Taxes 512.88 pending before the Commission in Cause Advertising Cost 30.00 CD No. 201304602 an application of TOTAL DUE: 956.02 Applicant to form a 640-acre horizontal 3120-00-009-005-0-000-UR well unit in said Section 19 for the THOMAS, BRIAN & MARISA Mississippian common source of supply WAYNOKA;NICKERSON 1ST,BLK 9, and that the Commission has previously LOT 5, 1040/815 formed 640-acre non-horizontal drilling Ad Valorem Due 20.00 and spacing units in said Section 19 Penalty 2.10 for the Oswego and Cherokee separate Mailing Fee 9.81 common sources of supply. 2010 Taxes 71.36 NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that 2011 Taxes 65.25 the application in this cause requests that Advertising Cost 30.00 SandRidge Exploration and Production, TOTAL DUE: 198.52 LLC, or some other party recommended 3135-00-002-004-0-000-UR by Applicant be designated as operator WOLTZ, PAUL DEAN LIFE EST. under the order to be entered herein of NICKERSON & OLMSTED BLK 2 the separate common sources of supply LOT 4 800/500 in the units covered hereby, including Ad Valorem Due 217.00 the initial well and any subsequent well Penalty 22.79 or wells to be drilled under or otherwise Mailing Fee 9.81 covered by Applicant’s proposed plan of Advertising Cost 30.00 development of such units. TOTAL DUE: 279.60 NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that 3135-00-003-015-0-000-UR this cause is set before an administrative GASCHLER, ANTHONY L LIV law judge for hearing, taking of evidence TRUST and reporting to the Corporation Commission of Oklahoma. Notice is further given that the application in this cause may be amended at such hearing in accordance with the rules of the Commission and the laws of the State of Oklahoma. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this cause will be heard before an administrative law judge on the Conservation Docket at the Western Regional Service Office of the Corporation Commission, Jim Thorpe Building, 2101 North Lincoln Boulevard, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, at 8:30 A.M. on the 13th day of August, 2013, and that this notice be published as required

by law and the rules of the Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that Applicant and interested parties may present testimony by telephone. The cost of telephonic communication shall be paid by the person or persons requesting its use. Interested parties who wish to participate by telephone shall contact Applicant or Applicant’s attorney, prior to the hearing date, and provide their names and telephone numbers. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that all interested persons may appear and be heard. For information concerning this action, contact John R. Reeves, attorney, OBA #7479, Fourteenth Floor, Two Leadership Square, 211 North Robinson, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73102, Telephone: (405) 235-1110; or Luke Roberts, SandRidge Exploration and Production, LLC, 123 Robert S. Kerr Ave., Oklahoma City, OK 73102-6406, Telephone: (405) 429-6344. CORPORATION COMMISSION OF OKLAHOMA PATRICE DOUGLAS, Chairman BOB ANTHONY, Vice Chairman DANA. L. MURPHY, Commissioner DONE AND PERFORMED this 24th day of July, 2013. BY ORDER OF THE COMMISSION: PEGGY MITCHELL, Commission Secretary 6357650noh

