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Alva Review-Courier Vol. 121 No. 92

Sunday, November 17, 2013 - $1.00

www.alvareviewcourier.com

620 Choctaw, Alva, OK 73717

Alva High School English teacher Chris Eckhardt tells Alva Middle School and their veteran guests about his experience in the military and how it helped provide him with an education. The students held their Veterans Day assembly last Monday. A video of the entire program can be seen on the newspaper website (www.AlvaReviewCourier.com). Photo by Lynn L. Martin

Avard Regional Rail Park Authority More than just hopes to entice crude oil shipping muscles required By Helen Barrett Avard Regional Rail Park Authority met Tuesday night with Joe Royster, Ed Sutter, Stan Bixler and Todd Holder present. Les Kamas could not attend due to pending surgery. Much of the evening’s business focused on future needs at the park. Toward that end, Woods County Economic Development Director Sonja Williams will attend a conference next week targeting oil and gas industries. The conference agenda includes topics on whether an industrial park is feasible for shipping crude oil. Another topic involves shipping by water. The Avard facility has direct rail access to shipping at the Port of Catoosa with international access at the Gulf of Mexico. The rails also connect to international shipping via the west coast and Chicago. “I think Sonja has her plate full,” Sutter said. “If she could set up some appointments, I’d make myself available for meetings. I am

intrigued by shipping oil by rail.” Sutter said future similar conferences are planned in the spring at Houston and Tulsa. Williams said she hoped to learn what type of facilities oil companies need for shipping crude oil by rail. Once she understands their processes, she will be better equipped when meeting with potential clients. Financial Report After in-depth discussion, the board approved the financial report. Holder said the original temporary SandRidge building had been moved to the company’s new site. Checks haven’t been written for that project at this time, but the costs will not exceed the original contract. “We hope to have that cleared up in the next 20 days,” Holder said. Another item of good news: the authority only has one more payment to Martin-Marietta for rock and other construction costs at the park.

Other Discussions The board discussed a potential one-time source of funding. Before applying for the grant of $60,000, a specific need must be identified. Sutter suggested creating a booth to be used in promoting the park as one possibility. Williams asked the board to provide her with specific ideas to promote. She explained that some things still cannot be done using only the preliminary engineer’s plan that they have. She suggested the development of a Phase II plan would be a good project. Another project that would be an advantage for the park and its customers would be highway signage, Williams said. Despite many attempts, Williams has not been able to get a response from the Oklahoma Department of Transportation (ODOT) or the division manager in Buffalo. Sutter said he would be meeting with ODOT officials soon and would present the problem to them.

Glass toss ends in DUI arrest By Marione Martin The sight of a thrown object and the sound of breaking glass caught the attention of a deputy as a vehicle was leaving a bar parking lot. According to information in the case, Woods County Deputy Sheriff Adam Honeyman was at the intersection of Oklahoma Boulevard and Meno Street in Alva waiting for traffic to clear. It was about 12:44 a.m. on Sunday, Oct. 6. Honeyman saw and heard a glass object being thrown from a black Chevrolet pickup as it turned onto Oklaho-

ma Boulevard from Cowboy’s Bar parking lot. Honeyman activated his emergency lights, caught up with the pickup and made a traffic stop. He approached the vehicle and told the driver why he had stopped him. The driver, identified as John Adrian Arenivas, 31, of Odessa, Texas, said he had not thrown anything. Honeyman detected an odor commonly associated with an alcoholic beverage coming from the vehicle. He asked Arenivas to have a seat in his patrol car. Honeyman observed

that Arenivas was unsteady on his feet and used his vehicle for support as he walked. Inside the patrol car, Honeyman could detect the common odor of an alcoholic beverage about Arenivas’s breath and person. Asked if he had consumed any alcoholic beverages, Arenivas said “yea.” He was given one of the field sobriety tests and did not do well. He became uncooperative and said he wasn’t doing any further testing. Honeyman

See Arrest Page 3

Ryan Bickerstaff qualifies for World Iron Man Triathlon

Man Florida. Bickerstaff started the race at 9 a.m. and finished around 4 p.m. About a month prior to the race, Bickerstaff suffered a leg injury. That injury limited his running distance to about 50 miles total in two months. “My legs weren’t quite prepared for that,” he said. “By the time the cramps hit, I’d already been exercising for seven hours.” He said the competition begins seriously at about the 18 mile mark of the marathon. “Up until then it’s about conserving energy,” Bickerstaff said. “You run at a steady controlled

By Helen Barrett Many remember Ryan Bickerstaff’s devotion to cross country track and competing in triathlons as a student in Alva schools. He began competing in triathlons 23 years ago at the age of 9 years. Now an adult living and working in California, Bickerstaff recently competed in the Iron Man Florida Triathlon in Panama City Beach, Fla. Finishing third in his age group qualified him for the World Iron Man Triathlon to be See Bickerstaff Page 9 held in Hawaii in 2014. Those earlier triathlons required a one-mile lake swim followed by a 25-mile bike ride, concluding with a six-mile run. In Iron Man competition, distances more than double to a 2.4mile swim followed by a 112-mile bicycle ride. The final leg involved a 26.2-mile marathon run. Bickerstaff finished the course in nine hours and five minutes. “When I got off the bike, I had a five-minute lead on the next amateur athlete,” Bickerstaff said. “I held that lead until 18 miles into the run.” At that point in the race, Bickerstaff developed severe hamstring cramps. “This was the first time I’d ever run a full marathon,” he said. “In 13 years I’d only run a half-marathon.” During the first half of the marathon, he ran a speed of 6:50 minutes per mile. After the cramps beRyan Bickerstaff gets his race gan, his pace slowed to 8:40. Gulf of Mexico currents in- number on his body prior to becreased the difficulty of the Iron ginning the race.


November 17, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

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Exploring our roots through music By Helen Barrett inspiration and comfort. Many of What kind of music takes you the songs from those bygone days back mentally to your childhood? were birthed from hard times. NeMaybe your parents listened to gro spirituals were sung by slaves songs like “Turkey in the Straw,” as they labored under harsh condi“Under the Double Eagle,” “Shall tions or tried to escape their irraWe Gather at the tional masters. River,” or “Beer Much of toBarrel Polka.” day’s music exists For those who because of roots lived in the era buried deep in before televithe history of this sion and iTunes, country. a static-filled “Roots music” — Dr. Kay Decker said is sacred and secradio with wire run to the nearest of the exhibit. ular, rural and urwindow screen ban, acoustic and as an antenna served as the main electric, simple and complex, old source of music. Families would and new. often pull out their guitars, banjos, Whether it was made on a fiddles and whatever other instru- porch in West Virginia, at a house ments they had to entertain them- party in Minneapolis, in a Misselves for an evening. sissippi juke joint, at a bluegrass Music was a main source of cutting contest in eastern Ken-

“This has been a three year process getting it here,”

tucky, beyond the bayou in Cajun backcountry or in a black church somewhere in the nation, this music has warmed us, enlightened us, informed us, touched us and defined us. We respect it and cherish it, much as we do tales told by a family elder or a poem with great meaning. When we listen to it, we take great pride in its diversity and history. We allow it to enter our souls and become an indispensable part of us. Smithsonian’s ‘New Harmonies’ Exhibit Currently, the Smithsonian Museum on Main Street exhibit titled “New Harmonies: Celebrating American Roots Music” can be seen at Alva’s Graceful Arts Studio. The sounds are as sweet as mountain air and as sultry as a

summer night in the Mississippi Delta. The instruments vary from fiddle to banjo to accordion to guitar to drum. But a drum in the hands of an African sounds different than one in the hands of a European. And neither is the drumbeat of an American Indian. Yet all the rhythms merge, as do the melodies and harmonies, producing completely new sounds – new music. The main beat of the exhibition is the ongoing cultural process that has made America the birthplace of more music than any place on earth. The exhibition provides a fascinating, inspiring and toe-tapping listen to the American story of multi-cultural exchange. The story is full of surprises about familiar songs, histories of instruments, the roles of religion and technology, and the continuity of musical roots from “Yankee Doodle Dandy” to

the latest hip hop CD. “This has been a three-year process getting it here,” Dr. Kay Decker said of the exhibit. Every two years the Oklahoma Humanities Council issues a call for proposals from local cultural arts groups to host a major exhibit. “When Graceful Arts opened, we applied for this exhibit,” Decker said. “We’re the last group to host this exhibit. After ours is finished on January 4, 2014, it will be retired.” This is the first time for Alva to host a Smithsonian exhibit, Decker said. “We hope to bring this to Alva every three years,” Decker said. The exhibit consists of many colorful displays with listening stations at each post. For example,

See Music Page 9

NEW HARMONIES — Celebrating American Music’s Roots, the Smithsonian Museum on Main Street exhibit, fills the Graceful Arts Gallery in Alva from now to Jan. Polka, klezmer, cajun and swing are some of the types of music displayed at the Dance 4, 2014. In the center a listening station allows visitors to hear many musical genres. station of the Smithsonian exhibit. Photo by Helen Barrett Photo by Helen Barrett

Fiddles, ukeleles, guitars and other instruments developed to play Apalachian mountain music, which evolved into today’s country sounds. Photo by Helen Barrett

Musicians such as Thomas Dorsey, the Oak Ridge Boys, The Jordanaires, and others including Elvis Presley contributed to the gospel sound enjoyed by millions today. Photo by Helen Barrett

Alva Hospital Authority meets Tuesday By Marione Martin The Alva Hospital Authority (AHA) will meet Tuesday at 5:30 p.m. in the media room at Share Medical Center. Board members

will vote on accepting the written reports from the chief executive officer. They will discuss and vote on Share Medical Center surgery policies and procedures, utilization review policies and procedures, and swing bed policies and procedures. There will also be discussion and action on bids to purchase professional and general liability insurance for 2014.

Authority trustees will look at the chief financial officer’s statistics report and financials report. Chief of Staff Dr. Elizabeth Kinzie will present the credentialing committee’s recommendations for reappointment of Dr. Philip Self, M.D., internal medicine to active staff as well as three reappointments to courtesy staff: Dr. Matthew Hudkins, M.D., teleradiology; Dr. Troy Smith, O.D., optometry; and Dr. Kenneth Tan, M.D., teleradiology. The board will hear reports on electronic health records, Share Convalescent Home, The Homestead, SMC Foundation, St. Anthony’s and the AHA chairman.


November 17, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

Obituaries RUBY RUTH RUCKER MEDICINE LODGE, Kan. – Ruby Ruth Rucker died Thursday, Nov. 14, at Medicine Lodge Memorial Hospital in Medicine Lodge, Kan. She was born March 1, 1916, in Forest City, Kan., the daughter of Nute and Elizabeth (Root) Martin. On July 10, 1935 she married Lee Rucker at Anthony, Kan. He preceded her in death on Dec. 23, 1986. She is survived by three sons, 10 grandchildren, 27 great grandchildren and 17 great great grandchildren. Funeral services will be 10:30 a.m. Monday, Nov. 18, 2013, at the First Christian Church, Medicine Lodge, with Pastor Tom Walters presiding. Burial will be in the Lake City Cemetery in Lake City, Kan. Larrison Funeral Home, 120 E. Lincoln, Medicine Lodge, KS, is in charge of arrangements. Memorials may be made to the First Christian Church or donor’s choice in care of the funeral home. Condolences may be left at www.larrisonmortuary.com DUANE CURTIS SEAMAN Graveside services for Duane Curtis Seaman will be at 2 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 17, at the Waynoka Municipal Cemetery with Mike Kee officiating. Interment is under the direction of Marshall Funeral Home of Waynoka. Duane Curtis Seaman, the only child of the late Claude Ezra and Opal Pauline (Marrs) Seaman, was born Aug. 29, 1930, in Waynoka, and passed away Nov. 14, 2013, at his home after a brief illness at the age of 83 years, 2 months and 15 days. Duane graduated from Waynoka High School with the Class of 1948. On July 27, 1952, he was united in marriage to Rita Cooley at Woodward. He lived his entire life on the family farm northeast of Waynoka, except for his tour of duty in the Army, when he spent two years in Germany. He enjoyed farming, ranching, spending time with his family, and helping others. Duane is survived by his wife,

Rita, of Waynoka; four children, Jackie Zink and husband, Gordon, of Fritch, Texas, John Seaman and wife, Carol, of Lahoma, Bill Seaman and wife, Cindy, of Waynoka, and Jo Brogan and husband, Wes, of Waynoka; seven grandchildren; sixteen great grandchildren; other relatives and many friends. Memorial contributions may be made through the funeral home to the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation for cancer research. Remembrances may be shared with the family at www.marshallfuneralhomes.com.

Affordable mental health care may overload resources By Warren Vieth Oklahoma Watch The Affordable Care Act isn’t just about access to primary care physicians and prescription drugs. It also requires insurers to provide benefits to people with mental illness, emotional disorders and substance abuse problems. But some health professionals are worried there might not be enough psychiatrists and psychologists to go around. Under the Affordable Care Act of 2010 (ACA), widely known as Obamacare, all individual and small group insurance policies sold in Oklahoma and other states must provide a number of essential health benefits, starting Jan. 1. The essential benefits include mental health and substance abuse services such as individual counseling and psychotherapy. A separate federal law passed in 2008 requires insurers to provide “parity” between conventional medical care and mental health care. Co-pays, deductibles, and the number of doctor visits and hospital days must be comparable. Experts say the combined impact of the two laws could be substantial: Mental health and substance abuse benefits will be more generous than they have been in the past, and affordable coverage will be available to more people. “The main thing ACA does is it provides coverage for people that don’t have coverage,” said Mental Health Commissioner Terri White, who manages Oklahoma’s overloaded mental health and substance abuse programs. “There are a lot of people with mental illness that we serve that don’t have any health coverage.” According to the U.S. Census Bureau, 685,076 of Oklahoma’s

JACK LESLIE WARWICK MEDICINE LODGE, Kan. – Jack Leslie Warwick, 91, died Saturday, November 16, 2013, at Via Christi-St Francis in Wichita, Kan. He was born September 3, 1922, in Medicine Lodge, Kan., the son of John and Beulah (McKaig) Warwick. He was a farmer/stockman, but had also worked many other jobs such as plumbing, carpentry and electric work. He was a member of the United Methodist Church, Medicine Lodge; had served as a 4-H leader; served on the Dry Creek School Board and Union Chapel Church Board; was past-president of the Rural Fire District; and was a trustee for Eagle Township. On August 5, 1947, he married Vera Irene Moore. She survives. Other survivors include three daughters: Betty (Frosty) Parr, Frontenac, Kan.; Kathy (Paul) Bird, Grand Junction, Colo.; and Mary Jean (Tony) Miller, Medicine Lodge; five grandchildren, and five great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his parents. Visitation will be from 9 a.m. to noon Monday, November 18, 2013, at Larrison Funeral Home, 120 E. Lincoln, Medicine Lodge, KS 67104. Funeral services will be held Monday, November 18, 2013, at 2:30 p.m. at the United Methodist Church, Medicine Lodge, with Pastor Dale Thiele officiating. Burial will be in the Highland Cemetery, Medicine Lodge. Memorials may be made to the donor’s choice in care of the funer- also learned that Arenivas’s Texas al home. driver’s license had been suspendCondolences may be left at ed due to a previous DUI arrest. www.larrisonmortuary.com. As Honeyman handcuffed Arenivas, a receipt fell from his pocket indicating he had used his credit card in the Cowboy’s bar. After securing Arenivas at the Woods County Jail, Honeyman went back to Cowboy’s and asked about the Tuesday Night Partly cloudy, with a low around 40. Wednesday Mostly sunny, with a high near 61. Wednesday Night Mostly cloudy, with a low around 43. Thursday A 20 percent chance of rain. Partly sunny, with a high near 56. Thursday Night A 30 percent chance of showers. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 41. Friday A 30 percent chance of showers. Cloudy, with a high near 44. Friday Night A 20 percent chance of showers. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 24. Saturday Partly sunny, with a high near 39.

Woods County Forecast Sunday Sunny, with a high near 65. West southwest wind 15 to 23 mph becoming north northwest in the morning. Winds could gust as high as 32 mph. Sunday Night Mostly clear, with a low around 32. North northwest wind 9 to 14 mph becoming light and variable. Winds could gust as high as 20 mph. Monday Sunny, with a high near 58. Light and variable wind becoming south 8 to 13 mph in the afternoon. Monday Night Mostly clear, with a low around 33. South wind around 7 mph. Tuesday Sunny, with a high near 59.