LEGAL NOTICE

(Published by the Alva Review-Courier on Sunday, July 28, 2013.) BEFORE THE CORPORATION COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF OKLAHOMA APPLICANTS: CHESAPEAKE OPERATING, INC. AND CHESAPEAKE EXPLORATION, L.L.C. RELIEF SOUGHT: WELL LOCATION EXCEPTION LEGAL DESCRIPTION: SECTION 3, TOWNSHIP 27 NORTH, RANGE 14 WEST OF THE IM, WOODS COUNTY, OKLAHOMA Cause CD No. 201304915 NOTICE OF HEARING STATE OF OKLAHOMA TO: All persons, owners, producers, operators, purchasers and takers of oil and gas, and all other interested persons, particularly in Woods County, Oklahoma, more particularly the parties set out on the Exhibit “A” attached to the application on file in this cause, and, if any of the named individuals be deceased, then the unknown heirs, executors, administrators, devisees, trustees and assigns, both immediate and remote, of such deceased individual; if any of the named entities is a dissolved partnership, corporation or other association, then the unknown successors, trustees and assigns, both immediate and remote, of such dissolved entity; if any of the named parties designated as a trustee is not presently acting in such capacity as trustee, then the unknown successor or successors to such trustee; if any of the named parties designated as an attorney-in-fact is not presently acting in such capacity as attorney-in-fact, then the unknown successor or successors to such attorneyin-fact; and if any of the named entities are corporations which do not continue to have legal existence, the unknown trustees or assigns of such parties. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Applicants, Chesapeake Operating, Inc. and Chesapeake Exploration, L.L.C., have filed an application in this cause requesting the Corporation Commission to enter an order, as follows: (i) authorizing and permitting an exception to the permitted well location tolerances in the 640-acre drilling and spacing unit comprised of Section 3, Township 27 North, Range 14 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma, for the Endicott, Tonkawa, Lansing-Kansas City Lime, Big Lime-Oswego, Cherokee Sand and Mississippi Lime separate common sources of supply, so as to allow a well to be drilled as follows: Location of Wellbore at Completion Interval: The proposed location of the end points for the completion interval for the Mississippi Lime common source of supply will be no closer than 165 feet from the north line and no closer than 1,320 feet from the west line and no closer than 165 feet from the south line and no closer than 1,320 feet from the west line of the unit comprising said Section 3, Township 27 North, Range 14 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma, and the location of the end points of the completion interval for the Endicott, Tonkawa, Lansing-Kansas City Lime, Big Lime-Oswego and Cherokee Sand separate common sources of supply will be no closer than 330 feet from the

See Legal Page 17


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July 28, 2013

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Alva Review-Courier

Action Ads For Sale

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for a FT Nurse Position at a busy medical office. Current State of OK Nursing License and BLS Healthcare Provider required upon start. Good verbal and written communication skills required. Typing and basic computer skills required. Benefits will be discussed at time of interview. Help Wanted Computer Repair Field Technician. Competitive Pay Please mail your current resume to Networking, PC Repair, Website & Benefits. Construction, farming Resume, PO Box 3, Alva, OK 73717 Design, Data Recovery, Onsite or similiar outdoor experience. Help Wanted Repairs, Day or Evening. 405-388- Overtime available. Great Plains Elston Enterprises LLC in 5379 Oilfield Rental. GPORRecruiting@ Waynoka, OK. is looking for CDL chk.com Drivers, Equipment Operators and

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For all computer repair needs call Help Wanted Adam Swallow at 580-327-4449 or for a FT Clerical Position at a busy 580-748-2349 or come by 1329 Fair. medical office. Looking to hire an Will do local housecalls energetic person willing to learn and be able to coordinate front office. Dawn’s Tanning Salon Computer skills, organizational open 24/7. Monthly unlimited $25. skills/prioritizing skills and telephone Contact Danielle Kornele at 580- etiquette required. Requires working 732-0402 with the public at all levels. Benefits will be discussed at time of interview. For Your Const Needs From A-Z, New Construction, Please mail your current resume to Roofing, Additions, Remodeling, Resume, PO Box 3, Alva, OK 73717 Siding, Windows, Int/Ext, Painting, Help Wanted All Work Guaranteed. Improve the value of your home. Call 580-732- Harmon’s Electric Career 1028 Opportunities. Licensed Electrician.

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Looking for reliable help to operate large equipment and general labor. Will train the right person. Competitive pay and company paid insurance. Must be willing to work 6 days a week. Please fill out application at Alfalfa County Land and Cattle located 4.5 miles N of Cherokee on the W side of Hwy 8/11. No phone calls please!

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BJCC is recruiting for:Food Service Specialist IV-Starting at $2170.08 monthly. ($12.52 hr). Correctional Security Officer I/II/III-beginning hourly salary $11.83 with increase to $12.42 in 6 mo & to $13.25 after 18 mo + overtime. Must be 20 yrs of age. Benefits for all jobs include Health, Life, Dental, Vision Ins, Vacation & sick leave. Contact Lisa Ackerman at 580-327-8000 at BJCC

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Land For Sale 80 acres. Barn and Large House. 1/4 mile west of Enid city limits. Motivated sellers. www.880wchestnutaveenidok.com For Rent

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Legal

feet from the south line and no closer than participate by telephone shall contact the

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From Page 16

For Sale 1,320 feet from the west line of the unit Applicants or Applicants’ attorney, prior Homegrown Tomatoes. 580-829- comprising said Section 3, Township 27 to the hearing date, and provide his or her 1359 North, Range 14 West of the IM, Woods name and phone number.

580-327-1998

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE:

2-5 p.m. The Cherokee Strip Museum in Alva is open every day except Monday. For information or arranged tours, call 580-327-2030. 7 p.m. Widows and widowers support group will meet at College Hill Church of Christ. Call 580430-6083 with questions. 7 p.m. Celebrate Recovery meets every Tuesday at the Bible Baptist Church, 4th & Choctaw, Alva. The purpose is to help people dealing with alcoholism, divorce, sexual abuse, domestic violence, drug addiction, sexual addiction, food addiction, co-dependency, gambling addiction, anger, grief and more. Wednesday 9 a.m. The Woods County Senior Citizens Center, 625 Barnes, Alva, is open for games and other activities. Exercise is scheduled each day at 11 a.m. Transportation provided upon request. 2-5 p.m. The Cherokee Strip Museum in Alva is open every day except Monday. For information or arranged tours, call 580-327-2030. 7 p.m. Alva Moose Lodge men’s meeting is held every Wednesday.

King Size Bedroom Set. Dresser, Nightstand, Headboard, Mattress & north line and no closer than 1,320 feet paid by the person or persons requesting Box Springs. $100. 580-327-0677 from the west line and no closer than 330 its use. An interested party who wishes to

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$OOUHDOHVWDWHDGYHUWLVHGKHUHLQ LV VXEMHFW WR WKH )HGHUDO )DLU +RXVLQJ $FW ZKLFK PDNHV LW LOOHJDO WR DGYHUWLVH ´DQ\ SUHIHUHQFH OLPLWDWLRQ RU GLV FULPLQDWLRQ EHFDXVH RI UDFH FRORU UHOLJLRQ VH[ KDQGL FDSIDPLOLDOVWDWXVRUQDWLRQDO RULJLQRULQWHQWLRQWRPDNHDQ\ VXFK SUHIHUHQFH OLPLWDWLRQ RU GLVFULPLQDWLRQ¾

Sunday 2-5 p.m. The Cherokee Strip Museum in Alva is open every day except Monday. For information or arranged tours, call 580-327-2030. Monday 9 a.m. The Woods County Senior Citizens Center, 625 Barnes, Alva, is open for games and other activities. Exercise is scheduled each day at 11 a.m. Transportation provided upon request. 1 p.m. Alva Duplicate Bridge will meet at the Runnymede Hotel. 3:30 p.m. Storytime will be held at the Alva Public Library for children ages 3-5 and their parents. 7 p.m. Alva Masonic Lodge #105 will hold the District 4 meeting. 8 p.m. Alcoholics Anonymous will meet at 1027 8th (Wesley House) in Alva every Monday and Thursday. Tuesday 9 a.m. The Woods County Senior Citizens Center, 625 Barnes, Alva, is open for games and other activities. Exercise is scheduled each day at 11 a.m. Transportation provided upon request.

Help Wanted

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Page 17

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County, Oklahoma, and to be completed in and produce hydrocarbons from the above-named separate common sources of supply; (ii) providing for the re-opening of the cause at such time as the bottom hole location of the well proposed hereunder has been determined; and (iii) establishing a proper allowable with no downward adjustment made thereto. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the application in this cause requests that the order be entered in this matter be made effective as of the date of the execution thereof or as of a date prior thereto and that the authorization and permission requested herein run in favor of one or both of the Applicants, including Chesapeake Exploration, L.L.C. acting by and through its agent Chesapeake Operating, Inc., or some other party recommended by Applicants. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the legal descriptions for the land sections adjacent to said Section 3 are Sections 2, 4, 9, 10 and 11, Township 27 North, Range 14 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma and Sections 33, 34 and 35, Township 28 North, Range 14 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this cause will be referred to an Administrative Law Judge for hearing, taking of evidence and reporting to the Corporation Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this cause will be heard before an Administrative Law Judge on the Merits Docket at the Corporation Commission, First Floor, Jim Thorpe Building, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, at 8:30 a.m., on the 20th day of August 2013, and that this notice will be published as required by law and the rules of the Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the Applicants and interested parties may present testimony by telephone. The cost of telephonic communication shall be

NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that all interested persons may appear and be heard. For information concerning this action contact Paul Willis, landman, (405) 935-8350, or Emily P. Smith, attorney, OBA No. 20805, (405) 9358203, Chesapeake Operating, Inc., P.O. Box 18496, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73154-0496. Please refer to Cause CD Number. DONE AND PERFORMED THIS 25th day of July 2013. CORPORATION COMMISSION OF OKLAHOMA PATRICE DOUGLAS, Chairman BOB ANTHONY, Vice Chairman DANA L. MURPHY, Commissioner BY ORDER OF THE COMMISSION: PEGGY MITCHELL, Commission Secretary

LEGAL NOTICE

(Published by the Alva Review-Courier on Sunday, July 21 and 28, 2013.) IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF WOODS COUNTY STATE OF OKLAHOMA In the Matter of the Estate of FAYE ELAINE TREKELL, Deceased. No. PB-2013-27 NOTICE TO CREDITORS All creditors having claims against Faye Elaine Trekell, deceased, are required to present the same, with a description of all security interest and other collateral, if any, held by each creditor with respect to such claim to the named Administrator at the office of Rick Cunningham, Attorney at Law, 409 College, P.O. Box 433, Alva, Oklahoma 73717, attorney for said Administrator, on or before the following presentment date: September 16, 2013, or the same will be forever barred. Dated this 16th day of July, 2013. LaVonna Faye Gribble, Co- Administratrix Judy Marie Kirby, Co-Administratrix Rick Cunningham, OBA #12629 Attorney at Law 409 College, P.O. Box 433 Alva, Oklahoma 73717 (580) 327-0080 Attorney for Co-Administratrices


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Students and teachers from the “Picture My Weekend” class assembled at the Graceful Arts Center to review their work for the day. At the time this photo was taken, a group discussion was being held where suggestions on improving the event were being discussed. About 27 individuals participated. Photo by Lynn L. Martin

Mitchell’s tenacity led to US energy boom By Jonathan Fahey NEW YORK (AP) — The technological breakthrough pioneered by George P. Mitchell, the billionaire Texas oilman and philanthropist who died Friday at age 94, reversed the fortunes of the U.S. energy industry and reshaped the global energy landscape. As Mitchell was doggedly pursuing the natural gas he and others knew was trapped in thin layers of sedimentary rock under several U.S. states, it appeared to most that the world was running out of oil and gas and what was left was found mostly in the Middle East. U.S. natural gas production had peaked in 1972 and prices were rising to alarming new levels in the middle of the 2000s, raising heating and electricity bills and sending U.S. manufacturers of plastics, fertilizer and countless other natural gas-dependent goods overseas. U.S. oil production, meanwhile, had peaked in 1970, and fell every year but one between 1985 and 2008. But after 20 years of trying, Mitchell finally learned how to combine horizontal drilling with hydraulic fracturing, a process together known now generally as fracking, to release natural gas at a rate fast enough to turn a profit. But the practice has also sparked powerful antagonism, especially in the Northeast, from residents and environmentalists opposed to increased industrial activity in rural areas and concerned that the fracking process or the wastewater it generates can contaminate drinking water. By the mid-2000s, fracking had spread across the industry and the country, and natural gas production in the U.S. began to soar in such places as Pennsylvania, Arkansas, Louisiana and Texas. In 2005, the U.S. produced 19 million cubic feet of gas, about the same amount produced in 1968. Last year, the U.S. produced 25 million cubic feet, a U.S. record and more gas than any other nation. And all this while drillers held back: They would have produced more if prices hadn’t fallen to 20-year lows. But this cheap gas lowered energy bills for consumers and inspired plans for new chemical plants, steel plants and fertilizer plants around the nation from manufacturers looking to capitalize on some of the lowest natural gas prices in the world. Electric utilities drastically increased the use of

natural gas to generate power, and cut back on the use of coal, helping the U.S. power industry substantially reduce its emissions of carbon dioxide. The U.S. now has the potential to produce so much gas that companies are looking to export it to Europe and Asia, just five years after regulators were approving plans to import natural gas in hopes of avoiding an energy crisis. In some areas fracking has been blamed for air pollution and gas leaks that have ruined well water, but the Obama administration and many state regulators say the practice is safe when done properly. New York, which is thought to have considerable natural gas resources, has imposed a moratorium on high-volume hydraulic fracturing and star-studded activist groups have staged countless rallies and events to generate opposition to the practice. As natural gas drillers were perfecting fracking, oil engineers learned to adapt the process to squeeze crude out of oil-bearing rock. By 2008, they had learned to tap oil deposits in formations in North Dakota and South Texas, and U.S. oil production started to creep up. It soon boomed. Last year U.S. crude production rose to 6.5 million barrels per day the U.S. after posting the largest singleyear rise in oil production since 1951, and production is on track to rise to 7.3 million barrels per day this year. That’s an increase of 46 percent since 2008. The increase of 2.3 million barrels per day is about as much oil as Venezuela produces. The International Energy Agency says the U.S. is on track to be the world’s biggest crude producer by the end of the decade.