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From Front Page

3.7 million residents did not have In some states, officials have questioned whether the number health insurance last year. Of those, an estimated 145,000 of private-practice mental health poor people don’t have much to professionals is sufficient to meet gain from Obamacare for now. the potential demand generated by That’s because Oklahoma refused thousands of new patients. White said the state mental to participate in a Medicaid expansion that would have provided them health department does not collect data on with low or the adequacy no-cost coverof the privateage, including practice netmental health work. She said and substance she was not abuse services. sure whether it The law’s would be suffibiggest imcient to handle mediate imall the people pact will be on who will gain an estimated coverage next 256,000 uninyear. sured Oklaho— Mary Jane Argentos, Accordmans above the poverty line clinical psychologist in Norman ing to the U.S. Health Rewho will qualify for federal tax credits if they pur- sources and Services Administrachase insurance through the federal tion, every county in Oklahoma marketplace that began operating except one, Grady, has one or more Oct. 1. Although the marketplace’s “health professional shortage arlaunch has been crippled so far by eas” for mental health practitioners. website problems, the Obama ad- Most counties also have shortage ministration has promised to fix areas for primary care providers as well. most of the bugs by Dec. 1. “There is no infrastructure for The Affordable Care Act requires most Americans to buy taking on this new population,” health insurance starting in 2014. said Mary Jane Argentos, a cliniThe federal tax credits will signifi- cal psychologist in Norman. “For cantly reduce the cost of policies for people who do what I do, which those who qualify, in some cases to is very individualized and, I hope, zero. The credits will be available high-quality health care, we are alto people with annual household ready overbooked.” Argentos said Oklahoma has incomes ranging from $11,490 to $94,200, depending on family size. too few practicing psychiatrists and Federal officials have estimat- psychologists. She said the probed that one in four people without lem has grown more acute because insurance have mental health or of the large number of returning substance abuse problems. Nation- veterans needing treatment for warwide, 32 million people are expect- related trauma. “These people have many probed to gain access to mental health lems and some of them very serious coverage through Obamacare. But access to coverage doesn’t problems,” she said. “They have necessarily guarantee access to pro- mental illness, complicated by addiction, complicated by post-trauviders. matic stress disorder, and they’re left to be seen by the providers who have the least level of training and experience.” Philip Hyde, a clinical psychologist in Oklahoma City and board member of the Mental Health Asreceipt, which was for three “im- sociation of Central Oklahoma, port beers,” which are 6 point al- said he thought the existing providcohol. Honeyman showed the er network could accommodate a bartender the bottom of the broken reasonable influx of newly insured glass mug that he had seen thrown people. from Arenivas’s vehicle, and it was He agreed that Oklahoma, like identified as a glass from their es- other states, has a shortage of psytablishment. chiatrists. But he expressed conArenivas has been charged with See Health Page 7 a felony DUI.

“For people who do what I do, which is very individualized and, I hope, highquality health care, we are already overbooked.”

Arrest


November 17, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

Page 4

GOP sees health care law as big 2014 opportunity By Alan Fram WASHINGTON (AP) — In his West Virginia district, the TV ads attacking Democratic Rep. Nick Rahall over the calamitous startup of President Barack Obama’s health care law have already begun. The 19-term veteran, a perennial target in a GOP-shifting state, is among many in the president’s party who have recited to constituents Obama’s assurance that they could keep insurance coverage they liked under the 2010 overhaul. That has proved untrue for several million Americans, igniting a public uproar that has forced Obama to reverse himself on part of the law and sent many Democrats scrambling into political self-preservation mode ahead of next year’s congressional elections.

Rahall was among 39 Democrats who, despite an Obama veto threat, voted Friday for a GOP measure that would let insurers continue selling policies to individuals that fall short of the health care law’s requirements. It was approved 261-157. “I’m concerned about my integrity with voters who have returned me here 38 years. They know me enough to know I wouldn’t purposely mislead them,” Rahall said this past week. “They have that confidence in me, and I want them to continue to have that confidence in me.” Republicans are emboldened by Obama’s reversal and the Democrats’ scramble for cover. They are already compiling lists of dozens of Senate and House Democrats such as Rahall who, in video clips and Alva Review-Courier written statements, have parroted Obama’s pledge that vot(USPS 016-180) ers’ existing coverage would 620 Choctaw St. not be annulled. Alva, OK 73717-1626 “There’s nothing more dam(580) 327-2200 aging than when your word is Fax: (580) 327-2454 devalued and people think they were misled,” said Rep. Greg Office Hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Walden, R-Ore., who heads the Monday - Friday National Republican CongresWebsite: sional Committee, the House www.alvareviewcourier.com GOP’s campaign arm. “And HERE TO HELP YOU especially damaging is when it actually affects you and your Publisher.............Lynn L. Martin Editor..................Marione Martin family. So in terms of degree (marione@alvareviewcourier.net) of impact, this is off the Richter scale.” Ad Sales...........Angela Courson Top Democrats, who need (angela@alvareviewcourier.net) Colette Baier to gain 17 seats to retake the (colette@alvareviewcourier.net) House majority, scoff that Reporters.............Yvonne Miller next November’s elections are far off. They say by then, the Sports...................Leslie Nation health care law will be to their (leslie@alvareviewcourier.net) advantage because it will be working well. Subscriptions Rep. Steve Israel, D-N.Y., & Action Ads..........Linda Toone (manager@alvareviewcourier.net) who leads the Democratic ConAd Design.............Paula Oakes gressional Campaign Committee, said his party will focus Page Design........Patty Hankey the campaign on the economy, Democratic efforts to fix it and Legal Notices.......Patty Hankey the GOP’s preference for cut(legals@alvareviewcourier.net) ting Medicare and granting tax breaks to the wealthy. The Alva Review-Courier is The Republican emphasis combined with the Woods on the health care law’s probCounty News, The Alva Advocate and Newsgram, and is lems “from a partisan perspecpublished every Sunday and tive gins up the Republican Friday by Martin Broadcasting base. But it alienates indepenCorp., 620 Choctaw St., Alva, dent and moderate voters,” OK 73717-1626. Periodical postage paid at Alva, Oklahoma. said Israel, who said those votAnnual subscription rates in ers “are more interested in soWoods County, Oklahoma $72. lutions.” Elsewhere in Oklahoma $90, Other Democrats agree that elsewhere in the United States plenty can change in a year but $108. POSTMASTER: Send concede that the issue poses address changes to Alva Review-Courier, 620 Choctaw problems. Martin Frost, a former Texas St., Alva, OK 73717-1626. Democratic congressman who Contents Copyright 2013 Member of the Associated Press, headed the House Democratic Oklahoma Press Association, See GOP Page 6 National Newspaper Association

Junkman’s Gems

The sales tax vote is history

By Jim Scribner I figured it would pass, but 79 percent was a good margin of victory. Time will tell if this was a good idea, whether it saves the hospital or just prolongs the inevitable. I did wonder if these funds could be used for improvements and needed equipment at the nursing home. If so, it would be a good thing. Someone said they actually saw a “vote no” sign somewhere. I never did, probably for a couple of reasons. First, not being in favor of freeing up the sales tax was not a popular stance, and second, the signs cost real money. Someone told me that they were somewhere between $5 and $10 each. I noticed some houses had three signs in them, and blocks with rows of signs. Someone said they saw a couple of signs on empty lots. I told him the empty lot ghosts were still on the voting rolls and were in favor of the tax. Monday was Veterans Day. Justin went to the middle school, the museum, The Homestead and the Moose Lodge for ceremonies honoring our soldiers. Justin said the Museum Armed Services area was good. It stopped

with the Vietnam era and hopefully will expand to modern conflicts. The Moose Lodge had a supper for the veterans and one guest, so Justin took me. It was a very good meal as usual, and I got to see several people I hadn’t seen for a while. One thing that does happen is there are quite a few World War II and Korea veterans amongst the missing every year. The main thing is never pass up a chance to tell a solider/veteran thanks for keeping our country safe. Thursday evening we went to the middle school to listen to the first-time musicians in action. It always amazes me how much talent is in Alva. A great job was done by all. Last Saturday (Nov. 9) was Cleo’s birthday. Next year I am getting help to spank her because I didn’t finish for three days. Thanks to the Facebook crowd and everyone else that wished her happy birthday. It was the first time the blonde was eating Thanksgiving dinner without her family. Trying to re-enact the tradition, she prepared a dinner for herself alone. The next day, her mother called to see how everything went. “Oh, mother, I made myself a lovely dinner, but I had so much trouble trying to eat the turkey!” said the daughter.”Did it not taste good?” her mother asked. “I don’t know,” the blonde said. “It wouldn’t sit still!”

Lucas Statement on H.R. 3350, the Keep Your Health Plan Act

Washington, D.C. – Congressman Frank Lucas today made the following statement after the United States House of Representatives passed H.R. 3350, the Keep Your Health Plan Act. The legislation passed the House today with a 261 to 157 vote. “I am pleased H.R. 3350, the Keep Your Health Plan Act, passed the House today,” said Lucas. “President Obama promised Americans multiple times that they could keep their health care plan if they liked it. However, he failed to fulfill that promise. I have heard from many constituents in the Third District who have lost their plans because they didn’t meet the requirements under Obamacare, and millions more across the country are facing the same issues. “While the president offered a proposal attempting to fix the problems his health care law

created, actual legislation is needed before real solutions can be implemented. That is why I am glad the House passed the Keep Your Health Plan Act today. This legislation would give Americans relief from the president’s flawed health care law by allowing health insurers to continue offering their old plans. H.R. 3350 would therefore ensure that Americans who are able to keep their health plan would not face onerous penalties under Obamacare’s individual mandate. “Americans deserve a break from Obamacare, and I am pleased this legislation will help accomplish this goal. Too many people are facing hardships with the law, and that is why I will continue to work in the House to pass legislation that will help ease the unnecessary burdens that the president’s disastrous health care law has placed on the American people.”


November 17, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

Annie’s Mailbox®

Page 5

Click and Clack Talk Cars

Adding more to the Help for stuck wheels mix may be too much Dear Annie: I have been married to Sarah for nine years. We have two young sons, both with developmental issues. When I met Sarah, she had an older son, “Del,” who was in the temporary custody of her father’s cousins. The cousins have raised the boy since he was 6 months old. He is now 13 and understands that our sons are his half-brothers. His biological father gets him on occasional weekends, and he always has had regular contact with Sarah and her parents. The cousins are good people. Del calls them “Mom and Dad.” But they are in their late 50s and not in the best of health. Their financial situation is also not as good as ours. They also have an adopted daughter who is 14. The girl was raped by a babysitter two years ago. Then, six months later, she accused her dad of raping her. My wife believes the girl said this for attention, and although I agree that the dad doesn’t seem capable of such a thing, it still worries me. Sarah never gave up legal custody of Del. I really love the boy and enjoy spending time with him. He lives nearby and rides his bike to our place frequently. Del has asked questions about living with us, but Sarah says she could never take him away from his parents. What is the right thing to do? – Confused in Pennsylvania

Dear Confused: We commend you for wanting to take this boy, but we suspect Sarah feels overwhelmed raising two children with developmental issues and is afraid to add a third child who is entering adolescence. Has there been an investigation of the alleged rape? If the charges are unfounded, it could indicate that the daughter is unstable, which also is not a great environment for Del. And examine your own motives – perhaps you feel attached to Del because he is more like the son you wish you had. Talk to Sarah about having Del at your home more often and for overnight stays. See how he interacts with his half-siblings and how Sarah responds to his presence. We also recommend you look into family counseling. Dear Annie: Whenever my wife and I go to the movies, it seems there’s at least a 50 percent chance that someone will be chatting throughout the film. I find this profoundly distracting, as I’m sure everyone else does. I get so angry, but I’m not sure what to say. I don’t want to cause a scene, just make them stop interrupting the film. What magic words would you advise I use? – B.B. Dear B.B.: There is no magic that will make a rude person less so. A glare often does the trick, but you also could politely whisper, “I’m

sure you don’t mean to disturb everyone. Could you please talk when the movie is over?” You also could find an usher, but that necessitates missing part of the movie. If they don’t pipe down, be sure to complain to the management afterward. Dear Annie: I have a response to the letter from “N.Y.,” the 35-year-old man who thinks his mom is being controlling because she throws her arm across his chest when they come to a sudden stop in the car. I, too, am in my 30s, and when I go somewhere with my friend, she does the same thing – throwing her arm over me when she stops short. You know what? We laugh. It’s such a natural instinct to do this in an effort to protect people you love. I do the same thing myself when I drive my aunt, who is in her 50s. “N.Y.” needs to get a grip. – Well Protected in California Annie’s Mailbox is written by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar, longtime editors of the Ann Landers column. Please email your questions to anniesmailbox@ comcast.net, or write to: Annie’s Mailbox, c/o Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd Street, Hermosa Beach, CA 90254. To find out more about Annie’s Mailbox and read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate Web page at www.creators.com.

Remember food safety during Thanksgiving By Mandy Gross, FAPC communications services manager Thanksgiving day will be here soon, and many Oklahomans will be preparing Thanksgiving meals for their families and friends. Thanksgiving is usually a joyous occasion; however, if the meal is not properly prepared, it could be a source of food-borne disease and result in a distressing time. “Food safety isn’t just for the food manufacturing plants, but it is important in the home as well,” said Peter Muriana, food microbiologist for Oklahoma State University’s Robert M. Kerr Food and Agricultural Products Center (FAPC). “The most common safety issues at Thanksgiving are those concerns of Salmonella and Campylobacter associated with raw poultry, as well as from Staphylococcus Aureus, which is associated with contamination of cooked products through human contact.” FAPC wants Oklahomans to have a safe and happy Thanksgiving and suggests the following food safety tips when preparing that Thanksgiving meal. Food Handling • Buy only government-inspected meat and poultry products, and check the “sell by” date on all food purchases. Never buy products if the expiration dated has passed. • Wash your hands thoroughly before and after preparing any food product. Use two cutting boards: one for preparing raw meat, poultry and fish, and the other for cutting cooked food or preparing salads. Food Preparation • Never thaw the turkey on the counter. Thawing at room temperature increases the risk of bacteria growth at the surface even though

the interior may still be chilled. • Thaw the turkey in its original wrap on a tray placed in the bottom section of the refrigerator. Allow approximately 24 hours of defrost time for every five pounds of turkey. • Thawing the turkey in cold water is safe. Submerge the bird in its wrapper in a deep sink of cold water and change the water every 30 minutes to keep it cold. Allow 30 minutes per pound to defrost a turkey in cold water. Stuffing the Turkey • Do not stuff the turkey in advance. The chilled stuffing in the turkey will not reach a safe temperature before the turkey is done. • Remove the giblet bag from inside the turkey before stuffing. • Stuffing must be cooked to a minimum temperature of 165 degrees Fahrenheit. • Precook the stuffing, so it will reach the optimum temperature before the turkey is overcooked. • Stuff the turkey lightly because the stuffing will expand as it is cooked in the turkey. If it is too tightly packed, it will not reach a safe temperature by the time the turkey is done. Do not use more than 1/2 or 3/4 cups stuffing per pound of turkey. If you are cooking a 16-pound turkey, use no more than 8 to 12 cups of stuffing. • An alternative is to cook stuffing in a pan to ensure the interior of the turkey is safe. Cooking the Turkey • Use a meat thermometer to determine when the turkey is done. • Insert the thermometer in the thickest part of the turkey thigh. Dark meat of the turkey takes longer to cook than any other part. • The turkey is done when the thermometer reaches 165 degrees Fahrenheit.

• Basting the turkey while it is cooking is not necessary. Basting tools could be sources of bacteria contamination if dipped into uncooked or undercooked poultry juices and then allowed to sit at room temperature for later basting. • Do not cook a turkey overnight in an oven set at a low temperature. Cooking a turkey at a temperature below 325 degrees Fahrenheit allows harmful bacteria to multiply. • Once the turkey is done, remove the stuffing immediately. • If you purchase a fully cooked turkey, pick it up hot and bring it home to eat immediately. Storing Leftovers • After the meal remove all meat from the turkey carcass. This should be done within two hours of the turkey’s removal from the oven. • Leftovers should be stored in the refrigerator within two hours after cooking is complete. \ • Leftovers should be divided into smaller portions and stored in several shallow containers. They should be eaten within three to four days. • If large amounts are left, consider freezing for later use. Do not wait until the leftovers have been in the refrigerator for several days to freeze. Frozen leftovers should be eaten within six months. Eating Leftovers • Reheat leftovers to 165 degrees Fahrenheit throughout or until steaming hot. Soups, sauces and gravies should be brought to a rolling boil for at least one minute. • Never taste leftover food that looks or smells strange. When in doubt, throw it out. For more information on FAPC, visit www.fapc.biz or call 405744-6071. Have a safe and happy Thanksgiving!

By Tom and Ray Magliozzi Dear Tom and Ray: I have a 2-year-old Camry, and I like to work on my cars. I live in northwestern Montana. Great place! But we have snow. I have a complete set of studded tires, and I am quite happy changing out all four tires twice a year. But I cannot get the wheels off the car myself – either set! I have changed wheels for 60 years, but I can’t seem to remove these. I had the dealer do it, and watched at the garage as they pounded on them with sledgehammers. I asked the service manager, and he told me that this is not an uncommon problem. What if my wife or I get a flat tire and need to remove a wheel? Did I mention I live in remote northwest Montana? The service manager told me that if that happens, I should loosen the lug nuts and drive it for a while, and the wheels will come loose. Is that really good advice? – Nick TOM: This is a pretty common problem, Nick, especially in parts of the country where snow, salt and rust are prevalent. RAY: What happens is that there’s a protrusion on the hub, over which the hole at the center of the wheel slides. The wheel is then secured to the hub with the lug nuts. TOM: That hole in the center of the wheel just barely fits around the hub’s protrusion. So if you have steel wheels, which I’m sure you do, and you have snow, salt and rust, which I know you do, the wheel and hub can become sort of fused with rust over time. That’s what makes the wheel hard to remove. RAY: Brute force tends to be the tool of choice for this job. That’s why you saw the repair guys going at the wheels with sledgehammers. TOM: My brother wasn’t paying attention when they taught this in mechanic school, so he also uses his sledgehammer for computer repair – less successfully. RAY: But more satisfyingly. TOM: What we do when we change a customer’s wheels in the snow belt is first take some sandpaper and clean off any rust or budding

corrosion that we find on the inside of the hole in the wheel or on the outside of the hub protrusion. RAY: You don’t have to worry if you end up making the hole a little bigger. The wheels are centered and held securely in place by the lug nuts. TOM: Then we grease both surfaces before putting on the wheels. That usually helps a lot, at least for the six months or so until the next seasonal changeover. RAY: And if you do have a flat tire and need to change a wheel in some remote area, the advice you got is almost good. TOM: Yeah, almost. What you want to do is loosen the lug nuts a little bit – not a lot! Maybe a quarter of the way off. And then drive the car quickly for a very short distance (like 10 feet) and stop abruptly. Then put it in reverse and do the same thing going backward. That usually will jolt the stuck wheel free so you can remove it. RAY: But don’t just loosen up the lug nuts and go driving around for a while. That usually doesn’t end well. Good luck, Nick. *** Changing your oil regularly is the cheapest insurance you can buy for your car, but how often should you change it? Find out by ordering Tom and Ray’s pamphlet “Ten Ways You May Be Ruining Your Car Without Even Knowing It!” Send $4.75 (check or money order) to Ruin, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475. *** Get more Click and Clack in their new book, “Ask Click and Clack: Answers from Car Talk.” Got a question about cars? Write to Click and Clack in care of this newspaper, or email them by visiting the Car Talk website at www.cartalk.com.


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Chapter AL PEO learns Senior citizen report about women in ministry Chapter AL of PEO met on Nov. 1 in the First Methodist Church’s parlor, with Marilyn Brown as hostess and Carolyn Gasaway as co-hostess. The minutes were read and the treasurer’s report was accepted. The cookbook committee reported that there are only 46 books left to be sold. Several members were thanked for gifts received during the month. The program was given by Rev. Dr. Judye Pistole on women in ministry. Pistole has been minister of the First Presbyterian Church in Alva for more than nine years. She stated that it has been an interesting calling. Women in the ministry is not the norm, although many women are mentioned in the Bible as teachers and helpers in the faith.

Women deacons were first ordained to minister to women who were ill. Society’s acceptance of women ministers has changed often; about every 20 years there is a push to ordain more women. Women bring unique strengths to the ministry, among them a heightened awareness of the need for hospitality (a great virtue) and a shift in theology to more earthy things. Following her presentation, delicious refreshments were served by the hostess and co-hostess. The next regular meeting of Chapter AL will be on Nov. 15 in the Methodist church parlor with Lola Heaton serving as hostess and Elma Ruth McMurphy as co-hostess. Dr. Elizabeth Kinzie will present the program.

Nov. 18 to Nov 22, 2013 Breakfast Menu for Alva Public Schools Monday – French toast strips, maple syrup, pears, milk Tuesday – Whole Grain Fruit Loops, buttered toast, peaches, apple juice, skim milk Wednesday – Pancakes, maple syrup, pineapple, milk Thursday – Yogurt granola, cinnamon toast, mandarin oranges, milk Friday – Sausage patty, biscuit, fruit cocktail, milk Lunch Menu for Alva Public Schools Monday – Popcorn chicken, happy coins, green beans, broccoli, rosy applesauce, milk Tuesday – BBQ on a bun Wednesday – Potato rounds,

corn, pickle spear, apples, milk Thursday – Corn dog, broccoli and cheese, potato puffs, fruit cocktail, milk Friday – Cheeseburger, dill pickles, french fries, strawberry cup, milk Menu for Woods County Senior Citizens Monday – Oven fried chicken, mashed potatoes, gravy, green beans, biscuit, oatmeal cookie Tuesday – Sloppy joe, potato salad, fruit cocktail Wednesday – Steak fingers, mashed potatoes, gravy, green beans, dinner roll, gelatin Thursday – Homestyle stew, coleslaw, crackers, cinnamon roll Friday – Ham and mac au gratin, winter mix vegetables, applesauce

By Betty Riggins On Friday, Nov. 8, we had a great attendance with a favorite meal of everyone: taco salad and cinnamon rolls. Carol Anderson was back for a visit and to eat, plus Jewell LeDou had her sister Seva Bullard from Lawton as her guest, as she is here recuperating from a broken wrist. Tuesday we had low attendance. We had Teresa Ramirez and Maria Morris in for a visit and to eat with us. On Wednesday, we had great attendance – ham and bean day. Olive Appleton played beautiful piano music for us. The morning was busy as most of the noodles from the

Northwestern Oklahoma State University students and employees can enjoy some time with their families as the university will close for Thanksgiving break Wednesday through Friday, Nov. 27-29. No

Christ in Waynoka. Chapter C was in charge of the program. They presented a skit, researched and written by Thamizin Harrison and Billie Buckles, about the seven founding sisters. Women performing in the skit, besides Har-

rison and Buckles, were Ann Kline, Paula Bloyd, Kay Ritter, Helen Thiesing, Betty Benson, Joyce Dixon and Judy Ferguson. Thirty women representing all four chapters were present for the meeting.

PEO chapter members shown left to right are: Billie Buckles, Ann Kline, Paula Bloyd, Kay Ritter, Helen Theising, Betty Benson, Joyce Dixon, Judy Ferguson, Thamizin Harrison.

classes will be held during this time, and campus offices will be closed. Classes will begin and offices will resume normal business hours campaign committee, said many on Monday, Dec 2. people still may lose their coverage because state officials have ample power over insurers. And he said the Obama administration cannot allow additional foul-ups. “If I were still in Congress, I’d be concerned,” Frost said. Sensing an edge, the GOP plans to cut commercials featuring Democrats’ promises that people could keep their health insurance. They are already emailing press releases Stop feeding the pig and get Geo. to reporters attacking Democrats on the issue. “With Obamacare proving to be a total disaster — from the botched website to the broken promises — it’s no surprise that Barber is now desperate to hide his support,” said one GOP release distributed in the district of freshman Rep. Ron Barber, D-Ariz. Republicans are aiming similar attacks against Democrats challenging GOP incumbents, urging Bosch geothermal heating and cooling systems can save you up to 70% reporters to ask them their views on on your home energy bills. With an additional 30% federal tax credit, these the health care law. systems are now more affordable than ever! America Rising, a GOP political action committee that compiles research on opposition candidates, Visit our site to find out how much you can save. is collecting video of Democrats’ BoschGeo.com/PropanePig comments on the law. Some conservative groups are already running

Propane bills too high?

challenged everyone to play with them. It was good to see the cover come off. Dusty from Beaver was in to give a presentation on Medicare medical prescriptions and the help you can receive. Next week on Tuesday, Nov. 19, David Shaw will be here to entertain for us. On Wednesday, Nov. 20, we will be making noodles. Friday night, Nov. 22, is our covered dish supper and games. This will be a full week, so you may as well come and join in on the fun. On Monday, Nov. 25, Mrs. Gagnon’s first grade students will be here reading their poetry for us. Thanks for reading my notes.

PEO chapters celebrate Founder’s Day

Chapters C, R, AL and ET of PEO International celebrated Founder’s Day on Saturday, Nov. 2. Chapter R of Waynoka served as hostess chapter. They served a delicious salad luncheon to the other cinnamon ladies at the North Side Church of

Northwestern to close for Thanksgiving break

freezer were sold, so now another batch will have to be made with all our great helpers. On Thursday, we had great attendance and beautiful weather. We have a new cook’s helper and she is doing a great job all over the kitchen. We have a full crew in the kitchen now and hopefully we can keep them all this time. Art Britcher brought his brother Herbert and sister Pamela Silver as his guests today. Steve Hansen came in and the pool table was uncovered and used again. This pool table was used many years by some of our old timers as Loren Korell and Lester Corr were faithful every day to shoot and

From Page 4

GOP television spots, with Americans for Prosperity airing ads attacking Rahall and Sen. Kay Hagan, DN.C., while defending Rep. Dan Benishek, R-Mich., for opposing the law. “It forces thousands to lose the plans they love and the doctors they know,” says the 30-second spot running on television and radio in Rahall’s West Virginia district. Barber also voted for the Republican bill. He said he believes that eventually, people will be able to keep the plans they want and the government’s troubled health care website will be fixed. Though Democrats opposed the House GOP bill 153-39, the vote was evidence of the pressure they feel over canceled policies. The health care law let insurers cancel some existing coverage that lacked the improved features now required. More than 4 million policyholders have received termination letters from their carriers, according to an Associated Press tally. Feeling public heat, Obama on Thursday took administrative action to let insurers continue current plans for a year. He took the blame for the confusion, saying, “That’s

on me,” not congressional Democrats. House Democratic leaders told reporters later that day that they had nothing to apologize for. Even so, most House Democrats felt Obama’s action was not enough and demanded a vote on a Democratic proposal. “They want to be on record,” said Rep. Mike Doyle, D-Pa. “Members are not judged by administrative fixes. Members are judged by their voting records.” Top Democrats finally proposed their own plan. But that was not until rank-and-file lawmakers threatened to back the GOP bill, which Democrats said would weaken the law because it would let insurers issue new substandard policies, not just renew old ones. A similar dynamic is in play in the Senate. Sen. Mary Landrieu, D-La., backed by colleagues who like her face competitive re-elections next year, has proposed legislation requiring insurers to renew policies canceled because of the law. Not eager to breathe life into a challenge to the health care overhaul, leaders have not decided whether they will allow a vote on Landrieu’s bill.


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Embolden others to intervene Oklahoma’s newest attack on suicide By Clifton Adcock Oklahoma Watch The aftermath of a suicide is an endless tunnel – of pain, regrets and questions. Could something have been done to stop him? Why did she do it? What warning signs were there? The act of taking one’s life leaves no easy answers for those left behind. “The majority of people who are survivors spend the rest of their lives not talking about this and suffering in silence,” said Mike Brose, executive director of the Mental Health Association in Tulsa, which will soon rename itself with the word “Oklahoma.” “You don’t necessarily get over it, but you can get better.” Oklahoma has a suicide rate that’s above the national average and was 12th highest among all

states and the District of Columbia in 2010, according to data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Both Oklahoma’s and the nation’s rates are increasing. The state’s suicide rate rose by 13 percent from 2000 to 2010, according to the Centers for Disease Control. And now, partly because of a rise in suicides among baby boomers, suicide is one of the leading causes of death among nearly all age groups. More funding for programs and better understanding of mental illness are crucial, Brose said. But his association also is mounting an effort to give people the basic skills for how to recognize and respond to a relative, friend or other person who may be suicidal. The approach is called QPR – “Question, Persuade and Refer” –

“If people who start to act on suicidal feelings can be deterred for at least 30 minutes or an hour, it may save their lives.”

and the hope is for it to become as widely accepted as CPR. QPR training outlines ways to persuade individuals to seek help and provides resources for referral. “It’s an attempt at getting people much more comfortable than they typically are around this issue,” Brose said. “I’ve heard it over and over again from survivors, ‘I didn’t know what to say.’” Brose’s organization in Tulsa also is expanding beyond the city, filling gaps created by the Oct. 31 closing of the Mental Health Association of Central Oklahoma in Oklahoma City. The organization is changing its name to reflect the broader mission and will take over at least two programs the Oklahoma City group had provided. One provides free mental health services to low-income people and a second screens teenagers for mental health issues. In the meantime, the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services is developing its own suicide prevention plan, using $500,000 in state funding in addition to federal grants. A Boy’s Death Nearly a decade after her teen-

Brandon Margalassi took his own life in 2004. His parents are still trying to understand. age son killed himself, Michele Magalassi of Owasso painfully recalls Brandon’s behavior in the weeks before his death. His birthday was approaching, and birthdays in the family were big events. This time, Brandon, then 14, was not interested in planning anything. “He was tired all the time, withdrawn from the family. He was just not engaged,” Magalassi said. “Had I known more about depression, I

would probably have asked more questions …. We just had no idea that he was that volatile.” In May 2004, Brandon, a popular honors student and football player, got into some trouble at school, along with others, for writing in a student’s yearbook. His father, Billy Magalassi, picked him up, took him home and returned to work. Brandon’s brother Justin was

See Suiside Page 8

Suicide rates climb for U.S., Oklahoma

Year Okla. Okla. U.S. Suicide Suicide Suicide Count Rate Count 2000 497 14.6 29,350 2001 515 14.9 30,622 2002 501 14.4 31,655 2003 476 13.6 31,484 2004 506 14.4 32,439 2005 522 14.8 32,637 2006 537 14.9 33,300 2007 531 14.7 34,598 2008 575 15.6 36,035 2009 567 15.2 36,909 2010 618 16.5 38,364 Note: Rate is number per 100,000 population, ageadjusted. Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Billy and Michele Magalassi established the Brandon Magalassi Memorial Scholarship Foundation to raise awareness of teen suicide and depression. Photo by Lindsey Morehead/Owasso Reporter

From Page 3

Health

fidence that the existing ranks of psychologists, licensed professional counselors and licensed clinical social workers could boost their patient load. “If there were insurance, I think there would be enough professionals,” Hyde said. “The problem is so many people in Oklahoma are either not insured or underinsured. Unfortunately, even therapy goes where the money is.” For people who obtain health plans through the government marketplace, the availability of mental health and substance abuse providers will depend on where they live and which company and policy they choose. For example, Blue Cross Blue Shield lists a total of 82 psychiatric providers within a 10-mile radius of central Oklahoma City, 55 within a 10-mile radius of central Tulsa and none within a 10-mile radius of Stroud.

But even within the Blue Cross Blue Shield network, the number depends on the specific policy chosen. For lower-cost “Blue Preferred” policies, the roster shrinks

to 67 in Oklahoma City and 19 in Tulsa. For even cheaper “Blue Advantage” polices, the company lists none in central Oklahoma City and two in Tulsa.

Mental health forum scheduled Two prominent Oklahoma leaders in mental health will speak and answer questions from the public at an event sponsored by Oklahoma Watch entitled, “Oklahoma Watch-Out: A Community Forum on Mental and Emotional Health.” Terri White, commissioner for the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, and Michael Brose, executive director of the Mental Health Association in Tulsa, will be featured at the forum from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. Wed. at Circle Cinema at 10 S. Lewis Ave. in Tulsa. Among the issues to be discussed are the reasons for Oklahoma’s high rates of mental illness and substance abuse, the state’s efforts to address some of the problems, and whether the Affordable Care Act and new federal rules will improve mental health in the state. Those interested in attending are encouraged to RSVP to events@ oklahomawatch.org and come with questions. Oklahoma Watch is a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization that produces journalism on a variety of public-policy issues.

U.S. Suicide Rate 10.4 10.7 10.9 10.8 11.0 10.9 11.0 11.3 11.6 11.7 12.1


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Run as candidate Sheila Holmes, Kid Detective for Alva Board of Education seat #4 The board of education of the Alva public school district hereby announces that statutorily qualified individuals interested in running as a candidate for the #4 seat on the Alva Board of Education may file to run as a candidate for this seat at the Woods County Election Board between the hours of 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Dec. 2 through Dec. 4.

Special airport meeting Monday

By Marione Martin After canceling their regular meeting, which was scheduled on Veterans Day, the Alva Regional Airport Commission has scheduled a special meeting for Monday, Nov. 18. They will meet at 7 p.m. at the airport. After hearing the manager’s report, the members will discuss with possible action the maintenance of the maintenance hangar. There will be discussion and possible action on a request from Lynn Martin for permission to construct a concrete apron or pad from his hangar door to the taxiway. Time will be allowed for any remarks and inquiries from board members and from citizens.

Alva City Council to consider purchase of two police cars

By Marione Martin The Alva City Council will hold a regular meeting Monday at 6:30 p.m. in the council chambers of City Hall. After votes on approval of minutes and claims, the council will hear the city business manager’s report. There will be discussion and action to approve Resolution No. 2013069 authorizing application for financial assistance from the REAP funds. The council will discuss and vote on authorizing the purchase of two new police cars from Washburn Ford in the amount of $26,650 each. Time will be allowed for brief remarks and inquiries from council members and citizens. The council meeting will be followed by the Alva Utility Authority meeting and the Alva Economic Development Authority meeting. The agendas of those meetings only list votes on approving minutes and claims.

Tourism Tax Committee to hear three requests

By Marione Martin The City of Alva Tourism Tax Committee will consider three requests for funds at their November meeting. The committee will meet Wednesday at 5:30 p.m. in the council chambers of City Hall. The group will be asked for $10,600 for Alva Christmas decorations, $10,000 for the Northwestern Oklahoma Medieval and Renaissance Faire, and $7,500 for the Miss Rodeo Oklahoma Coronation.