Resort could help keep tourism money in Kan. By Michael Pearce WICHITA, Kan. (AP) — Patches of prairie meet ridges of dense woodlands of hickory, oaks and walnuts at Clinton State Park, the trees often rising from steep, rock-strewn hillsides that fall into the reservoir. The area a tad west of Lawrence has a bit of Ozarks flavor. The state is now seeking proposals from developers to build a large resort and convention center in the park to compete with the Ozarks for tourism dollars. “I think there’s a market for it, some real opportunities,” said Steve Kelly, Kansas Department of Commerce deputy secretary. “I think it could attract people to this region and retain some (area) people who have been leaving to go to places like Lake of the Ozarks or maybe Big Cedar Lodge down by Branson for business meetings or retreats.” Robin Jennison, head of the Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism, also thinks Clinton is the place, and that the time is now, for a resort. “A lot of things are coming together, and the (U.S. Army Corps of Engineers) is very willing to work with us,” Jennison said. “The city of Lawrence is getting behind it, as are some in the Legislature.” Jennison said a feasibility study, completed in the spring by a resort consulting company at the request of the state, thought the park could support a resort with about 175 rooms, two restaurants, indoor and outdoor pools, a pool-side bar and grill, spa, fitness center and 15,000 square feet of meeting space. Within the past few weeks, Jennison said, developers have toured the state park. He’s expecting

five or six to submit proposals later this month. Kansas’ only resort on a federal reservoir, Acorns Resort on Milford Reservoir, opened in 2007. The idea of a resort at Clinton has been around much longer. Kelly Ryan of the Corps of Engineers’ Kansas City district office said some of the earliest management plans for the lake - which was built in about 1980 - mentioned a possible resort in Clinton State Park. Kelly said talk of a resort on a Kansas reservoir popped up several times in the 1990s, including in some feasibility studies. A feasibility study in 1997 showed Clinton was probably the prime candidate for a lodge and that the demand was probably there to make it succeed. “The main problem back then was the logistics of utilities,” said Jennison, a proponent of a resort during his 1991-2000 tenure in the Kansas Legislature. “It just would have cost too much to bring water and electricity out from Lawrence at that time, but that’s changed. Lawrence has grown almost all the way to the dam at Clinton.” Kelly and Jennison said the state park’s close proximity to Lawrence and the Kansas City area could work in favor of a resort. Jennison pointed out that events at the University of Kansas could fill many of the rooms, especially during fall and winter, which are often hard times on resorts

that rely on outdoor activities to draw guests. A resort in a state park also could draw families who want to enjoy time in the outdoors, Jennison said. “Another reason we need (a resort) is so people can have an extended stay in one of our state parks without having to have a camper or be willing to tent-camp,” he said. “This would make sense for those kinds of people.” Clinton already has quite a bit to offer those looking for quality time outdoors. The lake is ringed with more than 20 miles of trails, some of which have pulled mountain bikers from several states. The mixture of prairie and woodlands can make for good birding, and the lake can offer good fishing and has what Jennison rates as one of the best marinas in the state. Clinton Reservoir’s 7,000 surface acres pale, though, in comparison to the 50,000-plus acres of water at Lake of the Ozarks and other Ozarks lakes. Dave Mashburn of LodgeWell, a Johnson County-based resort development and management company, was involved with the earlier studies and said he plans to file a proposal to build a resort at Clinton. He, too, believes it would need to be a combination outdoors resort and conference center to have a chance to work.

GIVE AN OKLAHOMA VETERAN THE CHANCE TO BE HONORED. Your tax-deductible donation to OKLAHOMA HONOR FLIGHTS will help transport Oklahoma

veterans to Washington, D.C. to visit memorials dedicated to honor their service and sacrifices. For more information on how to donate, visit

oklahomahonorflights.org or call (405) 259-9000


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