Come help Sheila Holmes, Kid Detective, solve the Case of the Missing iPad with Northwestern’s theatre students Most everyone has heard of Sherlock Holmes, but this year Northwestern Oklahoma State University’s theatre program unveils Sheila Holmes in ‘Sheila Holmes, Kid Detective: The Case of the Missing iPad’ in the annual children’s production Nov. 21-23 in Herod Hall Auditorium. Sheila Holmes, her friends and trusty dog Waffles are in search of her brother’s missing iPad only to find that there are numerous iPads popping up and three possible culprits for the disappearance. The play is written by Northwestern alumna Ashlynn Walker. Walker graduated in the spring of 2010 as a speech/theatre major. She has written six plays, and after this year’s children’s production, two of them will have been produced at Northwestern. “This is a great opportunity

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for a budding playwright,” Walker said. “I am comfortable with ‘Sheila Holmes, Kid Detective: The Case of the Missing iPad’ being produced for the first time at Northwestern because it’s home.” The children’s production is open to area grade school children on Thursday, Nov. 21, and Friday, Nov. 22, at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. The public is invited to see the production on Saturday, Nov. 23, at 2 p.m., for a $1 admission. “The annual children’s production is a long-standing tradition for Northwestern,” said Kimberly Weast, MFA, associate professor of theatre. “It is a part of the final for my principles of acting class.” There will be a lot of audience involvement with three possible endings to the story, depending on how the audience votes. Students in the production, along with their hometowns, classifications and characters, are listed below: Natalie Sackett, Fairview freshman, Sheila

Holmes; Nathan Sackett, Fairveiw senior, Papa Bear; Mitch Cruse, Thomas freshman, Waffles; Micah Roberts, Newkirk junior, Charlie; Jamal Hymon, Oklahoma City freshman, Ranger; Taylor Morris,Pacoima (Calif.) freshman, Jett; Erin Hopkins, Fairview sophomore, Ms. Jenny; Patrick Wilson, Aubrey (Texas) junior, Principal Emmels; Tali McDonald, Alva senior, FiFi; Abbie Tillman, Elk City freshman, Mom; Trenton Judd, Sapulpa freshman, Peyton; Scott Bartley, Enid junior, Chris. Production crew includes Erin Hopkins, Fairview sophomore, stage manager; Hayden Nickel, Helena freshman, lighting board operator; Tiffani Mason, Lawton sophomore, audio board operator. Northwestern’s theatre program is under the direction of Weast. Contact her at kkweast@ nwosu.edu or 580-327-8462 for more information about theatre productions.

Suiside

home, but left to go to the school field house. Alone Alone for a half-hour, Brandon scribbled a suicide note and then shot himself in the temple. He died more than a week later at St. Francis Hospital. “We were blindsided,” Michele said. They had viewed Brandon’s moody behavior as typical for adolescence, not a mental-health crisis. Mental Illness Suicide rates are often an indicator of the prevalence of mental illness in a state. About a decade ago, a study by the federal Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration found that Oklahoma had one of the highest rates of mental illness in the country. The state has high rates in other indicator areas, such as prescription drug abuse. Yet those who suffer from mental illness, including depression, often do not seek help, Brose said. High suicide rates are attributable to factors such as a lack of access to mental health care and lingering stigmas about mental illness, said Rachel Yates, director of suicide prevention and outreach programs at HeartLine, a crisis resource center. “A lot of people don’t reach out because they fear the judgment. They fear being called crazy or nuts,” Yates said, adding, “It’s been such a taboo topic for so many years.” QPR training is supposed to address that. Yates, a certified QPR trainer, has taught the free one-hour training course at universities, military bases and support groups. Part of the goal is to break through misperception that talking with someone about suicide increases their chances of acting on suicidal thoughts. “People are scared. They don’t have a lot of confidence around this

topic, so they do nothing,” Yates said. “Talking about it can reduce one’s risk (for suicide), rather than increase it.” Brose said his organization is also seeking corporate partners to help implement the effort, which can be included in a range of occupations’ training programs. QPR training has been used in police academies, teacher training courses and even cosmetology schools, Brose said. “Anyone can learn,” Brose said. “If we’re really going to have an impact of bringing the horrific numbers of suicides down, we’re going to have to do a much better job of educating and training the general public.” Those Left Behind The Magalassis’ grief still runs deep. Michele’s voice falters often when she recalls her son’s death and the effects on the family. Justin was angry. Michele and Billy sought counseling. And then gradually, relying on their Christian faith, pastor, friends and others, the Magalassis began to move forward again in life. They decided “we’re just not going to let this tragedy break our family up,” Michele said. “This is not going to get the better of us.” The Gun Factor One factor in the suicide rates is the availability of firearms. Brose said in homes with guns, the chances of a successful suicide attempt go up because a firearm’s lethal efficiency leaves little room or time for someone to reconsider and stop the attempt. More than 60 percent of all suicides in Oklahoma were carried out with a firearm in 2010, according to federal data. “We’re not trying to interject ourselves into the gun-control debate,” Brose said. “It’s not about that argument.” He notes that use of gun locks or gun safes can help deter individuals who may be contemplating suicide. If people who start to act on suicidal feelings can be deterred for at least 30 minutes or an hour, it may save their lives. “There are a number of suicide attempts and completions in this country that are done spontaneously,” Brose said. “Oftentimes people change their minds … and suicide is averted.” The Mental Health Association

sponsors support-group meetings at its Tulsa office twice a month for survivors of suicide. “There’s going to be a suicide in the state today, somewhere. Probably more than one,” Brose said. “It’s a death that affects people like no other death. People spend the rest of their lives trying to understand it and asking themselves why.” Helping Others Brandon’s suicide has led the Magalassi family to reach out to help others. The couple started the Brandon Magalassi Memorial Scholarship Foundation, which awards $1,000 scholarships to Owasso-area high school seniors who write essays on suicide prevention. The foundation also sponsors “Shadow Run” education events that focus on problems that may lead to suicide, such as cyberbullying. They talk to other parents whose children have committed suicide, although not all parents in that situation want to talk. “I just hope it helps,” Michele said of the couple’s efforts. “We just never know who it’s going to touch.” Oklahoma Watch is a nonprofit organization that produces indepth and investigative content on important public-policy issues facing the state. For more Oklahoma Watch content, go to www.oklahomawatch.org. MORE INFORMATION • For information on mental health services offered in Oklahoma communities, call a community referral assistance line at the mental health association in Tulsa, soon to rename itself for the entire state, at 918-585-1213 from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. • Individuals seeking suicide outreach programs, compassionate listening, crisis intervention services or information and referral services can call HeartLine’s 211 service. • For information on QPR training, contact the mental health association at 918-5851213 or HeartLine at 405-8409396. • To reach national suicide prevention hotlines, calls 1-800-SUICIDE or 1-800-273TALK.


November 17, 2013

From Front Page

Alva Review-Courier

Page 9

Bickerstaff

Bickerstaff covers the bike course with ease.

effort. It’s the hardest mentally because you’re gradually slowing down. You just put one foot in front of the other.” When Bickerstaff reached the last 200 meters a competitor in his age group passed him. Knowing only a small percentage of runners qualify for the Hawaii meet, his competitive nature bolstered Bickerstaff to push himself harder. That final burst of determination allowed him to overtake his competitor, finishing in third place instead of fourth. “If I’d been 25 seconds slower, I wouldn’t have qualified,” Bickerstaff said. By qualifying early, he will now have a year to train for the Iron Man Hawaii triathlon. That race will involve much harsher conditions. “In Hawaii, it’s generally a lot windier,” he said. “The bike course can have 30 to 60 mile per hour winds. It’s hotter and a lot more humid.” Bickerstaff will train his body to adapt to the more adverse condi-

tions. “I hope to be able to do more running with the leg no longer injured,” he said. The biking portion takes almost half the race. By riding faster, the competitor can conserve energy for the run segment. “Here in California, you can ride your bike and run almost all year,” he said. “I can ride up the mountains and get some strength training.” In Florida the course covered mostly flat terrain. In Hawaii, the route requires conquering hills and running past hot lava fields. “The temperature outside may be 80 degrees, but the heat radiating off the lava fields will make it feel like 100 degrees,” he said. His parents, Henry and Harriett Bickerstaff, flew to Panama City Beach to watch him compete. “It was nice,” he said. His childhood dreams of competing in the Olympics have been shelved. Bickerstaff works full time for Intuit, the corporation that

develops accounting and financial computer software like QuickBooks, a job he’s held for eight years since graduating from Stanford University. “It’s been a good company to work for,” he said. “I have a flexible schedule so I can still train.” Bickerstaff got to compete in the Florida race because he purchased a new racing bike in 2012. The bike came with a free entry into the race. “This is a very popular race,” he said. “Once they post the entries online, it fills up in about 60 seconds.” He realizes he’s very privileged to be going to Hawaii. Approximately 2,000 of the world’s best athletes compete in Hawaii. To finish in the top of his age group at the world meet, Bickerstaff will need more than just strong muscles. He’ll also need a strong determination, a healthy body and a little bit of luck on the side. “I qualified on the first try,” he said. “Some people try for years.”

There’s nothing like a mother’s hug at the end of a long race. Harriet Bickerstaff congratulates her son, Ryan, at the completion of the Iron Man Florida Triathlon. Bickerstaff starts his second lap into Gulf waters as another group finishes their first.

From Page 2

Music

at the station titled Dance, an accordion is displayed behind glass with a listening center featuring polka, tejan, cajun, zydeco and klezmer music. The large display boards contain information about each type of music and well-known musicians who made that genre famous. “If you think about the people who make these exhibits, they have a variety of degrees in arts and design, history, as well as English. Graceful Arts kicked off their Smithsonian celebration with the Northwest Oklahoma Concert Series’ Riders in the Sky concert. The display will remain in Alva through Jan. 4, 2014. Scheduled Events During the next six weeks, many coordinating events are planned. • On Nov. 19, Dr. Shawn Holliday, Northwestern Oklahoma State University graduate dean, will present a lecture titled “Oklahoma’s Cherokee Outlet: The Beginnings of Cowboy Music” at 7 p.m. • Thanksgiving weekend, the gallery will be open from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 29, and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, Nov.

30, to enable out-of-town guests to visit the exhibit. • On Dec. 4 and 5 elementary students will tour the “Instruments in the Studio” exhibit. • On Dec. 5 Dr. Hugh Foley, Rogers State University, will present a lecture at 7 p.m. titled “America’s Roots Music.” • The First Friday Art Walk and Downtown Shopping Kick-Off begins at 6 p.m. around the square. The Christmas parade, caroling and holiday goodies at Graceful Arts, Murrow’s FrameArt, the Runnymede and other special events will be held. • On Dec. 12-14, ACT I Theatre’s Children’s Western Musical Christmas production of “For Unto Y’All” will continue the festivities. • Dec. 19 will be Senior Citizen Day at the gallery. Dr. Mike Knedler will present a talk about “Historical Singing Schools in America” at 3 p.m. “This exhibit has created significant awareness statewide for Alva’s downtown arts and shopping district,” Dr. Decker said. “Graceful Arts is booking tours now, and a team of volunteer docents will be working with all tour groups.”

Common items like an old washboard became musical instruments in early American music. Photo by Helen Barrett At right: Oklahoma’s own Woody Guthrie ranks among the fathers of modern music. Photo by Helen Barrett


November 17, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

Page 10

Goldbugs battle Christian Heritage to a heartbreaking loss By Leslie Nation Despite the defeat the Goldbugs’ football team took on the Crusaders’ home field, the game started out as a nail-biter with Alva very hopeful for a win. It came down to the second half when things started to take a turn for the worse for the Goldbugs, leading to the 42-21 defeat against Christian Heritage. Alva was the first to start out with the ball on their 19-yard line, and after eight plays moving the ball just 28 yards the Goldbugs punted away from their territory. The Goldbugs went only 37 seconds without the ball in their possession when Dalton Manning (#26) intercepted the ball at the Crusaders’ 30-yard line. With the great field position, Alva had a chance to be the first on the boards. They battled all the way to the 18 before Riley Hess (#26) fumbled the ball after a completed threeyard pass. Christian Heritage’s star linebacker, Micah Wilson (#33), was the one who came up with the fumble recovery to start their new drive on their 47. With a fresh set of downs and the momentum shift in their favor, the Crusaders made an impressive march down the field. Their go-to running back, Joseph Lemieux (#7), was shut down by Alva’s defense in their first possession, but the quick tailback found a hole up the middle for a 19-yard burst. Now on Alva’s 15-yard line, starting quarterback Colton Lindsey (#16) threw a pass deep into the end zone, connecting with Spencer Lindsey (#14) for the touchdown with 5:40 left to play in the first quarter. Trailing by seven, Alva was ready to make their move and start their drive from their 20. Ty Hooper was connecting with his receivers on all fronts. An eightyard pass completion to Manning and another 10-yard completion to Hess moved Alva down the field at a steady pace. But the Goldbugs made a breakthrough when Trevor Johnson (#20) broke a tackle, then sprinted down the sideline all the way to the Crusaders’ one-yard line for a 56-yard pass. Christian Heritage was able to push Alva back to the 11, but the Goldbugs would not

be denied and Hess came out with an 11-yard touchdown pass to tie the game. It was a full nine minutes before the Crusaders came back with a response for the Goldbugs. Nineteen plays and an 84-yard strike down the field gave Christian Heritage their second touchdown on a threeyard run by C. Lindsey. Alva was quick to give the Crusaders an answer after two big plays gave the Goldbugs the needed momentum. A 21-yard pass to Johnson put Alva in enemy territory, and a 36-yard pass deep towards the end zone to Cody Jones (#3) gave the Goldbugs six points. But a knee injury on the extra point kick put Cade Pfleider (#35) out for the rest of the game. Crusaders Rally For A SecondHalf Burst Christian Heritage came out with a quick punch after a 23-yard run from C. Lindsey put them near Alva’s territory. But the Goldbugs’ defense pulled together to stop the Crusaders and force them to punt the ball away. Starting the drive from their 29, Alva began a 61-yard march down the field for Joby Allen (#30) to take the ball in on a one-yard rushing touchdown. A 10-yard pass to Jones and a 14-yard pass to Johnson were the two big plays of the drive that kept the chains moving for the Goldbugs. Now leading the Crusaders 2114, Alva was ready to put this game away, but two possession changes later Christian Heritage retaliated with a four-yard touchdown run from Lemieux to tie it up with 11:55 left in the game. The Goldbugs had plenty of time left on the clock to take back their lead, but Christian Heritage rallied their defense to stop Alva for a gain of only two yards on their drive. The Crusaders started a new possession on the Goldbugs’ 31, and with the advantage of field position C. Lindsey connected with Gabe LittleJim (#44) deep in the end zone for a 31-yard touchdown pass to lead 28-21. With the ball in Alva’s possession, they stayed alive down the field making passing plays with big

Chase Jones (#57) stops Joseph Lemieux (#7) in the backfield for a loss of a yard in round one of the District 2A playoffs against Christian Heritage. Photo by Leslie Nation yardage gains. A 34-yard pass to Hess as Hooper ran forward out of the pocket to avoid the sack gave the Goldbugs that needed momentum. But things took a turn for the worse on the eight-yard line as Hooper threw an interception into the hands of Wilson, who ran the ball 41 yards down the field before being knocked out of bounds. This gave the Crusaders the opening they were looking for as Lemieux ran the ball in for his second rushing touchdown of the night, putting Christian Heritage up 35-21. The Crusaders would go on to score one more touchdown to give them a commanding lead of 42-21 and the win. Stats for the Bugs As Alva has throughout the

season, the Goldbugs faced a team that was dominant in the rushing game. While rushing only 61 yards themselves, their opponent ran the ball for a total of 326 yards and four touchdowns (179 of those yards and three touchdowns were from Lemieux). The leading rusher for the Goldbugs was Jones, who gained 32 yards on 10 carries, and while Allen only had four yards on the ground, he had the only rushing touchdown. It was a different story for Alva in the air, as Hooper threw for a total of 339 yards off of 21 completions of 47 passes. Hooper did connect for two touchdowns with Hess and Jones, but was picked off twice by Wilson and C. Lindsey. As for C. Lindsey, he threw for

noticeably fewer yards at 158, but recorded two touchdown passes, completing 14-of-21. Manning was the only Goldbug to intercept off of C. Lindsey throughout the night. The top receivers for Alva were Hess, who caught 12 for 114 yards and one touchdown; Johnson, who snatched six passes for 118 yards and one touchdown; Jones, who received five for a total gain of 60 yards; and Manning, who added another 27 yards off of four grabs. Overall, the Goldbugs were out-gained by 84 yards on offense against the Crusaders to give them a tough loss to swallow. Though the season is over for Alva, they ended the year with a winning record of 7-4.

Cody Jones (#3) runs for a gain of six yards as he bulldozes over Jacob Flies (#38) before being facemasked by the Crusaders’ Colton Lindsey to give the Goldbugs the first down. Photo by Leslie Nation


November 17, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

Page 11

Six-minute SWOSU surge dooms Rangers NWOSU Sports Information ALVA – Southwestern Oklahoma State scored four touchdowns in less than six minutes early in the third quarter to pull away for a 62-17 victory over Northwestern Oklahoma State at Ranger Field. Northwestern kicked a field goal late in the second quarter, and Kollin Retter made a touchdownsaving tackle at the one-yard line to send the Rangers into the break down 28-17. The second half was an entirely different matter. Southwestern took advantage of some great field position offered up by a succession of fruitless Ranger punts into a stiff headwind. The Bulldogs forced a Ranger three-and-out to open the half and marched 24 yards in three plays for a 34-17 edge. Northwestern again stalled deep in its own territory, and Southwestern set up shop at the Ranger two following a blocked punt. Ryan Corbin scored the last of his three touchdowns to make it 41-17. A pair of 30-plus yard touchdown passes followed over the next three minutes, as Southwestern rolled to its sixth straight win

over the Rangers, dating back to 1996. Senior running back Javari Liggins finished out his Northwestern career with his second consecutive 100-yard performance. He carried a career-high 32 times for 116 yards and a touchdown. Jarion Tudman accounted for the other Ranger touchdown and finished with 33 yards on 13 carries. L.T. Pfaff completed nine of 19 passes for 85 yards for Northwestern. Southwestern (6-5, 6-4 Great American Conference) finished over .500 for the first time since 2006. The Bulldogs outgained Northwestern 530-232 in total yards. Tanner Jones led the Ranger defense with a career-best 13 tackles – nine of them in the opening half. Chris Ladd and Derrick Thomspon added eight each. The teams swapped touchdowns over the first quarter and change. Liggins’ run evened the score at 7-all with 2:44 to go in the opening quarter. Tudman scored at the 12:50 mark of the second quarter to tie the game at 14. On the first playing of South-

Score by Quarters 1 2 3 4 Score Southwestern Okla... 14 14 28 6 - 62 Record: (6-5,6-4) Northwestern Okla... 7 10 0 0 - 17 Record: (2-9,2-8) Scoring Summary: 1st 09:20 SWOSU - Brian Robinson 8 yd pass from Dustin Stenta (Kevin Cantrell kick), 11-46 3:51, SWOSU 7 - NWOSU 0 02:44 NWOSU - Javari Liggins 1 yd run (Kevin Ditch kick), 8-32 3:35, SWOSU 7 - NWOSU 7 00:24 SWOSU - Matt Farris 3 yd run (Kevin Cantrell kick), 8-45 2:08, SWOSU 14 - NWOSU 7 2nd 12:50 NWOSU - Jarion Tudman 6 yd run (Kevin Ditch kick), 7-75 2:34, SWOSU 14 - NWOSU 14 12:38 SWOSU - Karl Hodge 75 yd run (Kevin Cantrell kick), 1-75 0:12, SWOSU 21 - NWOSU 14 05:03 SWOSU - Ryan Corbin 26 yd pass from Dustin Stenta (Kevin Cantrell kick), 13-80 5:27, SWOSU 28 - NWOSU 14 01:01 NWOSU - Kevin Ditch 22 yd field goal, 12-51 3:41, SWOSU 28 - NWOSU 17 3rd 12:07 SWOSU - Ryan Corbin 1 yd run (Kevin Cantrell kick blockd), 3-24 0:48, SWOSU 34 - NWOSU 17 09:46 SWOSU - Ryan Corbin 2 yd run (Kevin Cantrell kick), 1-2 0:04, SWOSU 41 - NWOSU 17 08:53 SWOSU - Brad Smithey 33 yd pass from Dustin Stenta (Karl Hodge pass from Brad Smithey), 1-33 0:06, SWOSU 49 - NWOSU 17 06:29 SWOSU - X’zavious Harri 31 yd pass from Dustin Stenta (Kevin Cantrell kick), 3-33 0:43, SWOSU 56 - NWOSU 17 4th 10:05 SWOSU - Matt Farris 25 yd run (Kevin Cantrell kick failed), 12-99 5:06, SWOSU 62 - NWOSU 17 SWOSU NWOSU FIRST DOWNS................... 27 19 RUSHES-YARDS (NET)......... 36-261 58-147 PASSING YDS (NET)............. 269 85 Passes Att-Comp-Int........... 35-23-0 19-9-0 TOTAL OFF. PLAYS-YARDS... 71-530 77-232 Fumble Returns-Yards.......... 0-0 0-0 Punt Returns-Yards............ 4-13 0-0 Kickoff Returns-Yards......... 2-66 5-62 Interception Returns-Yards.... 0-0 0-0 Punts (Number-Avg)............ 0-0.0 7-26.3 Fumbles-Lost.................. 2-1 3-1 Penalties-Yards............... 7-76 6-34 Possession Time............... 22:39 37:21 Third-Down Conversions........ 9 of 13 7 of 19 Fourth-Down Conversions....... 3 of 4 2 of 4 Red-Zone Scores-Chances....... 4-6 3-4 Sacks By: Number-Yards........ 3-34 0-0 RUSHING: Southwestern Okla.-Karl Hodge 8-106; Matt Farris 15-91; Dustin Stenta 4-30; Stephen Castigl 3-20; Matt Mendoza 3-9; Ryan Corbin 2-3; Noe Kipulu 1-2. Northwestern Okla.-Javari Liggins 32-116; Jarion Tudman 13-33; L.T. Pfaff 11-10; TEAM 1-minus 5; Jeremi Anderson 1-minus 7. PASSING: Southwestern Okla.-Dustin Stenta 23-35-0-269. Northwestern Okla.-L.T. Pfaff 9-19-0-85. RECEIVING: Southwestern Okla.-Ryan Corbin 10-100; Brad Smithey 3-53; Brian Robinson 2-21; M.J. Porter 2-20; Karl Hodge 2-9; X’zavious Harri 1-31; Travis Carroll 1-15; Matt Farris 1-14; Teverick Boyd 1-6. Northwestern Okla.-Reginald Harris 2-11; Jeremi Anderson 2-6; Montrell Logan 1-36; Justin Schanbacher 1-13; Jarion Tudman 1-7; Tevian Parnell 1-6; Mervin Stewart 1-6. INTERCEPTIONS: Southwestern Okla.-None. Northwestern Okla.-None. FUMBLES: Southwestern Okla.-Karl Hodge 1-1; Noe Kipulu 1-0. Northwestern Okla.-TEAM 1-0; L.T. Pfaff 1-1; Jarion Tudman 1-0. SACKS (UA-A): Southwestern Okla.-Jim O’Brien 2-0; Devin Benton 1-0. Northwestern Okla.-None. TACKLES (UA-A): Southwestern Okla.-Jim O’Brien 12-5; Ryan Feller 7-5; Kale Sawatzky 7-2; Eric Rodriguez 2-3; Noe Kipulu 3-1; Steven Townsley 3-1; Tanner Thompson 3-1; Jacolby Robinso 2-2; Michael Adefola 2-2; Tyler George 3-0; Cliff Nyagesiba 1-2; Devin Benton 2-0; Abram Piggee 1-1; Conner Bays 1-1; Troy Shoate 1-0; Gentry Rogers 1-0; Davionne Amie 0-1; Brandon Washing 0-1; Jake Doyle 0-1; Gene Gilbert 0-1. Northwestern Okla.-Tanner Jones 8-5; Chris Ladd 6-2; Derrick Thompson 4-4; Kollin Retter 5-2; Jeremy Gutierrez 2-2; Keenan Santacruz 2-2; Donavon Guidry 0-4; Caden Gacek 3-0; Theodis Williams 1-2; Traveon Kelly 1-2; Rontez Smith 0-3; Jacoby Beasley 0-3; Kenny Smith 0-2; TEAM 1-0; Joby Saint Fleur 1-0; Steven Majike 1-0; Chris Campbell 1-0; Ira Hill 0-1.

Making the tackle after a pass reception to Southwestern’s Karl Hodge (#33) (Dallas, Texas) is the Ranger’s Kolin Retter (#38) of Yukon. Photo by Lynn L. Martin western’s ensuing drive, Karl Quarterback Dustin Stenta – passes to Ryan Corbin to get it Hodge broke free for a 75-yard who threw for 269 yards – tossed to 28-14 with 5:03 left in the first gain to make it 21-14. the first of his three touchdown half.

Ranger quarterback LT Pfaff (#14) scrambles around the right side for a nice gain in first-quarter play against Southwestern of Weatherford. In pursuit is Jacoby Robinson (#90), Mitch Henderson #57) and Stanley Kulu (#45). Photo by Lynn L. Martin


November 17, 2013

The Ranger’s Jesse Smith (#33) topples backward as he fights for control of the basketball with Ft. Hays’ Dwayne Brunson (#31) in first half play at Perceful Fieldhouse Saturday night. The Rangers were fell 79-55 to Ft. Hays. Photo by Lynn L. Martin

Alva Review-Courier

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The Lady Rangers Jurnee Reid (#24) drives for the basket against Jazzmine Robinson (#10) of Cameron women. The Cameron Lady Aggies took the win Saturday night 62-57. Photo by Lynn L. Martin

Coach Larry Parker injured NWOSU coach Larry Parker was injured during the Northwestern vs. Southwestrn football game Saturday when he was knocked down by SWOSU players running to return a punt. Parker was taken to Share Medical Center by Alva EMS and later medi-flighted to Oklahoma City.

A fundraising dinner was held Friday night at Greg Baker’s barn north of Alva for supporters of Ranger football. Above, Head Coach Alan Hall thanks the crowd for their support. Below, the crowd enjoys a traditional western meal of ribs and pork barbecue. Dustin Chaffin and Charla Parker, left, along with Charla’s husband, Larry Parker, right, fill their plates at the fund raising event. Photos by Lynn L. Martin


November 17, 2013

LPXLP

Alva Review-Courier

Page 13

Lady Rangers fall in three No. 22 Oklahoma routs Iowa State 48-10 sets on Senior Night

By Leslie Nation Northwestern Oklahoma State’s volleyball team fell in straight sets on Senior Night against Newman, losing 15-25, 24-26, 19-25. The Lady Rangers trailed the Jets early in the first set, letting Newman get a sizable lead and trailing by seven early in the game at 5-12. At one point, the Rangers allowed the Jets to go on a 7-0 burst giving Newman their biggest lead of the first set with a ninepoint margin at 13-22. Northwestern would go on to score just two more points before the Jets would take the first set 25-15. In set two, the scenario for the Rangers was taking a turn for

the worse as they looked at a sixpoint gap at 6-12, but Northwestern quickly regrouped to go on a 10-2 burst and lead the Jets 16-14. That rally was enough to carry the Ranges all the way to match point at 24-22. Unfortunately, the Jets scored their next four points to win their second set at 26-24. Three of those points were off of attack errors by Northwestern. After a slight intermission for the two teams, the Rangers came back in the third set and stayed even with Newman throughout the first part of the set. The score 10-10, the Jets went on a 7-0 route to take a huge lead at 10-17. The Rangers tried desperately to overcome that margin, but Newman

had cemented their lead to win the third and final set 19-25. Two Rangers, Alyssa Eicher (#6) and senior Paola Turibio (#5), led their team in kills with seven each. Turibio also hit a team-high .429 for the match. Tiana Barnett (#18) assisted on 22 of the Rangers’ 27 kills. For the Jets, Gaylynn Jones (#2) hit a game-high of 13 kills followed by Ashley Gonzalez (#19) with 11. Alexus Litts (#4) recorded 36 assists for the night. Northwestern (5-25, 2-12 Great American Conference) had an encore performance home game against the University of Central Oklahoma Lady Bronchos Friday evening at 5 p.m.

Elisa Bentsen (#9) goes up for the attack and kill over Newman blockers Samantha Minihan (#8, far right) and Belinda Rohling (#12) in the second set. Bentsen had five kills of the night, four of them in the second set. Photo by Leslie Nation

LEGAL NOTICE

(Published by the Alva ReviewCourier on Sunday, November 17, 2013.) BEFORE THE CORPORATION COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF OKLAHOMA APPLICANT:MIDSTATES PETROLEUM COMPANY LLC RELIEF SOUGHT:WELL LOCATION EXCEPTION LEGAL DESCRIPTION: SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 26 NORTH, RANGE 13 WEST, WOODS COUNTY, OKLAHOMA CAUSE CD 201307481-T NOTICE OF HEARING STATE OF OKLAHOMA: To all persons, owners, producers, operators, purchasers and takers of oil and gas and all other interested persons, particularly in Woods County, Oklahoma; and if any of the named individuals or entities be deceased or a dissolved partnership, corporation or other association, then the unknown heirs, executors, administrators, devisees, trustees, successors, trustees and assigns of any such deceased individual or dissolved partnership, corporation or other association; and more particularly owners in the following offsetting units: Section 27, 28, 29, 32 & 34 Township 26 North, Range 13 West; Section 3, 4 & 5, Township 25 North, Range 13 West, Woods County, Oklahoma. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT Applicant in this Cause is requesting that the Commission establish a well location with an appropriate allowable for the Mississippian common source of supply, as an exception to Order No. 609893 underlying Section 33, Township 26 North, Range 13 West, Woods County, Oklahoma, at the following location: Surface Location: To be determined and defined in the final order to issue in this cause; First perforation closest to the surface loc:No closer than 165 feet to the south line or north line and no closer than 600 feet to the west line of Section 33;

Final perforation closest to the BHL: No closer than 165 feet to the north line or south line and no closer than 600 feet to the west line of Section 33, Township 26 North, Range 13 West, Woods County, Oklahoma. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN THAT the Applicant in this cause is requesting the following special relief: The Commission enter an order, to be effective as of the date of the execution thereof or as of a date prior thereto, and to authorize the Applicant or some other party recommended by the Applicant as operator for a well to test, as an exception to the above drilling and spacing order for the common source(s) of supply and location stated above. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN THAT this cause be set before an Administrative Law Judge for hearing, taking of evidence and reporting to the Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN THAT this Cause will be heard before an Administrative Law Judge on the Initial Hearing Docket at the Eastern Regional Service Office of the Corporation Commission, Room 114, 440 South Houston, Tulsa, Oklahoma, at 8:30 a.m., on the 10th day of December 2013, and that this notice be published as required by law and the rules of the Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN THAT any person interested or protesting the application please advise the Attorney of record and the Court Clerk’s Office of the Oklahoma Corporation Commission five (5) days before the hearing date above. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the Applicant and interested parties may present testimony by telephone. The cost of telephonic communication shall be paid by the person and persons requesting its use. Interested parties who wish to participate by telephone shall contact the Applicant or Applicant’s attorney, prior to the hearing date, and provide their name and phone number. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN THAT this cause, if protested, may be

subject to a prehearing or settlement conference pursuant to OCCRP 165:511-2. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that all interested persons may appear and be heard. For information concerning this action, contact Drew Veitch (918) 947-8551 or Michael D. Stack, Attorney for Applicant, 943 East Britton Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73114; Tele (405) 286-1717; Fax (405) 286-2122. CORPORATION COMMISSION OF OKLAHOMA PATRICE DOUGLAS, CHAIRMAN BOB ANTHONY, VICE CHAIRMAN DANA L MURPHY, COMMISSIONER DONE AND PERFORMED THIS 5TH DAY OF NOVEMBER 2013. ATTEST: PEGGY MITCHELL, SECRETARY OF THE COMMISSION

By Alex Abrams NORMAN, Okla. (AP) — Barry Switzer was so confident that Oklahoma would beat Iowa State that he got on Twitter on Friday and congratulated Bob Stoops for matching his record for most wins with the Sooners. Trevor Knight then went out and took care of the rest. Knight replaced injured quarterback Blake Bell in the second quarter and led No. 22 Oklahoma to a 48-10 victory over Iowa State on Saturday. The Sooners (8-2, 5-2 Big 12) closed the game with 45 unanswered points over the final three quarters, handing Stoops win No. 157 at one of college football’s most successful programs and backing up Switzer’s boast that he downplayed later in the day. Knight was 8-of-14 passing for 61 yards and rushed for 123 yards and one touchdown. Damien Williams added 10 carries for 128 yards and two touchdowns for the Sooners. Iowa State (1-9, 0-7) held Oklahoma scoreless in the first quarter and led 10-3 before Jalen Saunders returned a punt 91 yards for a touchdown right before halftime. Knight provided an instant spark after replacing Bell, who was 2-of-5 passing for 10 yards before he appeared to get injured on a fumble with the Sooners trailing 7-0. Stoops stuck with Bell as his starting quarterback after Oklahoma managed only 237 yards of offense in a 41-12 loss at then-No. 5 Baylor. And while the Sooners got off to another slow start, they outscored the Cyclones 38-0 in the second half. “We had fun. Like we’ve said all along, it’s not about one guy in this group of quarterbacks,” Knight said. “It’s the strength of the group. We’ve got to prepare every week to be ready to go and in situations like that.” Williams scored on a 69-yard touchdown run in the opening minute of the third quarter, lifting Oklahoma to its first lead of the day. The two-play, 75-yard drive showed the Sooners are capable of scoring in a hurry.

Brennan Clay added a 63-yard touchdown later in the third to extend Oklahoma’s lead to 27-10. The two long touchdown runs all but dashed Iowa State’s hopes of snapping a 15-game losing streak to Oklahoma. And Knight made a case for the starting role when he stumbled his way for a 56-yard touchdown on the first play of the quarter. It was the redshirt freshman’s first career rushing touchdown. “He played with poise (and) took care of the football,” Oklahoma co-offensive coordinator Josh Heupel said. “He missed a couple of things in the pass, but he handled himself well.” It was the first time Oklahoma had three players rush for a touchdown of at least 50 yards in a game since 1988. Stoops said Bell left the game because of an injury and not as a result of his inability to move the offense. Stoops added that the plan was to play Knight as well against Iowa State, but the move came sooner than expected because of Bell’s injury. Stoops said he’ll wait until he knows more about Bell’s health before he makes a decision on his starting quarterback for Oklahoma’s next game at Kansas State. “We’ll see. I’m not gonna say anything here a half-hour after the game,” Stoops said. “We’ll look at what we feel what’s the best way moving forward.” Oklahoma’s offensive woes carried over into Saturday, and things didn’t begin to get better until Knight took over. The Sooners managed just one first down and 25 yards of total offense in the first quarter. It marked the fourth straight game that Oklahoma failed to score in the first. Saunders scored Oklahoma’s only touchdown of the first half when he fielded a punt at the 9, eluded a few defenders, and raced to the end zone with 1:09 remaining in the second quarter. The Cyclones, losers of seven in a row, jumped out to a 7-0 lead when Sam Richardson ran untouched on a 4-yard touchdown run with 14:18 left in the second quarter.


November 17, 2013

LPXLP

NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that all interested persons may appear and (Published by the Alva Review- be heard. For information concerning Courier on Sunday, November 17, 2013.) this action, contact Drew Veitch (918) BEFORE THE CORPORATION 947-8551 or Michael D. Stack, Attorney COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF for Applicant, 943 East Britton Road, OKLAHOMA Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73114; Tele APPLICANT:MIDSTATES (405) 286-1717; Fax (405) 286-2122. PETROLEUM COMPANY LLC CORPORATION COMMISSION OF RELIEF SOUGHT:HORIZONTAL OKLAHOM SPACING PATRICE DOUGLAS, CHAIRMAN LEGAL DESCRIPTION: SECTION BOB ANTHONY, VICE CHAIRMAN 14, TOWNSHIP 25 NORTH, RANGE DANA L MURPHY, COMMISSIONER 13 WEST, WOODS COUNTY, DONE AND PERFORMED THIS OKLAHOMA 5TH DAY OF NOVEMBER, 2013. CAUSE CD 201307476-T ATTEST: NOTICE OF HEARING PEGGY MITCHELL, SECRETARY OF STATE OF OKLAHOMA: To all THE COMMISSION persons, owners, producers, operators, purchasers and takers of oil and gas and LEGAL NOTICE all other interested persons, particularly (Published by the Alva Reviewin Woods County, Oklahoma; and if any of the named individuals or entities Courier on Sunday, November 17, 2013.) BEFORE THE CORPORATION be deceased or a dissolved partnership, corporation or other association, then the COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF OKLAHOMA unknown heirs, executors, administrators, APPLICANT:MIDSTATES devisees, trustees, successors, trustees and PETROLEUM COMPANY LLC assigns of any such deceased individual or RELIEF SOUGHT:WELL dissolved partnership, corporation or other LOCATION EXCEPTION association. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that LEGAL DESCRIPTION: SECTION the Applicant in this Cause is requesting 14, TOWNSHIP 25 NORTH, RANGE 13 WEST, WOODS COUNTY, the following relief and special relief from OKLAHOMA the Commission: CAUSE CD 201307477-T [a]Establish by extending Order No. 581328 640-acre horizontal drilling and AMENDED NOTICE OF HEARING STATE OF OKLAHOMA: To all spacing oil unit for the Mississippian common source of supply from Section persons, owners, producers, operators, 10 to now include Section 14, Township purchasers and takers of oil and gas and 25 North, Range 13 West, Woods County, all other interested persons, particularly Oklahoma. A review of the records in Woods County, Oklahoma; and if indicate no producing Mississippian any of the named individuals or entities wells underlying Section 14. The records be deceased or a dissolved partnership, further state the Mississippi and Chester corporation or other association, then the formations are spaced on a 640-acre unit unknown heirs, executors, administrators, by Order No. 119355. This horizontal devisees, trustees, successors, trustees and drilling and spacing order for the common assigns of any such deceased individual or source of supply named above shall dissolved partnership, corporation or other supersede those existing non-producing, association; and more particularly owners non-horizontal drilling and spacing units. in the following offsetting units: Section [b]Provide that the order be made 10, 11, 12, 13, 15, 22, 23 & 24, Township effective as of the date of the execution 25 North, Range 13 West, Woods County, thereof or as of a date prior to the date of Oklahoma. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT execution of the order. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that Applicant in this Cause is requesting that this cause be set before an Administrative the Commission establish a well location Law Judge for hearing, taking of evidence with an appropriate allowable for the Mississippian common source of supply, and reporting to the Commission. IT IS ORDERED AND NOTICE IS as an exception to Order to be entered in HEREBY GIVEN that this Cause will be Cause CD No. 201307476-T underlying heard before an Administrative Law Judge Section 14, Township 25 North, Range 13 on the Initial Hearing Docket at the Eastern West, Woods County, Oklahoma, at the Regional Service Office of the Corporation following location: Surface Location: To be determined Commission, Room 114, 440 South Houston, Tulsa, Oklahoma, at 8:30 a.m., and defined in the final order to issue in on the 10th day of December 2013, and this cause; First perforation closest to the surface loc: No closer than 165 that this Notice be published as required feet to the north line or south line and no by law and the rules of the Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN closer than 1700 feet to the east line of THAT any person interested or protesting Section 14. Final perforation No closer than 165 the application please advise the Attorney of record and the Court Clerk’s Office of feet to the south line or north line and no the Oklahoma Corporation Commission closer than 1700 feet to the east line of five (5) days before the hearing date above. Section 14, Township 25 North, Range 13 NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that West, Woods County, Oklahoma. The well the Applicant and interested parties may is anticipated to be completed as a cement present testimony by telephone. The cost cased hole. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN of telephonic communication shall be paid by the person and persons requesting THAT the Applicant in this cause is its use. Interested parties who wish to requesting the following special relief: participate by telephone shall contact the The Commission enter an order, to be Applicant or Applicant’s attorney, prior to effective as of the date of the execution the hearing date, and provide their name thereof or as of a date prior thereto, and to authorize the Applicant or some other and phone number. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN party recommended by the Applicant as THAT this cause, if protested, may be operator for a well to test, as an exception subject to a prehearing or settlement to the above drilling and spacing order conference pursuant to OCCRP 165:5-11- for the common source(s) of supply and location stated above. 2.

LEGAL NOTICE

Alva Review-Courier NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN THAT this cause be set before an Administrative Law Judge for hearing, taking of evidence and reporting to the Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN THAT this Cause will be heard before an Administrative Law Judge on the Initial Hearing Docket at the Eastern Regional Service Office of the Corporation Commission, Room 114, 440 South Houston, Tulsa, Oklahoma, at 8:30 a.m., on the 10th day of December, 2013, and that this notice be published as required by law and the rules of the Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN THAT any person interested or protesting the application please advise the Attorney of record and the Court Clerk’s Office of the Oklahoma Corporation Commission five (5) days before the hearing date above. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the Applicant and interested parties may present testimony by telephone. The cost of telephonic communication shall be paid by the person and persons requesting its use. Interested parties who wish to participate by telephone shall contact the Applicant or Applicant’s attorney, prior to the hearing date, and provide their name and phone number. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN THAT this cause, if protested, may be subject to a prehearing or settlement conference pursuant to OCCRP 165:5-112. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that all interested persons may appear and be heard. For information concerning this action, contact Drew Veitch (918) 947-8551 or Michael D. Stack, Attorney for Applicant, 943 East Britton Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73114; Tele (405) 286-1717; Fax (405) 286-2122. CORPORATION COMMISSION OF OKLAHOMA PATRICE DOUGLAS, CHAIRMAN BOB ANTHONY, VICE CHAIRMAN DANA L MURPHY, COMMISSIONER DONE AND PERFORMED THIS 12TH DAY OF NOVEMBER, 2013. ATTEST: PEGGY MITCHELL, SECRETARY OF THE COMMISSION

LEGAL NOTICE

(Published by the Alva ReviewCourier on Sunday, November 17, 2013.) BEFORE THE CORPORATION COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF OKLAHOMA APPLICANT:MIDSTATES PETROLEUM COMPANY LLC RELIEF SOUGHT:POOLING LEGAL DESCRIPTION: SECTION 27, TOWNSHIP 25 NORTH, RANGE 13 WEST, WOODS COUNTY, OKLAHOMA CAUSE CD 201307479-T NOTICE OF HEARING STATE OF OKLAHOMA: To all persons, owners, producers, operators, purchasers and takers of oil and gas and all other interested persons, particularly in Woods County, Oklahoma; more specifically: Larry L. Bays and Karin Wearmouth and if any of the named individuals or entities be deceased or a dissolved partnership, corporation or other association, then the unknown heirs, executors, administrators, devisees, successors, trustees and assigns of any such deceased individual or dissolved partnership, corporation or other association. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT the Applicant in this Cause is requesting the following relief and special relief: That the Commission, based on the

Page 14 OKLAHOMA CAUSE CD 201307480-T NOTICE OF HEARING STATE OF OKLAHOMA: To all persons, owners, producers, operators, purchasers and takers of oil and gas and all other interested persons, particularly in Woods County, Oklahoma; and if any of the named individuals or entities be deceased or a dissolved partnership, corporation or other association, then the unknown heirs, executors, administrators, devisees, trustees, successors, and assigns of any such deceased individual or dissolved partnership, corporation or other association. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT the Applicant in this cause has filed an application requesting the Corporation Commission of Oklahoma to enter an order amending Order No. 609893 to authorize and permit an additional well in the drilling and spacing units formed for the Mississippian common source(s) of supply in Section 33, Township 26 North, Range 13 West, Woods County, Oklahoma. The additional well to produce hydrocarbons from such separate common source(s) of supply, with such authorization and permission running in favor of Applicant or some other party recommended by Applicant, and to establish a proper allowable for such well and such unit. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN THAT the Applicant in this cause is requesting the following special relief: [A]To increase density by permitting the Applicant or some other party as operator for an additional well within an existing drilling and spacing unit(s) for production from the above common source(s) of supply as an exception to the drilling and spacing order for the captioned unit. [B]That the order to be entered in this matter be made effective as of the date of the execution thereof or as of a date prior thereto and that the authorization and permission requested herein run in favor of Applicant or some other party recommended by Applicant. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN THAT this cause be set before an Administrative Law Judge for hearing, taking of evidence and reporting to the Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this Cause will be heard before an Administrative Law Judge on the Initial Hearing Docket at the Eastern Regional Service Office of the Corporation Commission, Room 114, 440 South Houston, Tulsa, Oklahoma, at 8:30 a.m., on the 10th day of December 2013, and that this notice be published as required by law and the rules of the Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN THAT any person interested or protesting the application please advise the Attorney of record and the Court Clerk’s Office of the Corporation Commission five (5) days before the hearing date above. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the Applicant and interested parties may present testimony by telephone. The cost of telephonic communication shall be paid by the person and persons requesting its use. Interested parties who wish to participate by telephone shall contact the Applicant or Applicant’s attorney, prior to the hearing date, and provide their name and phone number. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN THAT this cause, if protested, may be subject to a prehearing or settlement conference pursuant to OCCRP 165:511-2. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that all interested persons may appear and be heard. For information concerning this action, contact Drew Veitch (918) 9478551, or Michael D. Stack, Attorney LEGAL NOTICE for Applicant, 943 East Britton Road, (Published by the Alva Review- Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73114; Bus Courier on Sunday, November 17, 2013.) (405) 286-1717; Fax (405) 286-2122. BEFORE THE CORPORATION CORPORATION COMMISSION OF COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA PATRICE DOUGLAS, CHAIRMAN APPLICANT:MIDSTATES BOB ANTHONY, VICE CHAIRMAN PETROLEUM COMPANY LLC DANA L MURPHY, COMMISSIONER RELIEF SOUGHT:INCREASED DONE AND PERFORMED THIS DENSITY 5TH DAY OF NOVEMBER 2013. LEGAL DESCRIPTION: SECTION ATTEST: 33, TOWNSHIP 26 NORTH, RANGE PEGGY MITCHELL, SECRETARY OF 13 WEST, WOODS COUNTY, THE COMMISSION

evidence presented, pool the interests and adjudicate the rights and equities of oil and gas owners on a unit pooling and designate the Applicant or some other party recommended by Applicant as operator for the well to produce from the Mississippian common source of supply [Order to be entered in Cause CD No. 201307154T] underlying Section 27, Township 25 North, Range 13 West, Woods County, Oklahoma. The interests of the oil and gas owners involved herein and the rights and equities in respect thereto are sought herein to be pooled and adjudicated pursuant to 52 O.S. Sec. 87.1 within and on the basis of the drilling and spacing units covered hereby, and not limited to a single wellbore. The application in this cause states that Applicant has proposed the development of the separate common source of supply in the drilling and spacing units involved herein under a plan development and has proposed to commence such plan of development of such units by an initial unit well in the lands covered hereby, and that Applicant has been unable to reach an agreement with the owners of drilling rights named as respondents herein with respect to such proposed plan of development of the separate common source of supply in the drilling and spacing unit covered hereby. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN THAT this cause be set before an Administrative Law Judge for hearing, taking of evidence and reporting to the Commission. That Applicant could request that the Order to be entered in this cause shall include a provision allowing the operator one year from the date of the Order to commence drilling operations. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN THAT this Cause will be heard before an Administrative Law Judge on the Initial Hearing Docket at the Eastern Regional Service Office of the Corporation Commission, Room 114, 440 South Houston, Tulsa, Oklahoma. The cause to be heard at 8:30 a.m., on the 10th day of December, 2013, and that notice be published as required by law and rules of the Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN THAT any person interested or protesting the application please advise the Attorney of record and the Court Clerk’s Office of the Oklahoma Corporation Commission five (5) days before the hearing date above. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the Applicant and interested parties may present testimony by telephone. The cost of telephonic communication shall be paid by the person and persons requesting its use. Interested parties who wish to participate by telephone shall contact the Applicant or Applicant’s attorney, prior to the hearing date, and provide their name and phone number. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN THAT this cause, if protested, may be subject to a prehearing or settlement conference pursuant to OCCRP 165:5-112. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that all interested persons may appear and be heard. For information concerning this action, contact Drew Veitch, (918) 947-8551 or Michael D. Stack, Attorney for Applicant, 943 East Britton Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73114; Tele (405) 286-1717; Fax (405) 286-2122. CORPORATION COMMISSION OF OKLAHOMA PATRICE DOUGLAS, CHAIRMAN BOB ANTHONY, VICE CHAIRMAN DANA L MURPHY, COMMISSIONER DONE AND PERFORMED THIS 5TH DAY OF NOVEMBER 2013. ATTEST: PEGGY MITCHELL, SECRETARY OF THE COMMISSION


November 17, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

Page 15

Woods County Communication Call Center

November 6, 2013 1:51 p.m. Testing alarm at 500 block of S. Nickerson in Waynoka. 5:41 p.m. Question about traffic signs. 9:36 p.m. Screams, gunshots? At 700 block of Flynn. November 7, 2013 7:24 a.m. Question about construction. 7:35 a.m. 911 call, erratic driver on 81/64 south towards Enid, 72 mph, contacted Garfield County Sheriff’s Office and Troop J. 9:28 a.m. Individual driving extremely fast on Eagle Pass, 45-60 mph in a 15-mph school zone. 2:07 p.m. 911 call, stuck on CR 1090, transfer to sheriff’s office. 2:25 p.m. File a police report, ATV stolen on Saturday, officer notified. 2:36 p.m. Controlled burn on CR 1090/LeFlore. 4:51 p.m. Alva Fire Department volunteer anyone who can help with bonfire please call the fire station, the bonfire is at 7 p.m. at the drill field. 4:52 p.m. Several kids up and down the street in go cart vehicle in Waynoka. 5:58 p.m. Need sand on highway by Hammerheads parking lot in southbound lane. 7:20 p.m. Gas drive off at Loves. 8:44 p.m. 911 call, called back, cat called 911. 9:15 p.m. Car driving around Deer Creek, transfer to Grant County Sheriff’s Office. 10:12 p.m. Possum in chicken coop. 10:35 p.m. Cab by park pond, fire flaring up at drill field. November 8, 2013 2:02 a.m. Medical alarm at 500 block of Hunt. 6:53 a.m. 911 call, accident, hit deer, non injury, deer lying in road. 9:19 a.m. 281 closed to all traffic or just trucks? 10:02 a.m. Overabundance of dogs, can’t care for them, in Free-

dom. 11:08 a.m. 911 call, what day is it? 1:02 p.m. Dune accident at Little Sahara State Park by Southgate. 3:12 p.m. Woodward warrant check. 4:25 p.m. File a report of stolen ATV in Waynoka. 4:48 p.m. Gas meter hit at 300 block of E. Center, shut gas off. 6:18 p.m. Hit deer on north side of road by Camp Houston. November 9, 2013 12:12 a.m. Dogs barking on 1200 block of Flynn. 12:53 a.m. Two people just went in office at Coop elevator on Mill. 3:26 a.m. 911 call, ran out of gas west of Camp Houston on Highway 64 and CR 230, asked me to call his boss. 5:13 a.m. Individual lost his wallet. 5:16 a.m. 911 call, accident on 281 N., unknown how many or where for sure, do need ambulance though. 5:18 a.m. 911 call, hit deer 1 mile north of Alva. 10:30 a.m. Controlled burn at 11/1080 on south side. 11:03 a.m. Dad hurt his back at sand dunes, it’s harder to breath, back popping/bruising ribs, two dunes from north site. 12:46 p.m. Accident by bowling alley (Cowboys parking lot), no one hurt, Ford Ranger, silver Porsche. 12:47 p.m. 911 call, two-vehicle accident by restaurant on Oklahoma Boulevard. 3:46 p.m. Question on accident today or last night. 4:29 p.m. No water pressure on 2200 block of Santa Fe. 4:31 p.m. Locked keys in trunk in Alva. 4:33 p.m. Contacted Waynoka utilities. 5:25 p.m. Question on water pressure in Waynoka. 6:40 p.m. 911 call, bull riding

accident. 6:54 p.m. 911 call, semi lost control 1 mile north of Highway 11 on 132. 6:57 p.m. 911 call, needing officer to go with her to get her stuff. 7:11 p.m. Fire department requested Med EMS take no further action and Miller be called for a semi lost control 1 mile north of Highway 11 on 132, head injury. November 10, 2013 12:55 a.m. Loud music southeast of 4th Street. 8:32 a.m. Want to talk to deputy, not in, hang up. 10:16 a.m. Controlled burn at Major/CR 430. 11:02 a.m. Stolen gun from Country Club Apts, husband took it five days ago, newer 22 rifle, looks like new machine gun, subject convicted felon. 12:34 p.m. Locked keys in vehicle north of Camp. 1:52 p.m. Vehicle by garage in alley of 3rd between Church and Locust, been there since yesterday. 2:36 p.m. 911 call, someone hit her car at Walmart. 4:34 p.m. Man in a small light blue four-door car exposed himself, just before Lincoln Street, heading west towards 281. 7:18 p.m. Individual driving crazy down Mill in silver Chevy pickup supercab. 10:37 p.m. One of the road closed signs down at Greensburg curve. 10:57 p.m. Individual making threats towards two girls at Vista Apts, notified officer. November 11, 2013 8:12 a.m. AMS to Clinton, directions through Waynoka. 8:16 a.m. Missing dog, female white pug with limp, missing from 200 block of High. 9:38 a.m. Pond Creek – need a brush rig 4 miles north of Red Hill Road on 64. 10:44 a.m. Question for dog catcher, dogs at vet after attack,

Woods County Real Estate Transactions

Beginning book 1166 page 652 Real Estate Transfers Neal E. Williams aka Neal Williams to N & S Williams Properties LLC: Lot 5 in Block 5 in the East View Addition to the City of Alva: Quit Claim Deed. Neal E. Williams & Sonja M. Williams to N & S Williams Properties LLC: the South Half of the Northwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of Section 12, Township 27 North, Range 14, WIM: Quit Claim Deed. Neal E. Williams & Sonja M. Williams to N & S Williams Properties LLC: Lot 2 of the Benjamin Subdivision of the Southwest Quarter of Section 7, Township 27 North, Range 13, WIM: Quit Claim Deed. Neal E. Williams aka Neal Williams to N & S Williams Properties LLC: a tract of land in the North Half of the Southeast Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of Section 34, Township 28 North, Range 14, WIM: Quit Claim Deed. Donald E. Smith & Andra Harris-Smith to Lopp Construction LLC: a tract of land in the Southeast Quarter of Section 26, Township 25 North, Range 15, WIM: Warranty Deed. Arlene Faith Kiner to Arlene Faith Kiner, Trustee of the Arlene Faith Kiner Revocable Trust dated March 19, 2013: (1) royalty and/

or mineral interest in Section 7, Township 23 North, Range 13, WIM; (2) royalty and/or mineral interest in Section 6, Township 23 North, Range 13, WIM; (3) royalty and/or mineral interest in Section 28, township 24 North, Range 13, WIM: Quit Claim Deed. Frances Dean Kirkham, Trustee of the Frances Dean Kirkham Trust No. 1 dated Dec. 16, 1988, as amended and restated executed Sept. 15, 2003 to Simon Hunter Kirkham: ½ interest in Lots 3 & 4 and the South Half of the Northwest Quarter of Section 1, Township 28 North, Range 13, WIM: Quit Claim Deed. Frances Dean Kirkham, Trustee of the Frances Dean Kirkham Trust No. 1 dated Dec. 16, 1988, as amended and restated executed Sept. 15, 2003 to Ian Joseph Kirkham: ½ interest in Lots 3 & 4 and the South Half of the Northwest Quarter of Section 1, Township 28 North, Range 13, WIM: Quit Claim Deed. Mortgages Michael S. Terrel & Julie A. Terrel to Farm Credit of Western Oklahoma: Southwest Quarter of Section 36, Township 28 North, Range 14, WIM; LESS and except a tract of land described on page 693 of book 1166: $200,000. Frank K. Marcum to Farm Credit of Western Oklahoma: (1)

South Half of the Southeast Quarter of Section 30, Township 28 North, Range 17, WIM; (2) Lots 2, 3 & 4, Southeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter, East Half of the Southwest Quarter, Southeast Quarter, Northeast Quarter of Section 31, Township 28 North, Range 17, WIM; (3) Lots 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 & 6, Southwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter, Southeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter, Northeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter, and Northwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of Section 6, Township 27 North, Range 17, WIM; (4) Southeast Quarter of Section 9, Township 27 North, Range 15, WIM; (5) the real estate described below is subject to a mortgage in favour of the Farm Credit of Western Oklahoma, dated Oct. 23, 2012, recorded in book 1160 on page 432-435: $845,000. Joseph Weaver Turner & Amie Leigh Turner to BancCentral NA: the East 120 feet of Lot 8, and the East 120 feet of the South 10 feet of Lot 7 in Block 5 of the Mabel McGrath’s Subdivision to the City of Alva: maximum obligation limit $34,900. Sean Peter James Sandoval & Amber Sandoval to Wells Fargo Bank NA: a tract of land located in the Northeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of Section 25, Township 27 North, Range 14, WIM: $70,112.

who will pay for it? 11:03 a.m. Reporting trucks speeding through Avard, notified Woods County Sheriff’s Office deputy. 12:10 p.m. Question about activity at the airport. 2:33 p.m. Children playing in dumpster at 800 block of 2nd. 3:10 p.m. 911 call, caller on Woods County Sheriff’s Office number with question on ID being turned in. 5:44 p.m. 911 call, trash can on fire in road 1 1/2-2 blocks south on 1st Street on west side. 6:17 p.m. Referring car from Laverne, loaned out and not returned, told to notify Harper County Sheriff’s Office. 10:55 p.m. Three yorkies at 700 block of Logan. November 12, 2013 1:30 a.m. Two-story apt complex behind Sonic, purchasing meth upstairs. 7:51 a.m. Red F350 on 700 block of 4th in no parking zone, officer notified. 11:27 a.m. Two-vehicle accident, no injury, on 64 and 132. 12:49 p.m. Question on 911 surcharges. 7:44 p.m. 911 call, red vehicle sitting outside of Lincoln Elemen-

tary with male subject. 8:41 p.m. Skunk needs to be put down on Hunt and Maple. 9:32 p.m. Horses running toward Walmart on Flynn. 9:38 p.m. Deer feeder/camara stolen on Logan Road. 10:46 p.m. Domestic on 600 block of Linden, no weapons, car with flat tire, throwing stuff outside. November 13, 2013 7:18 a.m. Malfunction at crossing on Main/Dacoma, BNSF on way to fix it. 8:29 a.m. Controlled burn on Haskell between 920/930. 8:55 a.m. Domestic at school with juvenile and mom. 9:05 a.m. 911 call, needs locksmith. 10:30 a.m. Three cows out on CR 410 around Greer, no brands, two have white tags one split ear. 11:01 a.m. Juvenile in custody of the mom, headed back to Waynoka. The call center also handled the following calls: abandoned calls – 30, accidental calls – 20, pocket dial – 9, wrong number – 2, hang ups – 11, animal control – 6, sheriff – 45, police – 54, general info – 85, fire dept. – 12, ambulance – 13, road conditions – 2.

Woods County Court Filings According to the affidavits and petitions on file, the following individuals have been charged. An individual is innocent of any charges listed below until proven guilty in a court of law. All information is a matter of public record and may be obtained by anyone during regular hours at the Woods County Courthouse. The Alva Review-Courier will not intentionally alter or delete any of this information. If it appears in the courthouse public records, it will appear in this newspaper. Felony Filings John Adrian Arenivas, 31, Odessa, Texas: DUI ($859.70). Misdemeanor Filings Timothy Andrew Hall Jr., 28, Enid: Driving with license suspended ($275.20). Robert Franklin Cunningham II, 29, Carmen: Possession of drug paraphernalia ($344.50). Andrew Lee Armstrong, 32, Wichita, Kan.: (1) DUI; (2) Carrying a firearm while under the influence of alcohol ($1,098.70). Hilary Dawn Erickson, 23, Alva: DUI ($832.20). Civil Filings Capital One Bank NA vs. Dennis R. Seevers: Money judgement for an amount $10,000 or less ($205.70).

Paternity Filings Nathan Wayne Clover vs. Hilary Dawn Erickson: Paternity ($140.70). Blake Scott Corder vs. Jessica Marie Heath: Paternity ($140.70). Marriage Licenses Issued Nov. 4 – Ivelin Svetlozarov, 25, of Alva and Laura Rae Hopkins, 23, of Alva. Nov. 4 – Landon Ray Johnson, 25, of Alva and Kieara Alexis Wharton, 23, of Alva. Nov. 6 – Matthew Glen Stratton, 27, of Enid and Megan M. Burditt, 23, of Los Alamos, N.M. Nov. 12 – Logan Russell Carson, 28, of Waynoka and Angela Christina Conner, 31, of Waynoka. Divorce Filings Anita Raynae Malone vs. Robert Earl Malone Jr.: Dissolution of marriage ($198.70). Timothy Bailey vs. McKinzie Rae Bailey: Dissolution of marriage ($198.70). Tammy Denise Blake vs. Michael Carl Blake: Divorce granted. Traffic Filings Jairo Munoz-Gonzalez, 29, Cleburne, Texas: Failure to provide security verification ($221.50). Faustino Rojas, 31, Ring-

See Court Page 16

Woods County Sheriff’s Report November 8, 2013 7:40 a.m. Man called to say cattle were out but would call back for a deputy. 11:00 a.m. Detective from Midwest City called. November 9, 2013 6:33 p.m. Campus police called about individual. 8:17 p.m. Caller asking about individual. 9:45 p.m. Individual called about two inmates deputy is trans-

porting. November 10, 2013 5:52 a.m. Caller about individual. 7:45 p.m. Person called about individual. November 11, 2013 5:50 a.m. Person called about retrieving individual’s property. November 12, 2013 5:20 p.m. Call about individual. 9:30 p.m. Dispatch called about mini horses, looking for owner.


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Woods County Court Dispositions 15 Guilty Pleas Nine Felonies Curtis Wade Smith, 37, Oklahoma City: Defendant pleaded guilty on Oct. 14 in case CF-2006-74 for possession of stolen property. Defendant stipulates to violating the rules and conditions of probation. Therefore the order deferring the sentence is here accelerated. Sentence is a term of five years under the direction and control of the Oklahoma Department of Corrections (ODOC), with the time only suspended pursuant to rules and conditions of probation. Said term to run consecutive to case CF2008-39. Said defendant shall pay court costs and assessments. Curtis Wade Smith, 37, Oklahoma City: Defendant pleaded guilty on Oct. 14 in case CF-200839 for two counts of possession of stolen property. The court finds that the defendant has violated the terms and conditions under which said order of suspension was given. Therefore the order suspending the sentence of said defendant is here revoked. Sentence is a term of five years under the direction and control of ODOC, with all except 21 days suspended with credit for time served in Woods County Jail from April 12, 2013. Defendant must pay court costs, assessments and $40 monthly supervision fee. Lawrence Anthony Compo, 32, Alva: Defendant has pleaded guilty on Oct. 23 in case CF-2012-121 for (1) domestic assault and battery and (2) kidnapping. For count 1, sentence is a term of 10 years under the custody and control of ODOC, all of said term suspended pursuant to rules and conditions of probation.

For count 2, sentence is a term of 15 years under the custody and control of the ODOC, all of said term suspended pursuant to rules and conditions of probation. These terms to be served concurrent to each other and concurrent to case CF-2013107. It is further ordered that the sentence be supervised by ODOC upon release from incarceration for two years in conjunction with case CF-2013-107. Defendant shall pay costs, fees and assessments. Lawrence Anthony Compo, 32, Alva: Defendant has pleaded guilty on Oct. 23 in case CF-13-106 for (1) unauthorized use of motor vehicle and (2) malicious injury to property. Sentence is a term of five years under the custody and control of the ODOC, all of said term suspended pursuant to rules and conditions of probation. These terms to be served concurrent to case CF-2013107. It is further ordered that the sentence be supervised by ODOC upon release from incarceration for two years in conjunction with case CF-2013-107. Defendant shall pay costs, fees and assessments. Lawrence Anthony Compo, 32, Alva: Defendant pleaded guilty on Oct. 23 in case CF-2013-107 for assault and battery with dangerous weapon (amended from assault and battery with deadly weapon). Sentence is a term of 10 years with time suspended except the time necessary to successfully complete the Bill Johnson Correctional Center drug offender work camp or equivalent program therein, under the custody and control of ODOC pursuant to rules and condition of probation. It is further ordered that the sentence be supervised by ODOC

upon release from incarceration for two years in conjunction with case CF-2013-107. Defendant shall pay costs, fees, assessments and transport fees. Christopher Paul Wilson, 38, Alva: Defendant pleaded guilty on Oct. 15 in case CF-2012-125 for (1) distribution of controlled dangerous substance (CDS) and (2) unlawful possession of a CDS without valid prescription. Thereupon it was suggested to the court that the defendant is an eligible offender as defined in the Community Sentencing Act, and that sentence herein be deferred for 10 years until Oct. 14, 2023, conditioned upon said defendant conforming to rules, conditions, sanctions and provisions of said Community Sentencing Act. Defendant shall pay court costs, VCA, AFIS, CLEET and monthly deferred assessment. Defendant is sentenced to community service. These terms to run concurrent to each other and concurrent to case CF-2012-126 for grand larceny in house. Blake Deven Burton, 31, Waynoka: Defendant pleaded guilty on Oct. 2 in case CF-2013-25 for possession of CDS (methamphetamine). Sentence is a term of eight years under the custody and control of ODOC, all of said term suspended pursuant to rules and conditions of probation. Defendant shall pay a fine of $250, pay costs, fees, assessments, restitution, $40 monthly supervision fee and court-appointed attorney fees. Reyna Margarita Gardea, 40, Woodward: Defendant pleaded guilty on Oct. 15 in case CF-2013-

From Page 15

89 for (1) trafficking in illegal drugs and (2) possession of CDS. Defendant has previously been convicted of one felony crime and the sentence has been enhanced in accordance with provisions set forth. For count 2, sentence is a term of 10 years under the custody and control of ODOC, with all except the time necessary to successfully complete the Eddie Warrior Correctional Center program, if eligible, or a comparable DOC-approved program, and that upon successful completion of said program, the balance of sentence herein shall be suspended, pursuant to rules and conditions of probation. Defendant shall receive credit for time served in Woods County Jail. It is further ordered that upon release from incarceration, the first year of suspended sentence to be supervised by ODOC. Defendant shall pay a fine of $1,500, court costs, fees, assessments, restitution and transport fees. Ronald Jay Collins, 37, Latexo, Texas: Defendant pleaded guilty on Oct. 23 in case CF-2013-108 for (1) unauthorized use of a motor vehicle and (2) malicious injury to property. For count 1, sentence is a term of five years, with all except the first 45 days suspended under the custody and control of ODOC, pursuant to rules and conditions of probation. Defendant shall receive credit for time served in Woods County Jail. Defendant shall pay a fine of $250, pay costs, fees, restitution, assessments, a $40 monthly supervision fee and court-appointed attorney fee. Six Misdemeanors

Blake Deven Burton, 31, Waynoka: Defendant pleaded guilty on Oct. 2 in case CM-2013-123 for unlawful possession of drug paraphernalia. Sentence is a term of one year under the custody and control of Woods County sheriff, all of said term suspended pursuant to rules and conditions of probation. These terms to be served concurrent to felony case CF-2013-25. Defendant shall pay costs, fees, assessments and restitution. Ronald Jay Collins, 37, Latexo, Texas: Defendant pleaded guilty on Oct. 23 in case CM-2013-241 for (1) leaving the scene of accident involving damage and (2) driving without a driver’s license. For count 1, sentence is a term of one year under the custody and control of the Woods County sheriff, all of said term suspended pursuant to rules and conditions of probation. These terms to be served concurrent to case CF-2013-108. Defendant shall pay costs, fees, restitution and assessments. Ronald Jay Collins, 37, Latexo, Texas: Defendant pleaded guilty on Oct. 23 in case CM-2013-254 for petit larceny. Sentence is a term of six months under the custody and control of the Woods County sheriff, all of said term suspended pursuant to rules and conditions of probation. These terms to be served concurrent to case CF-2013-108. Defendant shall pay costs, fees, restitution and assessments. David A Caldwell, 55, Alva: Defendant pleaded guilty on Oct. 17 in case CM-2006-391 for (1) DUI

See Dispositions Page 19

Court

wood: Failure to stop at stop sign ($211.50). Adam Basil Douglas Walker, 31, Derby, Kan.: Transporting open container of liquor ($246). Donald J. Billings, 28, Waynoka: Operating motor vehicle without valid driver’s license ($256.50). Jerry Watson, 65, Amarillo, Texas: Transporting open container of beer ($316). Joseph M. Lopez Jr., 41, Omaha, Neb.: Transporting open container of liquor ($246). Jody Cardell Richards, 47, Woodward: Operating motor vehicle in manner not reasonable and proper ($256.50). Nicholas Heath Shenold, 19, Glencoe: Failure to yield from stop sign ($211.50). Dusty Joshua Whittemore ($24,

Huntington, Texas: Failure to provide security verification ($211.50). Raymond Lee Buckley, 32, Cedar Hill, Texas: Failure to stop at railroad crossing ($211.50). Chrystal Nicholle Gafford, 21, Enid: Failure to pay taxes due state ($211.50). The following individuals were cited for speeding: Linda Dianne Erikson, no age listed, Alva: 35 in 25 ($50 state dismissed); Sheena Marie Gaines, 26, Carmen: 86 in 65 ($281.50); Don Brent Stephens Jr., 36, Oklahoma City: 83 in 65 ($241.50); Blake G. Baker, 16, Alva: 75 in 65 ($188.50); Lloyd J. Murphy, 55, Amarillo, Texas: 79 in 65 ($226.50); Jairo Munoz-Gonzalez, 29, Cleburne, Texas: 78 in 65 ($236.50); Sky Laman Nolan, 19, Frederick: 75

in 65 ($188.50); Becky G. Sharp, 56, Waynoka: 75 in 65 ($188.50); Jason S. Donaldson, 41, Muskogee: 81 in 55 ($341.50); Leonardo Alonzo III, 35, Pampa, Texas: 70 in 55 ($226.50); James Edward Crider, 23, Chester: 71 in 55 ($241.50); Dartanian M. Brown, 18, Vici: 75 in 65 ($188.50); Dustin Keith Fognini, 45, Victoria, Texas: 75 in 65 ($188.50); Shawn Eugene Eisenman, 31, Moore: 75 in 65 ($188.50); Brock Adam Miller, 39, Waynoka: 75 in 65 ($188.50); Maria Azucena Castro, 37, Alvin, Texas: 73 in 55 ($241.50). The following individuals were cited for failure to wear seatbelt ($20): James Edward Crider, 23, Chester; Sheri Floyd, 22, Alva; John Howard Webster, 20, Carmen.


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November 17, 2013

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Action Ads

Community Calendar

Professional Upholstery CC Construction will all types of furniture. Over 55 Interior-Exterior improvements. years experience. Goltry, OK. 580- Room additions. Plaster Repair & 496-2351 Painting. Handicap. Structural & Non Structural Concrete. Will also Gene O’s BBQ accommodate Farm & Ranch. 580will be open this Friday dinner and 307-4598 or 620-825-4285 Saturday lunch for the rest of the month until Thanksgiving. The week Computer Plus of Thanksgiving we will be smoking For all computer repair needs call Turkeys. You supply the Turkey and Adam Swallow at 580-327-4449 or we will supply the smoke. Call Gene 580-748-2349 or come by 1329 Fair. 580-370-5532 for the prices. Only Will do local housecalls 20 Turkeys will be smoked Christmas Extravaganza Double B Carpentry Sun, Dec 1. 1-6pm. Hardtner For all your carpentry needs from Community Center, Hardtner, KS. remodeling, painting, drywall, Booth information contact Janet texturing, siding, windows, farm & 620-296-4652 or Sandi 620-296ranch, etc. 580-748-1489 4610

Help Wanted Dependable Auto & Truck mechanics, CDL, license is needed to drive wreckers. Pay based upon experience & ability. Paid vacation & other benefits. Moser Towing and Repair in Alva. 580-327-1135 or 800-813-9078

Mary Kay Black Friday Help Wanted 40% off whole website Nov 24- Full or Part-Time cook position Nov 30. www.marykay.com. 580- open at Beadles Nursing Home. 916 748-1755 call/text. amber.leroux@ Noble. Alva. Apply in person. EOE yahoo.com Help Wanted Sandi’ Treasures Beadles Nursing Home, 916 Noble, Hardtner, KS. Hardtner Community Alva, is accepting applications Center Room 19. Many x-mas items. for a Full-Time Administrative Large deco mesh wreaths. Hrs-Wed- Assistant. Microsoft Office Skills Fri 10am-noon & 1:30-5pm. Thur required. Experience in Human 1:30-5pm Resources, payroll and Medical Filing preferred, but will train. May pick up an application or print one off our website. EOE

All steel construction tilt flatbed trailer. 21’ long, 8’ wide, 32� tall. Hyd. brakes and tilt. $5000. Call 580-327-1612

Help Wanted Triple F Oilfield Service in Alva is seeking Truck Drivers. Must have 3 years vacuum truck driving exp. Call the Alva office at 936-572-0603 or pick up app at 46904 Jefferson Rd. Alva

Page 17

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Saturday, Nov. 23, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Coats, clothing and blankets giveaway at College Hill Church of Christ, 1102 6th St., Alva.

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Older 32’ enclosed trailer, tilted, paneled side walls, good wood floor, single axle, tires shot, 5th wheel mounted on trailer. $3500. Call 580327-1612

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3bdrm 2bth home in Waynoka, OK. Contact John Fuqua at 580-4307892

Sunday 2-5 p.m. The Cherokee Strip Museum in Alva is open every day except Monday. For information or arranged tours, call 580-327-2030. Monday 9 a.m. The Woods County Senior Citizens Center, 625 Barnes, Alva, is open for games and other activities. Exercise is scheduled each day at 11 a.m. Transportation provided upon request. 1 p.m. Alva Duplicate Bridge will meet at the Runnymede Hotel. 3:30 p.m. Storytime will be held at the Alva Public Library for children ages 3-5 and their parents. 6:30 p.m. Alva City Council meets the first and third Mondays of the month in the council chambers of City Hall. 7 p.m. Narcotics Anonymous meets at the First United Methodist Church. Call 917-855-9086 for information. 7-9 p.m. Alva Autism & Special Need Support Group will meet the third Monday of every month at the Alva Public Library. 7 p.m. Alcoholics Anonymous will meet at 1027 8th (Wesley House) in Alva every Monday and Thursday. 7 p.m. Book discussion at the Alva Public Library on “Out of the Dust� by Karen Hess, presented by Dr. Sara Jane Richter, OPSU. Refreshments provided. 7:30 p.m. Alva Masonic Lodge #105 will meet. Tuesday 9 a.m. The Woods County Senior Citizens Center, 625 Barnes,

Alva, is open for games and other activities. Exercise is scheduled each day at 11 a.m. Transportation provided upon request. 2-5 p.m. The Cherokee Strip Museum in Alva is open every day except Monday. For information or arranged tours, call 580-327-2030. 7 p.m. Widows and widowers support group will meet at College Hill Church of Christ. Call 580430-6083 with questions. 7 p.m. Celebrate Recovery meets every Tuesday at the Bible Baptist Church, 4th & Choctaw, Alva. The purpose is to help people dealing with alcoholism, divorce, sexual abuse, domestic violence, drug addiction, sexual addiction, food addiction, co-dependency, gambling addiction, anger, grief and more. Wednesday 9 a.m. The Woods County Senior Citizens Center, 625 Barnes, Alva, is open for games and other activities. Exercise is scheduled each day at 11 a.m. Transportation provided upon request. Noon Alva Kiwanis Club meets at Champs Restaurant. 2-5 p.m. The Cherokee Strip Museum in Alva is open every day except Monday. For information or arranged tours, call 580-327-2030. 7 p.m. Alva Moose Lodge men’s meeting is held every Wednesday.

LEGAL NOTICE

(Published by the Alva ReviewCourier on Sunday, November 17, 2013.) The Board of Education of Alva Public School District hereby provides legal notice that the annual school election filing period for candidates will open on Monday, December 2, 2013 at 8:00 a.m. and will close Wednesday, December 4, 2013 at 5:00 p.m. Board Member Position on Ballet: The votes shall elect a board member for board position No. 4 which has a 5-year term of office.

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EdwardJones

The Dow Jones Industrial Average was up 85.48 to close at 15,961.70. The NASDAQ Composite Index was up 13.23 to close at 3,985.97. The Transportation Average was up 49.73 to close at 7,211.04 and Utilities CLOSED up 3.15 at 506.91. Volume was approx. 759 million shares. Gold rose 89¢ to $1,288.18 and Silver CLOSED at $20.77, dn 2¢. Crude oil prices fell 5¢ to $93.71 per barrel. Wheat Price was $6.74, dn 4¢. Prime Rate is 3.25%

Stocks of Local Interest — Courtesy Pat Harkin

Name OGE Energy ONEOK Inc Duke Energy WilliamsCo Chesapeake Energy Wal-Mart ConocoPhillips SandRidge Energy

Close 38.34 57.80 71.80 35.22 25.88 79.25 73.30 5.88

Change +0.34 +0.45 +0.29 +0.16 -0.07 +0.17 -0.38 -0.13

30 Yr. U.S. Treasury Bond Insured AAA Tax Free Muni. Bond Yield to Maturity 5 Year C/D, Annual Pct Yield Money Market - 7 Day Avg Rate

Volume 365,759 678,420 2,180,703 6,018,429 7,159,013 5,042,192 4,684,523 9,469,789

3.62% 0.39-4.03% 1.90% 0.01%

Stock Market Report — for November 15, 2013


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Dispositions

The Alva Girl Scouts, Boy Scouts and Cub Scouts canvassed the town collecting food for the local food pantry. The scouts collected 1,975 pounds of food, almost a ton, thus surpassing the amount collected last year. This food will go a long way in filling those holiday baskets to be given to the families less fortunate and in need of some help this holiday season. A few of the scouts assisted church members in sorting the food at the food bank after the collection to be used in holiday boxes to be given out for Thanksgiving to needy families. Pictured, front, left to right, are: Charles Shafer, Joel Kreigh, Halli Jeansonne, Isabella Ramirez, Addisann Weber, Emry Williams, Harley Seiger, Morgan Vickers, CJ Watkins, Toby Anton, Cole Kilmer. Second row, left to right: Trystan Vickers, Jared Law, Daxton Williams, Heck Tanio, Endiyah Murry-Jones, Christina Jenlink, Gracie Jeansonne, Aubrey Towns, Ember Sandoval, Turner Killman, Garrett Killman, Nathan Andrews. Third row, left to right: Jacq Melton, Ashlyn Holloway, Sammy Hawley, Kaitlyn Meyer, Asia Blackledge, Alexis Malicoat, Kendi Richardson, Julie Church, Alyceia Stephens, Jazzni Hembree, Kylie Malicoat. Fourth row, left to right: Ryleigh Orcutt, Laura Anton, Amithyst Kopisch, Madison Vaughn, Lyndsie Vickers, Hayli Watkins, Gabriel Hoover. Fifth row, left to right: Sebastion Vickers, Keondrah Ferrying, Kyra Prophet, Jaylyn Scribner, Bethany Towns, Summer Seiger, Madison Rhodes, Morgan Hall, Shelby Scribner. Sixth row, left to right: Laura Maharry, Hailey Weber, Autumn Stout. Seventh row, left to right: Brayden Thomas, Raymond Vaughn, Jacob Law, Ethan Kilmer, Ashton Brown, Matthew Hansel, Zachary Thomas and Arek Greve.

The monthly Chamber of Commerce Friday breakfast was held at LaDeeDah clothing store Friday. The “Member of the Month Award” went to Radio Shack of Alva. From left, Terri and Gary Brown of Radio Shack; Melissa Graybill, Chamber board member; and Laura Girty, Chamber president. Photo by Lynn L. Martin

LEGAL NOTICE

(Published by the Alva ReviewCourier on Sunday, November 17, 2013.) BEFORE THE CORPORATION COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF OKLAHOMA APPLICANT:MIDSTATES PETROLEUM COMPANY LLC RELIEF SOUGHT:POOLING LEGAL DESCRIPTION: SECTION 22, TOWNSHIP 25 NORTH, RANGE 13 WEST, WOODS COUNTY, OKLAHOMA CAUSE CD 201307478-T NOTICE OF HEARING STATE OF OKLAHOMA: To all persons, owners, producers, operators, purchasers and takers of oil and gas and all other interested persons, particularly in Woods County, Oklahoma; more specifically: Robert Bergner; Vicki Bergner; Anna M. Unruh; Leslie Unruh;

Estate of Lorace Bergner; Chesapeake Exploration, LLC; Tiptop Oil & Gas US, LLC; and if any of the named individuals or entities be deceased or a dissolved partnership, corporation or other association, then the unknown heirs, executors, administrators, devisees, successors, trustees and assigns of any such deceased individual or dissolved partnership, corporation or other association. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT the Applicant in this Cause is requesting the following relief and special relief: That the Commission, based on the evidence presented, pool the interests and adjudicate the rights and equities of oil and gas owners on a unit pooling and designate the Applicant or some other party recommended by Applicant as operator for the well to produce from the Mississippian common source of supply [Order No. 584876] underlying Section

22, Township 25 North, Range 13 West, Woods County, Oklahoma. The interests of the oil and gas owners involved herein and the rights and equities in respect thereto are sought herein to be pooled and adjudicated pursuant to 52 O.S. Sec. 87.1 within and on the basis of the drilling and spacing units covered hereby, and not limited to a single wellbore. The application in this cause states that Applicant has proposed the development of the separate common source of supply in the drilling and spacing units involved herein under a plan development and has proposed to commence such plan of development of such units by an initial unit well in the lands covered hereby, and that Applicant has been unable to reach an agreement with the owners of drilling rights named as respondents herein with respect to such proposed plan of development of the separate common source of supply in the drilling and spacing unit covered hereby. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN THAT this cause be set before an Administrative Law Judge for hearing, taking of evidence and reporting to the Commission. That Applicant could request that the Order to be entered in this cause shall include a provision allowing the operator one year from the date of the Order to commence drilling operations. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN THAT this Cause will be heard before an Administrative Law Judge on the Initial Hearing Docket at the Eastern Regional Service Office of the Corporation Commission, Room 114, 440 South Houston, Tulsa, Oklahoma. The cause to be heard at 8:30 a.m., on the 10th day of December 2013, and that notice be published as required by law and rules of the Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN THAT any person interested or protesting the application please advise the Attorney of record and the Court Clerk’s Office of the Oklahoma Corporation Commission five (5) days before the hearing date above. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the Applicant and interested parties may present testimony by telephone. The cost of telephonic communication shall be paid by the person and persons requesting its use. Interested parties who wish to participate by telephone shall contact the Applicant or Applicant’s attorney, prior to the hearing date, and provide their name and phone number. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN THAT this cause, if protested, may be subject to a prehearing or settlement conference pursuant to OCCRP 165:511-2. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that all interested persons may appear and be heard. For information concerning

this action, contact Drew Veitch (918) 947-8551 or Michael D. Stack, Attorney for Applicant, 943 East Britton Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73114; Tele (405) 286-1717; Fax (405) 286-2122. CORPORATION COMMISSION OF OKLAHOMA PATRICE DOUGLAS, CHAIRMAN BOB ANTHONY, VICE CHAIRMAN DANA L MURPHY, COMMISSIONER DONE AND PERFORMED THIS 5TH DAY OF NOVEMBER 2013. ATTEST: PEGGY MITCHELL, SECRETARY OF THE COMMISSION

and (2) operating a motor vehicle without a valid driver’s license. For count 1, sentence is a term of one year under the custody and control of the Woods County sheriff, all of said term suspended pursuant to rules and conditions of probation. For count 2, sentence is a term of 30 days under control of Woods County sheriff, all of said term suspended pursuant to rules and conditions of probation. These terms to be served concurrent to count 1. Defendant shall pay a fine of $150 (count 1), pay costs, fees, assessments, restitution and $40 monthly supervision fee. Sheila Waldrep, 50, Alva: Defendant pleaded guilty on Oct. 17 in case CM-2006-392 for public intoxication. Sentence is a term of 30 days under custody and control of the Woods County sheriff, all of said term suspended pursuant to rules and conditions of probation. Defendant shall pay a fine of $100, pay costs, fees, assessments, restitution and a $40 monthly supervision fee. Kimberly Kay Jacobs, 48, Cherokee: Defendant pleaded guilty in case CM-2013-218 for (1) DUI; (2) uunlawful possession of a controlled drug without valid prescription and (3) threatening act of violence. For count 1, sentence is a term of one year under the custody and control of the Woods County sheriff, all of said term suspended pursuant to rules and conditions of probation. For count 3, sentence is a term of six months under the control of Woods County sheriff, all of said term suspended pursuant to rules and conditions of probation. These terms to be served consecutive to count 1. Defendant shall pay a fine of $150 (count 1), pay costs, fees, assessments, restitution, $40 monthly supervision fee and courtappointed attorney fee.


November 17, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

Page 20


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